29 Burst results for "Joffe"

What to Expect From the Sussman Trial With Kash Patel

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 2 months ago

What to Expect From the Sussman Trial With Kash Patel

"What are the next steps then? So this trial is going to wrap up. There is a period of time between the conviction and then the sentencing, right? Kind of decision of the jury, and then the sentencing, what can we expect next out of John Durham? What are the targets you think he's going to indict next? And has there been anything in this trial that has really surprised you? Yeah, so next, will the sentencing will be a couple of months away if and when I believe sussman's convicted in the next day or two. After that, we have to remind the audience. He already has another indictment in place in the trial set for this fall of the source to steal, and he also has a multiple count indictment for lying to the FBI at ton of times. And for making up all that Christopher Steele information. So he's got that in the pipeline public already. What I think is next is the joint joint venture conspiracy as John Durham has called it in the federal pleadings in the sussman indenting case that he has multiple other targets. And he has said Rodney joffe, the tech executive that was paid millions of dollars to drum up this false alphabet narrative while they were also drumming up their steel stuff. He has said publicly. He John Durham like Rodney joffe is a target of my ongoing investigation. He has also said in his pleading, these other people in the joint venture conspiracy, all that is, is legalese for a bunch of people have to get together to do this. The FBI, the Clinton campaign, fusion GPS, and these guys like Rodney joffe. And the Jake sullivans of the world. They're all mentioned by title in these pleadings. And they're all under his investigation. So that's why I think he's going to get a couple of FBI agents, and he should get Andy mccabe, who orchestrated this entire thing. And Peter strzok, hopefully, as well, along with fusion GPS and this tech guy Rodney joffe. And if he does all that, that's pretty good work.

John Durham Rodney Joffe Sussman Christopher Steele FBI Jake Sullivans Andy Mccabe Clinton Peter Strzok
"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

"Really <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Female> beautifully together. <Speech_Female> That is <Speech_Female> such a good example <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> as you're talking about <Speech_Female> this, I'm like, where <Speech_Female> do I think cancer <Speech_Female> genetics is headed <Speech_Female> in terms of this? <Speech_Female> It's like, I think <Speech_Female> we're going to be looking at more <Speech_Female> of this polygenic <Speech_Female> risk or like, okay, <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> I like this stacking <Speech_Female> analogy you have. Like <Speech_Female> maybe the BRCA1 <Speech_Female> and two <Speech_Female> gene changes <Speech_Female> there. Like maybe that's a <Speech_Female> really tall block, <Speech_Female> right? And the other ones are <Speech_Female> just little tiny ones. <Speech_Female> But they're all <Speech_Female> playing a role, right? <Speech_Female> So, <Speech_Female> or that jar analogy <Speech_Female> that some people use, <Speech_Female> you know, you start out with <Speech_Female> so many marbles in and then <Speech_Female> your lifestyle, you add more <Speech_Female> marbles, till it overflows. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But I <Speech_Female> think that's really interesting. <Speech_Female> And I think there is <Speech_Female> a lot of <Speech_Female> collaboration <Speech_Female> between these different fields <Speech_Female> to say, okay, well, <Speech_Female> let's put it all together <Speech_Female> in terms of <Speech_Female> like this person's <Speech_Female> health. <Speech_Female> And I think that's <Speech_Female> just, yeah, <SpeakerChange> just <Speech_Female> so fantastic. I think that's <Speech_Female> if you had more time. <Speech_Female> Yes, <Speech_Female> yeah, definitely. <Speech_Female> We get to talk about things. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> delighted that you're going to be joining <Speech_Female> me on my podcast. So <Speech_Female> we do this talk again. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Exactly. So you guys have to <Speech_Female> check out. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah, <SpeakerChange> you guys have to <Speech_Female> check out her podcast, the <Speech_Female> power of genetics. <Speech_Female> So I'll be on in the <Speech_Female> future. <Speech_Female> And yeah, it was <Speech_Female> just a pleasure to be able <Speech_Female> to interview you and I <Speech_Female> have to say, listeners <Speech_Female> now, I just love accents. <Speech_Female> Everyone <Speech_Female> has an accent. But <Speech_Female> I love non American <Speech_Female> accents that are different <Speech_Female> to me. <Speech_Female> So it's beautiful. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But thank you so much for <Speech_Female> coming on and just <Speech_Female> exploring all this <Speech_Female> with me because even <Speech_Female> with the <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> famine studies, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that's something that's been on my <Speech_Female> mind. I'm like, I've never actually <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> talked about <Speech_Female> on their show. We're really broke <Speech_Female> that down and everything. <Speech_Female> So yeah, <Speech_Female> that could be a very podcast <Speech_Female> just itself. <Speech_Female> I know, right? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But we'll include links <Speech_Female> to everything that we mentioned <Speech_Female> in today's episode. <Speech_Female> But thank you <Speech_Female> again for coming <SpeakerChange> on. This <Speech_Female> is really, really cool <Speech_Female> episode, I think. <Speech_Female> It was very fun. <Speech_Female> I really enjoyed it. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks Gary, great questions. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> For more information <Speech_Female> about today's episode, <Speech_Female> visit DNA podcast <Speech_Female> dot com <Speech_Female> where you can also stream <Speech_Female> all episodes of <Speech_Female> the show. We <Speech_Female> encourage your questions, <Speech_Female> comments, guest <Speech_Female> pitches, and ideas. <Speech_Female> Send them <Speech_Female> all into info <Speech_Female> at DNA podcast <Speech_Female> dot com. <Speech_Female> Search DNA <Speech_Female> today on Twitter, <Speech_Female> Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, <Speech_Female> so you can <Speech_Female> connect with us there. <Speech_Female> And a <Speech_Female> favor, please rate <Speech_Female> and review the podcast <Speech_Female> on Apple, Spotify, <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> wherever you listen. <Speech_Female> This truly <Speech_Female> helps us climb the charts <Speech_Female> and allow more <Speech_Female> genetic nerds like <Speech_Female> yourself to find the show. <Speech_Female> DNA <Speech_Female> today is hosted and produced <Speech_Female> by myself, <Speech_Female> kir denine, <Speech_Female> our social media lead is <Speech_Female> corinne Merlin, <Speech_Female> our video lead is <Speech_Female> Amanda andreoli. <Speech_Female> Thanks for listening <Speech_Female> and join us next <Speech_Female> time to discover new <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> advances <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the world of genetics. <Music> <Advertisement> discover new <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> advances <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the world of genetics. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> And <Music> <Advertisement> they're all made <Music> of DNA <Music> we're all <Music> made of the same <Music> chemical CNN <Music> <Music> <Music> we're <Music> all made of <Music> DNA all the way

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

07:31 min | 2 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

"The whole genome project out and then we dumped it down so much that we could sell it directly online. So a lot of my work is education and training. So I spend like my whole life teaching practitioners, whether you're a dentist or a chiropractor or a naturopath or a nutritionist or a doctor, how do you take this beautiful insightful information, how do you bring it into the context of who you are and what you want to achieve, whether you're a supreme athlete, or just trying to lose some weight, or just try to be healthy, or prevent disease, and then what kind of recommendations. And I think that's the true evolution of what we're seeing in genetics now, which hopefully we'll see more and more. Yeah, and that's why I always recommend if people do reach out and they're like, oh, I want to do one of these direct consumer tasks, like what do you think? And I think my number one thing is understand the limitations of the testing, but also order from a company that includes genetic counseling with your results, or someone some healthcare providers, someone that's going to educate you, what does this actually mean? Because if you're not well versed in genetics, then it's like, to me, it's not very helpful at that point. But it don't get your value. Right, right. So it's interesting with all of this of just understanding like, okay, you're more predisposed to this or that in terms of, you know, I've seen the buzz term DNA dieting. So I guess that's kind of what this means in terms of looking at what your predisposed to and tailoring your own diet and exercise to what we know about what your predisposed to. So I just want to say two things on that. So one is we never talk about risk. We're not interested in us. We've got no disease risk. We're not predisposed to say, we just looking at these pathways, these metabolic processes in our body to see whether they functioning up to me a lot and how we can get them to function optionally. So in the work we do at three X four, we have no conversations around disease. You're not predisposed to diabetes or cancer or anything. There are other companies that will do that. That's not what we do, because what we want to do is find out, how do we get your body to be firing on all cylinders and functioning as up to me and we do that by understanding a, which of the areas that might not be functioning so up to me and be what can we do? The second thing I want to mention is you use the word genetic counselor now. This is a highly appropriate as you are a genetic counselor. But I'm a little biased, right? I'm always throwing yourself by. But for those listening, I just want to be very clear. When we started out, we spoke about two different kinds of genetics, medical genetics, which very much is a bad risk, right? What is my risk of getting breast cancer or prostate cancer? What is my risk of getting high cholesterol in the family? Everyone died when they were young from my cholesterol. And that is a really, really important field of genetics, and there are some brilliant companies out there that I refer people to. And there's some amazing genetic counselors who are trained to be able to really understand the genetics and calculate susceptibility and risk through the family. And if you're looking for a rare disease like genetic disease, which genetics plays a huge role, you need to see a genetic counselor. But that's not what I've been talking about, right? So what I've been talking about is nutrigenomics, which is lifestyle genetics. So understand your generics, but ultimately there's loads you can do about it because you can make diet or lifestyle or supplement or exercise or stress choices around it to improve it. So the difference is in my world, the choice of make have a huge impact in the world of medical genetics, the choices we make have a lesser impact. So we don't actually we work with some genetic counselors who are very enlightened and very open to it, but mostly we actually work with practitioners who really work with patients to change their daily lives. So whether it's dietitians, naturopaths, lots of medical doctors, chiropractors, people like that who then go on to study genetics. So it's kind of the opposite like you study genetics and then learn counseling, we take practitioners actually either medical nutritional and we train them in genetics so that they can bring genetics in. But in our world genetics is only one piece of the puzzle that they bring in in your world genetics is a huge piece of the puzzle, which really needs attention. So I hope you don't mind. But it's important that we understand because we want to make sure that everyone is going to the right place to get the help they need. And if that is if there is a serious disease in your family that is happening early in life, you need to go to the medical genetics route. If it's more the chronic diseases or sport or way to everything, it's the lifestyle genetics rate. And it's fantastic that you're able to help in teaching and training healthcare providers because it's not just genetic counselors that can offer and explain services and information like this. It's like any healthcare provider can learn how to do this. And I think that's what the big part of it is. Like if there's a healthcare provider that's really well trained in genetics, I'm like, great, go see them. Like to me, it doesn't have to be a genetic counselor, certainly in this space, as you're saying, I'm sure. Yeah, there are probably some genetic counsels as you're mentioning, but it's mostly other providers. And that space and want to become a genetic counselor, looking for ways to engage with the field and boost your resume for grad school applications, then you should check out Sarah Lawrence's wide genetic counseling Wednesday summer series. Every Wednesday this June, sir Lawrence is hosting a series where you can interact through Zoom with genetic counselors from different specialties. It kicks off on June 1st, you can sign up at SLC dot EDU slash DNA today. Again, visit SLC dot EDU slash DNA today to register to level up your resume for applications in the fall. Did you know Perkin Elmer genomics was one of the first laboratories to offer whole genome sequencing on a clinical basis? Whole genome sequencing can maximize clinical diagnostic yield for patients, with turnaround time of four weeks for the pro band sample, Perkin Elmer's whole genome sequencing test is designed to provide access to additional valuable information compared to an axon. Perk and helmer also offers prenatal whole genome sequencing, as well as ultra rapid whole genome sequencing for critically ill newborns using dried blood spots. The ultra rapid genome has turnaround time of 5 days and includes mito, chromosomal C and B analysis, STR, TNR screening, and biochemical analysis. Also, listen back to episode one 76 with doctor maduri hegde, where we explore the power of whole genome sequencing, which also happens to be one of my favorite episodes DNA today. And stay tuned for a couple more episodes with Perkin Elmer soon. Discover all the Perkin Elmer genomics has to offer at Perkin Elmer genomics dot com. You know, I have so many questions. So I'm like, what do I ask in our last few minutes here? But I think one thing that I'm curious about is if you have studied or if some of your other colleagues have studied certain genetic conditions that have metabolic symptoms, just to understand human metabolic more. So a condition that I think about is like prader willi syndrome. I don't know if you're familiar with that. It's going to be people with increased appetite and obesity. Are there things that we can learn from genetic conditions to then apply to just humans in general of just understanding our genetics better? Kira, I love your questions. You certainly keep me on my toes. Okay, here's a great place. So actually it's great, right? We can do it with waves, probably. We can do it with we can do it with cancer,.

Perkin Elmer genomics genetic disease Perkin Elmer prostate cancer diabetes breast cancer cancer sir Lawrence Sarah Lawrence maduri hegde helmer willi syndrome obesity Kira
"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

07:52 min | 2 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

"To switch on a gene. And when we switch on the gene, we make a protein, which means we're making an enzyme or a hormone. We're making the body do something. And when we switch off a gene, we silence that enzyme or we kind of tuck it away, lock it away and we say, we don't want to do information right now. Are we going to tuck it away? Okay. Now, how does a body know whether to switch on a switch of genes? Imagine these little tags or flags called the motor. And if you put a little flag onto a gene, it's kind of saying to the gene, you can go to sleep now. You don't have to make this hormone anymore. You can just tell and wrap yourself up around the chromosome and go and have a quiet time. But if I take the flag off, I'm going to say to the gene, hey, wake up, unravel yourself, make that protein, make that home and get to business. You know, you've got work to do in the body. Now, the interesting thing is it was always believed that when we were born, because we all have these flags and tags in our body. That's basically how our body works. And this is something called methylation, which is part of epigenetics. But think of it as flags and tags. It was always believed that women were born that we were born kind of keen, right? We had no problem. Right? We were like a blank canvas. And then everything that happened to us was we were breastfed, whether we had a cesarean or an actual bird, what we were fed, the environment, the trauma, would add flags onto our tags onto our DNA. And that would determine how a DNA expressed itself, Howard you never behaved. Well, the super exciting stuff that's come out from this research that pyrrha mentioned is that it doesn't actually work like that. A lot of the tags are cleaned off. But it's not a blank slate and some of the tags stay with us. And so I'll give you an example the Holocaust. What they found was that the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors were suffering from the same post traumatic stress disorder that the grandparents, even though they had been brought up in a beautiful, safe nurtured, well nourished neighborhood in Queens, New York. So I was a possible that they can be experiencing the trauma of their grandparents when they had no exposure to what happened. And it's the same thing in famine. That, when we're starving, our body changes the way our genes behave and goes into a serious survival mode. Serious about mode, so put some tags and take so far the tags. Which is fine because then we get through the game and we're kind of trying to be healthy and everything. And two generations later, we're born into a country of wealth and food and nourishment and calories and everything. And yet babies were being born, actually interestingly, very overweight. They're like, so surely if they overweight, they're healthy, you know, they're big babies. But actually, it was the opposite and what we started seeing was heart disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, at very young ages, in children who were descendants of those who had suffered in the famine. I hope this is making sense. And why? Because during the famine, the DNA had been kind of programmed to hold on to calories because it was such a survival fares. And some of that survival of holding onto calories like the way they process glucose and incident had stayed through generations even though the feminine God and had manifested and it's very well documented that those grandchildren are famine survivors landed up having these chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes very badly and very early life and not because of what they had done in their life. So that's like genetics complicated, but that's what makes it so interesting and kind of so cool. It is, yeah, and just looking at, you know, as you're talking about like two generations later, having these effects from their grandparents, like, you know, I certainly not my grandparents, my great grandparents were in Ireland, and I'm sure experience some of the potato famine and everything. So it's just so interesting to see that it's not just genetics that were inheriting, but it's also like epigenetics literally means on top of the genome, like genomics. So looking at how that's being genes are turned on and off and how that's affecting us and our metabolism and that makes sense. Slow down your metabolism can serve your calories because there's only so many. You have to survive. So it's just interesting and I imagine that a lot of this is looking more at polygenic risk scores, not for the epigenetics part, but just like looking at genetics for metabolism, more focused on polygenic risk scores of, okay, let's look at a bunch of different changes throughout the genome and not just, oh, there's this one genetic change you have, this is what is leading to this risk for you. Is that kind of what I know you've designed some neutral genetics? How it works. You preach into the converted. So I've been in working in genetics for 20 years and about 5 years ago realized that we had already gone astray and lost our way, and we were building genetic tests. We were making these sweeping recommendations based on a single gene. The reality is genetics doesn't work like that. And genetics impacts our body and hard works, but not one gene defining that, especially not in my world, remember where genes interact with diet and lifestyle. So what I got to realize is that like 99.9% of the genetic testing companies, including quite a few that I've been involved in, we're building genetic tests where they were doing a test and I was like, oh, you've got the MTHFR gene variant. You should take these supplements and eat these foods. And I had this huge epiphany of our 5 6 years ago going, you know what? I've been getting it wrong for 15 years because jeans don't act in isolation. They're not that powerful. But when you group them together in an area. So imagine everyone understands information. Everyone understands detox. So glucose, you know? Imagine not taking all the genes that are going to impact that area. We can call it a biochemical area, metabolic area, or anything that the body does area, right? And we group together all the genes and we stack them up into what exactly, as you said, a polygenic score. So we built a scoring mechanism. We can actually assess how much are your genes impacting detox impacting information, impacting the ability to gain weight. And we can tell you individually how much that area is impacting you. And so that's actually why I started this other company three four genetics four and a half years ago because I realized that I'd been getting it wrong essentially for 15 years. And that the only way to give power to genetics is two things. Is group genes together, build them into scores so we can actually score it and bring power to the genes and the second thing is make sure there's a whole bunch of people out there who are trained and educated and mentored and understand how to interpret genetics to make sure that all your listeners get the best possible value out of the genes because one of the problems we're seeing in direct to consumer genetic testing is that if you're going to buy it online and they're going to send you the answers, they're going to have to dumb it down so much to keep it safe and I put that in virtual commerce that you must go Google on the Internet, right? Because you're not going to truly get the personalization that you were looking for. So in so many ways, genetics has failed because we came up with amazing science..

pyrrha cardiovascular disease diabetes Queens Howard New York Ireland Google
"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

07:45 min | 2 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

"You want to make sure it's beautiful and wholesome and intact. And the other thing is, do we spend like a whole lot of time and a whole lot of media campaigns saying, how healthy are the cells in your body? So they are some processes in our body like inflammation and detoxification and oxidative stress and methylation that really determine how every single individual cell in a healthy, how optimal it. Now surely it makes sense that before we worry about our heart and our lungs and our limbs and our skin, we want to make sure that a cellular level there are functioning as brilliant as possible. So are we started right at the top we call it going upstream, right? Then we can start thinking about how does genetics impact things like systems like glucose and insulin is a system in the body that we really want to be. And we know some people are most susceptible to having a kind of slightly mildly dysfunctional glucose incident, which if the data nasal is right is going to manifest as diabetes or insulin resistance. But it could be other errors. It's things like hormones. We all metabolize hormones differently, whether we're taking contraceptive polo, hormone replacement therapy, it's going to be metabolized every day. How we how our bones and our collagen kind of how strong they are. Two of my favorites are mood anxiety depression is so genetic, right? That is totally nature. You just have to talk to anyone who's got a family of anxiety and it's just past one's past time. What are the genes that are certainly one of them? We've all got in our family. It's so obvious and yet we wouldn't have this conversation ten years ago. And if we can understand that there's a genetic susceptibility to anxiety or depression, there's so much we can do early on to try manage those brain messages because remember it's brain messages, dopamine, serotonin, that are really battling to get going and it can manifest in different ways. So we can understand that someone is more susceptible and even things around memory loss cognition. Is genetic. And then my favorite topic at the genetics of weight management. This is my personal favorite. This is where I did my PhD. We all gain and lose weight differently. For some fast, super easy to maintain a healthy weird, right? We can eat what we want, we do a little bit of exercise. But there's some of us who it's really hard. It's hard because we hungry a lot. It's hard because we don't get as full as our friends or family. And it's hard because we're just seem to gain very easily and then we're really want to lose what it's hard. At least 50% of how we manage our weight is determined by our genes and the rest is the decision we make. And yet, ask my first degree was as a dietitian and you like 5 years of studies, no one mentioned genetics to me. Okay, it was a long time ago, but no one mentioned genetics. And then, of course, still. Still, I look at the dietary degrees, they still are teaching it. So dietitians used to say like, you're eating too much, you got no self control. You got no willpower. And I'm like, and I was part of that, I was like, now I'm like, oh my God, I can't believe we said stuff like that. All the idea that everyone needs the same amount of calories. Because 50% will be determined and remember that being able to consume calories and store them in your body. You are going to survive on the plains of Africa, right? So now there's a bilateral calories. Correct. It's evolutionary. We were the survivors. If you could hold on to that adipose tissue, you are the survivor now. It's actually flipped against us. So everything in genetics, as you all know, is about kind of evolutionary biology. And then not to drag it out, exercise, sports genetics, why can some of us just find it so easy to run fast, to run along, to swim, to jump, and to build muscle? What are some best recover very well other of us get injured very easily, and then lastly, of course, we mustn't forget nutrition. I do some of us respond to gluten in certain ways or different vitamins, do we absorb vitamins in the same way? Do we metabolize them in the same way? Do we need higher amounts? So that basically gives you like pretty much everything. I've got caffeine, obviously, is one of them. Obviously. Yes. Yeah, I know I've done some direct consumer genetic testing, and it says, you're very sensitive caffeine. I'm like, yep, I can check that box. I have 8 ounces of coffee. I'm good for the rest of the day. And my brother were full siblings. Nope. He can drink like ten ounces of coffee, and then he's good. So it's like, you know, that difference between our DNA is predisposing us to like, okay, how do we break down caffeine? How does that affect us? So it's so interesting just to see even within family members. If you're applying to genetic counseling grad schools in the near future, I highly recommend checking out Sarah Lawrence's wide genetic counseling Wednesday summer series. This is the third year Sarah Lawrence will be hosting this series where you can interact through Zoom with genetic counselors from different specialties for two hours every Wednesday in June. Kicks off on Wednesday, June 1st, at noon eastern. As many of you know, I graduated from Sarah Lawrence program two years ago. And the series was a fun way to interact with prospective genetic counseling students. I'm really looking forward to meeting more of you during the series. Myself and fellow genetic counselors will share about our roles and answer your questions live. Not only will you hear from genetic counselors in a variety of specialties, you'll also have the opportunity to discuss ethical and social implications of genomic medicine, engage with current students and learn about the exciting present and projected future of the profession. Anyone who attends all 5 will earn a certificate of completion and receive an application fee waiver for the grad program. Register now before we are fully booked, go to SLC dot EDU slash DNA today. Again, that's SLC dot EDU slash DNA today to be part of this interactive genetic counseling experience. Perkin Elmer genomics is a global leader in genetic testing, focusing on rare diseases, inherited disorders, newborn screening, and hereditary cancer. Testing services support the full continuum of care from preconception and prenatal to neonatal pediatric and adult. Testing options include sequencing for targeted genes, multiple genes, the whole exome or genome, and copy number variations. Using a simple saliva or blood sample, Perkin armor genomics answers complex genetic questions that can proactively inform patient care and end the diagnostic Odyssey for families. Learn more at perk and Elmer genomics dot com. You know, recent not a recent study, but an interesting study that I always think about now for years is looking at famines and how that affects future generations, like, you know, we look at the great Chinese famine and seeing, okay, the next two generations of family, they're at higher risk for obesity, and I would believe that's because of epigenetic factors being passed down. If you've heard of this or any famine, in fact some brilliant studies that have been done, I mean, the Chinese family and the Dutch famine was actually the best research was that. And then also the Irish potato Batman was done. Yes. And what's extraordinary about this story is that it was always kind of believed that first of all that epigenetics. So epigenetics is complicated. So you've taken me down a very complicated route, right? I have. I made this difficult for you to not. Thank you. Thank you for that. Right. So let's just explain what happens. So what happens is remember when I said in the beginning, epigenetics is about how do we switch genes on and off? And the way that our body decides whether.

anxiety depression Sarah Lawrence insulin resistance diabetes anxiety depression Perkin Elmer genomics Africa hereditary cancer famines obesity
"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on DNA Today

"Leaders in genetics. I'm cured, I'm a certified genetic counselor and your host. My guest today to talk about nutra genomics is doctor Yale jaffee, who earned her PhD in nutrigenomics. She has authored a few books and has been published in peer reviewed journals. She's the founder and CSO of three X four genetics. Welcome on the show. Thanks Kara, very happy to be here today. So I want to dive into it because I have a lot of questions. I'm shocked that even though we've been podcasting for ten years on DNA today, we've never had an episode correct me if I'm wrong listeners, but I don't think we've had an episode dedicated to nutra genomics. Wow, I'm suitably horrified, completely, that for ten years you've never had a guest on muta genomics. Yes. But to be the one to bring you this. You're the expert we're bringing on here. That's right. So let's if we haven't spoken about this topic before, let's actually just stop by saying, what is it? Sure. It's a big word that mostly no one understands, and when I first heard it, I didn't understand. And what makes it let's also just like make sure we listeners know what is the difference between nutrient genomics and all the other genetics that they probably have heard on the show or are seeing every single day and kind of in the world. So obviously nutri genomics speaks to nutrition and genetics together. So that's like start to that. But what it is really is about who we are and how we respond to the world around us. And when I talk about responding to the world around us, I'm talking about the food we eat, the exercise we do, the environment that we expose ourselves to, the toxins that we might consume, the stress venture, and even something like trauma, we all respond differently, and that's because 99.9% of our DNA is identical, but .1% is different. And the world of lifestyle genomics, or new to genomics, coal water water actually prefer lifestyle dynamics because it's not just about nutrition. It's really about why am I different? Why I do I respond differently? Can I understand how I respond? And if I can understand what are the best things for me to do. So that is kind of like the space. And then what it isn't, is it's not medical genetics, which is kind of where you came from, right? Where you get these kind of rich genetic variants that if you have them, your chances of getting a disease are quite high or likely. They very much associated with chronic disease, a very, very serious diseases. It's not ancestry dot com where you find out who your cousin is or find out where you came from in Eastern Europe. It's not that. It's not carrier genetics, like I've got a trait, you know, I'm going to blue eyes or brown hair or I'm going to have a unibrow, which we love getting information. I got a email from 23andMe the other day. That was one of the fantastic ones, but they give you these really your urine smells when you eat asparagus. You know, really important. Useful stuff like that. So it's not that. It's about it's about common gene variants, changes in our DNA that are absolutely about evolution. They define who we are, but the most important thing is, by themselves, they do not cause disease. They interact with the choices we make in our life, the food we eat, the exercise we do, and therefore give us some control on how our genes express themselves for our lives. Yeah, so really focusing more on epigenetics on that level. I feel like with what everything you're explaining there is a lot of an epigenetic focus, certainly including other just like genetic changes, but it has that. Yeah, well, yes and no. So I love that because actually it's a 50 50 conversation. And I'll tell you why. Like the first 15 years of my career, I've focused on the first 50% in the first 50% says I'm going to study these what I call them sparing changes. So we've got this amazing DNA sequence, which is just like an alphabet of letters that defines our blueprint. And the first 50%, we study these spelling changes that determine why we different from the world. And that gives us insight about who we are and how we respond. That's half the conversation. The second half of the conversation is what you refer to, which is epigenetics, which again is a word that no one understands, even serious scientists and health professionals. But what it basically means is, I make positive choices every minute of every day, whether it's a decaf coffee or double espresso, whether I go running or whether I meditate. Every single decision of every minute of every day I make decisions that are going to change the way my genes express or switch on and off. And that is the world of epigenetics. So in my world of lifestyle genetics, I want to have both conversations because I want to first understand who you are, get some insights about what in your body might be functioning optimally or suboptimally decide where we really want to focus our work. And then I want to give you recommendations around those daily decisions to switch on and switch off the best possible optimal genes to drive it to the best off of health. So it's really I call it insight in action. And it's like really time that we bought the conversations together and we didn't have them separately. Yes, because I think a lot of the conversation is always nature versus nurture. And it's like, no, it's nature and nurture. I think we have to define that. So now that we have a background on nutro genomics and understand all right, what are we focusing on in terms of this genetics, in this conversation, one aspects of our metabolism and our eating behaviors have identified genetic links? Okay, I'm going to start off with a really bad answer, which is everything. She's not really helpful to you. But I'm going to break it down a bit. So let's break it down a bit. Let's try understand when I said that pretty much every decision we make. And everything we do in our world will be defined to some degree by genetics. Let's understand what that is. So the first thing we talk about is we call it cellular health, but it's really imagine like people are all of us often think about our heart health because we've been like had so much media, right? Heart health, skin health, lung health, brain health, even. But no one ever said to you two things. One is, how healthy is your DNA? We really want to make sure that DNA is super healthy, right? Because when you make new cells with new DNA,.

nutra genomics Yale jaffee Kara chronic disease Eastern Europe
Rep. Gaetz: Hillary Clinton Was Engaged in Corruption by Utilizing DOJ

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Rep. Gaetz: Hillary Clinton Was Engaged in Corruption by Utilizing DOJ

"Right, so let's start Matt, give us your response to the latest. It was such a boring document to the judge from Durham saying there might be a conflict of interest between the lawyers representing, you know, Hillary's spy, Michael sussman, but on page two, the atomic bombshell that an individual called Rodney joffe's company wasn't just surveilling president Trump's apartment and Trump Tower, but The White House when we worked in it because quote, quote, from the documents, they had a sensitive arrangement to provide Internet cyber services to The White House. How is this not being picked up by the GOP? Talk to us, man. This is how the deep state works. They utilize national security standards that utilize vendors, they utilize private sector and government sponsored spying, private sector and government sponsored leaks. Seb, you'll remember each and every night when the mainstream media would say that we were Russian agents, we were Putin's lawyers and public relations consultants. And we shared with the American people that the reality was that it was Hillary Clinton. And the Clinton campaign there was engaged in corruption, criminal activity, collusion with Russia, and then utilizing the DoJ, the FBI, the national security apparatus to really I think author these leaks through the mainstream media to try to smear the president and the presidency. So in these Durham indictments, we see that they needed two things. A lie and then they needed so the content of the lie and then the distribution channel. And so they used Russians and they used illegal spying techniques to try to generate the lies and the suspicion. And then they used these DoJ and FBI leaks to get the media to fall

Michael Sussman Rodney Joffe Trump Tower Durham Hillary Matt White House SEB GOP Putin Hillary Clinton DOJ Clinton FBI Russia
Why Isn't the Hillary-White House Scandal the Story of the Century?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:34 min | 6 months ago

Why Isn't the Hillary-White House Scandal the Story of the Century?

"This document that was just looked like a dry note to the judge about a possible conflict of interest. Page two, it says that Rodney joffe working with Michael sussman. Hillary's camp a lot higher by Hillary's campaign was targeting through his cyber company. The president's home, the president's Trump Tower offices and The White House and the next sentence Boris that everybody misses because his private company had a quote sensitive arrangement to provide Internet services to The White House. In D.C. national security speak, that means the private company was accessing the classified White House comes system. This should be the story of the century baron. No doubt about it. It has to be the story that said Trey, of course, most of the mainstream media doesn't want to cover it, but just imagine if it were the other way around if the tables were flipped. It was mango Republicans who were conducting this absolutely awful undertaking. This would be the biggest news forget Watergate biggest news since the Civil War. But since it's crooked Hillary and her team and Jake Sullivan, one of the worst national security advisers in the history of America. He was the point person for this crime on the Hillary Clinton 2016 campaign. And then here's the bottom line. President Trump said that he was spied on at the campaign at The White House. And you know what? She was 1000% correct, as always.

Rodney Joffe Michael Sussman Hillary White House Trump Tower Boris D.C. Trey Jake Sullivan President Trump Hillary Clinton America
Devin Nunes on the Russia-Collusion Hoax

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:53 min | 6 months ago

Devin Nunes on the Russia-Collusion Hoax

"We are delighted to have with us former chairman of the intelligence community of the house who is now CEO of the Trump media and technology group, Devin Nunes. Welcome back to America first. It is great to be back on with your sea bass in this new. This is my first time back on your show. And I've lost that swamp title. So you can not call me part of the swamp anymore. And the picture behind you looks delightful looks very un swampy. So yes, we've been trying to get you on desperately. You've been on lockdown making sure that this is an epic launch. We're gonna talk about that momentarily, but I have to drag you back to the swamp as the person who fought so valiantly against the Russia collusion hoax in the interest of stopping the outrageous unmaskings and this Super Bowl Friday drop. I mean, just stunning. I read the memo to the judge, which isn't an indictment. It's just, it's the dripping out of additional details from John Durham. And what everybody misses, yes, it's shocking that this tech company Rodney joffe and others were targeting not just Trump Tower, but president Trump's home and also the EOP, the executive office of the president, which means a private company was surveilling The White House, but the next sentence Devin, everybody misses this. And they were able to do this as part of a sensitive arrangement by which this private company controlled the servers for The White House. Is this, I mean, this doesn't make the Watergate scandal look like an irrelevance? Well, I would say this, the Russia hoax and its entirety before these revelations was already a hundred times worse than Watergate wasn't even comparable. The only thing that has not happened yet is people haven't paid the price like they should. I mean, so many laws were broke here and the spine started way before. I mean, let's not forget. We had the unmaskings that we uncovered where they were essentially using the intelligence services to target the Trump campaign. We know that they went to the fisa court. They used that to spy on the Trump campaign. And so this went on and on. They had the Steele dossier that the Clinton spotted all of that in its entirety is much bigger than Watergate, you know, whatever imagine to be. But this that came last weekend, not only are they new revelations, but you can imagine where I sit, why didn't I get this information when I had subpoenas to all these agencies? How many times was I guaranteed? Oh, we've given you everything. Well, the fact is they didn't give me everything. So there are people now. That's definitely misleading lying and misleading Congress.

Trump Media And Technology Gro Devin Nunes John Durham Rodney Joffe President Trump Russia Trump Tower EOP UN Super Bowl Devin America White House Steele Clinton Congress
Yes, Someone Really Spied on Trump

The Larry Elder Show

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Yes, Someone Really Spied on Trump

"Back to the New York Post editorial about the filing by special counsel John Doe only last paragraph again. Now another piece of the Russia Russia Russia it kaput ski. A computer server operated by Trump company was secretly communicating with the Russian firm claimed slate magazine and countless Twitter threads of would be experts, including Twitter, tweets by Hillary. But as special counsel John Durham outlined in his latest indictment, that was just a story made up by tech executive Rodney joffe, who desperately wanted a job with the Clinton administration. He hacked Trump servers, cherry picked privileged Internet data that he had access to. And molded it to make it look like something nefarious.

Russia Trump Company Slate Magazine New York Post John Doe John Durham Twitter Rodney Joffe Hillary Trump Servers Clinton Administration
Hans Mahncke Unsure if Jan. 6 Committee Would Have Access to Joffe's Data

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 6 months ago

Hans Mahncke Unsure if Jan. 6 Committee Would Have Access to Joffe's Data

"The FBI and the CIA had to know a hell of a lot more than they've let on Don't you agree That's my view as an old justice guy Absolutely So the indictment tells us that the information that was brought to the CIA unlike the one that was brought to the FBI included details of Trump's Internet traffic while he was in The White House so that's obviously the new thing here So they must have not taken very long to figure out how it is that sussman would know that Because well they knew who was supplying The White House with these DNS services and that was joffe And I'm sure they pieced it together very very quickly Not to be a conspiracy theorist of course by reading actual newspaper accounts to the American people But let me ask you this The January 6th committee seems to be a Nancy Pelosi obsession That is their obsession is with Trump surrogates family Friends acquaintances to try and prevent him from running again They have no interest in what Nancy Pelosi did or didn't do in protecting the capitol building My question to you would be would they have access to what joffe or joff had created as well Do you know The data No I mean I don't know specifically but the very idea that and this is now confirmed I mean that's in the indictment Sorry in the finding which is on top of the indictment The very idea that you have a private individual with a very very checkered past as I mentioned he was involved in mail order scams and all sorts of things The fact that such an individual had that level of access does make you wonder what else do you have access to And who else might have that kind of access He might not be the only

CIA FBI Joffe Nancy Pelosi Sussman Donald Trump Joff White House
John Durham's Filing Alleges Clinton Colluded to Spy on Trump Tower, Trump White House Data

Mark Levin

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

John Durham's Filing Alleges Clinton Colluded to Spy on Trump Tower, Trump White House Data

"Friday's motion then for the first time revealed that the Internet dated joffe and his associates exploit it was do name name system DNS Internet traffic pertaining to a particular healthcare provider Trump Tower Donald Trump's Central Park west apartment building in the executive office of the president In other words let me help They tapped into the data in his computers at Trump Tower Donald Trump's Central Park west apartment building and the office of the president of the United States And I don't know who this healthcare provider is but perhaps as doctor for all I know All paid for by Hillary Clinton And the DNC

Trump Tower Donald Trump Joffe Trump Tower Donald Trump's Cen United States Hillary Clinton DNC
"joffe" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"joffe" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Obtaining and on the record waiver for sussman of any conflict of interest with the lawyer With limit sussman's ability to later challenge any conviction whether following a plea agreement or a jury verdict The court will likely grant that motion to ensure both at any waiver of the conflict is knowing and volunteering to ensure sussman can not later attempt to overturn any conviction based on the conflicts with his lawyer It is what followed in the next 12 pages however and not the mundane minutiae of this motion That proved explosive In explaining the potential conflicts of interest sussman's Latham and Watkins attorneys possibly had norm explained much more they get Trump plot To explain the potential conflicts dorm began with the charge Noting as factual background quote unquote That sussman while serving his counsel to the Clinton campaign met with FBI general counsel baker at FBI headquarters and provided baker quote purported date and white papers That allegedly demonstrated a covert communications channel between the Trump organization and a Russian based bank that alpha bank The motion then reiterated the indictment allegations at beginning an approximately July 2016 Joffe that's this Internet guy Worked with sussman the opposition research firm fusion GPS And numerous cyber research as I'm quoting now and employees at multiple Internet companies to assemble the purported data and white papers in connection with these efforts Continued the motion joffe exploited his access to non public and or proprietary Internet data

Hans Breitbart News Trump Donald Trump CIA FBI Rodney joffre Mark Levin Michael sussman Hillary temple The Washington Post United States Hillary Clinton joffe Nancy Pelosi Durham sussman joff White House
How John Durham Connects Michael Sussmann and Rodney Joffe to Spy on Trump

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 6 months ago

How John Durham Connects Michael Sussmann and Rodney Joffe to Spy on Trump

"Obtaining and on the record waiver for sussman of any conflict of interest with the lawyer With limit sussman's ability to later challenge any conviction whether following a plea agreement or a jury verdict The court will likely grant that motion to ensure both at any waiver of the conflict is knowing and volunteering to ensure sussman can not later attempt to overturn any conviction based on the conflicts with his lawyer It is what followed in the next 12 pages however and not the mundane minutiae of this motion That proved explosive In explaining the potential conflicts of interest sussman's Latham and Watkins attorneys possibly had norm explained much more they get Trump plot To explain the potential conflicts dorm began with the charge Noting as factual background quote unquote That sussman while serving his counsel to the Clinton campaign met with FBI general counsel baker at FBI headquarters and provided baker quote purported date and white papers That allegedly demonstrated a covert communications channel between the Trump organization and a Russian based bank that alpha bank The motion then reiterated the indictment allegations at beginning an approximately July 2016 Joffe that's this Internet guy Worked with sussman the opposition research firm fusion GPS And numerous cyber research as I'm quoting now and employees at multiple Internet companies to assemble the purported data and white papers in connection with these efforts Continued the motion joffe exploited his access to non public and or proprietary Internet data

Sussman FBI Baker Latham Alpha Bank Watkins Donald Trump Norm Trump Organization Clinton Joffe
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"An example of something that i personally experienced a about a year or so before olympics. Got a gene test One thing that that came out was that i had a sprinter gene. I didn't know i had always been More a road cyclist. An endurance base But it was a key that unlocked the understanding for me. And my coaches of why i was responding so well to Explosive power training so that was cool just to go. Oh you disturbed if unlocked something that she didn't really understand before the second thing that came up was my optimum diet was mediterranean. And my guess is they didn't even have a plant based diet on the spectrum of choices back then maybe they did. Maybe they didn't but it came up with mediterranean which is basically a plant based diet for me. Because i've never eat fish taste so it. Basically you know was was that for me and i was like okay. That makes sense. Why i enjoy it so much i like. I didn't have any trouble transitioning from an animal based diets to buy a site like. Oh this is fun this is delicious. You know everything about it just felt good to my body. But there's there's certainly people that alexander. I come across all the time in our work that will say you can't try a plant based diet or i don't want to because my body needs meet. Have you come across anything in your Research in kind of going back to that original question of two individuals optima diets in at and how much they can really differ and if that could be a thing where people's body needs whatever it might be whatever they say so. There's so much in what you just said. I mean i don't even know where to begin. So we'll we'll leave friends gene because that makes sense. I mean we can have a whole conversation about beden itself a second bodies. I have suspicion genetic gets you did based on compensation you decide okay. Old company that Pool three four. But i take issue with the mediterranean dot. Conversation he has why and that's why Testing company is that it is my belief that we are not at a point in a signs yet where we're able to determine from genetics. A diet plan and by the other mean what. We're seeing at the moment at the company. I suspect that you tested with. Which is you will be low fat. You were going to be low. Cobb you're going to be mediterranean right. They have three options. I didn't Okay yeah he said you wouldn't go because yeah right you just seeing what you're seeing right so they divided up into the streets and there are a couple of companies that do this. They say that you're gonna have all they do. Macronesia distribution sent behidn steady Protein thirty percent sent fat. But actually you know. Genetics is way more subtle than that way. More complex and so my issue is if you look the black grid docked right. So someone made a lot of money. On the black group docked and an individual's blood group is genetic right genes determined and they they came up with this book and this extremely successful career around the idea that your black group will determine your so now we've gone from having one dodger guideline for everyone which is the us guidelines to having literally like three or four yards for the whole population of the whole world but we have twenty five thousand genes and we have three to four million of these genetic variations. That are telling us how you respond to the world around you so when you do genetic tests and divided up into mediterranean low at a low carb we falling into the same trap which is at simplify things. We can take a beautiful complex science and we can simplify so make nice and easy for you to manage..

thirty percent olympics twenty five thousand genes four million three options three second thing Cobb two individuals one four yards One thing three four second mediterranean a year or about
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Buffet tables nutrients stress. torma owner. these things we're able to assist understanding so we talk about self norwich so nutrigenomics is actually much. Who am i. how do i understand. Mozelle hetero responsible. Now that's one piece of the puzzle. Which is what. I'm putting in now coming toward you. Spoke about the second piece of the puzzle is the way that our bodies work. Is that a jeans. Continue switching on and off so to use an example that. I'm sure you will completely appreciation. I walk into a coffee shop in the morning. And i order a latter an in latter is going to be a whole lot of dairy milk and a whole lot of caffeine now. My body is going to respond to that order. That drink remember. How do we respond to the wilderness. So i'll i'll genetic spinning will determine how we are able to metabolize or breakdown latter's in the dairy milk as well as metabolize caffeine. That's one part of it. But what actually switches on those enzymes. What makes the lactose enzymes. Which on assuming bit debatable. When the caffeine enzymes fitch on ryan It all is the food we taken so we drink caffeine. The presence of a caffeine will send a signal to switch on the gene. That makes the caffeine enzyme. That i can metabolize so now. We've got two things beginning to learn about ourselves through genetics. One is what are called insights. Understand myself self. Manage and the other one is action. When i do something. It changes the way my jeans behave. It changes the way my jeans switch on and off and that could be exercise bikes. So when i do when. I do a hundred meter sprint. The genes are going switch on and off very different than i'm running a very slow marathon so everything we do in our lives. Every micro decision of every minute of every day will change the way genes behave. And i'll i'll genetics will change how you respond so those two pieces of the genetics puzzle that determine how genetics impacts a health House judy so before we go into more about nutrigenomics talk about the gene itself. And what percentage is inherited and..

Mozelle two pieces one piece of the puzzle second piece of the puzzle One torma two things one part hundred meter one lot of judy
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"To kind of guide me on the journey. So so that's really how the the university thing happened so you're an underachiever. I understand so that's got that that laid out as we before we dive in as we are currently diving instituted no I wanna give you kind of how i understood. It understands it in layman's terms and then you can course correct you know for our audience if i It wrong it's just so simply because it's not that simple but in a few sentences To me from what i've understood. Learn so far as food and its chemical makeup has the power to either turn ourselves and their functions on and off by either disrupting good cell proliferation or disrupting bad cell proliferation or multiplication. It is that generally what it is and like. I said correct where i have it. I have it off overcomplicated. We're actually going back to some simple principles and also you kind of fifty. You did a good job but you did like half half piece of half puzzle and actually you miss the fist puzzle. So this on the buckle is very simple it says like this right we have a genetic blueprint that determines who we all and it's based on a code dna sequence That's inevitable fellows and at ninety nine point nine percents. We're on identical in our code but a point one percent Just like an alphabet in in. Genetics is folded as Twenty six but we have a code written about us and that's why recorded automated print and point one percent. We differ which means three to four million pesos in our dna. You and i are different from each other. Wow now those differences determine how we respond to the world around us heavy exist in the world so many people when they think about nugenix they think about our ishmael vegetables or caffeine will lactose right but actually the story is much much more complex and actually maxwell beautiful that because it's how do we exist in as well and how do we respond to the world around us so absolutely optogenetics will determine how responded to the food that we eat with that feed is caffeine or latter's vegetables vitamins or gluten Meat or any of those things but this more than that. How do we respond differently. Exercise so some of us when we train we get stronger and quickly passed. Some of us get injured. I need a lot of time recovery. So how do we respond when we stopped having this kind of activity around buddy. What about stress. Why does some of us managed More resilient to stress in alive an others of us less. What about viruses like covid. Why awesome more susceptible open. Get the virus. We get more ill so everything about nature. Genetics is how we respond to the world around us and that is driven by were coach genetic variation so these small little spinning changes in our dna spinning changes in dna. That we just for something is actually done have kimmel. I have a company called three for genetics. Which is actually a genetic testing company. We actually able to test with a cheek swab and look at those spinning changes. Dna and help you and stand how you responded to your world around you. Not just your food. Supplements excise carries energy..

three four million pesos half half piece of one percent fifty nine percents ninety nine point three for genetics Twenty six half puzzle fist puzzle
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"And so we're now into undone as you said in a networking in a nutrition clinic. I wasn't working just because i love nutrition. I was actually working to make money to go. Travelling in your back money. That was the degree i had dry. So i actually had was so angry. So just envision with the sufficient. I was leaving. I was just gonna work there long enough to earn some money to travel and audit and actually know. What's the next thing was going to be that exact age where you've got a backpack and you know your show and i was at the clinic in london. They were approached by some dr rosin garrison who was She's a geneticist. An yourself wasn't extraordinary visionary. And she had this idea that the future of medicine was going to be genetics nutrition and she wants company and she had an injury based up and she was looking for titian to it with her to build the first in interests and she came to this clinic. We had one dietician clinic. That was me and she's like. Would you like to spend a cop. Two days of me. I was like fantastic travelled to southampton i get to take a train again. It'd be a be. But i have no idea what nutrigenomics says and she don't worry we'll give you some papers to read so other way down. The train have hampton. I'm reading newspapers about an t barn. E still denoted stemming intimate had to fantastic days there and even though. I really did not understand anything that she was saying. There was something about the compensation that really excited me That genetics could influence nutrition or the over and it just walked something in me and she she turns well. We need a dietician who specializes in genetics. I know nothing i know. I don't even remember chromosomes. I remember jeans. But if you prepare be patient me off. Study and learn. And i'd love to to kevin join me. And that's what happened. Silent up joining Ended up moving the us. I lived in boulder colorado Which is a awesome place to that. You're gonna live in the from london and ended up on a growing up in inside anna and literally studying from biology textile. And the thing. Is that a new. So little that i was like just so grateful for these extreme mental number three women who ready changed my life in terms of mentorship but the one thing i realized on. Is that the geneticist. to Melody had the ridicule job. They had the good job they got to choose. The genes studied the genetics amended. Come to me and say so. What would you recommend like. And i'm known. I don't want to be doing like been recommendations. I want to be building genetic. It's okay so so. That's when i realized that if i was going to do this i had to go back to university that are bucking going to be able to do it on a ticks degree in a biology textbook so i went back to back to university. And that's when. I did a phd inch genetics but specializing in nutrigenomics. And that was a very long long. Because i was working at the same time. I had two little children and will become knows supervises when you should make those days was the early two thousands and it wasn't someone who i could say Canoe sleep visit Degree together.

kevin london southampton boulder colorado Two days two little children dr Melody rosin garrison first one one dietician three women two thousands anna titian
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"So man it's like any addiction It's it's my meditation it's scape. It's my way of connecting with will nature so as it doug gabby started. It's it's a real extrordinary gift to be able to disseminate implementation. Sounds like quite a passion. Is the ocean down there. Generally warmer or colder arpaio ocean even in the summer is still just pretty chilly. What what is the The ocean like off the coast of cape town. We'll be extract to because right as trying so we. We have the indian ocean which is obviously matt. I do not live on the indian ocean side we have the atlantic ocean and atlantic ocean is very cold all year round and in fact it's bowling summer so we have outside like a lot of time is swimming at about fifty fahrenheit. Yeah it's chilly sometimes. Go up to sixty but we do between fifty and sixty so it's shitty as But are very cold. Dr han akali over the benefits of cold water. She was talking about showers not swimming. So i'm sure you're you're reaping a lot of emotional and physical benefits from it. I myself do not some in cold water. So when i choose my races which i haven't done in a while there always have to be warm. Water between seventy and eighty. That's where you got Marissa's maybe but otherwise not. I'm as uh Me you become completely addicted to that cold and as you say is a huge amount of scientific research which talks about cold water immersion and as you see a lotta people using culture house which is great. If that's what you can access at grade and we talked about vegas stimulation and half and tested. It is remind amoud mood behavior out sleep. So i'm a big fan from a science point of view i've experienced it. We have achieved swimming community. Mac how so many people with mood disorders Battling with anxiety and depression drawn into cold water swimming and it is a genetic story ride. Because it's the cold water that actually switches on genes that are related to managing managing anxiety and depression. Sorta like certain fields. We can eat jeans exercise. They can do that. Changed the way genes. Behave and john but the same thing with with cold water immersion so it is a great time story a great genetic story the as well off. It is incredibly fascinating. Maybe we can dive into that. As we start serpentine through all of the aspects of our life that affect our genes. Not just not just food but you. This is fascinating. She started as isn't architect during your university years but you switched to dietetic after your grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. I was studying architecture and the exit. Update that's right. My grand was diagnosed with cancer. Died break quickly kind of cancer..

atlantic ocean about fifty fahrenheit indian ocean arpaio ocean cape town han akali fifty Marissa john Mac eighty seventy up sixty Dr
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Not gonna hide these things. And keep the yourselves onto our guest though. Alexandra super pumps or a neutral genomics expert in scientists to join us. And she's probably gonna be able to explain to us. Why achieves made for potatoes or vegetables could be good to our jeans and encourage good cell output. And why maybe jerry cheese made from. Cow's can turn on bad cell function and can lead to disease so let me dive in introduce our guest. Today we are going to geek out on some science which we know y'all love and genetics and nutrition and how nutrition plays a key role in our genetics with are really guest. Dr yale joffe In the field of nutrigenomics and she has been at it for nearly thirty years as a practitioner scientist. She juggles her time running for capetown south africa clinic. Three by four which. I'm excited to to dive into that name as well as educating health practitioners on how they can incorporate nutrigenomics their own work. Dr joppy is also the author of three books countless scientific articles and a member of the revolutionary team who matched the very first neutrogena test in the year two thousand. Oh and i'm not done. I have to mention that. She is an avid open. Water swimmer just like someone else we know. That's on the slugfest with us. And it's not me and she's a mom of two. Wow wow wow well. Welcome to switch for good podcast. Dr joffe a Thanks to that great in show we could ready. Just have you talked about swimming and not talk about. Genetic flaw is not going to happen. Well i'm gonna make you talk about some some nutrigenomics but we could definitely touch on swim. Eight let's just start there then. That sounds like fun. I i want to go into a wonderful wonderful story about your grandmother. So let's do some personal Dr jockey before we go into the nutrigenomics. How did you get into open water. Swimming do you. Compete are still very active in it. I do not. I do not compete as i am. Not competitive i do companies in the sense that i do every possible events. I can and i like most peoples federal as a got injured opinion. Just the usual story Discovered the open wta and discovered the ocean and so it's probably been about seven years now or nothing to us kind of started the ocean and you realize extremely amazing vulnerability in nature and just emerged in the ocean. And i discovered the coals. Which was the next step for me. And being able to withstand cold water immersion..

Today joppy three books yale joffe two thousand Alexandra Eight Three seven years four two africa nearly thirty years first neutrogena Dr joffe capetown jockey Dr south
"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"joffe" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Multiple times Experience the incredible cheese sauces at my favorite vegan spots like chefs Chefs are incredible like the chef. Alexandra that we've had on the podcast. Us deputy who is the head chef and co owner.

Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

Outcomes Rocket

05:39 min | 1 year ago

Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket. Today i have the privilege of hosting paul sorbo. He is the director of sales at wabi medical. Where they're helping the world to think better they're doing brain performance assessments with a very unique approach and in this interview. I have an extraordinary conversation with him. Learning more about how they're making a difference in brain health. And so with that intro. I am so privileged to have you here on the podcast paul. Thanks for joining me. Thank you chris. It's great to be here. Yeah so you know. We previously had another member of your team. Aaron from wabe. If you guys haven't had a chance to listen to that podcast go to the website. Go to wabe mad. And you'll see our rate chat with erin but today we've got paul on the podcast and he's gonna die of a bit deeper into the topic of brain health and what we're doing to do more and to do better within that field so before we do that though paul you know why. Don't you go ahead and tell us what exactly inspires your work in healthcare watts. Broad question to me I think for me it was always. I had a fascination with the human body whether it was from the performance aspect. i. I'm an ex bodybuilder. And so i always had this huge fascination trying to manipulate the human body to be the best at it could all the way through my undergrad. And we'll getting in about school. I had a huge fascination at the genome and and a genetic and solving things like duchenne muscular dystrophy with genomic other being crisper cast nine gene regulation. And you know all of a sudden. I started thinking about this and you know genetics. You're just familiar with upi genetics and and protonix. And when you really get into that you know you start looking at medicine as a whole and realizing that we are not controlling what we can. And that i want to continue to strive to make people the best version of themselves that they can be and continue to drive the education behind that specifically in now with lobby kind of the brain sector. Yeah that's pretty cool man so you did like weight training professionally or what. What's the story there. Never professionally I had a whole bunch of friends that were professional bodybuilders. Still to this day. You know on a fascination with muscle for lack of a better term probably unhealthy fascination for being I like to call bodybuilders the first bile hackers you know when when tides just now coming out and getting into mainstream medical community us bodybuilders. Been using uptight for twenty years and not in a nearly regulated fashion. Obviously very underground bro science for lack of a better term. But yeah i mean i. I'm five foot nine. I was all the way up to about two hundred fifty four pounds. It less than ten percent body fat which was not healthy by the way could punish shoes And realize that you know. I think that's a good topic of conversation about health. Though you know people. I think genuinely believe that external appearance can actually reflect internal health and that is so far from true. 'cause x i looked extremely healthy right. I ate what i thought right things. I had low body fat. I had astronomical amount of muscle mass for my frame but internally when i started looking at my labs my panels my lipid panels cluster all levels my ratios. My inner cellular calcium levels all of a sudden. I'm like close. I am the furthest thing from health. Yeah and you know. It's a good call and we've got a measure to understand where we're at and that's a lot of what you guys are doing with wabi around the brain so talked a little bit about the business and some insights about how you guys are helping. Health care leaders do their job around brain assessment. Yeah i think the key there to what he's done let me start by saying why doesn't do anything do what we do. Is we make information significantly more accessible so measuring the brain has been really underdone. Because it's never been a accessible be. It's never been affordable. Those are the two things that david oakley data joffe really set out to change e. g. and evoked potentials or. Erp have been around for sixty seventy years. The problem with both of those erp specifically was really only used in brain death situations to measure. You know long hospital procedure and prostate expensive and b. e. g. is really people are familiar with the g. from epilepsy studies. And these really terrible torture base you know. Eeg say league caps. You're just awful and they're expensive and they're not quick right so when you talk about measuring the brain you know. Are you going to send a client or patient to go. Get a yearly. Mri no are you gonna go send a client to get a yearly specs or anything else out there eeg. No you're not gonna do it because it's going to cost them. I don't know that many people that have five to ten thousand dollars our way every year. Nobody i mean right very hit. I know people that do it yearly. And i'm like that's excessive right but when you really look at that the problem is that by not doing that on a regular basis as we don't have a whole bunch of data on the parade you know it's not like we're able to just go in with a stethoscope and listen to the way than our heart is a. We haven't been able to do that with the brain and so really. The only clinton which measurement is happening is when. There's already a problem whether there's already issues of cognitive decline whether there's already ti stroke whether there's already behavioral sheeps and so we don't really know these baseline normative were supposed to be or house amongst progressing their cognitive science progressing as they age. And that's really. The foundation of lavi is providing a simple fast and affordable assessment that we establish a baseline and then compare subsequent. Scans to see how someone is progressing

Paul Sorbo Wabi Medical Paul Upi Genetics Erin Aaron David Oakley Chris Joffe Clinton Foundation Of Lavi
"joffe" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

The Friends of Israel Today

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"joffe" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

"What, why is that important to you? I have to know have. I I love working with withstand with with wisdom with us. I do love working stay with US obviously. But I, love working with the Friends of Israel because we both as Jews and Christians understand the importance of Israel as the homeland for the Jewish people the historical and religious connections to the land of a of a country that is a beacon of light in the Middle East democracy where anyone of any religion can celebrate their beliefs and have access to their holy sites without fear of persecution. This is I go to the Kotel. Ca Dome of the Rock is there. I can walk the path that Jesus walked follow. That same thing that's very moving. That's that's important. What would happen if if they weren't in Israel What would happen for the where no democracy and one no freedom to our working together to ensure safe and secure Israel is very, very important to me and I am particularly grateful for the work that the Friends of Israel does on on Israel's behalf you know for our listeners some of you might be, you know you might not recognize the name Paul Joffe. But if I know a lot of our listeners, go to our national conferences they. Go to our WINONA LAKE conference they go to our Lancaster conference and you might remember Pa because she was the one that sells Israeli jewelry while she's there as well. I. Mean Paula is she's got a ton of things that she's doing and this is just one way that she supports Israel and she also connects with you. So maybe you remember for those of you listening who've into our conferences maybe you you remember Paula from that. I think about the importance like you're saying of an Israel when it comes to Jewish people and for Christians as well because you know like you said, you can go to the Western Wall and what's amazing Christians left going to the Western Wall. They respect that and I've never met a Jewish person that says you gotta get this Church of the Holy Sepulcher Outta here or you gotta you gotTa get rid of the garden tomb or the Via Dolorosa you gotta get rid of these things that's never liked that there's a unity and understanding that Jerusalem and Israel is a sacred place for both people. This is something that needs to be preserved. Wouldn't you say I would agree with that? Paul. How can people in the short time that we have remaining outcome people connect with stand with us in what we're doing is as evangelical growls, Chris Thank you so much for asking me that question I would encourage all of your listeners to go to our website stand with dot com and learn more on the homepage their tab that if you know of an anti Semitic incident, you can click on that tab and that report will go right to our center for Combating Antisemitism This is an amazing new agency that launched just about a year ago and it is lead believe it or not by a wonderful mcsorley gamble who's a Christian and they have among other things, a rewards program where they can offer a monetary compensation for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a person or persons accused of committing an anti Semitic crime So their website if you want to go there directly, even it's stand up to hatred dot com, but you can get to them by going on the homepage and clicking. Right. Through to them learn about who we are learn a bath high school on campus programs that we talked about. You might know some exceptional students that you'd like to recommend for these positions I would suggest that you doesn't matter that they're Christians they can participate. Yes. On College Campus Right? Right. We talked about that as a matter of fact, my campus coordinator for the mid Atlantic regions a wonderful young man. Matt. Courses who. Christian. Yes. As a matter of fact, he's Hispanic and he just participated on the stand with US panel on why it's important to be a Latino Zionist. What website again can people go to stand with US DOT COM stand with US DOT COM my friend if you're listening to stand with US DOT com, go there connect with stay with us dot com.

"joffe" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

The Friends of Israel Today

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"joffe" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

"Right. So another example we're not just in the United States we're across North America a young woman who attended McGill University was just recognized for her leadership with the Stan with us. Roberta. Side award for courage and leadership because on her campus at Gill University she was really stunned to come face to face with several anti. Semitic incidents one being in her sorority where she wanted to participate in a panel on diversity and was told, no, you're Jewish that would make other students uncomfortable. You may not be. No sorority, a place of refuge, and she face this but What she was really recognized for was outstanding leadership in dealing with a professor political science class, which was attended by over six hundred students The professor used the Israel Palestinian conflict as an example of human rights violations. So she reached out to her stand with US campus coordinator and in conjunction with our superb research and strategy team cam up with a whole new list of resources for the professor which was attended while and used in future lessons. Really. Yeah. So this is A change of mind absolutely within a professor usually you'd think there might be ardent. They're not gonNA move there you know but but it looked like you were able to change your mind as a result of the students were they are remarkable. They are the leaderships leaders they are on the front lines and stand with US trains. Them gives them the confidence, the tools to stand up to to the antisemitism. And speak out and tell the truth. That's amazing. Now, listen for those of you who are just joining in. I, Have Pala Joffe with me she's the executive director of the mid Atlantic region for stand with us. We've been talking about the work that stand with us doing and when we come back, Paul is GonNa, give some information on how we can connect with sand with us. We're GONNA continue this discussion and Paula is going to highlight which I think is something. So important the work of how Christians and Jewish people can come together for the cause of good to stand up for the nation, of Israel, and to stand up for the Jewish people. So be sure to stick around. Israel is under constant attack. They're under attack from the United Nations in certain European countries even label Israeli goods to warn the products are made in Judea and Samaria the middle. East has a very unhealthy antisemitic sentiment toward Israel and the Jewish people listened. There are a lot of reasons to be upset this this this constant attack of Israel from the world but you know what really makes me sad is when Bible believing Christians oppose Israel. If there is one text reveals God's heart and passion for his people and his land, it's the scriptures and the Church of Jesus Christ needs to. Know. This biblical truth and that's why I'm excited to offer you a resource that will give you the tools and information you need to show that God loves Israel it's called ten reasons Christians should support Israel. Ten reasons Christians should support. Israel is an easy read and it will connect you with Bible verses that will show your brothers and sisters in Christ..

Israel United States Stan professor McGill University Roberta executive director Gill University North America Church of Jesus Christ Paula United Nations Pala Joffe coordinator East Paul Atlantic
"joffe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"joffe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anto good afternoon it's twelve noon I'm Marla Davies from WBEZ Chicago it's This American Life I'm kinda Joffe Walt sitting in for ira glass is here but I'm taking over today show because we're talking about questions that I think are pretty fundamental to all of us at various points in our lives but especially pressing for me these days I'd like to explain with a brief example of a situation I find myself and all the time lately with my two children feeling deeply lost it's bath time Jacob the older one is running a restaurant is giving out great prizes cups for grown ups and also animals I would you can says if someone in your family is Christian you can get one of those what no yes no they don't do it matches the animal and says sorry I can't have any animals Christian No shoes allowed says my three and a half year old to my Jewish face so here is my question what am I supposed to say right here because I should say something right I should say that is not okay because why because I said so because your NGO because Jews like your great grandparents were driven from their communities by exactly the mentality you've just expressed to me my three and a half year old boy where because we live in a majority Christian country and I'm worried that I've clearly already failed to provide you with a positive relationship to Judaism born is the best approach not to say anything he's just having a bath I don't know as you will hear it's not nice to say that somebody can't have.

Marla Davies Chicago Joffe Walt Jacob
Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

The Electorette Podcast

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

"I'm Jim Taylor. Skinner in this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with professor reproductive. Rights Advocate Carol. Joffe about her new book. Obstacle course the everyday struggle to get an abortion in America. We opened our conversation by discussing. How legislation has failed to protect access to abortion because it overlooks the everyday obstacles. That make it nearly impossible from any women to obtain an abortion legislatively. I confess to being very cynical. I seriously I don't think that even I mean. Look the country's deeply deeply divided about abortion those who are pro choice. See these restrictions as inhibiting often in a very cruel way women's ability to get an abortion. Those who are against abortion say. Yeah that's the point. We we are putting these things in precisely so we don't believe in abortion so therefore These restrictions are good because they make it harder to get an abortion. They they make it easier to close down clinics so all is to say that. I'm I mean in terms of the legislative process I don't think that anything we say in our book will sway. Those who who are opposed to abortion could put an antiabortion restrictions. What my co author David Cone and I are hoping is that those who are pro-choice but do not do abortion work or study or advocacy twenty four seven like many of the People. We discuss in our book. will come to understand how onerous restrictions are and hopefully will will move to remove those legislators out of office so who who are doing this as people who are pro choice when. I look for someone to vote into office right just to put. It simply feels like this people when they speak to us and you know. They're saying vote for me when they talk about abortion they talk about Roe v Wade and it doesn't spread from there they don't really talk about all of the little restrictions that have gone into place which makes exercising your right to an abortion nearly impossible for a lot of women. I mean legislatively one of the things that you point out in the book is that you know Central v Wade past have been about what to- hundred restrictions by now probably probably more like thirteen hundred? Yeah I feel like none of our politicians are really focusing on those. Are you know they have a blind spot? They're only looking at Roe v Wade. We have the protective weighed. Yes no if certainly make sense and and You know what I would say in response to that is of course. It's important to protect Roe. V Wade and there's a lot to be very nervous about at this very moment about row but what researching and writing this book show to me. Is that many women already live in post real world. In other words if roe is overturned what presumably will happen is it will be turned back to the states. That means they'll be a lot of traveling from what we now. Call hostile states to quote haven states. But that's already happening. I mean one thing that really surprised me and I've studied abortion more than thirty five years. one thing. That really surprised me was just extent of the travel of efforts at took to just get to a clinic for so many women. The really important thing about your book when I was reading it. You outline the stories of a lot of women. I think the first person you highlight is a fifteen year old teenager right and her parents were kind of in and out of the picture. And when you think about the fact that in some states you have to have parental consent right and you think about the thousands of dollars at it takes to get an abortion and this particular person ended up in one of those e call fake clinic. What do they call them? A clinic crisis pregnancy center. You just talk us through that scenario of what that might have been like for her fifteen year old teenager while she was a extrordinary. We did not interview her personally. We we found her story she had written it up So I can't speak to her personally but she. She had extraordinary. Extraordinarily determination was like for her to go to the center. She lives in the state where she had to make a separate trip to the clinic. Twenty four hours before the abortion. She got to the clinic. She realized something was wrong. It was a fake clinic. These crisis pregnancy centers and there's thousands of them there. There are more crisis. Pregnancy centers in the United States. Now than there are abortion providing facilities and in a number of states. They get they get public funding. You know one of the most of the many things in this world to be enraged about one of the most enraging things is for example in the state of Texas. Money is taken away from family planning centres not even abortion. I mean you may be sure does not give money to abortion clinics but to family planning programs contraceptive programs and gives them to these religiously sponsored crisis pregnancy centers that outright. Lie To women they either tell them they're ultrasound is so far along that Can't pass get an abortion? Or sometimes they tell them they're ultrasound shows actually earlier stage in pregnancy than they actually are so these women won't rush and by the time they get to a clinic They'll be too late. Another feature of them is that they have been very aggressive about buying property. Is nearest possible to legitimate abortion facilities and it's often very very confusing to patients. I mean this this case that we talked about in the book we call her Collier. It's very common especially for example in in a case that we do discuss the park crisis. Pregnancy center had a parking lot right next to a clinic. People from the fake clinic would stand outside would wave women in who of course stopped that they were being waived into the real clinic. So yeah this is one of many many problems that women face when they try to get an abortion. When I read this story I I. It was just incredible to me. I was so angry. And just the Paul the links go to to to to lie to women and you know into teenagers who are going through something. That's really really hard. So and in that case with Talia this clinic you can remind me or tell me if I'm correct or not. This clinic was right next door very close to it and it looked very much like the real clinic and the name was very similar. That's right and when you go into these places they're they're you know they're wearing lab coats and make you think that their doctors that's right and just it's just unfathomable to me the link to go through none of the I think you hit the right word on the head. It's unfathomable that these fake clinics Goto but it also Jennifer I would also say it's unfathomable the lengths women not just teenagers but women in general have to go through to get their abortions and they do. Yeah they do right. That gets to one of my next questions do we do. We have any data on. The percentage is the percentage of cases where obstacles collectively were. They've been successful right in a woman knocking abortion we done. That's a great question. We don't have good data on specifically women who were dissuaded or allied to at a crisis pregnancy center. My colleagues here at UCSF in the answer program have come up with a estimate that about four thousand women a year Who Show up at clinics are turned away because they arrived too late in in just station. Your listeners should understand that all abortion facilities are not uniform some go only through the first trimester of pregnancy some go to eighteen weeks Some states a number of states have banned abortions after twenty weeks there's only three or four clinics and the United States that will perform abortions after twenty four weeks and that's usually for Fetal anomalies or the woman herself is is very ill. I mean those are not the only people who get abortions there. But that's the bulk of the cases so It's a very cruel vicious cycle Europe. Poor woman you find out you're pregnant you try you look around you. Try to find a clinic. You make an appointment you try to find someone who will drive you there. You try to arrange childcare for your children. Sixty percent of abortion patients are our parents You arrange to take time off from work so all you have to put all these things into place. What we found out is simply getting a getting a reliable ride to a clinic if you don't have your own car or even if you do some clinics a use sedation which means you are not able to drive yourself home afterwards. Anyway but the time you get all these pieces in place and you show up to the clinic you may be past that clinics limit

ROE Wade United States Professor America Jim Taylor Skinner Joffe Ucsf David Cone Texas Collier Talia Jennifer I Paul
"joffe" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"joffe" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The ACLU has filed a lawsuit on behalf of Louisville's EM w women surgical center saying the law is unconstitutional. Wwl Kyi weather forecast. Partly cloudy, a high of fifty five your next news update is at three. I'm Suzanne Duval, NewsRadio eight forty W H A S results may vary. Call for details. You've been. Thinking about for years. You've heard how lace it can be a life changer. And now there's never been a better time to see if Lasik is right for you. That's right. If you're looking for Lasik and Louisville Joffe custom Lasik has advanced custom laser technology. And now for the best price starting at just two hundred ninety five dollars per I put this offer years was over in seconds and within twenty four hours. I had better than twenty twenty vision a beautiful facility, the latest technology Joffe Lasik changed my life. Joffe is your answer for safe pain-free, affordable Lisek Joffe lacy can correct nearsightedness farsightedness and astigmatism, and now for the best price starting at just two hundred ninety five dollars per I in Louisville. Don't wait any longer. Get your one hundred percent free. Lasik exam to see if Lasik is right for you. Call in schedule your free Lasik exam. Just style star star. I on your mobile phone now. Dial star star E Y the exam is one hundred percent free. Just dial star star I on your mobile phone now that star star E Y. Dial star star I islands in the Caribbean. Like to say that if you. You don't like the weather. Wait, ten minutes. Hi, I'm RIC Edelman, and that's great advice for the stock market to it's easy to get upset when the market falls. But what we have to remember is that this too shall pass. Let's easy to say. But sometimes it can feel hard to do. So in times like these. When stock prices are swinging wildly one day to the next making you worry that your financial future might be at risk. Here's the advice, you need don't feel that you have to go it alone. I invite you to talk with one of my experience, financial planners at Financial Engines. Let's take a look at your investments and see if they're doing what you need and expect will either reassure you that you're doing what you should be doing or we'll give you recommendations to help. You get the peace of mind you need. So you can well wait for the sun to shine..

Lasik Louisville Joffe custom Lasik Joffe Lasik Louisville Wwl Kyi ACLU Suzanne Duval Joffe RIC Edelman Financial Engines Lisek Joffe Caribbean two hundred ninety five dollar one hundred percent twenty four hours eight forty W
Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

PRI's The World

02:04 min | 3 years ago

Yemen's crushing war takes a tentative first step to a resolution

"Yemeni capital by secret. Police last year they held him for five months in prison run by Yemen's who the rebels he shot and his family live in Cairo. Now, we spoke with him this afternoon about the planned release of thousands of prisoners who were captured in the Yemeni civil war. I remember what my family had to go through Joe tension. They constantly worried that I wasn't gonna make it alive out of the prison than even know where I was I was kept in dungeon for five months solitary confinement, one meter by one meter and a half cell. I had no windows. There was no light for the first two weeks. And. I was literally buried alive. People ask me what I stepped out of prison when I was released will I be seeking revenge against the footy. I guess my captors, but the one thing I kept insisting on repeating was that out of one vengeance out of entre. Vengeance. What has happened has already happened? Let's turn promote peace. So to my family to the prisoners inside those cells. It means a lot that those are breakthrough that has got to be a prisoner. Swap the prisoner. Swap is gonna mean, basically, giving them a second chance at life Yemeni political active at political analyst and former political prisoner. He Sean Allah Mesa. He spoke with us about the prisoner. Swap brokered by the UN this week in Sweden, which may help pave the way for further talks to end the Yemen war. I'm Marco werman, and you're with the world. So an African king walks into a barbershop, I'm king Joffe Jolfa ruler of someone. Yeah. We'll have see them to be ready to say that barbershop and Eddie Murphy's coming to America was one of many influences in a new play by Nigerian INA Elam's barbershop chronicles is set in. Also in Johannesburg, Harare, Legos London as well as.

Yemen Political Analyst Sean Allah Mesa Eddie Murphy Ina Elam Marco Werman Legos London Cairo Joffe Jolfa UN Johannesburg JOE America Sweden Five Months One Meter Two Weeks
The case of Carlton Heard

Serial

01:57 min | 4 years ago

The case of Carlton Heard

"Plus court fees, which she has to pay because she put guilty. She was convicted. If the state had dropped the charger, she'd gone to trial. In one, these fees would disappear. I showed them to Ross to ask if he could explain the itemize list, fourteen different fees, some with names that suggested deep respect for catchall accounting, reparations county operations court, special projects fund something called ad fee. Russ had no idea what the stuff was. Laughing. Oh, my that's steep is what it is. Anna, who's the court? A total of seven hundred eighty four dollars and fifty cents on top of the five hundred. She paid the bondsman rusted. There's a way he can petition the court to waive the fees Vanna campaign, but she doesn't ask them to. He doesn't offer technically is not her lawyer anymore. List of fees was surprised to Anna to have you seen this before this number? Now? Did you know about all these fees? No. No. I mean, I plan to pay it. I'm just, you know. Do you have a job? No. I just lost my job. So I don't know. Just crazy. Rianne getting hungry, Sarah. She's pregnant. She just found out. She's happy about it hoping for a girl a month later, and it was working at McDonalds, her online account with the court. Meanwhile has turned red indicating that the county clerk has handed over the Bill to the attorney general's office for collection all this for an m for disorderly. Felony. Judge I was talking to for a different story in the series told me he was thinking of giving a defendant serious time what's serious time I asked explained well to someone with common sense, even one day in jail is devastating life changing to someone who's got no common sense. Maybe they do three years. Five years means nothing go right back out, commit more crimes. I knew any men punishment is relative what it takes to teach you a lesson depends on what you're used to, but there was more disturbing implication as well when that prowls this courthouse and throughout our criminal Justice system that we are not like them. The ones we arrest and punish the ones with the stink. They're slightly different species with senses, dulled and toughened. They don't feel pain or sorrow, or joy, or freedom or the loss of freedom. The same way you are. I would this little case for the state of Ohio wasn't little for Anna. In our interview, she couldn't bring herself to watch the bar surveillance video of that night. It was too upsetting. She teared up a couple of times thinking about what a horrible year at had been, and she blamed herself. She'd been stupid to go to a bar like that. She said the people she didn't trust. Anna doesn't have money. She doesn't have a stable job. She's really young, just twenty one. And I didn't feel the stress and outrage and shame of this case less than I would have. I think she felt it more. Before Annas final day in court, when she ended up taking the plea russet had only one interaction with the judge. Regarding Anna's case, he was summoned to her chambers Bakar bailiff who told us that judge Clancy had a question for him. Ross waited around for twenty minutes. Finally, the bail of came out and just related the question out of curiosity, the judge would like to know was the defendant in this case related to a county judge had recently retired. Same last name. Rest whole debate live now no relation. Russell me this almost a year after it happened. What if the answer had been? Yes. And it was related to the retired judge. Oh, said Russ, it would have been dismissed if they've found out she was a judge's knees or related in some way. I don't think she would have been charged. That how it works in Cleveland next time on Syria. Serials produced by Julie Snyder Emmanuel, Joe cheap, Ben Calhoun, and me with additional reporting by easiest goski editing on this episode from IRA glass, Brian Reid, Khanna Joffe walled, Nancy, Updike. Whitney Dangerfield is our digital editor research. In fact, checking by Ben falen sound design and mixed by stone Alson music clearance by Anthony. Roman Seth land is our director of operations. ZipRecruiter ads voiced by Stephanie food. Ciro staff includes Emily Khandan, Julie Whitaker, Cassie, Halley, and Francis Swanson. Our music is by Adam Dorn and how Wilner with additional music from Matt McGinley. Our theme song is by Nick Thorburn and remixed by Adam Dorn special. Thanks to Dana Chavis, rich Auras, Amy Callaghan, Lisa Knoller Bennett. Epstein, Alex Kotla, wits, and Steve bogere who spent a year in the Cook County courthouse in Chicago. He wrote a great book about it called courtroom. Throw to that book is the inspiration for the season. We also wanna thank the judges in staff at the cuyahoga county court of Common Pleas. Also everyone. Over at the county prosecutor's office and at the cuyahoga county public defender's office. Finally, the art on our website was made by melody nukem. She created the mural for this episode and by moth studio, who do the animation, please check it out on our website, serial podcast dot org. That serial podcast dot org were also, of course on Facebook and Twitter support for serial comes from ZipRecruiter. Unlike many job sites, ZipRecruiter doesn't wait for candidates to find you. ZipRecruiter finds them for you, so you get qualified candidates fast, try it free at ZipRecruiter, dot com. Slash cereal. That's ZipRecruiter, dot com. Slash cereal, cereal production of this American life and WBZ Chicago.

Anna Ziprecruiter Cuyahoga County Court Of Commo Russ Ross County Judge Cuyahoga County Mcdonalds Adam Dorn Cook County Courthouse Vanna Wbz Chicago Ohio Sarah Facebook Nick Thorburn Attorney Prosecutor Matt Mcginley Ben Falen