35 Burst results for "Johan"

Joe Biden Is Using the Spiral of Silence To Force His Vaccine Agenda

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:11 min | Last week

Joe Biden Is Using the Spiral of Silence To Force His Vaccine Agenda

"This is so important everybody. It's not just about believing the lie. You then become a stormtrooper for the lie. It's not enough just to say that. Oh yeah i believe that the vaccines the greatest thing ever biden his using the spiral of silence to create an rb to enforce his own concoction of lies. Nick charter chatter professor of behavioral science at university of warwick wrote in quote. Would you stand up to an oppressive regime a phenomenal piece of writing. He said this. The vast majority of people aren't prepared to rebel against totalitarian rulers and analysis. That was done. By organizational theorist james march and nor region political science johan olsen from two thousand four argued that human behavior is governed by what humans tendency to conform to unwritten rules of appropriate

Nick Charter Biden University Of Warwick James March Johan Olsen
Molina's RBI Single in 9th Lifts Cardinals Past Marlins 1-0

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Molina's RBI Single in 9th Lifts Cardinals Past Marlins 1-0

"The Adare Molina delivered his eighth career walk off hit with an RBI single in the bottom of the ninth completing the cardinals one nothing win and a three game sweep of the Marlins Paul Goldschmidt reached on an error by shortstop jazz Chisholm junior to start the ninth Matt carpenter followed with a one out walk before Molina sent the Marlins to their fourth straight loss St Louis starter Johan Oviedo worked a career high seven scoreless innings losing pitcher sandy Alcantara pitched a team season high eight and a third innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Adare Molina Paul Goldschmidt Jazz Chisholm Marlins Matt Carpenter Cardinals Johan Oviedo Molina St Louis Sandy Alcantara Dave Ferrie
"johan" Discussed on Arrested DevOps

Arrested DevOps

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"johan" Discussed on Arrested DevOps

"The other point is that sometimes are foundational things such as to we have discipline around keeping builds fast and stable and those kind of things or are we working in a programming language. That i'm so familiar with that. That i have a hard time groggy. What's going on on the screen. Then i need to practice outside of my context in order to get the component building parts in line such that they stop mattering so there's like the awareness and then there's like the proficiency how can i like make the smaller component parts go away. I don't care. I can read a text or text. I can read some coat. And i don't care about variable declarations or something like that or at least i don't ponder what it means when it says float sixty four. I know that. And i know that you don't have to process that you don't just sit there and just kind of translated right like it's again back to the idea of going back to Spoken languages it's when you think in the language versus having to translate like when you're learning the language the first year like okay. You said this word. I'm translating that into a context. That i have and then i hit the point when i don't have to translate that anymore and i think one of the things i really like where you're going with about the foundational stuff because i now realize in some of what i was talking about was talking about refinement right. You know again like that idea of if you're if you're trying to improve but when you're going back to that foundational thing you you know it's not going to be just one thing but i like the idea of you have to take that to put into context that resonates to and i also think there's a lot about the cognizant also about progressive disclosure right like you. Don't try to learn everything all at once. Either you know right like it's like okay. Can you get this foundational principle. You know and yes. You're going to have all this other noise about like and this i continuing this with teaching where it's like 'cause people when there's a brand.

one one thing first year sixty things four
What a Johnson & Johnson vaccine rollout could look like

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

What a Johnson & Johnson vaccine rollout could look like

"More shots in more arms. That's the hope is. Us health advisors gave the green light to another covid nineteen vaccine. The johnson and johnson vaccine is single-dose and does not need to be frozen. The company said if they emergency use authorization from the fda will have twenty million doses available by the end of march. Dr johan van hoof is the global head of infectious disease and vaccine johnson and he was asked during the panel discussion. How the vaccine can be changed to more efficiently protect against mutations and variants if need be we all got complacent biard in in the making all new volume Vaccine dad would enter the pays one twelve though before fhimah the vaccine is not as effective as maderna's advisers reducing moderate to severe covid symptoms by sixty six percent.

Johnson Dr Johan Van Hoof Biard Infectious Disease FDA United States Fhimah Maderna
FDA panel greenlights Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine

Buck Sexton

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

FDA panel greenlights Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine

"To a full green light. FDA independent panel is okay to the final agency vote could come as early as tonight. After hours of testimony, the FDA panel voting to approve the emergency use authorization of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. It still needs a final thumbs up from the FDA before could be shipped out. The ones that comes accompanies. Dr Johan Van Hood says They're ready to go with four million doses immediately and then more supply. $100 million to do s government in the first half of 2021 Alex own ABC nears. The House

FDA Johnson Dr Johan Van Hood Alex ABC House
Unlawful assembly declared as Trump supporters, counter protesters clash in San Diego

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 9 months ago

Unlawful assembly declared as Trump supporters, counter protesters clash in San Diego

"In San Diego yesterday, a group of protesters finally clashed downtown maybe sees Todd and has more on that story. The confrontation between supporters of President Trump and counter protesters on the Pacific Beach boardwalk turned ugly, prompting police to declare the gathering and unlawful assembly because of acts of violence. Johan Eggman was locked inside his restaurant for several hours and witnessed some of the reported violence. He saw them throwing tear gas and it was just nuts. Officers were sent in with riot gear, claiming they were hit with rocks, bottles, eggs and pepper spray while trying to Separate the two crowds and now we're just hoping that we don't show up tomorrow with broken windows and stuff like that. Police clear the area overnight.

President Trump Johan Eggman Pacific Beach San Diego Todd
8 million people to get prepaid cards with stimulus money

WBZ Morning News

01:16 min | 9 months ago

8 million people to get prepaid cards with stimulus money

"Federal officials taking steps to make sure Americans don't mistakenly toss out their stimulus check. If it arrived by mail, direst says it's mailing eight million prepaid visa debit cards loaded with a federal stimulus payment, advising people to keep an eye open for the envelopes If the funds are not directly deposited in their bank accounts. The tax agency also says it's changed the envelopes to make it more evident that they include this $600 check It fellows what happened last spring, when some discarded their prepaid debit cards loaded with the first round of stimulus money because the envelopes were not clearly marked as coming from the I. R S or Treasury Department. The latest batch will be mailed in a white envelope with a label that displays the Treasury seal. Matt Piper CBS News in San Diego police in riot gear sent in to break up a violent confrontation between supporters of President Trump. Encounter protesters. Police report being pelted with everything from rocks to eggs as they tried to separate. The group's Johan England owns the breakfast Republic, a local eatery in downtown San Diego, throwing tear gas and Was just not and then says he kept his door's locked, and he's just hoping that he still has a business when he gets to reopen his doors later this

Matt Piper President Trump Treasury Department Cbs News Johan England San Diego Treasury
"johan" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

07:47 min | 11 months ago

"johan" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"I'm looking around me and there are no masks and site. The shops are open. People are walking in picking up items, putting them down and nothing seems to be quarantined because of this. I dare say it feels a lot like normal. Now, of course, things aren't completely normal in Sweden the country was hit by the pandemic as every country was, but it has been handled remarkably differently. Sitting across from me is author and historian Johan Norberg who's just published his most recent book open the story of human progress you thanks for joining me. This podcast is a little bit different for me because first of all, we're together in the same place, we're inside enjoying a coffee at a cafe. We're fairly socially distanced, but we haven't properly measured it and this circumstance in the UK at the moment would be illegal. We couldn't be doing this mixing between households indoors. So this is a very strange experience for me but you. Think you think thank you appreciate that. Take it slow you live in Sweden. So this isn't strange for you. You've been having coffees. This is how we lived the past six months so. To us the surprising thing is that the rest of the world has chosen a completely different path. It must be strange with the world is on Sweden in particular because you have been the outlier in the way that Sweden handle covid nineteen do you think there are any regrets? It is controversial in Sweden as well. But the first thing we've noticed is that we're. Caught the attention of everybody else, and that's always flattering for small country in a way but it's also always a little bit scary to be the odd man out. If you make a major mistake, you want to make the same mistake as everybody else rather than doing something differently even if that mistake is a grave mistake. Yes, and that is my conclusion so far it seems to be the conclusion on most Swedes as well. Trust in the public health authorities in the Swedish government has searched skyrocketed during the pandemic and. Was said all the time from Swedes during the first wave of the pandemic is that no countries gone escape this the only thing you can do delay cases and the transmission of disease in other places but at huge cost a huge cost to not just the economy but to society the societal fabric, mental health, domestic abuse, the cost of kids who miss out on school all those things, and that seems to be what we're seeing right now. Sweden, we continue to act normally, but you and everybody else is going back into lockdowns and we have no idea when an even what normal is for the rest of Europe, it does seem. To be going in that direction in the UK, we're getting new rule afternoon rule, much stricter measures coming in in France and Spain as well. But your top epidemiologists public health officials have said, we're not really going to know who got it right or wrong for years when it comes to cove nineteen, you've hinted at it there we will know much sooner the implications of lockdown what's happened to non Kobe patients what's happened to those children who weren't able to go to school potentially endorse a not very nice circumstances in their households. Do you think that in Sweden that's being recognized elsewhere seeing the devastation that's been wrought from going into lockdown? Absolutely I think that's The difference between Sweden and other places I think that. Sweden and our authorities stuck to the script basically when most at least liberal democracies war game day pandemic. The Swedish version. The Swedish model was what everybody or at least most experts and politicians agreed upon because they saw the long term consequences. The alternative costs are going down into drastic radical lockdowns. The thing that changed was all the other countries suddenly lost faith in what they had thought about when they took a sort of cold calculation of costs and benefits long-term. And when everybody else thought it to change their minds and and this is something that we've seen when we look at when and how and why did countries going to lockdowns it wasn't based on any cost benefit analysis. It wasn't dependent on the state of their health care at that point in time all the transmission it was based on what the neighbors do. So it was really just herd mentality in a way and I think, and when I listened to specifically health authorities in another countries, they begin to regret this. Now, they're beginning to see the cost, the other costs to people who didn't get covert but lost out you lockdowns it was thought at. The start of the virus in the UK that the UK might go the same way of Sweden and then as you say that that changed rather dramatically of course, your neighbors Denmark who I believe you're threatening to lock you out again would point to Sweden's higher death rate when it comes to cope in nineteen and say, well, on that metric, it's completely failed. So do you think Sweden's been more honest about the very difficult trade offs that have to be made or do you think that they're still optimistic that at the end of all this even on the death rate? Sweden look quite decent compared to other countries I. Think Sweden has been a bit more. Honest about the trade offs we know that there are costs associated with any choice we make and to some extent we're all flying blind here, but everybody else got. So completely focused on covy nineteen and then the immediate costs and cases and deaths for obvious reasons. But then they just assumed away everything that's going to happen long-term. When it comes to The Swedish analysis of so what is the cost I think that one difference was that a country like Britain got so scared by some early modeling based on? Also so many unknowns that it was almost completely useless that just seeing that printed in newspapers in T. the TV and radio it was just so scared that you had to show that you did something `bout, we had the same kind of models in Sweden as well. Saying that we face ninety thousand, one, hundred, thousand deaths by now if we didn't go into the same kind of lockdown as Britain did and that was off by some almost ninety five, thousand deaths in Sweden. So it tells you that we're all guessing to some extent, but you're guessing perhaps you should add hurt we. A more rational version of the precautionary principle. The one thing we do know is that it's associated terrible health and social costs to people to to shutdown societies enforce people stay at home and not going to school and not being able to go to work and associate. Do you know if there's been any collapse in the health care that's been delivered to non Cova patients in Sweden we had lots of voluntary social distancing in Sweden when you look at mobility data. For, March April may it was fairly similar to? Northern countries. But on a voluntary basis, people stayed at home and they didn't go to cafes like this for for a very long time and they didn't go to hospitals because they didn't want to catch Kobe nineteen for example but what happened then was that our authorities really recommended people. Don't stay away from hospitals. If you need care if you need attention, you should go we have the capacity and that's better intensive called some benefits than than staying home.

Sweden lockdowns UK Johan Norberg Britain Kobe Europe Swedish government Cova France Spain Denmark
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 1 year ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
MLB Playoffs Preview

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

04:18 min | 1 year ago

MLB Playoffs Preview

"Okay. Let's get to the American theories start today obviously the headliner is the the series I'm going to be lucky enough to do starting at seven o'clock. Tonight we've got the Indians playing host to the Yankees you got Shane Bieber Garrett Cole a good old fashioned. Of Two aces one guy you know the best pitcher on the planet two years ago versus Shane Bieber's the best pitcher on the planet this year, what are you expecting in this series? Yeah. Mean this is going to be one of the best games of the entire postseason. I suspect you know what an unbelievable matchup shame bieber won. The MLB pitching triple crown wins the are strikeouts I gotta do that since Johan Santana and two, thousand six, and he not even be the most dominant picture in this game was Garrett Cole is pretty good. I looked up any postseason series game would match up and I might have missed one but the last. Game. One. Battle with a lower co by the area that I found was two thousand fourteen Clayton Kershaw as eerie won the MVP versus Adam wainwright who had a two three yards that year. So there's been some great ones we had Sherzer Colin game the world series last year, but this is just Terrific game one matchup for me the key thing in this series, and in this game, tonight is going to be how clean they play and I gotta say having watched the Yankees a lot this year they have not performed well on defense I was looking at defensive runs saved and there's no perfect measure of defensive play but the Indians were tied for second best in the regular season defensive run save they have an excellent defensive team Garrett Cole was talking about yesterday how the the Indians don't make mistakes in on the other hand. The Yankee seem to make a lot of mistakes the key guy for me in this series, labor. Taurus who has not had a good season he is not played well, defensively what about for you just some other factor that's jumping out of you. Yeah. I wasn't good point on the defense I watch Erin Moods game session the other day Friday or Saturday they made a bunch of airs and the look on his face was just discussed. Because that's been a problem on your ankles. Yeah. Obviously, it's the Cleveland offense. Are they going to be able to generate enough runs and I'm intrigued because yet they had one of the lower homerun rates in the majors. The Yankees allow the most home runs of any playoff team. You Know Garrett call had some of those homerun issues you know in the middle of the season not so much as last couple starts, but the Yankees do give up run so. That's to me. CLEVELAND'S GONNA have to figure out a way to knock it few the fence Jose Ramirez of course has been red hot Carlos Santana, great regular season, but he's heated up a little bit the last couple of weeks. So that's the key can Cleveland hit any home runs off the New York pitching and can the Yankees hit on the road the numbers the road splits for the Yankees this year are shocking. Great. Point. In fact, we had a note saying Sam. Millard this one of the twenty largest home roads blitz I. Forget how far he went back. This was history X. number of years but the twenty largest. Were Colorado Rockies, teams, and the other was the two thousand twenty so that yeah. Huge toll roads blitz this year. The. White Sox and Oakland Plankton a Lucas G Lido the obvious pick for the white sox start in Oakland Hey seuss Lazaro gets the start the young left-hander for the Oakland athletics we had serling the podcast yesterday and she mentioned the white sox fourteen in our game started by left-handers Lazardo left-hander. So I was a little bit surprised but maybe that's kind of where Oakland is with their rotation right now. Now, they don't have a clear number one I was surprised because Lazaros last appearance was actually in relief so I thought they might use them out of the end. This could be kind of a bullpen series for Bob Melvin right buster they had the lowest era In relief many team you know really deep bullpen saw even the Lazardo starting I would not expect him to go deep into this game maybe even just one time through the rotation.

Yankees Shane Bieber Garrett Cole Cleveland Shane Bieber White Sox Oakland Johan Santana Bieber Garrett Cole Clayton Kershaw Adam Wainwright Bob Melvin MLB Carlos Santana Lazaro Lucas G Lido Sherzer Colin Millard MVP
Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

The Academic Minute

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

"Today on the academic minute Johan Neem professor in the Department of History at western Washington University discusses three men vocabularies and why the least dominant could be the most important. My research argues that our debates over higher education have three better vocabularies, the utilitarian, the pragmatic and the virtue ethical. The first two are dominant especially among citizens and policymakers too utilitarian colleges must satisfy the preference of higher education's consumers to pragmatists including many elected leaders. Institutions must consistently evolve to meet the changing needs of society and the economy. To Virtue. At this on the other hand, colleges have internal goods of their own such as the cultivation of knowledge and curiosity about the world and these internal birds require practices to sustain them including, valuing basic over applied research and teaching. To virtual emphasis, colleges must change the world rather than just adapt to fit it. That's how university is structured and what faculty members and students do while in college shaped the ultimate educational and scholarly outcomes. Many of today's most popular form seek to make higher education faster cheaper standardized but threatened the kinds of academic practices that cultivate intellectual virtues. By understanding these Meta vocabularies, we can make sense of the ways in which participants in the public conversation around higher education talk past each other. We can recover a shared language for Liberal Education I. Hope my research will help college students, their parents, voters, and policymakers. Makers understand the different perspectives that we can use to think about the purposes of college. Ultimately, in my research I wanted to understand why professors like me are uncomfortable with reforms that to many others seem to make common sense. By identifying these Meta vocabularies. I was able to see what was at stake for all who care about higher education's future that was Johann name of western Washington University.

Western Washington University Johan Neem Professor Johann Department Of History
COVID-19: What did Sweden do differently?

The World

05:03 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19: What did Sweden do differently?

"Sweden has been the country that a lot of people have loved to hate during the pandemic. It's no lock down strategy was seen as naive and cruel by some. But the World Health Organization has praised Sweden's results. A few weeks ago, Sweden did massive testing and found a record low infection rate. But now rates are creeping up, and Stockholm is considering further measures to contain the virus. Dr. Johan Jessica is a Swedish physician and professor at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. I asked him if he was concerned about the rise in Corona virus cases. I don't think we should look at it at all. It may be a statistical circuit race, and it's going up and down. It was up a couple of months ago and then down again, So I think we should wait to make any judgment on that. But I mean, you are seeing an increase now. Yeah, there is an increase on people are concerned about Yes. So if cases continue to rise in Sweden at what point would you advise Sweden to strengthen its measures? Like what kind of increase would you need to see before pushing for that? I couldn't say, but it's not the time yet anyway, you know that Sweden has come in for some really tough criticism for its no lock down policy. It's something that Swedish officials and professionals have been saying the rest of the world just doesn't understand. Help us understand the situation in Sweden. Well, we've had a look down. I call it a soft look down and build some voluntary participation by the people. But if you tell people how this disease transmits, and what's the things you should avoid. People will listen to you. People are so stupid. You talked about a soft lock down. Explain what that actually is. It is. For example, As soon as you feel the slightest cold, you trance state and I will not go to work. Work at home. As much as you can avoid crowded places. There are a few legal restrictions a crowd conflict begin their 50 people, for example, on bus drivers are allowed to deny entrance in their buses. If there are too many people in there, so there are a few but mostly bills on military participation. When it comes to the practical advice for the Swedish population. Is the government urging people to maintain social distancing wear masks, masks, not wear masks. Is that not been one of the things that the government's pushing for? Because there's no science to prove that they work. And yet we hear from experts all over the world that there are plenty of reasons and scientific ones to wear masks. But that's the way I've seen here. Sweden has reported nearly 5900 deaths since the start of the pandemic. That's more per capita than both Denmark and Norway. So at this point of pandemic, what do you think explains the difference. I think we'd have a much bigger seeding of cases in Ah, late February and early March. Then our neighbor countries that we started at a much higher number of infected people than they did. Dr. Jessica You played a key role in coming up with Sweden's response of the current virus. What do you know? Now that you didn't know six months ago about the best way to contain this virus? It spreads more in clusters and influence a dozen ransom moves like a wave over the population. But this is his jumps from a group of people to a new group of people. And that wasn't clear six months ago, and that makes, for example, contact race and becomes much more important with a cluster disease like overhead. And how has it reoriented your approach to containing the Corona virus in in Sweden? Contact tracing is now very important, rigorously in all parts of the country, falling off context, testing them. So that had become more important now than it would have been your influence season. So if you believe it sounds like you do firmly that the Swedish approach is largely working, how come other countries have not adopted it, especially other Nordic countries? The problem was much smaller in their country when it all started on DH. There are political reasons will, but I won't go into that. That's one thing. I would say that it's far too early to compare countries to countries Now we have the beginning of this. This would be going on for a long time. And I think we should wait at least a year before we draw any conclusions or what Which strategy worked on which did not looking back right now, in September of 2020 is there anything that Sweden should have done differently at the start of the pandemic? We should have been better at protecting the old and afraid that was the mainstay of the strategy. But it didn't really work actually, for a number of reasons, and why not? We weren't really prepared, I would say. But wasn't that kind of like one of the first headlines about the Corona virus that it's you know people with co morbidity, ease and and the elderly who will be most affected? Yes, but it takes some time to get a ll the equipment on the training And you don't know that from one day to the next, So we were late. I think they're what about Swedes? What's been kind of the Swedish attitude about this approach to containing the Corona virus. Has anybody protested? Oh, yes. Oh, yes. I have been quite a number of people who say that this is wrong. But this is a democracy. People loved their own use. But maybe listen countries and we have no time the U. S reaction that this is against the Constitution. That reaction hasn't been here at all.

Sweden Stockholm World Health Organization Dr. Johan Jessica Karolinska Institute Dr. Jessica You Professor Denmark Norway
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"That's going to be also a new wave of writers who are. In great shape and obviously have more freshness than the guys who finished through the front. So. It'll be interesting to see what's going to happen in the world championship. So We will be covering that. We're we're making some adjustments for this super unusual fall season where. the remaining grand tours of lap with what are normally spring classic. So I, think we're GONNA be doing. Weekly check, ins, that include Johan and you're going to do one or two weekly check ins with Victor Hugo pain on La Vida correct in Spanish I just spoke with victory will so in Spanish were going to do Lama Vida for the big doers for the ground tours for the euro on the we're GONNA at least do one when podcast midweek another one the weekend. So that say six book Casper, Ground Tour, and will also cover all the classics in Spanish. So I'm really excited to keep that going. Excellent. All right. We're going to wrap this up and I. You know I just WanNa take a second to thank everyone for tuning in I mean there are. Thousands, of places to get your information on on the Tour de France, and so people taking time to spend it with us every single day for forty minutes or whatever is greatly appreciated and yawn. I just want to thank you for all of your hard work and inside I know you're on the phone and texting and communicating with people all over and getting all this inside information and it's I learn something every single day I know our listeners do too. So I, just wanted to thank you as well. Well, it's been a pleasure and as always to be with working with you with it goes very smoothly. You're You're an ideal co hosts and. Yeah I mean I can't wait to. Be Back with you for for auto races. All right. Thank you and we'll talk after World Championships House. Okay. Sounds like a plan. Thanks everybody..

Lama Vida World Championships House Victor Hugo Johan
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"A as a note, new professional with a certain pedigree and and so yeah, I mean twenty that. kind of makes sense. Good for him. Incredible. Twenty Times more than she was supposed to. That's that's a pretty that's a pretty good race. It's a lot for these young writers to handle it is it is I mean that's the that's one of the things you know that we often underestimate you know I mean and not just in cycling because in cycling finally ultimately, you know this compared to you at do other sports. There, there's not that much money involved compared to any other high level elite sports, right? But. It's still I mean it is difficult to manage as young writer You know all of a sudden. You know you're famous you get money you know you're popular. it's not easy to keep your feet on the ground i. mean now let's I'm often it's easy to say you know they should be you know there should be more grounded but you know let's just think back and all of us when we were twenty or twenty one, you know I mean just just just put yourself in that position. If I had money at twenty one I'd be dead you're. Good thing you didn't have much money then because you're still around so. Yeah. Okay a great great show. Johan thank you so much. Enjoy your day off. I really get mountain bike with the kids re we will be good. Good good good and we'll be back on Tuesday. Okay. Thank you speak on Tuesday..

writer Johan
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"I'm Jay behavior joined by Johan Bruyneel and Johann you called you said. Yesterday that the the the race begins on stage fifteen and you are absolutely right. I mean it is. It is on an an shaken up by the way But yeah, what an incredible stage finish we had today we'll get into more details of that but Wow. we don't know what this podiums, GonNa look like we've thought up until today was going to be probably rogue. Lich and then pogue hr a bernal in either order. Yeah. Not Anymore not anymore now than you more you know and As. I said you know this was the first real mountain stage at the you know in the in the in the bigger mountains, the longer mountains and you know Contradictory to what we could expect Bernal as you know more more known is a climber for these type of climbs. Now. He's defending champion of the Tour de France. today we saw that you know whatever signs we had seen of certain little little details of weakness and Gumbo. Now, in the first two weeks they were they were true. They were true and they were you know today he actually. Paid the price to try to keep up with the you know the writers who are in my opinion on little bit higher level and you know. Himself Anti mini also were kind of trying to minimize these kind of little little weaknesses, which is what you're. You're supposed to do you know you're trying to? keep up your game and and so yeah, that's what they did. But today there was no more hiding you know today but now. fell through the ICE A as we say over here I don't know if you say if you say that in English our. We don't use that expression but. Just I'm just making up a a new saying by literally literally translating he fell through the ice. But the I'm sure that everybody understands what I mean are so so yeah, I mean he he obviously has been for two weeks trying to keep up and basically you're riding a little bit above the level these actually at right now pure pure on his on his class on the island and and today you know on these long climbs. He just doesn't have it. You know and it was it was remarkable to see that now fell through when The race amongst the big guys wasn't go on yet. So he afterwards, he declared that he was on the limited already since the first climb. So we we didn't see that but you know I'm pretty sure that the riders in the Palatal on the writers are around him cdot little details that on TV of course, we didn't see but if you're writing next to someone. You don't just see but you also hear you hear how they agree. You know you look how they are they little little things that you know about your rivals. That that only the riders the competitors know about each other, right? So I think it was remarkable to see that the especially. Bernal. was having trouble when Jimbo vs MA which no. Once again, an amazing race not gonNA say strategically it's pretty straightforward there so strong. That they don't read they don't really strategically they just but one of the other after the other. a little bit like demon. AOL's was doing in the past you know. So they basically took over and are producing the same scenario. but this this time in. Is the victim of that strategy and and so when art was pulling on on the last climb on where everything was supposed to be separated all of a sudden and you don't do too many people surprise we saw a number now coming off the back in from there on it was it was really painful to see us could. You could see he was struggling he was fighting with the by he didn't look like he found the good position, his face was criminalizing. All the time and he had through teammates with him and those debates I mean already when he when he when he got in trouble, he only had two teammates with him, which is not not which is not what we're used to see new used to see teaming ails. Driving it setting the tempo in the climb with five or six guys and one by one they peel off after they've done their job. Now here they are on the receiving end they are. Following or trying to follow the strategies and the efforts of the rest, and you only had two with him do teammates that are not specifically known to be. You know the best climbers that riders don't get me wrong. But you know they're not super super climbers was Creek Golf Ski and Gusto Vehicle. and so they stayed with Banal and even you could see when once Bernal was dropped. of course, he was on the limit all the time, and finally he had to go but mentally. He was all all of a sudden. He was done. You could see his demeanor, his head went down. He was struggling on the bike and plus he had to constantly call or give instructions to ski who was setting a temple for him to you know to slow down. which was, which is painful to see you know for the defending champion of the tour De. France. That was that was quite a shock. Yeah, it was we kept thinking he was just going to get stronger as the tour progressed. No yeah what. Do you think. Thomas. Or calling each other. Right now,.

Bernal Creek Golf Ski Johan Bruyneel pogue Jay ICE France Thomas AOL MA Jimbo Gusto Vehicle.
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Christian dancer question for the probably do these really good pure sprinters they. They're not interested in being an all around her or making that transition. It's not what they do know I mean they're not interested but you could say, okay, you know they need to improve in order to get over climbs. So. Usually. That goes at the expense of of pure power. So if you know as a sprinter that few stages in the Tour de France that are really within your reach and you can make it to the finish I, mean this sprinter I mean, if you know, you're the fastest. Than this, you know you know that you're one of the three or four foster's writers and your biggest goal is make it to sprint. You know so that saved from start 'til from the start till. The last kilometer. That's basically your huge. And then finally you need to, you need to be there and be able to. Bring out that extreme explosion which which you know I think the best. The best example is a guy like Caleb you and you know that's the pure pure sprinter. But but yeah, I mean it's a trade off you know they. They can say, okay, we can try to improve a little bit but then You know. We're not going to be that that that have that last percent of extreme explosive power. Have another question. This is a pretty funny observation and I I did. I can't pronounce their screen name it's not their name. so forgive me but it says this, why don't the riders get their package food pre opened often you see them fumbling and accidentally dropping food trying just to open it. Okay. Open to, how would you do that? How normally in you know you get you get. Feedback, right. So you get a bang and there's all kinds of different things in there's there's there's two bottles and they're to do full water bottles. Then there's some gels. So obviously you have. First of all, you have to get those gels. Out of that back. So if they are open, you're already gonNA. You'RE GONNA have half of the GEL radio on your hands. It's sticky. You know. If you have, for example, if you have a piece of. Rice cake or something you know the thing the first thing is they have to get it out of the back and put it in their pockets. Once again, this is this is this is the. Way Cycling Goes I mean you get food but the race keeps going right and sometimes it's extremely fast in the feed zone. So you know you know that when you when you when you're there, you have your guy standing there you need to get that back no matter how fast it goes right so if it's opened already, then you basically have to wait until it's a bit slower until you you have to keep riding with the bag on your back, which is very uncomfortable. So no I mean, that's yeah. It doesn't work like that you would be you would have food over and then on top of that, you know you don't eat everything. Straight away you put it in your pocket and you eat bit by bit. So it's open you have your Jersey back pockets. Of Philip gels and cakes and stuff like that. So it's it's it's not possible to reopen that. Okay. I thought it was a fun question this. I mean. It you know. It could be if they take it easy and they decide the altogether. Okay. Here's Here's the feed zone. Let's have lunch break. Yeah. If you have questions or comments for Johann please send those in the move at we do dot team. And look for dramatic finish tomorrow before the arrestee. Thank you so much. Johan we appreciate it. Thank you. And hope to speak to everybody tomorrow..

sprint Caleb Johan Philip
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
Alarm over Philippines drug-related killings in Manila during COVID-19

BBC Newshour

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Alarm over Philippines drug-related killings in Manila during COVID-19

"Turn to the Philippines now because there's alarm over a recent spate of summary executions in a suburb of the capital city, Manila Since the start of 2020 they've bean 11 drug related killings in pin Johan all taking place during the covert pandemic. The murders by Moss Come incomers President Duterte continues to wage his four year old war on drugs. Under which thousands of users and dealers have been killed during police operations. Human rights groups believe the death toll could be more than 20,000, with many of the deaths carried out by masked assailants, sometimes working on behalf of the police. The police denies that they say any killings were in self defense

President Duterte Manila Philippines Johan Moss
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"I personally think that the Jimbo vs should sh from now on they should have done it already after his after winning two stages they should set well. We're super super satisfied with you. He's super satisfied with himself course and we can all. We can all agree that he's that you're the best writer in the world right now you don't need to show it anymore we need you one hundred percent. As fully recovered as possible after every stage and. If I can call it the constructive criticism for Jimbo visa. That I would like to say if they're listening or if somebody's listening, please do not let Walter not get involved in the sprints anymore. He doesn't need it. The Belgians are happy. We're with two stage wins and. if if you movies wants to have. The full power of of the world, the helper. They have to do it differently. Today's episode of the move which features. What I consider to be. One of the brightest minds, the sports cycling has ever known my dear friend Johan Bruyneel this show presented you by ordering another talking about brilliant. This device is is far and away the most accurate. Tracker Health Tracker Recovery Tracker that I've ever come across so many data points when it comes to analysing your sleep when it comes to respiratory rate when it comes to core temp, this is really been the thing that's I think separated or up from the field. at a time of a global pandemic, we all know that the body temp in court temp is a key indicator of the onset of any illness particularly Cova. they've just launched a partnership because of that with the NBA and the w NBA what I do every morning just obviously I sleep with my rang I opened my APP downloads. It shows me all my dad from the night whether the heart rate heart rate variability, sleep stages, movement body Tim. Etc etc. You can also just open your browser log into your account and it's actually They do a hell of a job over there. On the on the laptop as well are the desktop or whatever you're using it home. So head on over to or ring com and join US sinister data. Sleeping. Night. Night. Welcome back to the move podcast stage eleven of the two thousand Twenty Tour de France I'm Jay be hager joined by former racer and thirteen time grand tour winner as a director Johan Bruyneel to take a look at what we saw today which. Had some action at the at the end of this stage of stage eleven and looking ahead to tomorrow as to what we can expect especially with juicy and team tactics how you doing, Johan I'm doing well doing well, you know it was pretty uneventful stage I would say the whole day as expected a bit boring but. The last thirty seconds. Made up for the afternoon I think. It is it's exciting. You know I I have to remind myself sometimes the you know sometimes the Best Basketball Games you know all the action is in the last minute. Yeah. Cycling happens that way a lot too, and it's worth it. We'll get to that. It's hiding sprint in a minute but let's let's go back to early in the stage of how it developed in how a couple teams were controlling the pace. Yes. Well, we we knew it was it was basically flat. The hall pilot on as usual assumes in these are things that they're not just assuming. It's cycling is the appropriate on a such a small tight world where there's a lot of interaction between cyclists of different teams because some of them are ex-teammates some of them live together in the same area and training mates even if they're on different teams. So usually what's going to happen in a stage like this it's a flat stage, the they're going to go to. One writer a a guy who writes for the quickstep or an and a guy who rides for shuttle and then say, Hey What's what are you guys going to do today and then these guys are going to say this and it's no secret we are going to ride for a bunch sprint. There's no know there's no, there's no other way. So, let's say the whole Peleton knows this because these rumors go around and everybody can they can kind of guests At the end of the day, this is what lots of doll is there. For example, that that's their only goal right now right to have bunch sprints whenever they can. So that's exactly what happened. We had one guy that will break away A. It was the guy knew was not going to go anywhere a guy from Groupama, Francaise do. French guy. You know he got his time on TV and then you know but around the around half of the stage you've got real in. By then the Kooning quickstep and local shuttle doll as expected were setting the pace. And you know from then on it's I mean. Basically from the beginning on. As soon as the breakaway is gone, it is supposed to be a really relaxed stage for the big majority of the Peleton especially for the the DC contenders and their teams. And that's how it how it worked out except of course a few. Few incidents there's always a few incidents in in a station here. while the first, the first incident or event was the intermediate sprints for the points in the green. Jersey. So we saw again Bennett getting the upper hand from Peter Again, a the sprints, the those points are. they're necessary for people who go for the Green Jersey. They're not determining no because the difference between first and second or. Third in this case, they're not so pick. and. Then the only other things that happened were basically, you could see that at the end of the stage slow forty kilometers.

Johan Bruyneel Jimbo writer NBA US Walter Green Jersey Peleton Bennett Kooning Groupama Peter Again Cova. director Jay hager
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"And I personally expect. From from the information I have. And the crash of the dossier in grimace rich and his abandoned. A out of precaution but also you know not being able to train for a whole week and have to treat that. Injury which apparently was big big injury on on his leg so. This is a really good Primos rob which I think is still going to get better which is not good news for the for the rivals. Welcome back to the move podcast. I'm Jay behavior joining me as Johan Bruyneel this is the supplemental show. If you WANNA call that to some people, it's the more popular show that we do covering Tour de France and some other grand tours. Mainly getting the inside of Johan Bruyneel has thirteen victories as a director in a grand tour. Doing Johan I'm good. Everything's good over here in Madrid Spain Jabe. Doing. Good. It feels like we've had two weeks of racing in. It's only stage for before we get your your thoughts on what you saw today in what you're going to predict for tomorrow. We have a couple of messages from our friends and sponsors. Here's Lance. Today's episode of the move is presented by or a ring. What device to me? This is the most advanced. Health and wellness tracker. I'm just GONNA, call it that on the market gives me three key scores, the reading, the score, the sleep score, and my activities score. It is the most accurate sleep tracking device on the market. But as they used to say in the GINSU.

Johan Bruyneel Madrid Spain Jabe Jay director
Are There Zombie Viruses  Like The 1918 Flu  Thawing In The Permafrost?

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 1 year ago

Are There Zombie Viruses Like The 1918 Flu Thawing In The Permafrost?

"Now we take you to the top of the world to the Northern Coast of Alaska where a cliff is crumbling and exposing ancient hunting site. There's another head back there. GonNa head right here head right their main body right here. Across the Arctic these prehistoric settlements are being unearthed. And the reason why is climate change as NPR's Mike Lean do cliff reports? Scientists are worried about something that could be lurking inside. These settlements Zombie pathogens up on top of an ocean. Bluff team of archaeologists is trying to pull off an emergency excavation. Here we have ribs and vertebrae other long bones. That's Dominique Tulu. Student helping to dig out hunting cabin. He's found a stash of animal bones at the other end of the house. Glenis on shows me where someone was storing fresh. Kills so this. Is this skin right here? At my feet are mummified seal. These seals are incredibly well preserved. You can see their skin their whiskers and this odsal paw. Oh Paul everywhere they dig. There's another surprise owing us. This is ridiculous. That's an Jensen the archaeologist leading the team they're out of coastal site near Ukiah that the town wants known as Barrow. They're rushing to save a piece of history before it falls into the ocean the cliff where the cabin is buried is going breaking apart because of climate change bird bird after bird after bird stack up in their skin. There there is the whole boy. Things are getting super stinky. The birds are thawing in rotting. That's right when students hands covered in black king bird flesh. Oh yeah hands. Oh my gosh. Oh now Johnson starts worrying about something. We can't see even flu virus. Oh norovirus yes. The team realizes there could be bird-flu hidden in these carcasses. You he all across the. Arctic climate change is causing the ground to warm soften like butter and there are a lot of things buried this ground. Not just animals but also their diseases tinkering take a rank colleen. You're GONNA drive yourself seriously. You need a break cooling. The major as a student she puts on gloves. Yeah you should probably do that hand. Because I mean a lot. Dunkin you at this point. In the excavation something even crappier happens. A human molar appears really human tooth. Now the site rat isn't a burial ground. There shouldn't be bodies right here but the two does make them pause because it reminds them that there aren't just animal diseases buried in the Arctic but also possibly human diseases. There are tens of thousands of bodies hidden in the Arctic permafrost. Jensen knows this better than anyone. I've gone a lot of burials. Yeah I've probably Doug as many variables was anybody. Some of the people buried up here. They died of smallpox others from the nineteen eighteen flu. Have you ever seen human remains like as well preserved as this seal? Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah well the little the little frozen girl from rookie. Avic ARE NYACK. Yes she was. She was actually much better preserved than the seal. The little girl was just six years old. She was carefully wrapped in duct skin. Parka WITH A FUR-TRIMMED. She had this little sled with her. She died about eight hundred years ago. Water in around her burial I think and she was socialist. Basically encased in ice. We're able to take her out in a block of ice. Her body was so well preserved that Jensen shipped her to anchorage so doctors could do a full autopsy. One of those doctors was Michael's Zimmerman a paleobiologist at the University of Pennsylvania. I've done the number studies on frozen bodies in Alaska and when you open them up the organs role there and they're easily identified. It's not at all like Egyptian mummies where everything is shrunken and dried up. So it's easy to see what a person died up for the little frozen girl. It was starvation. But Zimmerman has seen infections embodies excavated from permafrost in one case a mummy from the Aleutian Islands. Looked like it had died of pneumonia and when he looked for the bacteria inside the body there they were frozen in time. We can see them microscopically in the in the lungs. There's this fear out there that once human bodies are exposed by melting permafrost. The pathogens in them could come back to life like Zombie pathogens. It's not unheard of anthrax. Can do it. It happened just a few years ago. In Russia a massive reindeer burial ground thought in the anthrax that killed. The reindeer woke up and started an outbreak. Were these new moon. You bacteria still alive. Zimmerman tested it. He took a smidge tissue from the lungs warmed it up fed it and tried to revive it. Nothing grew not one single cell though. I was happy because I didn't have to worry about catching anything. Zimmerman says he wasn't surprised. Bacteria were dead. Anthrax is a special case. In general bacteria that make people can't survive deep-freeze we're dealing with the organisms. That are hundreds of years old at least of the stuff. I work out of their frozen for hundreds of years and I really don't think they're ready to come back to life. I asked him if the same is true for viruses. I think it's extremely unlikely we've never been able to Culture any living organisms out of these bodies in nineteen fifty one a pathologist from San Francisco. Johan Halton decided to test this out. He went up to a tiny town near nome Alaska in dug up the bodies of five people who had died of the nineteen eighteen flu a virus that killed at least fifty million people Holton told. Npr Two thousand four that he cut out tiny pieces of the people's lungs and try to grow the virus in the lab. I hope that I would be able to isolate living virus. And they couldn't they ours is dead. And in retrospect of course maybe that was a good thing a good thing. But here's the crazy part. Holton tried to capture the virus twice. He went back to Alaska when he was seventy two. In Russian. Scientists like Holton have intentionally tried to revive smallpox from bodies in their permafrost. They recovered pieces of the virus but couldn't get that to grow either so maybe when it comes to Zombie Diseases. It's not melting permafrost. Me Need to worry about but what scientists are doing in the lab mike do cluff NPR news.

Zimmerman Alaska Anthrax Arctic Jensen Holton Mike Lean FLU Dominique Tulu NPR Nyack Smallpox Ukiah Aleutian Islands Paul Colleen
Is Sweden right in its handling of COVID-19?

Between The Lines

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Sweden right in its handling of COVID-19?

"When most of Europe went into strict lockdown in much Sweden but the trend social distancing was recommended and large gatherings were banned but restaurants workplaces and junior schools and boarders. I stayed open in pursuit of what some people call herd immunity strategy. So how's it going? And what listens are there for Australia? Will Swedish Intellectual Johan? Norberg is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute and he's author of progress ten reasons to look forward to the future Johan welcome back to between the lines. Thank you great to be back now this week. The Australian Treasury Josh Freudenberg was asked if we would follow the Swedish example as we into the next stage of the vars response and he ruled it out and he said quote. Sweden has forty percent of Australia's population but Sydney tons the death right. The numbers speak for themselves. That's Josh Freudenberg. Our Prime Minister Scott Morrison waiting. He called Sweden's approach a death sentence. Johan what do you think well? I have to admit that compared to Australia. Sweden does not look like a success but in fact nothing looks like a success. Compared to Australia right now except for possibly New Zealand is in the same vicinity but every European country has suffered much much worse whether they've had entered lockdowns or more of a Swedish line and I think that's partly because we got the transmission Into our population at earlier in a more massive stage. It's more difficult to when we have all these land borders next to countries with millions and millions of people and of infected so. I don't think the comparison with Australia is. Is that relevant apart? From the fact that you also have to deal with it longtime when you get out of the lockdowns and when you begin to approach more of an open world again with will global travel then at least the World Health Organization says that Sweden might be a model to look to in any case and and and despite everything so far Sweden has been an outlier when it comes to policy but not when it comes to the outcomes sweetness somewhere in the middle when it comes to European states. Okay no matter how you add the numbers up. Sweden has more deaths than your Nordic neighbours. What do you expect to see in those countries as as Tonga's on that's true so far it looks worse in Sweden? But why is that well? The assumption from Swedish L. Authorities. Is that our neighbors. They have merely postponed cases and deaths. They have not avoided them. They went into lockdown. Which means that in the short run. It looks good but once they get out of it and they're starting to get out of it now. The the lockdowns on the shutdowns. They're bound to see a second wave of infections and deaths the thing to ask when you look at the Swedish model is at. Did we avoid to overwhelm our healthcare system Did those who suffer and died from covy. Nineteen would they have died in any case if they got this disease six months later or twelve months later? So did we avoid that kind of healthcare breakdown and it seems like we did that all the time. The intensive care units have had an excess capacities. Weeden by around twenty percent. So far so it seems like They they would have died from the disease whenever we got the disease into our population. And what I expect from our neighbors. Unfortunately that without a vaccine and that might be a year away and could take much longer. They won't be able to avoid it in the long run and they will suffer those consequences once they get out of lockdown.

Sweden Australia Treasury Josh Freudenberg Prime Minister Scott Morrison Johan Europe Norberg Cato Institute Tonga Weeden Senior Fellow Sydney World Health Organization New Zealand Covy
Löwenmensch: The First Monster

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:20 min | 1 year ago

Löwenmensch: The First Monster

"Back in twenty seventeen. We recorded an episode of stuff to believe my entitled the First Monster and again we ran it in this most recent October over but in the episode we discussed the lion man or the low in inch of which was this. This figure that resembled The was a a human with alliance head hybrid a hybrid being combining animal and human likeness into a single likeness. Yeah now this was This particular killer artifact the mench was discovered in nineteen thirty nine at a stone age cave site known as startled whole or stable cave at Holon Stein near Vogel heard in Germany but it would be another thirty years before anyone got a chance to examine these broken pieces of ivory due to the world wars but eventually thirty years later that's when German archaeologist Johan discovered that these two hundred fragments came together to form a thirty one centimeter centimeter or just over a foot long figure carbon fourteen dated to between thirty five and forty thousand years old. It had the body of a man in the head of the lion. In two thousand and three another lion man was discovered in southwestern Germany this was carbon dated to around the same time period and by by some estimates. Well you know first of all these are amazing just for no other reason. They're just they're just fascinating figures that they give some insight into what ancient people were doing what they were making but also seemed to be the oldest Examples of figurative art. We've seen the Venus of whole fells. Take the title before I think Is from thirty. Five thousand to forty thousand years ago discovered in two thousand eight and two thousand sixteen but while the the Venus is the the depiction of the Feminine Forum and the Law and minch is a human fused with the beast. Yeah and this is what we were drawing attention to the episode. The idea that this is the earliest. I example that we knew about of fantasy art. It is an imagined being yeah as stated by Clive Gamble and archaeologist at the University of Southampton UK UK is quoted in nature quote. They depict an animal world in a semi realistic way. It shows early man moving from his immediate world to an imaginative world. So let's just a brief breakdown of the Lowe and minch certainly go back and listen to that episode that we did if you want more on that topic. But here's the cool thing and in a imagine number of you caught this news already because it was covered a number of places they I even saw it featured on Stephen Colbert show but in December of two thousand nine hundred ninety eight new discovery every was made and it might just blow the lion man and Venus out of the water. This is so cool. Yeah so this story takes us to different. Corners of the world takes us to Sulawesi SC Indonesia one of the four greater sooner islands. And it's actually the world's eleventh largest island I read so we've known about Pleistocene settlements in the the area for quite some time in early Homo sapiens are known to have reached this area between sixty thousand forty five thousand years ago previous studies these from some of the the same archaeologist involved in in this particular fine which is the arch team out of Australia They've revealed prehistoric art and ornaments events. Dating Back Thirty thousand to twenty two thousand years ago in this area and Homo sapiens apparently made it here against some time prior to fifty thousand years ago. So here's how this new finding came about in two thousand seventeen spelunker named Ham Rula climbed into a previously uncharted chamber in Sulawesi. Let's see cave system known as Morose punk cap a limestone cave system in while he was performing a government survey of the case. And if you're wondering ring was Amrullah. His first name last name. Apparently a lot of people in Indonesia just go by one name yet. It's just Just the one name anyway. He he gets. He crawls through a narrow space into at this New Chamber and he discovers cave paintings in the cave paintings were subsequently examined and written about by Aubert at all in earliest hunting scene in prehistoric historic art published December twenty nineteen in nature and again. This is the same arch team out of Australia. Those involved in some previous studies in the area so as the title implies they used some dating technology uranium series dating on Cave Popcorn or mineral deposits that It hanging over some of the motifs in the scene and they were able to date this hunting seeing back to at least forty three thousand nine hundred years ago so that it is twenty thousand years older than the hunting scene on the walls of Francis Lescoe cavs and coming back to the low and mench. That's also four thousand years before the lion man and I realized we're talking about such kind of ironic that we're talking about such big periods of time and there's a large portions of human history that it can also make four thousand years not seem like a lot right which is which is bizarre but obviously four thousand years is a lot of time and to to set the record back. Four thousand years is amazing. So here's an important caveat though there's more work to do as they need to date not just the the work overall looking at the cave popcorn but each figure individually before we can be one hundred percent certain in all of this because there's ultimately the possibility that different portions Sion's of it have been added at different times. Yes now the main archaeologists requoted thing they don't think that's the case but yeah we certainly should date the different parts. I think the the parts that had been that have been dated so far are just the regular animals but the more interesting part. Let's get into that. So yes the overall it depicts what seemed to be individuals using spears against prey animals in a hunt and this would be an on its own with being amazing fine right it would. It would predate any hunting scene gene. We've seen before. But on top of this some of the hunters appear to be what the researchers refer to is theory th- ropes or animal human hybrids as much like the low and Mitch. Yeah some of the humans appear to have tales or snouts right so if this is correct if the Now again and the parts that have been dated already were overlapping. Just the animals that were being hunted buffalo type creatures and pigs. Yeah wild pigs and then a type of buffalo called an no which is also known as a midget buffalo so like a water buffalo except smaller okay And so I think they haven't dated the other figures like the the the theory and throw are the human animal hybrids Yet but it looks like they're probably from the same period we're just not certain about that. Yeah but but if so this would this would probably predate the low and mench making this the earliest evidence. We have of fantastical thinking of like magic thinking among among humans showing human animal hybrids like a human hunting buffalo with a bird's beak. Yeah very cool. Yeah and it's it's we get into it in that that episode about the first monster about what this means right like what what ultimately does it mean to have in your mind. A human with a beast's head on one hand it is imagining something that does not exist in the real world and but then on a deeper level it is taking what this means. What does a bird mean? What are the the ideas that that Just a mere symbol of a bird summons and our DEA two of a human being what happens when these This mix of symbols and meanings collide. What new ideas are born out of that collision absolutely so it? It basically shows that that people from this time period period of four thousand years earlier than we thought may have been dealing with this kind of complex thinking mashing up symbols ideas and concepts concepts even taking aching on a humanoid form. Becky Ferrara wrote an excellent piece on this for the New York Times and she points out in this that the researchers believe that these as may have been animal. Spirit helpers something that's commonly find his shamanistic beliefs so yeah there's a possibility that we're dealing with animism animism and shamanism

Germany Australia Holon Stein Sulawesi Sc Indonesia Stephen Colbert Indonesia New York Times Vogel New Chamber Johan Sulawesi Clive Gamble UK Becky Ferrara Ham Rula DEA Amrullah Francis Lescoe Lowe
"johan" Discussed on Lore

Lore

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"johan" Discussed on Lore

"World with the clean conscience but that's not how Johan handled it instead he sent a message to those involved in his conviction that while he is convinced Maria had been murdered he was not the killer it didn't matter though on February twenty third of one thousand nine hundred six he was led on the platform in Chicago where a noose was placed over his head after a few formalities in a moment with a priest the lever was pulled and the trap door Johan hoke was Mr I don't think there's any doubt about that he used core human needs the need for community companionship and love to lure in women and take advantage of them and the horrifying results speak for themselves during his interrogation with inspector George shippy Johann was said to have professed his reasoning behind all those crimes marriage was purely a business proposition he said when I found they had money I went after it he was what some historians have called a professional bigamist someone who made a career out of Marion as many women as possible in order to steal from them a report from the women's Rescue League in nineteen o five estimated that more than fifty thousand women had been victims of similar crimes up to that point Johan hoke as far as historians can gather was personally responsible for nearly sixty of them experts and authorities tried to warn people to way back in eighteen eighty four nearly a decade before Johann arrived in Chicago and began his murderous activity the Chicago Tribune ran a massive five column article that walked people through how this type of crime worked and how they could protect themselves against it the author of the article even placed fake marriage and it's in the very same paper and then studied nearly forty responses he received the results were eye opening because they showed just how quickly some people ignored common sense when it came to their own search for companionship and love everyone longs to find their special someone but not everyone is who they claim to be criminals like Johann hoque stepped in to take advantage of that Ni- but don't assume that this was a male only field between nineteen twenty and nineteen fifty four Art Nancy Hazel killed four of her husband's along with a handful of others who got in the way she did it for the insurance money and it earned her the nickname the black while Vera Renske was a Romanian woman convicted of killing thirty five husbands and lovers between nineteen twenty and nineteen thirty using Johanns's favourite murder weapon arsenic but the most famous female lonely hearts killer in American history might have also been the most local to Johann hoke Belga ns follow the same recipe for her own murderous ways she placed personal ads in local papers explaining that she was looking for a wealthy husband and invited anyone interested to come and speak with her many of those unwitting men would eventually disappear and bells bank accounts would grow a little more but here's the craziest part of Hurston Corey Belga ns was married in Chicago in eighteen eighty four and was still shown as living there on the US census in nineteen hundred which means that for a number of years I bell and Johann lived in the same town naturally that makes me wonder did either of them read the other person's ads if they did did they ever consider replying or was it far too easy for each of them to see through the lies that had been printed on the page perhaps the occasionally ran across the obituary of another mysterious death and nodded knowingly after all it takes a black heart to do the things that each of them dead and we'd like to believe those types of people are rare if history has taught us anything though it's that sometimes we get it wrong.

Johan
Inside Shenzhen Digital Economy With Johan Nylander

Digital Business Models

07:20 min | 2 years ago

Inside Shenzhen Digital Economy With Johan Nylander

"For today's session we are here on Nylander which China Correspondent Award winning author of Shenzhen a so great reading and join these joining us from on Congress to the end. It's pleasure to have you with us. Thank you so much for inviting. It's great to be on the show yeah absolutely and the of course a was an amazing greeting. Anyone strength understand what's happening right now. I think in China and why he's going to be so important for the global economy. I think it's a it's a master read. Let's that from your wardrobe to was what was actually because you you stopped. It boggles on on that. When you know we wouldn't have yet the superstars that we have today yeah well. I can explain why became suppressant in the city of when I moved with my family to Oklahoma eight years ago back then remember my new friend. Sid used to warn us about transcendent. Don't go there. It's dirty. It's a joke to pollute effects with tons dangerous. You Trust the border and steal your kidney lung cancer and I thought wow sounds ons exciting so assaulted tramping there on the North End. I realized that my friends among the it it will grow about the city but not real exciting things happening. They're just way more defend looks like when people in Hong Kong realized and and especially when it came to the text off times over the years and more more regularly when a student stories stories for international ups the technology seen in China under off to avail license. Mike is suited the epicenter of the world into specially hardware and integration between Audrey of all. I have to talk order about this are up. It's simple yet inches. Of course let's let's stretch it from from the end and I'm gonNA. I'M GONNA ask soccer creepy but he's with him and he's a Silicon Valley in travel now the Shenton he's a he's really becoming also important is actually be important that I would not say that supervise think if indicates sex developments of hardware-software associate more like older boats arresting that really clever people in Chanson really ten Aviv Tokyo of what I see that everybody's everybody's gaining from Mall grits slugger action then the second touch that's CPR abundant how some no tremendous advantages. They're really really really for the software software development. Is this development branding getting close strengthen chest send us is from sexually talk back and and I think when the grinches happening to takes this violent emergence with string stuff I'll translate them in the it off so I think both of them and if it's leverage yup absolutely and of course if a few get to the softer tower of this illegal violin I guess combining the hardware our of Johnson and the release of what you call the faster further diving. I think it can be rea- very our for combination but Shenton so far as being really about the hardware but them you'll see expected to logos the more and more in software at Breda network yet. I mean as we said a transcendent south China is famous for hardware comes from both sexual wrote that Munger factoring but then you have confidence that ten cents tencent is as no the world's biggest Jamie It's also the company behind as we shocked at a we shut off this you could say it's the apple APPS. It's one of the most interesting into companies the want right now and that's a hundred percent sub-strategic sues so you also have a trend in software wonder and a newborn expecting softer products coming up a show for America. Yep and in your experience as you've been covering quite some time Shinsen a wendy the the rise of of what we're reading things that make it up in some way you mean window You mean just sixty yeah more like Shinsen is a sea by also courses Benami like that something eh like an article was eastern yeah so the the story by the city's tremendously facet is also screwing. I mean the store's been told until the end forty two years ago it was it was nothing barry except from rice fee small fishing bitches today is up to twenty million people in some of the biggest technology companies on the parents. I don't happen because chance and was the first the first region but you could do to trade free more free in China was the first academic the experiments and it really kicks. I will factories and now eventually oh you stop jumps companies and it has been a gradual gradual. WanNa find interesting to to keep them. It's it's not that it's you know went through a stage and now it's a total of sanctions and keep on developing keeping in terms of economic stability exte- long eight percents a even more interesting the how how the comes casare becoming be new species

South China North End Jamie It Shenton Mike SID Oklahoma Shenzhen Congress Shinsen Hong Kong Barry America Johnson Audrey Tencent Breda Network
Trump promotes false video of Rep. Omar on Twitter

Red Eye Radio

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Trump promotes false video of Rep. Omar on Twitter

"President trump used Twitter to share an edited video made by conservative comedian that falsely accused congresswoman Johan Omar of dancing and partying last week on the eighteenth anniversary of the nine eleven terror attacks the inaccurate tweak with the video provoke new criticism of the president's misuse of the social platform and Twitter's management of false information I'm only

Twitter Congresswoman Johan Omar President Trump
Can 5G fix America's broadband problem?

The 3:59

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Can 5G fix America's broadband problem?

"You're tired of dealing with your cable company five jay could let let you cut ties with them for good. The next generation of wireless technology is coming out and it's rolling out across the world but it's already being touted as a possible replacement for traditional home broadband. The real question is will five j hold up to household use and how you gonna pay for it through the noise. That's the most important question now eli you've been playing around with five jay at home as a kind of replacement for johan broadband. What's your verdict it. I've been using an early version of sprints five g. network which isn't officially live in new york but you can find it in certain spots the right guys if they sell the devices all across the country but in certain areas as as they get ready to turn it on they already are testing it so you can hop onto that network in advancing where i live. There happens to be five g. and it works really well as home broadband <hes>. There's still a lot of things that need to be worked out. <hes> had some issues with xbox netflix on certain devices <hes> but <music> speeds were generally between one hundred to two hundred megabits per second which is on par with what a lot of people get at home. It's actually a little bit faster than the national average last year from i louisville's clo test <hes> so as far as playing games on xbox for streaming four k net flicks browsing the web all the things you use the internet for it was was perfectly fine the real question i think is going to be what would your daughter allowance bay. And how quickly are you going to ban through. That daughter allowed because i was reading a story this morning. You had a great faith drop on saint at about it and talking about streaming show info k for example suddenly you're burning through that daughter reasonably quickly and if you don't have the data cap to match shit doesn't matter what you spades are if you're burning through and then you get kind of type it on your spades. That's going to be why people get annoyed because i was watching a sixty

JAY Johan Broadband Louisville ELI New York Five G Two Hundred Megabits Five J Four K
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Dot com slash the move twenty five percents all right Johan. We're in the absolute final stretch here. Everything's Kinda set. We're all GonNa make it two pairs. You and I included mentally. We're GONNA make it to Paris and looking back on your original predictions before the show even started you started by saying Bernama was GONNA win. Then you started to change your opinion a little bit looking closely at guarant- aren't Thomas and as we head into the final day which shouldn't affect that that standing you actually picked number one number two yeah yeah it's true I mean Bernal Dad. Bernal was obviously it was clear he was on on really good form. <hes> and that's why initially I picked him over over Greg Thomas because grant didn't have a great lead up to the Tour de France with <hes> you know another good spring and then <hes> he got a little bit better and shaped into remedy but <hes> crashed into tour of Switzerland had to abandon <hes> so yeah I mean I did. I did change <hes> because I had second thoughts <hes> not so much not not so much about the potential of <hes> of Bernal but I thought that I had gone a little bit ahead of myself <hes> by by expecting so much from from this twenty two year old writer and so <hes> when when Lance and George orch got the opportunity to have a second big I changed from Bernal to Thomas but yeah now their first and second so I think <hes> in in any case <hes> it's it's a it was a good pick both of them <hes> but yeah what a riot whether ride again for teenagers right because this year they're losing Chris Room in the dauphinee which is the guy who already won four times and they are still first and second. It's this is unbelievable believable and if you look at the whole race in your nails I mean it's it's it's it's fair to say that they were not as strong as the other years there domestiques were. We're not so strong..

Bernal Dad Greg Thomas Johan Paris George orch Switzerland Chris Room writer Lance twenty two year
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Don't know how accurately this but if there's a chance that the descent of the Iran is wet and I have the chance to do this breaks you. You have to take the risk. You have to say okay well. If I have a flat I have a flat and that's that's it you know about going down with this breaks or not. Having this breaks in having to race against two or three guys who have this breaks that that makes a big difference big big difference Aluko have this breaks. I think tomorrow yeah worked well form today. Do you have a prediction for tomorrow. I know that's tough but prediction. I I think I always I would be surprised if the all although you don't know because they're so little strength left in the in the bunch that it's really difficult to to to control for a team the stage but you know you would have to say with with everything is at stake still that the winner comes from the favorites so I don't know man. It's <hes> team is not that that's hard but it's going to be after today was hard. They will have done the easier all. I don't know what I've seen today. If we go off today <hes> from all the favorites destroy the strongest climber was bitten also but now the moral there you go. I'm looking forward to tomorrow. Thank you yeah. I very much <hes> thank you. I'm sure appreciate it if you have questions or comments for Johan and obviously this shows helping tremendously if this sport isn't hard enough to understand then you have teams doing plan that doing things that don't make sense and it's completely confusing all of us but this really helps send in those questions and comments to the move we do dot team and of course Johan can explain all these dynamics to us. Thank you very much. Have a good day have a good day. You have a good afternoon and <hes> let's hope for spectacular stage tomorrow..

Johan Iran
"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"johan" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Okay Johan that was <hes> not too much of an exciting day but now we're at a point in the tour where we can <hes> look at some things that happened today and <hes> especially look into tomorrow going into the individual time trial the one and only in a short one at that but <hes> would love your thoughts on what you saw today especially one of the biggest breakaway groups we've ever seen in the tour yeah yeah well. I mean I I. I kinda thought yesterday yes. It's it's definitely a good chance for big group <hes> because the first part of the stage with quite easy but forty riders. That's something that I can't remember have seen something like this I into forty riders. That's that's that's incredible. I mean that's twenty twenty three percent of the Peleton almost one four of the Peleton away <hes> at the end. If if there would have been there would have been <hes> <hes> harder race in the in the back you would have had to think if the Peleton was the Peleton or if the front group was the pilot on because they were more numbers <hes> but yeah so you could see obviously from from the very beginning when this group went away <hes> I've heard it was really really really fast at the beginning and that <hes> it was quite <hes> a lot of suffering and very difficult to get into that group but once it was gone and you saw who was in there <hes> you could see straight away that for example what I thought yesterday somebody you good attacked. They will be no. There was nobody from his team in there so I think that <hes> that that was <hes> enough to know that he was not going to try to attack doc today <hes> which you know which didn't happen he didn't attack <hes> and also for example. <hes> astonished only had one writer in there so they were not preparing an attack and it was Peyot Bilbao. Who's a good climber? <hes> <hes> so you could kind of early early on Simon Yates was in there obviously was not Adam yeah it was going to attack on that <hes> on that last climb eater his brother so they were in there for the stage win and that's that's the race we saw we saw the race for the stage win coming from the breakaway and <hes> I mean say Simon Gates and <hes> and be bill ball were in two guys that <hes> obviously two of the best climbers of that breakaway the they were together with this Sir guy from Boorda who is a little bit less known Muehlberg but obviously also really good climber and so yeah finally they they made it to the finish was three months sprint. <hes> with I would say you know Simon Yates being thing at at least the smartest because you know and he was immature that he was I into that last cornered was only one hundred fifty meters to go and whoever comes out last Garner has full speed and can start sprinting. It's very difficult <hes> to to get over a guy like that one of them all he didn't win by much but <hes> but still you know he wanted and I think <hes> you know during the stage actually I was. I was looking at the what happened than at some point. Simon Yates was a gone with the Bora guy and <hes> better you'll bowed astonished. Guy was trying to bridge up and then a little bit further back was Mateo Thirteen who was was surprisingly strong today. Actually he's sprinter is a strong rider. I mean he's <hes> he's one of the guys this is one of the sprinters that can actually make over certain difficult <hes> terrain but he was actually getting away from the second part of the breakaway obviously with the intention to to try to be as close as possible to the front the race and then you know basically through <hes> a foster central to make it to the to the Front group and at some point I was.

Simon Yates Guy Mateo Thirteen Front group Johan Simon Gates Peyot Bilbao writer Boorda Garner Adam Muehlberg twenty twenty three percent one hundred fifty meters three months
"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"And at that point, my mammogram materials just meet like it wasn't. I was really even saying anything. I wasn't making a point. I would say this is what it's what it's been like. You know, just finding out like could be the Portland, I, you know, let's start with my set and, but I'm not really like being confrontational. I'm just saying, you know, say my stuff and they they get up and leave come here. You know, listen to this and they leave. And the rest of us not just go swine because I acknowledged that will acknowledge that it's kind of weird, but I just keep going. It's fine. What's interesting is I get off Asian, the host I find I found I found this out later the hosts enters the next comic agent Asian lesbian, Irene to. She goes up nex and the point that the Trump Trump crowd is back back at our table. She the moment she goes on stage. She one of the kinds goes. Another one. There were just terrible around. Yeah. Mad at everyone where you working on anything when you decided when the president got elected and you decided to go Alice working on a bit about Titanic. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I was like literally in the middle of working chunk about Titanic in about I was making the case that Jack and rose were bad people because like there was a scene where rose like was on the, she was on the rescue boat and like Saint by Jack who's on the ship. And she decided to jump back into the ship because she loved him so much and wanted to die with him. And I was like, well, somebody somebody else could have been saved, person died because of that stupid gesture rated too. Yeah. Yeah. So it's like, no, they're, they're south there. Bat, selfish people. And also the husband wasn't really like just doing. But yeah, I was excited about that. And and I just I one of the election can't work on that bit and I I should should bring back. Well, thank you so much for taking time to be on both. I was really great to get to talk to my pleasure. Johann maranda if you live in LA and you're listening to this in time, his one man show why Johan Marando should be deported is happening Friday July twenty seven. If you don't live in LA can watch some video of his act on the bullseye page at maximum fun dot org..

Jack Irene Alice Johann maranda Portland Johan Marando LA president
"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Welcome back to bullseye. My guest is stand up comedian Johan maranda when you hunt was three years old, his family immigrated to the United States from Peru, and they've stayed here without documents ever since he talks about it in his one man show it's called why Johan Miranda should be deported. It premiers NL a this week, a lot of folks who are the children of first generation immigrants or who are immigrants who were brought to the United States by their parents have to deal with a particular reprecussions of that, which is. People who take that action, people who moved to a different country. Are very special. People are like brave. Even those who are fleeing terrifying conditions are nonetheless like extraordinary brave, resourceful resilient, self-sacrificing people. Right? Because it's the hardest thing that you could imagine ever doing uprooting your entire life and starting it somewhere else. And for that reason, they often have expectations of their children that they gave something up and their children have to take advantage of the benefits that came from them giving something up. Did you have to deal with that with your parents? Well, my parents. Do you have to. I'll give parents credit in that. They never vocalized it. They, they've never really said like, here's disappointment. Even though they have all the right to say all they have all the right to say, we've sacrificed so much for this. And I think about that all the time. And so, yeah, even though they don't vocalise it still something that's like heavy on my mind and I stays where it's like, is they base hacker Faisal much for me to do this. You know. Especially when I bomb like the not even good at this. But yeah, no, I, I think I think anyone anyone in my situation feels that heavy. You know, it's just a and I think that goes along with I, I'm definitely against any any attempt to criminal anytime to criminalise parents for that reason. I think especially with Dak other sort of this narrative while it's well-meaning, it's kind of harmful of like, well, you know, the doctor recipients are innocent, right? Don't blame them. It's the parents who like did the evil thing that's like, well, not really like I am glad my parents. I, if I went back and time, I will tell them go earlier. I I fully support what they did. I think that's why a lot of that is our against these kind of compromises. Let like legislative compromises that protect Dako savings, but also like heavily primer allies. The parents basically, and it's like, well, now. Well, that's not. It doesn't really represent how my actual lived experience of like my parents. Are better people than me strong people. And so it's like anything that criminalizes on document appearances just doesn't ring true to me. So now that you've done this talked about your status on stage and it's been a couple of years now, are you glad you did it. Yeah, it's hoped me personally, just they don't talk about it. So yeah, I'm, I'm glad I did it. I'm going to keep doing it. I guess because there's no like solution coming up in the foreseeable future. So. I can't imagine not talking about it. You know, it's, they would kill me. You go up in front of dozens to hundreds of people every night when you do stand up comedy and. You know, I imagine you have to interact with them afterwards often. Has anybody ever have you ever interacted directly with somebody who thought that you don't belong in the United States? I've only had one incident because I perform mostly in LA in San Francisco, so everyone's usually chill. I remember a couple of months after the elections before Trump even got inaugurated performing in so Noma and is in northern califor-. Northern California. Yeah. And the host, the ho- the host was doing his sat and kind of acknowledged that there was like Trump supporters in the front row and like, you know, kind of bantered with them. And so I, I knew that the host was like Trump sports in the front row. So I go on stage and I don't. I don't really interact with them..

United States Johan maranda Trump Johan Miranda Faisal Northern California Noma Peru califor LA San Francisco three years
"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"johan" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"There were like, well, it's time to get time to get your time to apply for your exam. And so they gave me the application and it's like, oh, you need a social security. So all I can't really, you know. Do do this, I guess. So I, you know, I didn't finish. I didn't take the exam which I can. I guess I can go. Like I talked to that a teacher recently. I'm like, I can take an any point. Comedy doesn't doesn't really pan out to become a barber. I mean, I'm just saying a lot of comedians need haircut, yeah. Yeah, I got a clientele of, you know, it's built in. Nasc fiber to the comedy stars. Yeah. So, but yeah, around that time, that's when I started doing stand up because, oh, it was like, oh, well, there's literally nothing I can do. Let's hear a little more stand up from my guests Johan Rhonda. This is from a set that he did at hot tub here in Los Angeles, which is sort of an alternative stand up show in this bit. He's talking a little bit about the neighborhood that he and his family settled into in California before after after they came to the United States from Peru. We moved moved to San Francisco in the Fillmore district which when I was a kid, it was it was a black neighborhood, not really the case anymore. It's been gentrified. I have convicted feelings about that vacation because like obviously, when it comes to migration here in this country, I have liberal views on immigration yet when it comes to why people moving against them all, I'm like, we have to build a wall..

Johan Rhonda San Francisco Los Angeles California United States Peru
"johan" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

The Joe Budden Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"johan" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

"I know that old out is not a fundamental about he said exactly what he had to say an ira to okay well anyway is with us it i'm gonna play footsie uh so there's all his new album and i i think it's a a record that hasn't really health hasn't really been such an hiphop and i think he touched opponent in in this record as expensive genes in cry no more genes being your lineage not expensive actual genes disappointed fontenay which the statistics are you in any pain seven days a week fake every plagued be lots of wake no mistake the nothing else you would they got great feet i was that i could emmys with the wave live that'll be the moment but johan medicine medicine them put any his the me we got to be put to score with committed could be done ship waikiki in the guest room has over at night it's like forty youth oldest recorded life opic fields was than all other reason not to bring it fears the glock the nod colleges got to sleep fats to tell you baffoni the key all links would have the trap was that eichel i'll like this discounted like the little guy three a m stretch deeply in town on a nike civilised borderline border law the mark levin of all the dreams of phases these monitoring inflict green call magnus the mall with abc's.

waikiki mark levin abc johan medicine seven days
"johan" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:18 min | 4 years ago

"johan" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Johan there seemed to spain although voices globe's panel manly young leave food manohla that up w tiger palm really while in two zero henman although the zoo the behavior fee at mieno him will be do you sure a senior you must thing they you on b blow one she the commentary body your us this as an with you the king why come on two the by may down perry sure german style june nate solder i do our update no not yet boom the bureau it is.

Johan spain