18 Burst results for "Joel Salatin"

What Current Heart Health Treatments Get Wrong and How to Fix This

The Keto Answers Podcast

05:39 min | 2 months ago

What Current Heart Health Treatments Get Wrong and How to Fix This

"Doc. Thanks for coming on the show today. Thank you so much doctor, appreciate having you on big Sandia working at an excited to share a lot of the stuff. I'm doing with your audience. Likewise have been following your stuff for while I. Think the first time I saw year. Your stuff was actually. Tat Halio flexible years ago. Paleo? Facts was definitely an interesting event a lot. Good people over there and you know for for anyone who's never been an again. It's kind of like finding your tribe and you know getting some good food and working out a little bit and getting some excellent lectures from some very very entertaining speakers and really kind of supporting all the stuff that we do award. You know we're talking about Paleo or or carnivore. I think the one thing that separates me maybe from a some of the people that I met there is that you know we're just hardcore about organic free range grass fed wild seafood, so it's like know we want you to eat this way, but we also want you to eat the best of the best. This is not lite. Jack Wolfson sang a Burger King. Get a double opera. Hold the Bun. You know we WANNA make. Sure? We do at the right. Early, I mean. Have you had any pushback on that type of stuff? There's sometimes where I promote that very similarly and I just get this whole. You being elitist freak, and like people can't afford that and not sustainable for all Americans I mean. What is your sort of slanted that? Yeah. My slant is I mean it is the only thing that sustainable I mean the the way that corporate farming happens and and large ranches. Operates that is not sustainable, because that is just destroying the environment. You have to do it through regenerative. Farming and grazing practices, so I think books by Joel Salatin and and things that they really identified the best way to do. It is really the only way, and that is the healthiest forest to I mean when we test people's levels of pesticides and chemical exposure there sky-high. If they don't if they don't eat things, the right way so does it costs more for organic food. Is it cost more for free range grass-fed? Yeah, and it should, and you know Anthony I would challenge all those people and say hey. I I can probably find some other areas of your life where we can cut from the budget. Don't Cook from the health food budgets better for us. To eat that way. Live that way and it's and it's again. It's the only way the planet's GonNa Survive is by is by doing things the way we've always done it as hunter gatherers in. Bringing that into twenty first century world, totally one of the things that I think about often is that how hard it is to even have access stuff right now and just how all nutritious food used to be free in abundant passed, and now I'm even going to small towns. availability for real food is actually pretty challenging will a lot of work to do regarding supply chain and distribution, and getting to that point, where Jenny little bit before we started recording about how you see your time between. Scottsdale in a small town in Colorado and just wondering in Colorado sort of a small area. Do you have easy access to food them even in Austin where I'm as? There's not that many sources to to buy truly good quality food. Yeah I think you know the other thing, too. Is that the more that we support this? The more that we put our money direct our resources into these types farms. Well more people are going to do it it just. It's just a great business model kind of one of the things I've talked about most recently. Is that you have all these people? Millions of people literally millions that worked for the the and Human Services Department on a federal level, and in the State Department of Health, and the County Department of Health and school board. You know a health if we were to get rid of a lot of those people. Because their jobs are totally unnecessary. Get rid of those people in redirect them into organic farming into into pasteurize. Practices it sounds like a pipe dream, but you know. Let's put all the really. The resources over their prices will come down. It's better for our health. It's better for the planets, but you know I think you know. Listen answer your question up in this small town where in Colorado there, there is a place up there that again. There's a lot of places that do you know free range grass-fed that do? Who they do grow during the in during the cold season's that they're able to grow indoor You know in greenhouses, and and we support those people and again I'm not interested in new cars, new new housing or new clothing for myself. I'm not interested in travel. I mean I love doing all that stuff. Believe me I do, but the first thing is. You gotTa Take Care of yourself with the food and especially. If you've got young ones at home, anyone your concern with with health and wellness. You gotta put. Put Your money over there, you know Scottsdale is okay for food, and then California's pretty pretty ahead of the trend when it comes to healthy food California of course has their own problems, but Colorado and I think over the years once again. Farmers markets we love going farmers markets Arizona's got some great farmers markets for nine months out of the year the growing season. Here I mean obviously they've got a ton of sunshine. You know the the issue down here is water and summertime too much heat flight. They're growing. Season is nine months. It's it's really spectacular.

Colorado Scottsdale Sandia Joel Salatin California Jack Wolfson State Department Of Health Anthony Arizona Austin Human Services Department Pasteurize Jenny County Department Of Health An
"joel salatin" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

13:04 min | 4 months ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"Old crack House Foundation. That's amazing and it was just wonderful. They were doing it as a as a gift to the inner city as a as a gift to the inner city but I asked them I said so. So how much of Saint Louis Is? Food could be produced this way. They said if you take out the dairy and the beef you know the big. The big mega stuff saint Louis could feed its entire city within the city limits. This way and that's true in Detroit. It's true in Baltimore. It might not be true in La but the but here's the thing we don't have to solve every single person's problem to start solving some and our problem is so many times I start down this path and somebody starts throwing at me the most extreme situation and you know what I don't have all the answers for the most extreme situation. You know the the single mom of four minority in a food desert in whatever okay. I don't have the answer to every single situation but I'm looking at suburbia. I'm looking at at incredible things that people are doing an opportunities and if we just did what we know I ran into a lady in in Edmonton Bridge. A Albert. Thank you and she was fifty single lady living in a fifth floor. Condominium just wanted to wanted to farm in a worse she had no money no land nothing and she just had this epiphany one day she said I know I have one friend that has a backyard. She this the backyard she said. Would you mind if I grew up like a ten foot? Ten Foot Garden in your back. I JUST WANNA grow. Something for instance shorter so she little ten ten. By ten plot group started garden the ladies neighbor saw the garden and she said. Do you think your friend would put a garden in my backyard and laser. Well no ask. We'll sure I met this lady. Eighteen months after this initial conversation with her friend she was farming. Eighteen backyard. Had A part time employee was a time farmer. Her her oliver tools were on the side of her bicycle. She bicycled from spot to spot to spot with Oliver Tools and hurt. She started a business called on borrowed ground and growing food. So the thing is is their creativity is their opportunity. It's up the Wazoo if we would become as interested in this as we are the latest dysfunction in the Kardashians or or you know what I'm saying the latest whatever. It's not that we don't have time for it not that we don't have money for it. If there's one really positive thing to come out of this pandemic I hope it's a restructuring of what's valuable in life and if we can if we can even grab a thirty percent bump in value trajectory. It will have been the best thing that ever happened to. That's a large bump. But yeah if we can restructure what's valuable to us. It's very important and as you talking about earlier. What to serve these essential businesses. What what is essential and non essential. It's it's so arbitrary strange and this is something that politicians really aren't supposed to have the power to dictate what we can do in that way and they're not doing it in a smart way. Like here's a perfect example liquor. Stores are an essential business. Non Essential Business Alcoholics anonymous. So alcoholics anonymous not allowed to have their meetings but liquor stores are open because they're essential that is asked backwards thinking that doesn't make any sense. Absolutely I mean Yeah in in. Virginia I mean. Yeah we've got ours in Virginia's well they opened liquor stores and closed the churches they open Walmart and close the farmers market. I I mean Asinine it is. It's absolutely asinine and and and I would even argue that. They don't have the constitutional authority to do that. Would examine it. That would be my argument but but boy fear fear. Fear spawns things that we can't even imagine. What is it like where you are? In Virginia's restaurants open no no so we're so on May fifteenth. We we entered. What's called phase one and so So churches are allowed to to meet again not that the government could have ever taken away but anyway. That's that's the that's the narrative that's the narrative Churches can meet again. We're still at the ten person rule for for Gatherings gatherings but a church as long as they're at fifty percent capacity there. Okay so so. That's up and running Hairdresser back to work a lot of the like the personal hygiene barbers hairdressers you know Small very small scale kind of things like that are back. But it's a it's a slow you know. It's a very very slow process. Yeah it is in someplace. Texas is pretty wide. Open Texas restaurants hotels Everything's backup phoenixes the same way. Yeah Right Right. Places are opening up comedy clubs again at half capacity right right so I mean we're having our. We cancelled our first to Farm Tours. We do a we do what we call the lunatic farm tour at the farm hundred people on Hay wagons. Obviously we can't social distance on Hay wagons. You can't get right so we're having our first one may thirtieth it sold out. Not a single person has complained. We've told him there. WoN'T BE SOCIAL DISTANCING. You're on a Hay Wagon. If you're if you're uncomfortable then you can walk the tour and we don't drive fast. We've got people on Hay wagons. We're not you know. We're not driving at road speed so you can walk it if you want to. But our impression of the feedback we've gotten is just oh relief. Finally I can go somewhere. I can be with people I can. You know. That's the plus side. We're GONNA appreciate what what it's like to do stuff to be able to go outside to go to a restaurant to go to a public gathering. Have Picnic yes stuff. Yes yes I think. All of our of our historically normal social interactions are going to be much sweeter than they have been in the past because we're social beings we're not hermits. A few of us are hermits but not many most of us. You like to see people and if there's one time when you want to be together it's in hardtops. Yes who wants to go through hard times alone and when I see these World War Two vets dying alone because their family can't be around them the guy he's dying who cares you know if son and daughter and grandkids. WanNa come and be around him. I just well the fears that the they'll get it and they'll give it to someone else wind up in terminals world understand what our problems is that we haven't done controls You Know I. I wish there had been one state. That said we're not GONNA do anything so that there could be one control right but the problem is nobody's done control so we so we really we really don't know well there's been places that have less restrictions than others and then also there's been countries that have less restrictions as we. Yeah so and you getting. It's it's really difficult to Parse the information in bright and get a straight answer on it is this is a good thing or a bad thing all ultimately over the course of time particularly you were talking about with the unemployment rate equalling you know one percent equalling thirty thousand lives over the course of a year right. I mean we really don't know what that number is. GonNa look like here and it could be absolutely devastating. It is. I mean we already know that you know suicides are up child abuses up. Spousal abuse is up. We know that just police reforms that serious and there are so many demographics that we don't know like like Sweden. For example fifty fifty five percent of all households in Sweden are single single person. Be Really agreeable people. That's crazy fifteen percent. Yeah swears in in Italy in Italy. It's it's only eight eighteen or twenty percent something like that so so there are a lot of multigenerational households in Italy. Italy's a much older older demographic and more people in a household a lot more. Smoke Sweet Oh yes Italy for how much they smoke. Same thing in Spain Spain a lot a lot of smoke and they got hit hard as well right yes they did. Imagine that's going to lead to a compromised immune system sure so you've got all the people living together you've got a large percentage of folks that are older and then you got the cigarettes and the exercise. It's not the gyms that I found when I was in Italy in the fuck is this Jim. Nice hotel just pathetic Jim. Yeah this is working out over there. Yeah Yeah Yeah that's true that's true and and as as we go forward with this thing I I look at this and say well. Let's let's let's at least wipe ourselves off and say okay. What can I learn from this? What what can we learn from this going forward and culturally? Obviously we can learn. Well we need to. We need to decentralize and diversify our food processing system. I mean for me that's like number one and and then for the for the average consumer though that's thing but for the average consumer what can you do to facilitate a secure food system and your own secure food system and one one is to simply start stockpiling more food? I mean have more food in the house. You don't have to go to the grocery store three times a week. Buy In bulk. Go to the go to the farmer's market by from farmer you can get you can get twenty pound bags of oatmeal. You don't have to get a little cup full of quaker oats you can get. You can get rolled crimped by the fifty pound bag. It's it's it's pennies on the dollar. I mean this is how you save money you buy and we talk about price. Interestingly our our whole chicken price at poly face is cheaper than boneless skinless breast from Tyson Walmart so the way to save money is to get unprocessed. That's that's how you eat. Well Okay you know the famous movie. Food Inc the Documentary Food Inc. Wonderful movie but they. They presented the same thing remember. That family went to the fast food place and he said they couldn't afford tomatoes. Well a pound of our ground beef is cheaper than that Burger soft drink and and massive fries that he got and there's probably more nutrition in a half a pound of our ground. Meat did that whole meal but you can buy two pounds of our ground meat for the price of that whole meal. The fact is that junk. Food IS NOT CHEAP. Junk foods expensive you start talking about nutrition. A SNICKERS BAR. Snickers bars is twice as expensive per pound as our grass finished world class. Ground Beef so when you start looking at these kinds of things you start realizing. Oh okay so so really. I just need to just adjust where my money's going and how spending so so spend so. Spend a bulk. Buy Bulk by unprocessed. Get in your kitchen. Yes and develop a love for domestic culinary arts and kitchens are great place to teach your kids science fractions a quarter teaspoon. Great Place Teacher Kids so so math. Math fractions stuff science. You.

Hay Wagon Italy Virginia Sweden Texas crack House Foundation Oliver Tools Saint Louis saint Louis Edmonton Bridge Detroit Baltimore La Kardashians Spain Jim Farm Tours Meat
"joel salatin" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

05:01 min | 7 months ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Would call revenue. Revenue is made up of two components. It is sales times the total dollar amount for those sales. That's GonNa give you total revenue. Now we can increase total revenue by doing more transactions or we can increase revenue by doing a higher dollar amount per transaction. We can increase revenue by doing both of those things. If you're a business that does a lot of sales. A high volume of sales in terms of quantity of transactions. But you're not charging enough. You can actually going broke pretty quickly as I've talked about in previous episodes. No one or very few people in these small organic vegetable space are successful selling a low value product. You just can't compete with the walmarts and whole foods in the large commercial farms as a small-scale farmer if you try and price against them you're GONNA lose every time because they can produce more product than you at a lower cost than you and they will do more transactions event you which means at the end of the day they will have a higher profit and you'll be really racing them to the bottom. That's where this whole race to the bottom phrase came in or just going to keep lowering prices to trying makeup for sales volume and when you lower prices your competitor is lower prices and then you lower prices again and you race to the bottom. When you're racing down. There is no limit except for free. You don't WanNa be in that battle so you need to think about how you can sell your product at a premium price because you are selling a premium product. A lot of times people will lower their price because they get nervous. I don't know if I can charge them much lower price because they wanNA lower it for 'cause I think all people should have access to food. I mean that's a great cause. But what you do when you lower your prices for causes your saying that you are going to subsidize someone else's food purchases. They can't afford to pay what I need them to pay for food. So I'm going to lower my prices. My business is going to subsidize. Their Diet. Sounds great in theory is altruism at its best but as Joel Salatin said Altruism doesn't put food on the table or pay your taxes. You have to charge enough for your product. Putting a high sticker price on a product is scary. Believe me I get it our starter. Package cost almost three thousand dollars in a market garden. Space where all audit tools are sub. Five hundred dollars were selling a high dollar amount product in that is scary. I'M NOT GONNA lie. It still is today but I have the charge that in order to stay in business and in order to grow the business given that fear of pricing I think a lot of people price their product lower because they are trying to avoid that fear or that gut reaction that says something like. I don't know if anybody will buy it for that much. Is it really worth that much? So and so's selling it for acts. I'm going to sell it for two. X is anybody even GonNa do that. Legit fears understandable fears. And if you're selling the same exact product is somebody else you really only have priced to compete off of although you could also say service could be one aspect of how you're competing but if you're selling a different product a better product you have to price more in you have to accept that some of the market is going to realize that your product is different in. That's why you're charging more for it. Some of the market will realize your product tastes. Better looks better lasts longer..

Joel Salatin
"joel salatin" Discussed on AnarchoInc - The Free Market Business Podcast

AnarchoInc - The Free Market Business Podcast

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on AnarchoInc - The Free Market Business Podcast

"We're we're going back now to doing more home but it gets to be more expensive in <hes> in your time is valuable. What's that this is a time preference. It's it's economics yeah and so like to me when i think about these things i always like. Mike unspiritual hat comes on right if very conspiracy his like why why is it so expensive like why you know why is it so expensive to have chickens or so expensive to you. Get a greenhouse or things like that. It's it's interesting. I find it interesting interesting. That's all in america to start also so <hes>. Let's just put this out there number one first thing that i would say no too if anybody wanted to. Homestead is making it look pretty. You can't make it look pretty and yeah right okay so you need let that go. It's not going to be nice beautiful rose. Everything's not going to be mowed down everything. We have a paved areas. It's not going to be like so you're fences are gonna look shitty and you're gonna use old skylights that you found on craigslist as your little greenhouse starts right in the garden. I mean that's where you start. You say containers and sprinted right but it's all little tiny baby thinks that's how to start in my opinion. Moorland moorland is better chickens getting to your neighbor's yard than you do need offense yeah yeah so think things like that so you you know people didn't feed their chickens corn and soy food that they got at the farm store. Okay so <hes> you gotta feed. 'em scraps and you've got to save so you know we say tactics to yeah cheaper. You know i'm gonna highly recommend this. I just going to do a plug. Do you know who joel salatin is. No absolutely <hes> marketer who actually <hes> brought me into the party itself before <hes> was he became amo libertarian because of joel salatin because joel salatin is a libertarian farmer and it is he's amazing dude <hes> oh yes and he's aw he's basically fought the state so you are going to love this guy and if you wanna do home stating i highly recommend it because him okay matic's he shows you the cheapest best s. way to get the most product for the least amount of money and time. You're gonna love him. Cool cool well yeah and i'll plug to <hes> ben ben <hes> with homesteads and home schools podcasts to <hes> panji such a cool dude. I didn't very cool did yes. Did you okay okay yeah yeah. I had him on recently to. It's an episode before. This one comes out but yeah that's i'll have to listen. I gotta lotta love on that show which was really cool. I didn't know how big podcast was out there. It was cool but i didn't know how many people would listen to it and i had so many people right knee and tell me that it was really really cool. 'cause i home school. Yes we're going to get into that too and that i taught my daughter had a read through playing world of warcraft awesome awesome yeah she she was a hard time learning how to read. She's brilliant..

joel salatin Moorland moorland matic craigslist Mike unspiritual america
"joel salatin" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"It's exactly the same. However, we can look at things from a different perspective. And then we will find that organic is better. And then he has another article about the real value of organic fertilizers. So I don't know, man. I don't know if I buy the idea that just because it's synthetic is what's causing the problem. If you think the nitrates are the ones are the problem of the red tide. It would seem that any amount to fertilizing any amount of inducing an artificially unusual amount of nitrates into a waterway would be the same problem. I would say that the issue is the the form in which the two types of nitrates arrive, right like, so we agree that the nitrates from organic fertilizers take longer to break down. Right. Okay. Whereas the others don't. Now, if these coming pellets form and there sprinkled on the ground more, they're sprayed in the four sprayed like liquids on on top of the liquid on top of the ground or something like that. That's the non-organic type then run off runs from the plant down to a little gully from the gully down to the the water and then out and off agus, right? Whereas. Maybe if it takes longer for the manure or whatever it is that contains the organic nitrates to sit on the ground, and it seeps into the soil better in this sort of compounds over the course of years and just makes for better soil. We we already know the crop rotation works because we've seen Joel Salatin at every and.

Joel Salatin
"joel salatin" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"And you touched on soil i've interviewed this guy a guy in the us actually i really like his name's joel salatin near the great book called the pig ness of pigs where he talks about how it annoys him so much mental go like church potlucks and people are eating like twinkies and gmo corn from the bag and all these things that kinda like strip our planet of resources but then he also really gets into this idea of soil that is it is void of of like nutrients and minerals and vitamins and how soil turnover in the us because of all these i think the calls them just basically like annual crops that we grow along with you know kafe oh farming and and all the other horrible farming and ed cultural practices to happen in the us basically depleted our soil lately deport oil and we aren't able to grow crops quite as well or or they're not as rich in nutrients at cetera and there really isn't much natural resource management going on even in the us with a lot of farmers over here now what what really kind of like made made my ears perk up when i was talking with randy was he mentioned how another thing you guys teach in addition to just like this this awareness of the spirit of of abundance and then also the financial savvy to be able to create like local community banks is this idea of natural resource management like treating the farm as an ecosystem sits within a broader ecosystem can you can you touch on what you're actually teaching these farmers and and give me examples of how you've changed like how they manage their soil or vegetation or you know their water yeah absolutely ben well you know if you're going to be a farmer and grow crops grow plant it's you you've gotta think of your soil as that's your engine of growth and if you don't take care of your soil you will wear it out it it it is it is a soil is something you need to invest in most a lot of people that do gardening here in the states or in canada or an australia will know that you should probably create some compost to enrich your soil we're always hauling pu around here we've got goats and chickens we even dealt up our bar and in a way that an actually speaking of joel salatin and by the way.

joel salatin us randy canada australia
"joel salatin" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on WLOB

"Sleeping in your car how you raise your children at cetera there are restrictions so that it's either illegal difficult or expensive to do the naturalist farmer joel salatin the dave of his book is everything i wanna do lizzy legal both groups are supportive of people living as individuals or in collective units whether hippies seemed to be misguided is that when they vote for socialist policies they're voting against their antiauthority antiauthoritarian position because socialism isn't a byproduct byproduct of free choice made by free people but by centralized power deciding for others this also applies to a lot of things hippies nowadays seem to favor legislation for this or that or the other green energy gay marriage it's cetera none of that is free will and thus counter to their beliefs in order for freethinking societies to work it's imperative to first educate yourself on what that means and vote accordingly here here i tend to agree well let's go to the phones we've got gene the christian anarchist and he wants to school beyond global warming go ahead jeanne okay mark ken guys global warming.

joel salatin mark ken
"joel salatin" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Sleeping in your car how you raise your children et cetera there are restrictions so that it's either illegal difficult or expensive to do yeah the naturalist farmer joel salatin the dave of his book is everything i wanted to as illegal both groups are supportive of people living as individuals or in collective unit whether hippies seemed to be misguided is that when they vote for socialist policies they're voting against their anti anti authoritarian position because it isn't a byproduct byproduct of free choice made by free people but by centralized power deciding for others this also applies to a lot of things hippies nowadays seemed to favor legislation for this or that or the other green energy gay marriage it cetera none of that is free will and thus counter to their beliefs in order for freethinking societies to work it's imperative to first educate yourself on what that means and vote accordingly you're here i tend to agree well let's go to the phones we've got gene the christian kissed and he wants to school be global warming go ahead jeanne okay guys global warming.

joel salatin jeanne
"joel salatin" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Next thing legal art are made another copy of accounting so i will judge people the last person in a damn room on curvature company or not pick shit up that's another thing i learned from duty of you guys think i'm or i wish i could send everybody back through joel salatin when he was walking he said never have your hand empty pick shit up around the form imagine what this water will look like very but even the wall walked down picked up trash when they saw you'd have the whole world clean pick shit up people too lazy to do anything in the modern world and then they can't figure out water broke by the way you'll be happier when you feel like you've got a good day's work done all of this in the world where people work half a day like jim from office legal i'm gonna use common sense the smallest fallen cabinet right here legal that's the least amount of stuff we have league goal now let's say you needed to talk to other people go locked their income back if i see one more person what happening somebody three feet away i'm going to fire you how 'bout that i'm sick of it and one bad apple spoils the whole bunch be active get out of your chair once in awhile 2018 don't fuck around with me we're going to get shit done you're gonna have a happier life things you me more efficient doing this makes your life more efficient i'm sick of seeing people lazy get up and do stuff don't walk by a piece of trash throw it away if you see something idiotic don't step over its then down of it wanna greatest philosophers and world said let everyone clean their own sweep their own front porch in the whole world will be clean if we in this company get super organized here that's how you change the world it has reverberations that go way passer and if you're lazy here if you believe.

joel salatin jim apple three feet
"joel salatin" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"I know about computers right don't try to want to me and be like well tie does it on and no pat you smarter than bill gates anybody bill gates kind of invented computers he used notepads use fucking notepads it's been proven over and over jebrane works better still in a nondigital fashion on certain aspects of your day so adult nothing a pissed me off until you can have numbers which are better businessman than we don't try to upgrade the system then giving i'm handing you a simple system these cost maybe two dollars for ten or something if anybody's low on money and needs to dollars i'll buy him for you a guy or you can get him from a company thing this is also if you work for me this is more like a direct command so if you decide to do the opposite weapons happens in the military when you disobey a direct command you hear courtmartial braun out wrong lebanon don't do it all girl eur of zero gives zero fox who evoked you are do what i'm saying because i've been observing things for a year or two and it's not like i like so it's enough don't cross beyond this bathroom trying to tell you first of all loom lewis r i want to our little side note on firing people so i realize in hindsight joel salatin did not need me who is already fully operational now i contributed a lot working there for two and a half years for three dollars an hour.

lebanon joel salatin three dollars two dollars
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"And then the west we've seen a drop like sixty percents. The these are these. These are these are big issues. And and, you know, so if you read Malcolm glad we'll, you know tipping point out liars and things like that most of the time big change doesn't have until there is some, you know, some tipping point some thing. And I mean, some things some people think it'll be the Konami, you know, that everything's gonna crash. I I have no clue and I'm not a prophet. So the one thing I don't do is say, what do you see twenty years from now, I have no clue no idea. But, but I think one thing that we can learn from studying history is that normally things have to get really really bad to get the attention of the average person. I think that's pretty much a, you know, a historical precedent, and how how how bad is that bad? Well, it's pretty bad. You know, come in and take over Rome, you know, whatever. How bad can it get? We don't wanna find out. That's the problem. Yeah. So so can we change it? And we could we could change it so fast. It would make your head spin. But, but, but you know, will we do we do we care what what's the average, you know, with the average person where we're going to go. So you know, I we certainly can. But I I'm pessimistic in the short view, I do believe for sure that. That the way we're farming is the only way to go sustainably regenerate over time. And I think it will ultimately went out the question is, you know, what has to happen before the average person. That's the Donald's and Burger King before that person has their wakeup call. So all hands on deck. Everybody time to get involved. And lastly on your website. It says that at poly face farm. You heal the land in Germany farmers, and I would love to hear about do. You have courses and apprenticeships internships that people can get involved if they wanna learn from you and your family. Yes, we do. We have a very formal apprentice intern apprenticeship program, we we essentially have a five-month intern program in the summer, and then and then three of those interns can move on into the master kind of the graduate program, which is apprenticeship and that goes for twelve months, and we take about ten interns, usually every summer, and so we have a very formal vetting processes a ten day August one August ten every year we take queries. And then we we pick about forty. We invite them for two day checkout. That'll be November one to ten those forty will come over that for two days pick two days during that period. And then we pick our ten and that starts you into this process. And and yeah, we we. Invest a lot in and we I do formal lectures, we do field trips. We it's total immersion, you know, immersed experience. You live on farm as a team, and we eat together we have an on farm chef for those five months fixes are evening meal. So we can all eat community about twenty five of us every day, that's the farm community..

intern Konami Malcolm Burger King Rome Germany two days twelve months twenty years five months five-month ten day two day
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"By the end of one year. You will have your your farmers lined up. You'll have that food relationship lined up. You will be skilled you have exercised your discernment muscles, and you will be knowledgeable and skilled, and you will be able to walk boldly into next year as a head held high participant in environmental legacy trajectory, change and. That really gives me hope and that's one question. I had for you d- you feel because I lately I've been feeling really distressed about. Usually, I'm an optimistic person, but environmentally. I just feel like we're we're the trajectory were on just seems to be so dark in disconnected from nature. I'm just curious. Are you hopeful about the future? Do you think we can turn things around? Well, I think we can the the question is will we you know, when you when you look at the historical historical precedent, you know, collapse. You know and things like that you realize that that if you're a betting person, if if you're betting on whatever, you know, actu- aerials. You bet. That we're not going to turn it around before, you know, dire consequences, and and, you know, there are there are numerous, you know, things whatever conflicting, you know, merging that, you know, from from, you know, pathogenicity to to soil running out to water running out to minerals running out to, you know, health sickness disease diabetes numerous things escalating infertility. I mean infertility in the west in the developed countries is is like a forty percent what it was fifty years ago. And interestingly Africa has not seen a single diminishment in in. I'm talking about male fertility sperm counts. Africa's not seeing any change in the last two years..

Africa actu forty percent fifty years two years one year
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"You know, I'm I'm way over I'm way over you know, convincing. I've I've I've watched I've watched this literal transformation from the armpit of the community to arguably by any measure by far and away the most green verdant piece of property in the community. And I've watched that in my lifetime. And that's pretty that's pretty exciting. Yeah. That's so exciting because I mean to revitalize a piece of land just must be the most rewarding feeling like you said, you just go outside and look around and think, wow, I got to participate in this. You're you willing participants very exciting. And you know, my permaculture teacher always said don't beat people over the head with all your ideas and ways that they could change just lower people in by the fun of what you do or by how beautiful it looks or how good your produce tastes. And it sounds like that's kind of what you're doing. Because Polly face seems like such a great community and. In your food is world renowned. Yes. Well, again, go back back to dead. Then you know, when we when we started down this path. He read some Andrei Voisey and stuff. I mean, this is this is before Allan savory was doing his work. I mean, great goodness. And he's so far ahead of his time. And and we started this controlled grazing. And we we started seeing some results of very very early on quickly. And he made the mistake. One day was down two neighbors place, and he made the mistake one day of saying something we're gonna have one hundred cows on that place and the neighbor just. He debt dad was not an indomitable public speaker. Like, I am he was a man of conviction. But he was not a public speaker. And it it it hurt him the way. This neighbor derided him and laughed at you. Crazy, you know, and then came back he says, I'll never again tell somebody when I'm going to do he said he said he said he said you can't push on a string. We can only pull on the string. And we're gonna lead. By example, today, we run a hundred and fifty cows on this. Okay. And and and you know, and and today, you know, I I missed that every day of being able to see the, you know, where this eventually went. But but yeah, we've definitely taken that position. You know, we we've got great neighbors. We love him to death. They're salt of the earth. You always say all our farm neighbors. Trust them with my Bank account. My granddaughter just don't trust them with my land or food SIS. I love that. So. Okay. That brings me to a question too of. So we have this land all around the world, there's millions. I don't know how many acres of depleted land farmland in the US all over the globe. Do you see this land is an opportunity that we could green or Breen the earth revitalize neglected land, which would also help us with climate change. Which is a problem facing us today. Is this an opportunity for us just waiting roll? We'll absolutely and without question. So so the same way that we've done it here with pry was concentrating on carbon carbon recycling animal movement and perennial Perennials along with water. You know, water development building ponds. And I mean, we have eight miles of waterline. So we have fresh gravity fed water everywhere on the farm. I mean, you know, it's not like we don't spend money. We spend money on projects that lasts for five. Five hundred years definitely I like to capitalize project. So the fact is that if I mean, I I just look at the the global the planet is often too big for people around their heads around. So so I just look at the show a valley here where we live which is twenty miles wide eighty miles long. And I say, look if if all of the soil that is moved every year to plant corn and beans to feed urban wars, which aren't supposed to eat it. Anyway, if all that soil movement were instead strategically moved up in the ridges and valleys and mountain surrounding us to build water impoundment for when there are floods and snow melt and hold that water high, and you know, and and and let it gravity flow into the valley floor..

Allan savory Andrei Voisey Polly US Five hundred years One day one day
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"We don't just walk out like a bunch of swashbuckling, you know, sailors, and and say, well, I'll shift this DNA to that DNA, and I'll just pour on poison here and get some poison here. If I have a sickness, well must not just use the right, drug and know, our position our senses nature wants to be well, the the default position nature is wellness. And if something is sick or disease, I probably mess something up. That's a fundamentally different way of of of learning than simply assuming something sick or disease. Just used the wrong bottle and true and say that a farmer is listening or someone that wants to get into farming. And they they have land that is maybe monocrop. There's a ton of up that's been sprayed on it over the years. Do you think 'cause I I was talking to a farmer that is more conventional about this interview? And he said, well, I'm just worried if I switched to ecological farming. It would be what was his quote, he thought he'd have low yields, and it would just be chaos and a weed free for all. Yeah. Well, I think it's important to realize that we didn't get here overnight, and we won't get out of it overnight. And in fact, as my dad, you know, came to the conclusion in the, you know in the in nineteen sixty that the chemical approaches essentially a drug addiction. So so what these conventional guys are in there. They're in a drug addiction situation and the soils drug the situation the land is a drug addiction situation. And if you if you pull out a way it's going to go through withdrawal, just like any other drug addict. And and so what you know what I? The the as their in. Lisa say, so eloquently, you know, the the hardest climate change is the climate of the mind. And so if you. If you if you don't want any change, if you're perfectly comfortable and happy with you know, what you're doing. And you don't want any change. Then, you know, don't because you won't be successful only when you actually change in the climate of your mind, can you actually make a successful transition and otherwise, otherwise what you're gonna do some consciously you're going to sabotage yourself because you don't believe in it anyway. And so you're going to fail just to prove your your initial assessment that see this doesn't work anyway. So now, I'm gonna prove it doesn't work. And and you'll you'll actually even even if consciously you're saying I'd like to try this some constantly you're gonna advertise yourself. So this is where I always say, I've never convinced anybody into this never argue. Anybody into it? You come with your heart. And we we have this saying, you know, I'll I'll believe it when I see it which is not actually true. What's actually true? You'll see it when you believe in. And and and so so you need you need a change of heart change of paradigm changed, worldview, whatever and those kind of changes happen at different places for different people. Sometimes it's a it's a sickness sometimes I met one guy. He said mine mine happened when I picked up a carrot from my farm and realized I didn't dare eat this carrot until I went and washed it off he says what's the deal with that? I can't even eat a carry out on my own place. And that was that was his pithy. So, you know, everybody's everybody's, you know, whatever come to Jesus moment is is a different story. It's the different we call the final drop of water. You know, everybody has their different story. And and until until you have your. All of this sounds like gibberish pie in the sky living in Peter Pan law world, you know, come on. And and and you know, doesn't work, but I can tell you here. You know, we're we're getting five times the production per acre of the county average that and that's without planning cedar buying a bag of chemical fertilizer and sixty years and starting on Iraq ball. So you know, I. When when these guys start into me that doesn't work. I just laugh, you know..

sickness Lisa Iraq Peter Pan sixty years
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"You're just you're either you're either coming out of or going into the next epizootic talk about fragility, but nature because of its diversity and its symbiotic. You know? Different species in proximate place. It creates pathogen. Pathogen cul de sacs, pathogen hurdles blockades. So that these things don't turn into epizootics. So you know, that that was that was that's one significant thing. The second thing is that nature nature. Pre it wants to move more toward Perennials not annuals. And so, you know, if anybody's listening to what an annual is an annual is something that goes up makes a seat in one year, and you have to replant it. You know squash is an annual corn is an annual. You know, we is an annual, you know, watermelons or an annual okay. Have to replant them per Enel is something like a tree Bush grass many of many of the Forbes herbs and things Molin plants. You know, the they live for a long long time and come back year after year from rootstock. Now nature certainly has annuals in the seed Bank. That's brought up quickly in a in a disturbance face. We we only call them weeds. But but nature is primarily perennial and and the way to build soil is with perennial succulent forages. They're actually more efficacious at converting solar energy into biomass than trees or Trump's because the turnover rate is higher the actual the actual life fishing of of the conversion of solar energy into biomass is actually more rapid and faster and more. It's it's it's more per acre. But these fast cycling Perennials have also fast like Ling life there. They don't they don't have a long slow lifelike tree. They sprout they grow they die quickly. And so if we're going to keep them vegetative and green and growing and metabolize over energy. They need to be pruned every time they reach. They reached senescence they need to be pruned back to to stay vegetative. And the way they does that is with the herb afford. The urban core is the Brunner and to do it the urban four it moves, it's mobbed up. And it's mowing so moving mobbing mowing are the three characteristics of the urban wars worldwide when we divorced the urban war from this moving mobbing mowing ministry, then everything that is beautiful. And so. Soil creative and organic matter depositing sequestering, and all that all of that positive turns negative, and so, you know, things like Cal spiracy and the UN long shadow report and all that stuff..

epizootic Enel Brunner Cal spiracy UN cycling seed Bank Forbes Trump Ling one year
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"So that when when rains came and the water ran it would just slow the water down couple places. We actually just took rocks and put them in the bottom of gullies to form a an a permeable damn, you know. So when the when the water when rain gushers came it, would it would come up to that. That Little Rock dam, and it wasn't impermeable. But it's slow the water down enough to make it drop it sill up hill. And we started getting terraces, you know, on the hillside. So, you know, there was a lot of a lot of that early work. I'd be dead used to go by the this was before, you know, in the early nineteen sixties most people that were growing corn for sale. We're still picking it by the ear and taking it down to the elevator. This before you know, combines and things and so so dad would go down and bring home corn cobs. We got we had a dump truck, and he would go home down. And they would just they would just augured corn cobs into our dump truck. He'd bring it home and spread them out on his rock piles, essentially, we were just looking for Ganic matter wherever we could get organic matter and very early. We bought a Chipper wood Chipper, a pretty significant would shipper. So that when we worked in the woods, we had a lot of forest on the farm, and so we started really looking at the forest as a biomass. You know, a biomass incubation area to to remedy the biomass shortage in in the open land. And so we began this kind of democratized biomass. Where where where the extra that was being created in one spot, we'll became the remediation biomass for you know, a depleted spot and that democratization of biomass. You know, really really brought started bringing things around. It's amazing to me that your parents had the foresight. It sounds like they were mimicking nature's patterns to replenish the land and revitalize it. Yeah. Well, you know, again, I think it's important. And I'm so glad today two things one is that we were not money people. I mean, we had we had lost a farm and Venezuela South America, dad, lost everything we had we had no savings. We had. No, we had nothing. Now, you know in nineteen sixty one you can still buy land. You could you could get a mortgage on the land itself. And so. So that's what we did. But we had no money. And so we couldn't go out and buy things and put on the land. I mean, we couldn't even buy organic stuff. But if if it'd have been vailable and what? And so the the fact that the land was so poor, and we were economically distressed that was a double creativity thing and so bad actually early on. And yet understand that my his father my debt, my dad's father. My grandfather was charter subscriber to rodale again at gardening and farming magazine when it came out in nineteen forty nine and grandpa, always had never used chemicals. He had great big compost piles, he had integrated, you know, chickens and garden and stuff he never farmed full-time or anything like that. But he was very much a, you know, a tinkerer and a and an ecologist. He in fact, got the patent on the very. I walking guard spring, you know, the ones that that walking along and roll up garden hose, and they go and called the it was called the sprink- real. And he had the very first patent on a walking on a poor on a mobile sprinkler. It's genetic all this creativity is. Yeah. That's right. That's right. And of course, you know, the older I get the smarter dad was and so he, you know, he bought into that ecology, but dad was trained in the communist, and so he linked the ecology and the economy together. And he realized that the chemical approach was essentially, you know, drug addiction that you you were on his treadmill. And you you kept you kept buying in this stuff, these chemicals are pesticides or whatever..

Little Rock dam Ganic Venezuela farming magazine South America
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"You know, six seven years old the two of us could could get the edge of one of the country tires and kind of tip it off the tractor platform as he drove slowdown through the field. Then he'd go along and put the the the electric fence stakes down in the little half inch pipes in those concrete stanchions, and that's how he built electric fence. So I've been a lot of places on the in the on the world, you know, and I always ask farmer audiences. Does anybody not have enough soil to hold up electric fence steaks? And so far all I mean, you're. Europe Australia New Zealand, you know, wherever Scandinavia where I've been nobody has said, we don't have enough soil to hold up electric fence stakes. It was a pretty gully. I mean, we had sixteen foot deep gullies just great big areas. You know, half an acre of just nothing but shale rock, I mean, not a weed not vegetation on anything. Just just down to two solid rock. It doesn't sound like a very fertile. A fertile the ginning Joel. Oh, no. It wasn't. You know, you know. What's what's interesting to me is that that that many of the, you know, kind of the I con's of sustainable farming. I mean, take Elliot Coleman there in the New England. Those of us who have done this buying large started on poor ground. We didn't start on really good ground. And and I think there's something about impoverished, an impoverished context that makes you extra creative because you know, for sure we couldn't afford it just truck in soil, right? And and so you you have to look at your at your circumstances in sit too. You know and say where do we go from here? And and it it indeed. I think makes you more creative than you would be if you were starting at a at a much higher level that makes total sense. You've got to. Try things out and see what worked. Well. Yeah. We we did a lot of things there early on. I mean, the first thing we did we steep steep real steep hillsides that were just you know, bearing and gully and we felt those out and got the cows off of them and got the animals off of them. And they of course, on some of them, we planted trees, others, squirrels planted trees, but you know, over the years, those very very steep hillsides. And when I say, very, I mean, you know, stuff with a. Whatever, you know, fifteen percent slope hillsides size that you wouldn't want to drive a machine on and and those those of all reforested now, and and and stabilized some of the deep gullies, we just would cut we would cut some branches and just carry them over and stick them with the butts facing downhill, and the the the feathery branches facing uphill to just create kind of a filter..

Joel Elliot Coleman Europe Australia New Zealand Scandinavia New England fifteen percent six seven years sixteen foot
"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"joel salatin" Discussed on Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

"Restorative design or Aetna? Botany than stay tuned for sustainable world radio. I'm your host and producer chill clue. Ta. My guest today is Joel Salatin farmer writer lecturer and teacher one of the most famous farmers in the world. Joel co owns Polly face farm in Swope Virginia with his family hailed by the New York Times is the high priest of the pasture and profiled and the bestseller. The omnivores dilemma Joel Salatin is the author of ten books, including the sheer ecstasy of being a lunatic farmer. Everything I want to do is illegal, and you can farm welcome to sustainable world radio. Joel salatin. Thank you, Jill waterfall privilege to be with you. It's great to be with you. And I found the history of your farm. Polly face farm, very inspiring. Your parents bought the land in nineteen sixty one. And I believe from what I read online. It was kind of a worn out piece of land. And now in twenty seventeen it sounds like it's an oasis of organic matter and. I believe you have ten employees, and you have four generations living on the farm when you're doing really well with sales. I'm just wondering if you could tell us a bit about the land what it was like when your parents were spotted, and then what it's like now just to give us an idea of where you are. Sure up at the best illustration of what it was like when we came in nineteen sixty one know, we're in the Shenandoah Shenandoah valley Virginia, which was if you know your history was in the American history book will say it was the breadbasket of the confederacy during the confederate confederacy. I mean, this is where the reaper wasn't admitted. Cyrus mccormick. You know, who founded international harvester invented the the reaper here in night in eighteen thirty seven which is the official beginning of the industrial revolution. So this was a very fertile valley. When the native Americans had it Europeans came started plowing everything up because there was it was such rich land, and it because of its elevations and rain shadow we could grow really, you know, I qualify small grains, because we're in rain shadow in this valley and are elevated well over the next hundred and fifty years, you know, some three to eight feet of. Topsoil washed out and on our far when we came in nineteen sixty one there was so little soil that when dad started, you know, trying to rotate the cows around the cows sheep around with electric fence there wasn't enough soil to hold up electric fence stakes. So we actually poured concrete in old used car tyres, push the half inch pipe down in the concrete, and my brother, and I we were little kids..

Joel Salatin Shenandoah Shenandoah valley V host and producer Polly Aetna Joel co Cyrus mccormick lecturer Swope Virginia international harvester New York Times writer official fifty years eight feet