31 Burst results for "Johannes"

Bitcoin IRA

DC Forecasts

00:32 sec | Last month

Bitcoin IRA

"12 p.m. Thursday, December 15th, 2022. Bitcoin IRA Bitcoin IRE review our newest Bitcoin IRA review discusses launching a retirement account with crypto. The Bitcoin IRE reviews show that since it was founded, the platform processed up to 1.5 billion in transactions with more than 100,000 users. Bitcoin IRA was founded in 2015 by Chris Klein, Johannes Hayes, and camillo kocha. They founded

Johannes Hayes Chris Klein Camillo Kocha
 4 Palestinians killed in flare-up as Israel counts votes

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

4 Palestinians killed in flare-up as Israel counts votes

"Is ready forces have killed at these four Palestinians as Israel counts final votes in its national elections The deaths of several Palestinians occurred in separate incidents in raids in the occupied West Bank and in east Jerusalem a Palestinian who stabbed a police officer in Jerusalem's old city was shot at and killed according to police the police officer was lightly wounded In the West Bank mourners poured into the streets for the funeral of the Palestinian man who police say through a fire bomb at them during a raid the violence comes amid a backdrop in which former Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is expected to regain power backed by far right allies The coalition government is expected to include the extremist lawmaker itama Ben gee who said Israel would soon take a tougher approach to attackers Israeli political analyst Johannes Lesnar believes the toughest stance on violence is what most Israelis want The Israeli people wanted change

West Bank Jerusalem Israel Itama Ben Gee Benjamin Netanyahu Coalition Government Johannes Lesnar
"johannes" Discussed on The Recovery Show

The Recovery Show

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"johannes" Discussed on The Recovery Show

"Good day and we're live. We are alive for today's session of how to rescue yourself from repeated relapsing. I'm sure in Johannes, your concert on call because your mental health matters. What do you think a change plan would look like? That's right. You would have in it, what is it you want to change? Do you know? What is it you want to change? Did you have a clear idea about that? Because often times, when you have a problem at repeat relapsing, is that there wasn't a clear identifiable primary issue or problem that you would like to solve and change to new way of being and doing and behaving. So yeah, I'm getting a sense that you did. Go true. And come up with change plan. But if those of you who are interested and are following this and will be coming up with your own relapse prevention plan based on what I'm about to share

Johannes
"johannes" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

01:31 min | 4 months ago

"johannes" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Is that I don't. Know. As I don't know, also and I said imagination and I did one revelation. And some more. Crystal number, Johannes so a bias. And then. The empire about you.

Johannes
"johannes" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

01:31 min | 4 months ago

"johannes" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Is that I don't. Know. As I don't know, also and I said imagination and I did one revelation. And some more. Crystal number, Johannes so a bias. And then. The empire about you.

Johannes
"johannes" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"johannes" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

"Yes, and I'm really hoping that the people here can see your heart and also see the potential of where this can go. And if God leads this into a certain level and not further, then that's a God thing. We just take it and we have this relationship going anyways and there is place. It won't change things already. We have identified connection with next level worship and Bible seminary Bond. Anyways. And now this is not if you can do something in Germany, but if you can do more in Germany, then you already doing. So one of the things that I'm really excited about, Johannes, and this is something you wanted to do and I went, okay. Our new book, I don't have a copy nearby, but you actually are translating it, but I always had to stop and think about my own subtitle. The life altering formula of the lord's prayer. But you're translating that into German, and I'm excited about that. Yeah. I mean, it's a worship leading book that doesn't do anything about it doesn't talk about music at all, which makes it applicable to the church in general, which is actually, we do this one and then we do a next one, I think. For worship teams. But I've used that material already. In general, for framework, in worship services, and it was just a very powerful way to communicate the basic meaning of and the structure of the prayer. And I think I'm convinced that this will help churches and individuals to approach that prayer in a certain way. Why is it important because the lord's prayer, I mean, Germany is Lutheran traditional and Catholic traditional Jewish and Roman Catholic tradition, and they use that prayer as a formula. So features sometimes have this aftertaste with that kind of a prayer because it's formulated..

Germany Johannes
"johannes" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"johannes" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

"This is live talk with Dwayne Moore. We're talking worship on a global scale. Hey everybody, welcome to live talk. I'm doing more and I am in Germany. In fact, I can not pronounce the name of the city that I'm in, but I'm about four hours outside of Frankfurt. I know this because we flew into Frankfurt, in Germany, last night, and drove four hours somewhere. We drove on the Audubon, which means there's no speed limit. It was interesting. But we are glad that you're with us today. We are having a wonderful guest. Doctor Johannes Schroeder will be with us today. We are replaying an interview that I did with him recently. And while we are here in Germany, we are with doctor Johannes Schroeder. He's actually our host as his guests. Traveling within the country, meeting pastors, leading conferences, speaking at the seminary where doctor Schroeder is a professor. So we are excited about the opportunity to be here and we are excited that you are with us today. So I encourage you to watch this program. You're going to enjoy Johannes and his presentation. God is at work in Germany. And we're thankful that next level worship international has been invited here to lead conferences and to do the things that we are working on here. In fact, we are introducing a new book that I wrote that has been translated into German. That's part of the reason we are here this week to introduce that book and begin a plant seeds to see if God might have our ministry continue to work in the wonderful country of Germany. We'll be right back in a few moments with more live talk. Live talk with Dwayne Moore. Biblical, worship, perspective. We are back with live talk, get show today.

Johannes Schroeder Dwayne Moore Germany Frankfurt Audubon Schroeder Johannes
"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

Next Level Worship Podcast

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

"Today. I'm very excited to have my friend doctor Johannes Schroeder from Germany and you'll have to tell us exactly where you are in Germany, my friend, but we are so glad you're here. Welcome. Yes, thank you for having me. I'm excited about this opportunity. How did I do on your name? And how did I do on, you know, just could you even understand me in my southern English? I mean, how are you doing? Well, I started in Virginia. So yes, I understood. Okay. And since I'm the only one in the room, I assume that you are addressing me. I am addressing you. I do remember in a previous conversation though, you said you did I catch you invested some time either in Tennessee or somewhere more down south did I hear that correctly? Well, yeah, I was did my internship in Tennessee and Nashville Tennessee and I've spent some time with friends in Louisiana and I will lose. Then you totally understand me. Okay, we're good. Okay. Well, good. Well, we are glad that you're with us. We are looking forward to refocus coming up in just a couple of weeks now. Refocus global worship retreat. And you're very much a part of that. And we'll see you actually see you there. At the event. Just looking forward to it. Yeah, not only lie, but we're going to see you on video. We're going to show a little bit of that. During this interview today, just a touch of what we're going to be showing of your life kind of pull the curtains back a little bit and let people see and get to know you a little bit more. Even at the retreat. Yes. It's wonderful. Thank you for having me in that part. Yeah. So tell us what are some of your roles are there in Germany?.

Johannes Schroeder Germany Tennessee Virginia Nashville Louisiana
"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

Next Level Worship Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

"Now they'll be online, but they'll be gathered together in their places and then they'll be a part of the bigger picture, the bigger group of that's meeting in Pensacola beach Florida. And so we will come together as one large massive conference with people speaking different languages from different cultures, but we've got, we've got ways that we're working to basically bring down those barriers of language, bring down those barriers of culture and denominational things that divide us, the body Christ should be unified and so that's our emphasis as our focus and we're so grateful and so thankful for the opportunity and the privilege to get to work with people and so many places. Doctor Johannes, that you're about to meet. I just call him Johannes. He is an example of someone we partner with and you're going to hear more about how we partner with him as you listen to this interview that we're about to do now. But I just wanted to start off by saying, do well with everybody. Don't just pretend to love people really love them. And I think that's what's drawing people to us into the next couple of worship because we just want to help people wherever they are. And that's what that's what Paul said to do in Roman shepherd 12. When people, God's people are in need, be ready to help them. And I want to say that to you wherever you are, look for ways to help other people and do it. Enthusiastically. Serve the lord enthusiastically. It's not easy. It's hard work. But, you know, we just got to be loving each other with genuine affection and taking the light and honoring each other. That is what we try to do. Next step of worshiping, and we probably that you are encouraged that you know God is on your side. God is for you. Loving, loving you by wanting to get other people to help you and come alongside you..

Doctor Johannes Pensacola beach Johannes Florida Paul
"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

Next Level Worship Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Next Level Worship Podcast

"This is live talk with Dwayne Moore. We're talking worship on a global scale. Hey everyone, welcome to live talk. I'm doing more. Today we have doctor Johannes Schroeder who lives in Germany. He is a professor there. He is a pastor. He is also a phenomenal musician and choir director, worship leader. He wears many hats. He is a partner in our ministry. He is actually translating my newest book on prayer into German and we're going to be going lord willing to Germany in May to help launch that book in the country of Germany. So we're going to have, or I'm going to have a conversation with him today that is going to be, I think, very interesting. We delve into leading others and worship the importance of choirs in a church setting and the role of choirs in a church setting how to lead others and especially how to lead a choir to lead others in worship. So these are some of the conversations we're going to have. We're also going to talk about the culture there in Germany, the church culture. So a lot of good stuff to listen for. So tune in and thank you for being a part of laptop today. We'll be right back. You're listening to live talk with Dwayne Moore. International conversations on worship..

Dwayne Moore Johannes Schroeder Germany
"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"Intelligence means it is really would benefit from a process based approach. Absolutely. I mean the one thing that got reified and has a really negative impact is information. These sort of absurd claims that information is just as fundamental as substance or whatever. It's something it's a way of looking at the problem, right? If you use an information based approach, you have a certain way of looking at a problem, but it's not like the university of people some people say the universe is made of information. Does that mean? It's just completely meaningless. And so yes, I agree with you. We have to think about what do these terms mean? And what kind of work? One of the really important practical aspects of doing philosophical work and science is to check concepts and to examine what is the work they do. And a lot of the concepts are using don't do any real work in the moment. So I think that's one of the reasons we have to rethink. That's what I tried to do in the lecture. The question a lot of those concepts that we use every day are actually a lot of them are just metaphors, you know, they're not defined beyond the genetic program. And so on and so forth. These are metaphors that we use very carelessly without realizing that they're metaphors anymore. Well, I really derailed us, but let's get back to agency and the idea of closure and well, I'll let you continue about how you think of agency and its role in evolution. So this is actually stuff that came out of making this lecture. The lecture itself has been a process. I've been giving this lecture for years at the university of Vienna to about 15 students before I hope it actually forced me to record it and then I thought, why not put it up on YouTube? So that's what I did, and now it's been viewed by hundreds of people which is fantastic. Thank you. All who have taken the time to do that. So in the lecture, I sort of came to agency very late, right? Just like in my career. And now I've sort of really interested in the role it plays in evolution. So here's the bake historical movement from Darwin. Darwin's theory of evolution was a theory of struggle for survival of the individual of the organism. It was an organism based theory. It had very big difficulties. It had no mechanism for inheritance. Kept starving busy and it had no mechanism for the production of phenotypes either. So this theory was then completely transformed in the 20s and the 30s through the modern synthesis and the rise of population genetics, which bracketed the organism. And so looked below the organism at the genes. And it looked above the organism at the population level. And it completely forgot about the organism. The organism just became this sort of interface where population level in genetic level interact. It had no importance. And of course, even Darwin knew that the behavior of organisms actions, choices that organisms make have really important consequences for evolution. But it's become a really big taboo topic not just because the term mechanism mechanistic explanation is often mistaken nowadays. This meaning, you have to explain something at the level of molecules, the molecular gene. And I think that's just crazy. We're dealing in the life of neurosciences. Hierarchical multi level. Systems that need to be explained at multiple levels. So then there is no scientific reason to focus on only one level. That's just a historical thing that happened, right? So I become interested in these higher levels and I was thinking, what does organization what role does organization play in evolution? And you need this sort of weird biological organization. So let me I probably have to talk a little bit about this. So please do. This specific notion of closure. Organizational closure is an idea that you have to basically account. It goes back to camp. It's a very old idea. It was explicitly formulated by the developmental psychologist piaget, and the idea is that you account for all the causally important factors from within the system, basically. Everything that you need to continue is has to be produced from within the system. Now it's very important to make a distinction between that sort of closure and thermodynamic closed system. So systems with organizational closure have to be thermodynamically open. They have to have a constant flow of matter, food, and energy through the system. Otherwise they can not achieve this organizational closure. And what it ultimately amounts to is that you have a life cycle, right? So you have your at the end of the life cycle have produced something that looks a little bit like you. And that is one of the fundamental principles of evolution you need, a principle, not just a variation, but you need the right kind of variation, and you have to pay a lot of attention to that. If you want to be truly evolvable, a lot of people have pointed out that very simplistic concepts of evolution like replicators, reductionist accounts that were pioneered by really smart people like John Len Smith and then others like Richard Dawkins that you can have a naked replicator to just make copies of itself. It was pointed out really early on in the 70s, actually. By eigen and Schuster that you get something that is called an error catastrophe. So if you have a molecule that replicates itself, you get errors. And the errors are just linearly accumulating. And at some point, if you have exponential an exponential copying mechanism, you just get errors. There's no way to maintain a species that could be selected before. Like that. At the other end, you have self organizations to recover from its work that is about auto catalytic systems, for example, a self-organizing systems that maintain themselves in a certain state. But they can't very either. Because as soon as they vary, they're no longer auto capability, so they know we all are produced themselves, by definition. And so you have no variation and can select. And so this is a really tricky problem, and so I realized thinking about this that you really need the sort of life cycle that organisms have in that life cycle depends on organizational closure, this specific snake that bites its tail organization of living beings. This is very superficial description of a very complicated theory here. Now, what you also get with closure is agency. Okay, so what you have to imagine is that if you look at it from a dynamical process oriented point of view, your current state is an organism depends on past states of the environment you react to your environment, but also on your past states and those of you ancestors. So partially obese, your current state can only be accounted for through previous states that you had internally. So a lot of it depends on causes that come from within. And that's exactly what it means to act to have agency. So true that a true concept of agency and I'm not talking about people who want to explain it away by saying it's nothing but information process. So to input output processing. It is not like that. It is something that you have agency when some of your actions are caused from within your own system. And that can only happen.

university of people Darwin university of Vienna John Len Smith YouTube eigen Richard Dawkins Schuster
"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"For you and then we'll continue our conversation. Hi yogi. Kevin Mitchell here. I'm a big fan of the holistic non reductive approach that you and your colleagues bring to biological questions which feels very rooted in principles of process philosophy and system thinking that we're popular for a while at various stages in the 20th century, but which were then replaced with a very mechanistic and reductionistic outlook. It feels to me like holistic dynamic approaches are gaining traction again. Probably because we now have experimental and computational tools to generate and deal with dynamical datasets. And I wonder if you feel the same way in the reception your own work is getting. Yes, thank you, Kevin. Yes, I do feel that way. And as I just said before, a dynamic, even going beyond dynamical systems. Beyond fixed structures. This is extremely important. And I think there is a big revolution coming at some point. It's a little frustrating to see how slowly it's catching on. A lot of the empiricists have problems seeing the practical use of these things because these ideas are still very theoretical and a big challenge is to bring them to the bench basically. And that's even though I work theoretically now, exclusively, that's one of my big aims is to work towards getting those theories in the range of empirical tractability. I think that's extremely crucial. So I think Kevin is a very optimistic person. I like that. And also, it's nice to see that this work is seeing among those people that really matter. But I wouldn't say it's gotten a lot of track traction in the mainstream of genetics or developmental genetics. And it's a bit sad to see how theoretical work is massively undervalued in those fields. I think one of the reasons is to technological progress has been so fast and the temptation to just produce datasets and resources has been overwhelming to a lot of people. So we forgotten a little bit about what I earlier called philosophical biology. And I think it's very important to get back to those conceptual questions now. And I've been trying to get people to notice and get interested in it, but it's really hard. I think it's also has a social dimension and everybody is under a lot of pressure to produce stuff. And these sort of questions are not very conducive to career basically in today's academic system. I have to say. Well, thanks, Kevin, for the question, so sorry to interrupt us because I wanted you to continue talking about about the big ideas from the course before you do that though. I am going to interrupt us again because a big thing that you talk about is process based philosophy a process metaphysics of process approach. And I love process metaphysics. I still find substance metaphysics, the idea of things is so ingrained, and so trained into me that I, I still have a whole lot of trouble thinking of things in processes and I'm wondering if that gets easier if you think of everything in processes or if you still struggle and think of things as think of processes as things. So yes, that's a very good question. I mean, you don't. So basically there's beautiful work by Johnson, make up, for example, that look at the metaphors we live by the book where they describe something that they call the containment doctrine, which they can show that very early in your childhood. You form this vision of the world basically. I call it the Tupperware model of reality. It's basically foxes within boxes, containers within containers. And so that's very very deeply ingrained and what is important here is to say that for a lot of questions and topics you don't need process based explanations of process based approach. Because it is very hard. I think was the first philosopher who brought up the absurdity of it all he said. You'd have to change language, for example, subject object he used to cat is the white cat is bristling towards the dog. It's captain widely bristling dog worth it. You know, and so that's taking it as absurd. I'm also bore his has a beautiful about this in his short story, blown orbis tertius or clone or pistachios. It's called this beautiful story. And so you don't have to get rid of your language you're thinking. But you have to realize that sometimes this very deeply ingrained pattern of thinking is hiding aspects of phenomena of questions. It's preventing you to ask questions that just don't occur to you if you think like this for me. In genetics, it's very strong because you have this idea that you can explain processes, developmental processes behavior in terms of genes, which are things. Genes are things. Yeah, yeah. So they're like hurls in a string. And so you have a huge gap between how is that thing causing any sort of behavior or phenotype. And that's been neglected for a long time because we are happy with saying, you know, this gene does that, but does that even mean? And these are quite obvious questions that are also beautifully treated in Kevin's work. I have to say. That have often been so obviously in our face that we didn't see them anymore. Sometimes. And there's a beautiful Whitehead quote from philosopher Whitehead, where he says that often it's exactly those things that are so obvious, obviously not right that we don't even see them anymore. And these are the things that you have to actually I used to work all the time. Yeah, of course. It's terrible. So yeah, so it's exactly those aspects of reality that nobody's questioning. If you question one of those and really find something, then that's how really big deep insights occur of course and changes in how we perceive the world. And I think that's very true. So this is one of the challenges here is to see where and when do you use process oriented thinking process space and explanations? And when is it okay? It's okay in many aspects in many areas of life and science is substance based explanations. That's fine. Yeah. In science, we're very concerned with definitions, right? So what's the definition of a gene? And so on the podcast, we talk a lot about intelligence and natural and artificial intelligence. And I feel like when you name something like intelligence, it reifies it and all of a sudden, it seems like a thing. And, you know, I don't get into this later about whether what kind of thinking process thinking or otherwise to apply to these sorts of things. But I feel like the entire world of intelligence natural artificial, whatever those words, whatever.

Kevin Kevin Mitchell Whitehead Johnson
"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"Down in 2015. I'm still carrying on some of the specialized work in evolutionary development and evolutionary systems biology through our work on concepts of process homology, modularity, dynamical modularity, and so on and so forth. But I would say I've moved on, especially in my scientific work, what I call philosophical biology and interested in the concept of agency and its role in evolution, which is probably something we'll talk about. Today, so I've taken a turn an irreversible turn away from empirical side. So I would say okay, so let's talk about yeah, you mentioned agency and its role in evolution. And that's kind of the focal point and end point of your course beyond networks. One of the things that I found interesting, that sort of lit me up was I just see this parallel between what you're talking about in tying together genotypes and phenotypes and how to understand evolution in the complex systems that we have and how development plays a role. In that process and using dynamical systems to model that, I just see this massive parallel with what's going on in modern neuroscience as well. So that's why I thought immediately, oh, I've got to have you on. Because I wanted to explore this. And I haven't thought deeply about making super close ties and exploring what it means for neuroscience, but this is something that I want to pursue further. So I don't know if you so I don't know how familiar you are with the modern landscape of neuroscience or at least one facet of it that we talk a lot about on the podcast. But maybe maybe what you could do is just give a really broad overview of this of the course. And then we can go from there. In two or three sentences. And two or three sentences, of course. By the way, I should say this thing is 12. It's like 48 30 to 40 minute videos. So it's super rich with historical perspectives, quotes, philosophical perspectives and the modern science of evolution and genetics. So yeah, take it away. So here's the executive summary of this. I was aware, I'm superficially aware of what's going on in neuroscience through colleagues that are engaged and work there. And I am, of course, aware that a lot of the arguments I'm making in my lecture apply as well, let's not that I've published in the field. But the central point, I guess, is that I was interested in the limits of limitations of dynamical systems modeling. Because I was always claiming that I am a process thinker that everything explanations have to be more focused on processes and biology and this is become really important in the field of genetics, genomics, but also neuroscience because of this increasing pervasiveness of networks that you see everywhere, and they pop up everywhere, and often there are just some sort of hair ball graph they're called and systems biology with lots of nodes and connections. And they're put in front on a slide and they're presented as an explanation of what's going on. They don't really explain anything, right? But that was one of my problems. They just show that a system is complicated basically. I wouldn't even call it complex. And so I became frustrated with this. And that brought me into contact with people very early on through my master supervisor brain. Goodwin. And then I peed she super as a John writers was pioneering this approach of using dynamical systems model with data to describe the actual dynamics function and evolution of gene regulatory networks. And this combination of empirical and theoretical work really appealed to me, it was really new, this was before assistance biology was called systems biology, people called it functional genomics that we were doing at the time. And I claimed I went around and said we're really looking at this in terms of process. But I soon became aware that the methods we were using is also still very much rooted in this network view of living organisms. And if you look at living organisms, what they do is they change their structure, constantly. So we capture a specific structure in a dynamical system model. And from that point of view, it's still static. You have the equations that describe the interactions. And those interactions are fixed. So I became interested in back to work I did during my master's thesis where I got in touch with the work by matron and barella and I had read a lot of very little. I did a master's in holistic science and the southwestern England in a little hippie college called Schumacher call it read a little varella and got in touch with embodied cognition and activism. And so it's a funny twist. They basically took those ideas that came from neuroscience cognitive neuroscience into the field of genetics. So it's come full circle. And through that I became aware and through my employment in this philosophy of science institute the kli. I got to know Alvaro Moreno and my player Mario who are doing work on agency and organizational accounts of organisms. And their theories very much rooted in more. And shows that the essence of biological organization is in the constantly change and structure of the organism. It's the self making auto creative aspect is that it never stays the same. It's like the red Queen and Alice, which has to run to stay the same. It changes all the time. And so there is this old argument going back to theoretical biologists Robert rose, and that you can not actually model this sort of organization. And it's very controversial. And I became interested in these sort of questions. Because if you're really a processing, and I think that's really important here, you need to get let go of those fixed structures. We can only study small aspects of development and evolution using dynamical systems theory, but we can not capture the agency of the organism. And therefore, I think that's crucial for neurobiology if you come back to that. You need a dynamic approach, basically. But a dynamic approach that is radically dynamic, not persistence, right? Well, as I was saying, I see the parallels between how you've used dynamical systems theory within this limited approach to model the developmental process, et cetera. And so in neuroscience, dynamical systems theory is all the rage right now to take a whole population of neurons and figure out what they are doing through their like a trajectory through these lower dimensional spaces. And map that on to eventually to behavior. So that was kind of the parallel that I saw. I wonder if I should you know what I'm going to do, I'm going to interrupt our conversation because since we've talked about dynamical systems theory. So I'm going to play you a question from a guest before we move on. So I had Kevin Mitchell on we didn't talk too much about his book innate, but in the book innate, it's all about how development has had gotten the short shrift in the story of our genotypes and how that leads to our behaviors, our phenotypes and our behaviors. Anyway, so I thought he would be a good person to ask to come on and ask you a question. So I'm going to play his question.

barella kli Alvaro Moreno Goodwin Schumacher Robert rose red Queen John Mario England Alice Kevin Mitchell
"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"Hello, it's Paul. On the episode today, I have a chat with Johannes Jaeger, who also goes by yogi, which is what I call him during the episode. On his website yogi bills himself as a freelance philosopher, a researcher and an educator, and he's actually done a lot of empirical research in systems science and evolutionary biology and a range of interdisciplinary topics as well. The reason he's on the podcast is because I recently took his online YouTube course called beyond networks, the evolution of living systems. So the course covers a lot of ground, but is roughly about how because of the complexity of us as biological organisms, functioning in a highly interactive and complex environment, we need to rethink evolutionary theory, and yogi makes an argument that we need to add a new perspective to evolutionary theory that accommodates a role for agency as biological organisms. And the course has the title beyond networks because within this agency perspective, we need to somehow move beyond the dynamical and mechanistic explanations that we currently use to study things like gene regulatory systems, which are traditionally thought of as networks of interacting genes and products of those genes, and so on. So I wanted to have them on because first of all, I really enjoyed his course, as you'll hear, but also because his argument applies equally well to explaining brains, which are in the same complexity realm as organisms, obviously, and given that on this podcast, we often talk about using networks like deep learning networks to explain intelligence, I think that yogis is an important message to consider. So I highly recommend the course. Note the term highly recommend because fair warning if you do watch the videos, your reading list will exponentially increase with all the books and papers that he quote unquote, highly recommend throughout. We also have a guest question from Kevin Mitchell today, who was on the podcast recently on episode 111, I'll link to yogi's blog and website and to the course that we discuss in the show notes at brain inspired co slash podcast slash one 18. If you find the podcast valuable consider supporting it on Patreon, we just had our first zoom presentation and discussion group through the Discord server that I run for Patreon supporters. This one was about the landscape of cognitive science, and it was a lot of fun. So I look forward to having more of those in the future. To support the show, just click the Patreon button at brain inspired dot com. All right, it was a pleasure having yogi on and I hope that you enjoy the discussion as much as I did. I came on to you and in fact, we're going to talk about your online course on YouTube called beyond networks the evolution of living systems, and I'd like to say I came onto you through academic means, but I think YouTube figured out that I was looking for biological autonomy topics because I had read all the Moreno and Mateo mossos book on biological autonomy and I was either searching for it or YouTube knew that I wanted to search for it. And then that's how I came across your course, which I just want to say is I really love this course. And I'll probably recommend it in the introduction, but I just want to reiterate that I recommend it to all my listeners to check this course out. But before we talk about that, I would love for you so that I don't patch it to introduce yourself and talk a little bit about your background and the empirical research that you've done and then how you've sort of transitioned and your trajectory to your current thinking. Well, thank you very much. First of all, it's really nice to hear that the lectures are reaching beyond their initially intended target audience, which was sort of accidental, and that's really nice to hear. I'm an evolutionary biologist, systems biologists. I had for years been researcher in the lab myself and then had an empirical was the head of an empirical lab in the center for genomic regulation in Spain, and I was looking at the evolution of gene regulatory networks that are involved in the early development of especially fly skipper and insects, but the aim was to learn general principles of network evolution. And I was using dynamical systems theory for my work and I guess I've always been a bit of a philosophy. So I was reading philosophy as a high school student I was interested in the philosophy of science while I was a student. And I read beyond the classes that I took about the philosophy of science. But it was at that time when I was a PhD student still that I noticed that we had a really hard time publishing our work at the time the field was very hostile to the modeling studies and I often realized that the reviewers didn't sort of criticize the methods that we were using, but they didn't get the questions that we were asking. And so I took this step back. And I was wondering about what kind of questions do scientists ask. And this set me on a trajectory that got me into becoming the director of a small institute for the philosophy of science, which is called the Lorentz food for evolution and creation science, just outside Vienna, a few years back. I didn't stay there for very long for various reasons, but since then I've continued on this philosophical trajectory and during my time at that institute I could make some really fantastic connections. Scientists found usually get in touch with the science, but I had all these people that I was working with. And there are some really good people out there that know a lot about not just the science that we're doing, but also how we do it. And it's a pleasure to be working. With several of them now in collaboration. So my work has taken if it was ethical term, but I'm still doing biology I would call it philosophical biology. It's a type of theoretical biology that I would put famous people like Connor at how waddington into that it has been on the back burner for the last 50 years or so. And I think it's high time to revive it. Can I ask, but so you said that you were studying or reading philosophy in high school and interested in it, and I did too, but I really didn't understand looking back, I really didn't understand it. I didn't have the same grasp on it, that I believe I do now, of course, that's probably not true. Also. But do you feel that same way or did you get it back then? No, absolutely not. And you also read the kind of niche. Yes. Of course, that's great. I still like that book, but as you said, I mean, the context matters a lot. And I am definitely reading very different things right now. This was not a planned trajectory. I meandered through a lot of this. And as you explore, this is something I use in my work on academia as a system as well is that we have to have space to explore. And a lot of it is serendipity. When you give yourself the space and the time to explore. Which is very important in my own trajectory. What would you say right now is the balance between your philosophical work, output, let's say, and empirical, because I know you're working on multiple philosophy manuscripts. As completely less empirical science, my lab shut.

yogi Johannes Jaeger YouTube Patreon Mateo mossos Kevin Mitchell small institute for the philos Paul Moreno Spain Vienna waddington Connor
"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"But <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> i i <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> guess <Speech_Male> it's still <Speech_Male> working progress people. <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> not perfect. We're doing <Speech_Male> our best to hear. What the <Speech_Male> budget of zero <Speech_Male> computer so <Speech_Male> immed- <Speech_Male> before we go <Speech_Male> like i want to say like you <Speech_Male> are. You <Speech_Male> don't know maybe you do. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> if i can. If <Speech_Male> i'm someone who listen <Speech_Male> to podcast at <Speech_Male> great there isn't <Silence> a lot of like <Speech_Male> cool <Speech_Male> advertising <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's like a <Speech_Male> lot of jerk off <Speech_Male> just talking about how great <Speech_Male> they are <Speech_Male> And this is a lot <Speech_Male> of very eager. Canned <Speech_Male> speeches sought <Speech_Male> unless. It's kind of sucks <Speech_Male> but your <Speech_Male> show is probably always <Speech_Male> source <Speech_Male> of a genuine <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> authentic <Speech_Male> real <Speech_Male> conversations <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> this fucked up industry <Speech_Male> working <Speech_Male> beautiful <Speech_Male> but the <Speech_Male> industry working <Speech_Male> and i think <Speech_Male> it's super important. <Speech_Male> I think what you <Speech_Male> do. A great service <Speech_Male> did not only the students. <Speech_Male> You have obviously chris <Speech_Male> august but <SpeakerChange> everyone <Speech_Male> else can listen to it. <Speech_Music_Male> A laughing <Speech_Male> at least just <Speech_Telephony_Male> wanna pointed out whoever <Speech_Male> listens to this <Speech_Telephony_Male> if you are a young <Speech_Male> creative <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> if you're an immigrant <Speech_Male> of a <Speech_Male> different background <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you going <Speech_Male> through some shit or whatever it <Speech_Male> may be <Speech_Male> fine me. Hit me <Speech_Male> up a more <Speech_Male> heavy. 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And i'm <Speech_Male> more than happy to take some time <Speech_Male> on my schedule and chattan <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> chop it up. <Speech_Male> That means <Speech_Male> a lot <Speech_Male> that that that <Speech_Male> right there makes me <Speech_Male> warm <Silence> inside that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> these conversations <Speech_Male> can be <Speech_Male> a place for people to <Speech_Male> find that <Speech_Male> and you <Speech_Male> know there's also all <Speech_Male> sorts of cultural <Speech_Male> challenges that people have <Speech_Male> with their own families <Speech_Male> to try to just <Speech_Male> what you said <Speech_Male> and people living <Speech_Male> with those things and <Speech_Male> not seeing <Speech_Male> people who look like them <Speech_Male> think like them <Speech_Male> in leadership in education <Speech_Male> and to <Speech_Male> have you offer that <Speech_Male> is is <Speech_Male> is powerful <Speech_Male> meaningful and important. <Speech_Male> So thank you so much for <Silence> that. That's amazing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nor <SpeakerChange> pleasure. Thanks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for having me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and listeners. You can find <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a as website <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> amid a meaty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> suspension musical. Saudi <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> named love <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Oh <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> it's not <Speech_Music_Male> like amid <Speech_Music_Male> or all men or <Speech_Music_Male> however other <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people have said my <SpeakerChange> name. The past <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i did google <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pronounce <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> alvin kamara last <Speech_Music_Male> name and found <Speech_Music_Male> it both ways kamara <Speech_Music_Male> in comparison. I don't even <Speech_Music_Male> know that <Speech_Music_Male> one. But i'm <Speech_Music_Male> being all sir <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> false or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a lsu balser <Speech_Music_Male> non baltazar. <Speech_Music_Male> Find me a dance. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Podcast at mac <Speech_Music_Male> dot com. Dude <Speech_Music_Male> thanks again so much <Speech_Male> man. <Speech_Male> We'll see you again <Speech_Male> when you get the next one recorded <Silence> till then see a by.

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"Them in through that i learned a lot about the cd's type of work. So when i asked you went and applied this reason why didn't apply to drogue new york city's i saw cams work and it's really cool. I want to be part of that. Somebody hit you up. And i. I just found out. Kids weren't really learning about agencies in lake. Who's doing what in like i before. I even worth a pariah. I knew ross's names. I knew that he'd won Like a is whatever School projects student award and i looked at his book to be like. Oh that's how people these kids are in their books. That's how i should be doing my books like my books are like it's saddam was kind of thing. I was kind of focusing which is sounds maybe lane to a lotta people but i find it odd that you wanna to be part of industry. Not no musician being. I don't know who the fuck the beatles are. i don't know who are. You wanna be a rock musician. That's impossible go. It's stunning that. That student is now the exception. I mean we were all like that. We were all. i mean. We didn't fiance the that with loved advertising and couldn't get enough of it. It was really inspiring to look at war daniels and it the thing about it was. It was a simpler time like now it's like the work is so so unique that it's i mean yes for what you're saying it's important because you see who made it blows your mind but like it's kind of hard to learn the craft looking at awards animals like it was for us because this area back to the beatles analogy. It's like you learn to be a musician by playing someone else's song i write and so for us. It was like okay. Here's kind of how advertising works. Let's apply that to our problem but now advertising solutions are so connected to that brands truth like there's nothing about your.

new york city ross daniels Like a
"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"Your none of them. None of them. I think i'm a pain in the ass work with an always the opinion the work i think i think being the kid to be honest i mean not necessarily on calls i try to keep myself some level respect into be honest i think it is like just trying to add levity job this job is fucking hard man like it's a hard job i don't think people get it. We don't do none of five. we don't do. There is no rhyme or reason. No mathematical equation. It's it's like somebody gives the asked this to you. To some business from creatively in like you look at a blank piece of paper. Then you gotta fray to light god or bahama fucking tickle me elmo whoever your diabetes and you then hold that you like it and then your bosses like the next day then the client likes but they don't completely changed it and you work hours late this. It's tough fucking job. And if you can't find a levity in it kid Big fundraiser south from the people you work with in like it's just painful. I currently at work on could mean meena. Miko is a catas- tig are direct. Cd a whole.

five Miko next day bahama
"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"Ahead until i mean we have temp most great creatives that i've met for the most part. Have this kind of weird temper. Sides them like little like hissy fits just consider ourselves that he's like quote unquote artists. Crushes about the looking blah blah blah. Yeah totally it's like trying to be but you know not as smart or crazy but we also hear stories of like the neal friendships for back in the day. You're like god. Those guys. just bad asses outerwear. They really did actually kind of scumbags but right just goes right right. That's right and so. Here's here's i want to share something with you so i asked this question on every episode. I say like knowing what she now. If you go back in time and whisper something and you know young kids ear. What would you say yourself in graduate school and for me. i've never. I don't know if i answered the question on the podcast for me for the longest time my answer was was going to be. Everybody's trying the best they can like. These people are doing their job. The best they can do their job. And i used to call them all. I used to call everybody. Who wasn't a creative idiots in assholes. And they're not sure they're not an why are you so fucking your typical that you think their incompetence is sabotaging you on purpose like they're not there to fuck you over think that's the right thing to do. They're doing. I think that's the thing that leo said. It was like you know like everyone's out they're going to give you feedback. council On the production ceiling blah blah. And might you might not agree with it which is fine but the thing to remember. Is that everybody in the back of their minds whether the right or wrong whether you agree with it or not. Is they believe they're making the idea better. That's what's coming in. I'm gonna fuck this guy's idea like.

leo episode
"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"johannes" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"You need to figure out the best way quickest way for to you to relate to people relate the consumer so that the work isn't just like some stunt gimmick piece of shit knocking highs lichner effect or create something that consumer. How often have you gotten like really clear. kinda like. I don't wanna say mind-blowing but like really insightful. Insight delivered to you in a brief where you understand just from reading the brief the person you're talking to or is that coming from you talked a little bit about of how could here's what asking so at our school we have. I m teaching students kind of right there on brief hunt for those sort of cultural or behavioral or psychological insights about how people feel about their lives their day. Whatever the connection with people whatever it is and how brand can fit into that and in my experience in my career i guess planners were really knew when i was working in new york. And we didn't get a lot of really insightful. Brief so is that often given to you or are you still feeling like that's part of your job as the creative. It's like it's going to be creative sometimes. Giving great ideas. Somebody given bad ideas. And then you've got to figure it out. Stodgy is funny thing. Because to be honest. I be blunt. I didn't give zero talks about strategy. Until i went to jail and i work with leo. I saw the way. Leo really valued entreated strategy strategists. You know with profound respect. Even marc aaronson. Who's the head of strategy The sweetest guy was so sharpton. so smart. in the people he's hired coincidentally all incredibly insightful Really well and worth valium goal is is to forty one is they provide you if they're good. They provide you with something for you to jump off of to start working thinking ideas but in the middle of thinking of ideas you start to kind of bring out some deeper insights a little bit of like this is a territory site based off of the bigger insight and then what strategy does really well. And they can help. Sharpen that and make sure you're staying true to with any provide.

new york marc aaronson Leo forty one leo zero
Gobert, Jazz agree to 5-year, $205M extension

Kim Komando

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Gobert, Jazz agree to 5-year, $205M extension

"Tim McMahon reports that Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert has agreed to a five year $205 Million extension, the third largest contract in N. BA history behind Johannes on Tennekoon Po and Russell Westbrook.

Tim Mcmahon Utah Jazz Center Rudy Gobert Tennekoon Po Johannes Russell Westbrook
Biden team accuses Pentagon of stonewalling transition

Innovation Hub

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Biden team accuses Pentagon of stonewalling transition

"Has canceled meetings with president He liked Joe Biden's transition team, saying the priority is to focus on the response to the Corona virus pandemic. Here's NPR's Tom Bowman. The move angered Barton's transition team, which said some 20 meeting slated for Friday were canceled by acting Defense Secretary Chris Miller. Miller said in a statement that some meetings have been rescheduled and there was a mutually agreed upon holiday pause. But Johannes Abraham, the executive director of Biden's transition team, told reporters there was no mutually agreed upon holiday break. Abraham said there was no time to spare because of the delay in the start of the transition process. Tom Bowman. NPR news

Tom Bowman Defense Secretary Chris Miller Joe Biden Johannes Abraham NPR Barton Miller Biden Abraham Npr News
Jupiter and Saturn will form the first "double planet" in 800 years

Financial Quarterback With Josh Jalinski

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Jupiter and Saturn will form the first "double planet" in 800 years

"What astronomers call a great conjunction, the closest they could be seen in the sky together. For nearly 800 years, according to Scientific American and Astronomical conjunction occurs when any two heavenly bodies appear to pass or meet each other as seen from Earth. To make one great, though, requires an encounter between our solar system's two largest planets, the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, a line to allow the giant worlds to seemingly convene roughly every 20 years. But the last time Jupiter and Saturn appeared so close was July 16th. 16 23 back when Galloway was still alive, a little more than a decade after he first used to telescope to discover Jupiter's four largest moons that now collectively bear his name, Great conjunctions. Have at times drawn scientists to speculate over their possible links with major events. For instance, Johannes Kepler investigated whether the star of Bethlehem Which in the Nativity story of the Gospel of Matthew Guided the three wise men to Christ. Birth was a great conjunction. Calculating that one in fact, did occur in seven BC Is it possible the Madge I or Wiseman and we don't know. There were three. Remember the Bible never mentions three Wiseman. But is it possible the Madge I who were basically astrologers were following the great conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter? Well, one did occur in seven BC, So the timing seems to be about right. Where is he? Who has been born king of the Jews for we saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him. It makes sense to me that God would use such an alignment of heavenly bodies to announce the birth of a king or other important events like sign posts. Genesis Chapter one verse 14 and God said, Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night and let them be forced signs and for seasons and for days and years. He determines the number of the stars he gives to all of them their names some Fort 1 47 4, But for those that study Astro theology, they see the Bible as Astrological allegory. The story of Jesus they believe is really about the sun s u N rather than son s. O N. Passing through the Zodiac each year. And indeed, there are numerous examples where the life of Jesus, beginning with his birth seemed to align if you will, quite neatly with the astrological Zodiac. Consider that the sun s U. N is reborn every year on the 25th day of December. That is the days begin to lengthen during the winter solstice. Jesus is born in the stable between the constellations of the horse and goat secretaries and Capricorn. 30 years after Christ birth, he was baptized 30 days after the sun s U. N is born. It enters the sign Aquarius, the water bearer Thies are but two Now to be clear. I'm a Bible believing Christian. I believe the Bible

Matthew Guided Wiseman Johannes Kepler Galloway Saturn Jupiter Madge Bethlehem
Trump wins North Carolina, Biden Wins Georgia

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Trump wins North Carolina, Biden Wins Georgia

"Voice your vote An update on the two remaining uncalled states in the presidential race, ABC News can project President Trump will win the state of North Carolina that, according to Edison analysis of the vote tallies from election officials. ABC News also projecting Joe Biden will win the state of Georgia. Biden maintains a lead in Georgia by about 14,000 votes against President Trump due to the slim margin. State election officials in Georgia began a hand audit of nearly five million ballots in the presidential race. Those results do by November. 20th. Georgia has not elected a Democrat for president since Bill Clinton president elect both Joe Biden, meantime, moving ahead with his transition by an administrative transition official, Johannes Abraham. Today President Biden and Vice President Paris Want administration an administration that looks like American that means finding divers. Experienced Helen from across the country. President Trump has not conceded the race and continues to pursue legal challenges in several states with continuing

President Trump Georgia Abc News Joe Biden Edison Biden North Carolina Johannes Abraham President Biden Bill Clinton Paris Helen Donald Trump
Bukcs, heat begin Eastern Conference semifinals tonight

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Bukcs, heat begin Eastern Conference semifinals tonight

"Bring on the Miami Heat. Middleton back set out right wing bounced to Marvin Williams out of the corner. Honest three pointer. Why not ABC? Easy as 1234, the alphabet 1 12 to 98. Johannes and the Bucks eliminated the Orlando Magic in five games on Saturday. Now they advance to the Eastern Conference semifinals. To take on the heat. Miami head coach Eric Spoelstra knows his squad is gonna have its hands full trying to guard the MVP. Also, you're going to have to do more prep. But we're not re inventing the whole wheel on how we prepare for a game. So you just get into your routine age, Each opponent is going to present really different challenges. This is a really good team. Obviously an MP player on their team, You're going to do things well. Game one of that. Siri's tips off tonight coverage here on the same day starts at five o'clock.

Miami Bucks Eric Spoelstra Marvin Williams Middleton Siri ABC Johannes MVP
What NLP Tells Us About COVID-19 and Mental Health with Johannes Eichstaedt

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:08 min | 2 years ago

What NLP Tells Us About COVID-19 and Mental Health with Johannes Eichstaedt

"I am here with Yohannes Istat Yohannes is an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University. Yohannes. Welcome. To the WII podcast. Thank you pleasure to be here. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. I think we learned about some of your research in the context of a presentation you did at the recent Forum. That was held by the human centered AI institute at Stanford and we're looking forward to digging into that. But before we do I'd love to hear a little bit about your background and how you came to work in a computational psychology computational social science. Yeah. Sure it's a it's a new field. I was a physicist by training many years ago. Okay and at some point decided that I. Cared more about people than I did about particles. Made A. Very Long career transitions for. Psychology into the social sciences and about ten years ago started out in started carving out in area that intersects big data machine learning with computational questions psychology and just straight up psychology questions. So for example, can be predict the heart disease risk of areas using twitter, and do the psychological predictors that we pull out from the twitter language correspond to what we know about heart disease. Can we better understand depression I mean looking at what language that people use precedes the first diagnosis of depression in the medical records so It's been really fun I. Mean I've been really enjoying IT A. Because of the physics he background I'm more matthew perhaps than some other psychologists and so I'm I'm on the sort of computational psychology side, and then there are psychological computer scientists with which interface whether we have the critical expertise across domains to actually find new stuff. Teredo. New Solutions Interesting. You're saying it is most of your work involve doing analysis of texts from social media context in drawn conclusions from that. It tends to be taxed yet tends to be extended tends to be a social media in generally all text data sets of fair game. So we've we've also used transcripts. Of therapy directions where speeches were autobiographical writing to writing prompts, but the beauty of social media data is that you're so highly powered because of the size of these data sets. That you can really use sort of deeper machine learning methods and you also have. Such high statistical power that for feature exploration for finding things like associated language patterns you have the power to discover these unexpected associations and you use you need to be order in the the thousands of people in these data sets and social media easiest source of data for those kinds of analyses. And there are other advantages disadvantages of using social. Did I could talk about sir? Okay. So at Advantages is. So you in compared to other psychological research, you don't ask people to get off the couch and Philo. Right. You don't knock on their door and you also don't intrude into their mental processes with some question in principle, right in an ideal world it's an a kind of ecological assessment. It's people that are in digital spaces they're behaving as they normally would with their friends with with hero needs with a right there just being themselves and you sort of as there are sitting around their digital campfire, you sort of listening Ed scale with their permission of course, and so there's this notion that it's unobtrusive for some psychological processes can be can be quite nice. One of the major disadvantages is that you have certain kinds of distortions in the social media signal. You have sampling biases. Certain populations are just not as represented. But that's getting less and less at it was never that big of a concern to begin with. So. For example, the median age in twitter five years different than the median age of the US population and you know people always say how you how can you make a population estimate based on twitter? You know I'm not on twitter. But you're also not in a representative survey, the vast majority of the time. Right. So in Gallup, poll polls a thousand people to get a national estimate of how people feel about trump or but they will being as you're also not in that survey. Right, and so when we have five million users on twitter and we can estimate the demographics and age that we can post, ratify these samples to represent the population actually much better. Than Your thousand person representatives obey rate and so does that make sense the sampling bias things? I think we've tackled it now we've. Beat the dead horse many times enough that that. People are coming around the the other thing or the other main concern is that the people social desirability bias that people are putting on facebook social media. I was GONNA ask about that right An advantage is that you're observing people being themselves, but often people aren't being themselves they're being their twitter self. Twitter or or their facebook south right? That's. Sometimes those are different selves. Yeah that's true and so we've we've tried to characterize a little over the years and it seems like what's really happening is not so much. So particular on platforms like Facebook, your facebook graph, the people you're connected with on facebook are the people who know you. So there's a certain element of just keeping you within the bounds of who you are roughly as a person that would just otherwise just seeming congressmens. But we have seen however is that people tend to suppress statements they not feeling well. Along. Two dimensions the I mentioned is sort of when they're sad depressed. In the other one is if there if they experienced families than life, which is part of the problem of these sort of comparative processes on Social Media, for certain groups in particular that you're comparing your normal life to somebody else's highlight reel. And that's certainly the case. So if you think about American culture more generally. I think there's two foundation myth that sort of Guy American social norms. The one is sort of positivity bias sort of suit of happiness style set of legends and myth and norms and archetypes. And then the second one is A. Protestant work ethic. which is that it's good to be successful and that successful people are somehow morally righteous or morally praiseworthy.

Twitter Facebook Stanford University Yohannes Istat Yohannes Assistant Professor Of Psychol Computational Psychology Depression Physicist Philo United States Representative
Smart: Refs overturned call to keep Giannis in

SportsCenter AllNight

02:29 min | 2 years ago

Smart: Refs overturned call to keep Giannis in

"To be honest in the books were up on the Celtics fourth quarter 96 to 89. Boston, though. They came to play dice swings to jail in Brown against Middleton tested three for the wing Swiss since I shot in the face knocks it down, anyway. Time out. Mike Budenholzer and the Celtics have done it again. 98 5 Sports Hall by that three by Jalen Brown had Boston up a point, but Johannes the reigning M V P For a reason. Smart guarding honest. Now they switch about sandy, honest catches on ties. Hook shot down with a foul beautiful bounce by Middleton as he found the honest deep in that paint, Johannes goes to work, and he's got the mean mug goingto make it 1 15 1 10 wkmg with that call that a three point play that had him up five late that help seal the deal was another from Yana said a combo. With about a buck 30 to go an overturned call that kept him in the game and help the Bucks beat. The Celtics won 19 1 12 36 points, 15 rebounds, seven assists. Milwaukee improves to an MBA best 54 12 moved within a window of clinching the top seed in the East for a second straight year, Nagumo was called for a charging fowl, appearing to negate a basket and giving him 1/6 foul. The call It was changed to a blocking foul on Marcus Smart after review Smart and Johannes with this take postgame the recession and said I was late. Frankly, I think we all know what that was about six. I didn't want to get him out. Just call a spade A spade is what it is speaking as a player. I think he's a good player. I think Well, in that respect about that is the first floor peaches May he plays hard. He was the best player. I think he's a bad person that day. That's his opinion. He was moving in last place, but either way it away if he was charging he was not sore. I'm having going to win and away from this place, it was changed. Call Chris Middleton, 18 for the Bucks Smart 23. Jalen Brown, 22 with Jason Tatum, just five points on to off 18 shooting.

Celtics Johannes Jalen Brown Chris Middleton Boston Marcus Smart Mike Budenholzer Bucks Yana Sports Hall Nagumo Jason Tatum Milwaukee
Five shot dead after hostage situation at South African church, police say

Business Rockstars

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Five shot dead after hostage situation at South African church, police say

"Five people are dead and more than 40 have been arrested after an early morning hostage situation at a long troubled church near Johannes Berg, South Africa, a statement said. Police and military responded to reports of a shooting at the International Pentecostal Holiness Church, where they found four people shot and burned to death in a car and a security guard shot in a different car. Six other people were injured. Police say they rescued men, women and Children who had been held hostage. It appeared to be living at the

International Pentecostal Holi Johannes Berg South Africa
Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

Software Engineering Daily

20:28 min | 2 years ago

Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

"Honest welcome back to the show. It's great to be back under so thanks so much for having me. Of course you run. PRISMA and PRISMA is involved in workflows for accessing data. Can you describe the AP? Is that sit between the front and the back end database layer, and where PRISMA fits in sure so I think that's a pretty complex questions. It's always. Always depends on what your application architecture looks like, and there's so many angles to take does feed for example, take a more mortar jam, stag texture, or if you take a micro services architecture, the onset is always depends. What's always the same as if you build application that requires state of assistance? Then chances are you're using database and how PRISMA fits into. Is that it tries to help application developers built applications more easily was working with the databases so typically that means you're using a part of PRISMA. What's called the prisoner client that sits typically in your application server? That's typically an API server and talks to your database. Typically, this part of the stack is known as an or layer or data access layer. PRESI-, in particular is not an Orem can talk about that separately. The pretty nuanced topic, but prison up to. The main function is to serve to access state. I'm more easily in your application language. Can you talk about that in more detail? Like? Why would I need a additional layer of access I? Mean I think in general? I if I'm sitting on the front end and I want to access the database I m hitting some service that services talking to a database and the service is requesting the data from the database. Why do I need prisma to help out with that database access so this setup just to recap one more time, so you have your fronton application. Let's say you have reactive of you up on the other end. You have database. Let's say you have a more traditional postures, my sequel database, but would also apply to same for more modern. Modern Dynamo DB etc, and then typically have this middle tier that's let's say an API server, and where you would use prisma for is just having an easier time building your API server in order to talk to the database, so let's say you're using pastas. The most barebones thing you could do is implementing your Api Server and just writing implementing your points, or let's say rebuilding a graph gals over implementing overs, and then just talking directly to the database by writing raw sequel. Curry's and that works, but that comes also was some problems. Problems typically in terms of productivity, and does not quite abstraction level that you want as an application developer to be productive and confident in what you're writing the same way as fronton applications are built through abstraction layers. Let's say react angular view. It's the same on the back end that you also want more application at U. Matic obstruction layer for away you talking to the database, and historically there's been many forms of the most common one is in Orem, and they're on more modern ways of how you build a better abstraction on top. Top of fear database for data access, and that's a pattern that implementing was prisma that to be referred to as careerbuilder. Can you explain in more detail? What is the difference between a query builder and an OEM right? So that comes down to the way how you're thinking about these application patterns, an Orem stands for object, relational knepper, and the idea behind an orum is mapping a typically a database table to a class in typically object oriented programming language, and this is a pretty intuitive model and is widely used in tons of. The most prominent one of be being active record as part of friggin rails, but there tons of other ones as well and the Java world. There's hibernate and the idea there you have tons of tables in your database, and you want to map that somehow and Julia programming language and your programming language. You're typically working with classes as opposed to a career rebuilder with looks more like sequel way, but maps you sequel statements into statements in your programme language and the difference really come down to how much flexibility and control you need, but they're tons of downsides of or and that as Good more widely used became more and more well known, so there's a great block posed called the Vietnam of computer science, which is all about or ems and the problems behind orum's most importantly one thing called the object relational impedance mismatch. Talks about the problems of mapping databases database tables to objects where he's just a big amount of oven, impedance mismatch, and the way around that is that you should think about the craziest that you're writing a database instead of obsessing too much about the classes and objects, and your curry should really determine the shape of the data. You're getting back in the same way as the British striking analogy to how gruff LDL's was the sort of pattern where draft, but L. is all about the quarry writing that you need in your components, and it's a pretty similar pattern that you're now applying the way how you do. They access on the back end. If I was to set up PRISMA for Miami application. What would the life of a query look like and the structure of a query look like? So what you'd be using concretely, there is prisoner. Database took. And what you would use to career database is a part of prisma called the PRISMA Klein's. The prisoner client is basically just a Java script library that you installed installed from NPR. And you're. Writing that query ones in your coat. One great advantage is that it's fully type safe by leveraging type script, so you're writing that query and then strode run times when your application is deployed. That code gets invokes that under the hood generates a database dependent query, typically a sequel query, but as we were supporting of databases, swell could generate dynamo queries, Atra, and these queries are centered underlying database, and the data's returned, and then returned injury application code. Got It and. What the difference between using PRISMA AND USING GRAPH KUNAL! So, it's a really two fundamentally different technologies for different use cases I. think a good way to think about is where into application stack. These technology said so graphic. L. is typically used for fronton applications to talk back end up locations whereas prisoners specifically the prison. My client is used for typically your backup location to talk to your database so analogous in this way, but typically the different layers of the stack. However, it always depends was newer approaches like the jam stack your friends and education can statically directly talk to

Prisma Orem Prisma Klein AP Developer Curry U. Matic Julia Careerbuilder NPR Orum Miami
Head of EU's top science panel quits over COVID-19 response

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

Head of EU's top science panel quits over COVID-19 response

"Modified Audi had only become president of the European Research Council on the first of January but you commission spokesman Johannes park confirmed that professor Ferrari has resigned the news was first announced by the Financial Times based on a statement released to the paper by Ferrari who said he had been extremely disappointed by the European response to the pandemic he complained about running into institutional and political obstacles as he sought to strictly set up the scientific program to combat the virus I'm sorry I shockingly

Audi President Trump European Research Council Johannes Park Professor Ferrari Financial Times
Getting to Know Luther's Pastor: Johannes Bugenhagen

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Getting to Know Luther's Pastor: Johannes Bugenhagen

"This episode we are once again on location and the Museum of the Bible they say that here at the Museum of the Bible they have seventy two hours worth of content within the walls of this museum but we only have five five minutes and so we don't have time to look at all the great treasures but we're going to focus on one treasure. We're on the fourth floor. This floor tells the story of the Bible through artifacts and even starts before the Bible with just the history of writing cuneiform tablets and then it gets to a very exciting part of the museum for me and that is the part dealing with the reformation and I'm standing right next to a fascinating Bible the placard next to it identifies it as Lutheran Pastors Bible so first. Let's talk about who is Lutheran Pastor. Luther Pastor is Yohannes Hanis Vegan Haagen he was born in Poland on June twenty-fourth fourteen eighty five and he died city of Berg on April Twentieth Fifteen fifty eight as a student. He was not impressed with the reformers at all. FX He I read Luther in fifteen twenty eight when he first read Luther the arguments just did not convince him but then something happened as red luther a second time in fifteen twenty three and he was reading eating the Babylonian captivity of the Church and as he was reading that he was convicted of the truth of the Gospel and he was also convicted that he was is in the wrong church and he needed to get out of that church and go with Luther so he made his way to Berg is a great scholar so he became one of the professors at the University Edinburgh and he also became one of the pastors at the Parish Church at Saint Mary now Luther was also one of the pastors at Saint Mary's Church he two names for Buchen Haagen. He called him. Dr Pomeranians and Pomerania is the area that we know today as Poland so luther was calling him the doctor of Poland. The title that Luther had for him was my pastor. Luther needed a pastor this pastor to so many needed a pastor and he looked to Yohannes Buchen Haagen so that's the losers authors pastor part now we need Luther Pastor's Bible part and what we have here is a Latin Bible. It's beautifully printed. It's two columns and it's the Latin text the wonderful thing about this. Little treasure is it has gone. Huggins notes fall through it. There's only one note in a hand other than Bougie Hawkins and that note has two little initials after it P. M. and they stand for Philip Philip Malinche. Somehow Philip Malinche then got a hold of this Bible. Maybe he thought it was his. I don't know and he wrote a note in it. Then he signed his name to it but but all the rest of the notes belong to Bougie this was the Bible that he would have used to study. This is the Bible that he would have used for his personal reading and this is the the Bible that he would have used for his sermon preparation and this Bible was here and the Museum of the Bible. It's a testament to a number of things. It's a testament to the fact that luther sought out a pastor that he knew he needed someone to hold him accountable and not only did he say. Bougainville's huggins was my pastor. He also said Haagen was also my confessor. This was the man who held them accountable and also reminds us. That luther wasn't alone. We we sometimes have this vision of losers. He's you know Contra Mundi Luther against the world standing alone. The reality is he had colleagues and one of those colleagues was honest Bogan Haagen boob huggins legacy can be summed up in three words. Pittsburgh and the impact on Susie had vitner number two Pomeranians remembers hometown Poland. We had an impact there too on the church and the number three pastor because if he was luther pastor will then he was probably a good pastor and that's Yohannes Michigan Haagen and this is Bible and I'm Steve Nichols on location for five minutes in Church history for more ordination

Luther Pastor Museum Of The Bible Contra Mundi Luther Philip Philip Malinche Luther Huggins Poland Yohannes Buchen Haagen Buchen Haagen Museum Of The Yohannes Michigan Haagen Berg Bougie Hawkins Saint Mary's Church Bougie Steve Nichols Pittsburgh Dr Pomeranians Saint Mary
Romania: Pro-govt rally protests anti-corruption 'abuses'

Global News Podcast

02:33 min | 5 years ago

Romania: Pro-govt rally protests anti-corruption 'abuses'

"Purpose i rushed to face gave the water to drink and i can still see that face when belsen was liberated by the british in april nineteen forty five one of the first soldiers to enter the camp was newman turbo just six months later he and gina were married the wedding dress which was made from british army parachute is now on display at london's imperial wool museum gina toggle devoted the rest of her life to teaching people about the holocaust to ensure the horace were never forgotten the holocaust educational trust set you would be remembered for his strength resilience and wisdom shala gallagher on the life of gina tuggle still to come remember this before you place your bets on your next world cup match you might want to see what paul the octopus has to say about it took us who correctly predicted spain as the twenty ten world cup winners will issue the russians go one better with killys the deaf catch to remain in now when more than one hundred thousand government supporters gathered for a mass rally in the capital bucharest it was cooled by the governing social democrats to protest against what they say is the excessive power of prosecutors in romania eastern europe correspondent nick thorp reports this rally was the government's onset to the last two years of street protests against it special buses and trains brought supporters from all over romania many wore white tee shirts the organizers request critics like in the rally to those organized by rumania's former communist dictator nicolae ceausescu the government building was lit up in the blue yellow and red trickle of the romanian flank bucharest mac told the crowd that they were there to fight for freedom and dignity the roddy was cool to increase the pressure on president klaus johannes to obey a constitutional court order to fire the head of the anticorruption agency known by its rumanian initials dna the dna has successfully prosecuted many top officials for corruption and drawn the ire of the government the minister of justice suggested last week that the government could impeach president yohannes if he refuses to dismiss the dna.

Belsen Klaus Johannes President Trump Nick Thorp Europe Imperial Wool Museum London British Army Horace President Yohannes Nicolae Ceausescu Romania Bucharest Spain Gina Tuggle Six Months Two Years