11 Burst results for "Joel Peter Witkin"

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

08:48 min | 3 months ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Right, let's do this. How are you? What the fuckers? What the Fuck Buddies? What the Fuck Knicks. What's happening I mark Merrin. This is my podcast. W T.F. Welcome to it. It's been okay the last few days. I don't know how up to speed. Those of you tuning in with the. where I'm at but I am within. The Grief Tunnel. It's coming up on two months. On Saturday. since Lynn Shelton passed away. and. It's something is changing. How are you guys I I look I'm not going to make a life out of grief, but it seems I seem to be. You know in it and monitoring it and feeling the feelings. But I, don't want to neglect. You guys I don't want to forget to tell you that on the show today. Helen Mirren is here. Oscar Emmy Bafta an Tony Award winning actress. The Amazing Helen Mirren, the stunning and profoundly talented Helen Mirren. Shown this HBO thing this Catherine the Great Limited series, but she's been in a lot of stuff and I I actually watched her. kind of going through her stuff. And realized she was in an old movie. That I saw when it came out at the arthouse. In Albuquerque New Mexico was called Long Good Friday was a relatively contemporary. pry, the early eighties. Modern, English gaster movie with Bob Hoskins. And she's the female lead, and she's a great but hoskins. Just to work with. That guy didn't want an animal man. Just you know fierce, fucking seething presence. There, aren't that many seething presences. But I was lucky I was fortunate. It was on the criterion channel. Which I watch. And I'm going to watch. A Lola Net completes the trilogy of whatever that was Veronika. Voss the marriage of Maria. Braun in low level, fast bender movies. I didn't know it was a trilogy. But I talked to my buddy Tracy letts. The I'll drop a couple of names. He's been very. Nice to me during this time of sadness. Talking through it and Experience, something similar in his wife's been very helpful in my Kim McCall tonight even. Staying in touch with the people. That's the hard the hard stuff the hard part about. The grieving is you. You know I I'm. I. It's The aloneness a bit. But like you know. Tom Lean came over for dinner. The other night and I've been hiking with my pal Al Magical. Going up the hill. Talking about stuff gossiping a little bit things get limited Yohan. Everybody's not doing much the the gossip in. Way What you can talk about. There's not a lot of fresh news around, and you know in terms of the. The macro. That can't That's never good anymore. It's fucking paralyzing out here. Just managing the existential despair in terror. Of whatever the fuck is happening. And just watching people snap, it's it's amazing the. Consistency of these. Belligerent ignorant. Dumb dumbs. Who just refuse to take care of themselves or others by really simply you know wearing a dumb mask indoors. So they don't get sick and they don't get other sick with this thing escalating, but these people have really some of these people have. Really can they're gonNA die on this hill, man? This was the freedom fight that they were gonNA fight. This mass business when they lose it. I've watched three or four videos of women supermarkets in target stores. And I just watched one of a guy. I've watched two of a guy, it is literally. Like watching and I don't have children, but I'm saying I'm thinking the three year old, a three to five year old temper Tantrum in the body of a grown person. And raving. It's usually doesn't even make sense. It's just like something snaps in their head, and it has to do with a mask, and it represents a lot of things. Freedom. God you know didn't intended. It's just a confusion. Of conspiratorial garbage and Right, wing, talking points and some. Christian. End Times business. Just mashed up in sort of. Just kind of blurts. And usually, there's a physical activity. a childish physical activity throwing groceries on the floor. Taking things off a rack. Something snaps inside these people and I think you really get to see who they are. Emotionally. At the core. Of whatever. Ideological Insanity they've allowed their brain to be program with. And, it's I three three to five years old and I would imagine intellectually some them close to that as well and I don't WanNa be condescending, but just watchos. Seeing this is not grownup behavior. It's just. It's like you know just. Stubborn children. Being told to do something healthy. And just like no, no, no! Very exciting. I acknowledged oddly I acknowledged the The passing of Ronnie and Donnie. gallion I believe is how you say their last name Ronnie and Donnie gallion. Of beaver Creek Ohio the the oldest, the longest surviving conjoined twins. they died July fourth I did not know it was that many days ago. And the reason I. I brought attention to it is. They. I wouldn't say they traumatize me. Because I bought the ticket. and I think expanded my brain, but blew a hole in it. for sure. When I was younger some you know this I had a mild obsession with the circus or the sideshow, the midway show the. The circus freaks as they were called human anomalies Joel Peter. WITKIN would call them. But. I couldn't understand my fascination with them. I had books about them and I think it was really just that they were. Terminal Ian? Tragically some of them unique. By, birth. Some by choice, but the ones by birth were more fascinating to me yet. They figured out a way to exist. I think it spoke to something inside me. I felt so uncomfortable. That going to the New Mexico state, fair nervously buying a ticket to walk up a ramp to a viewing window in a trailer to look at Ronnie and Donnie sitting in there, just watching television with their their their flesh of conjoint, and whatever organs as shared exposed. That they seem comfortable. They were watching television. They They didn't seem to mind looking at them, but they didn't put on a show. They were just there and it was there. It was inspiring me. I mean. Outside, of the fact that they were. I don't know what their life looked like, but in the trailer they seem comfortable and it was quite a. A decent racket didn't have to do much I mean they were already conjoined. I. Mean I guess they could do more, but they really didn't put a lot of effort into it. They were just sitting there. I think maybe one of them was having a snack watching television, but the way they moved in the way they sort of just. I think it made me feel better. That there was a place in the world for everybody. And you know oddly, my place was on stage just well. I I was not in a trailer. I don't have a conjoined twin, but I have a a sort of hidden emotional obesity..

Helen Mirren Ronnie New Mexico Fuck Knicks Donnie gallion Lynn Shelton Bob Hoskins mark Merrin Tony Award HBO Tracy letts Albuquerque Kim McCall Veronika Braun Tom Lean Al Magical Catherine Voss beaver Creek Ohio
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

15:02 min | 6 months ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on LensWork

"Off Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing but eventually landscape was fully accepted by the painting world and their came on the scene painters who really excelled at landscape painting and it sort of became normal until eventually people said well. Wait a minute Move over landscape. We're interested in this bit of Flotsam Jetson and we want abstracts in you know with enough passage of time. We've suddenly got Jackson pollock dripping paint on canvases that are neither landscapes nor are they portraits and so we value that some people value Jackson pollock's work because it's so innovative and so different. I think the exact same thing can be said of photography in the early days of photography mostly what people were interested in photographing was portraits pictures of people. It was so innovative and people wanted to have pictures of themselves and so a huge branch. Photography took off in that direction and then eventually landscape came about in an abstract. It's the same kind of pattern. Well here we are today here. You are today as an artist trying to make artwork. That is personally expressive. Which do you value more in terms of what you create? Are you most interested in pursuing traditional execution at the highest levels so that someone might look at one of your landscapes and ansel Adams landscape and say I can't tell the difference because they're both executed so well that might be the high water mark for you or you might really Value Jackson. Pollock and John Cage in the prepared piano and say I'm interested in innovation. Therefore you're going to do all kinds of innovative imaginative work. That other people might look at and say well. That's not very you know it's not what I call a picture. It's not anything I can recognize. It's even an abstract or it's you know. Joel Peter Witkin something like that and say that's not a photograph. I can't help but conclude that there there really isn't a right answer to this question but it is as worker to me this morning. A dance between innovation an execution and both have their virtues both have their fans both probably have their non-fans but I think that's not quite the end of the story because maybe from a strategic point of view it's worth asking. Which are we most likely to succeed in when it comes to getting our work recognized in the marketplace in the art world if fame and exhibition publication is your objective. Which is likely to be the path that's going to get you. Those objectives more readily. Is it going to be clean execution of an aesthetic? That's very traditional or is it going to be innovation and that's where I think we get into the rub because I think when it comes to the gallery world and to the publishing world to a large degree innovation is the king. It seems like galleries and publishers are not very interested anymore. In publishing traditional work that somehow the.

John Cage Jackson pollock Youtube Avant Garde Rachmaninoff baseball Lens Work Publishing editor Joel Peter Witkin Jerry Brooks Jensen ansel Adams landscape Nari Soul Steve McCurry Juwan John Paul Capela Negro Eugene Dong John Sexton Pena
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

19:11 min | 1 year ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"Maybe it's love Oh well defined for yourselves your interest for France and French I just I I like it and all the my favorite artists and art has typically come from France and Belgium and I think a lot of it comes from I was just world today they make very clear distinction they very much state oriented don't night church oriented so how does that go together for in your urine you're feeling I'm an in current modernity in the current age there's definitely a an enforced secularization still I mean it's still bubbles under the surface there's the when they had the phone heart on display way back I think ten years ago it was just crowds came to see that as as a relic there is there has always been this sort of creeping undercurrent sort of royalist and Like the MANDORF EST 'cause and you know the entire French occult Revival is basically is underlined with this one continuous theme of almost anti Republican Anti French Revolution Anti Secularization sort of push back against that and I mean there's much writing on on decadent literature talks about the fact that it is really the first Catholic literary movement whereas you had sort of sentimental writing about church yet sentimental writing about religious experiences but when you take you know writers like we small or Leeann boy and look at the way they use their Catholicism or their conversion as pushback again Against what they saw as the secular izing rationalist modernity that was creeping in changing the world for the worst so that I think that that that Frisian for some between these two extremes is is very important as characterizing factor that makes all that so interesting that if you didn't have that kind of almost personality crisis if you didn't have that history is like blood sacrifice birthing republic then I don't think he would have produced the same time backfired at the same time of culture that's probably very true yes yes and do you did you also read the works of an offer millea but I haven't I have not read him night I need to get him he's one on the list that I really do Nikkei also gets into that executives that question in an even at the end he became a Sufi funny enough so he entered do not direction of Mississippi. Well Ken gene now that we spoke with all the things that define you today and well defined yes we are part of Dale it's really that way and maybe let me go as much as you want back in your life you said you were educated in America you have a background familiar back for me family background far back in France can we can we know a bit about your past and how you became that Demimondaine upset that you are today and where did it on start and how did that all come together let's see Gosh so wide ranging question I take it back Yeah I well I was raised in a very religious conservative household very very religious very structured upbringing and went to in America we called Private Schools I went to private school environment now is actually not it was the denomination my parents were different denomination but they chose the school because it was they felt that it was a good school and would be beneficial for for me having we just moved into the American south from Virginia which is still part of the American south but not quite the same as going to Georgia yeah and I spent most of my youth and youth groups and church camps and having to endure all that really awful banal interpretations of the humanise and reducing them down to the lowest common denominator I still to this day we'll walk out of a mass if I see an acoustic guitar if I come in fill of acoustic guitars and so yeah so that was that was my up bringing still very close to my family I think they about high school I I left high school I dropped out and took what's called a ged what's the general education diploma And then went to community college so I ended up going to college early does that make you a teacher Eddie's is that what it is it is and you don't finish high school and you actually general education diploma was I left I was so disgusted I went to a public high school so I left high school I left I went into high school into a public school and I didn't I didn't do it no I didn't I I was not socially inept I could engage with people it's there's there's a lot to be said for them not being the type of person Smith says I can't make small talk I can't engage with people I mean you need to be able to engage with people to be a functioning member of the world not a badge of honor but I found it very very boring and I acted out a bit I was a teenager so I I ended up leaving and going to college early so something a very uncon- unconventional pass which my mother encouraged me on but she's always been very encouraging to me even though she's you know very very religious sometimes puzzled by my proclivities yeah so it's been very very supportive so I think that kind of very conservative very religious upbringing definitely had tacked on me and and pushed me towards the directions I took in adulthood sure but so you were born in the states or boring okay so no I was born in America and lived there for you know all back into my into my twenties and early thirties and then I lived for our time a long time in New Zealand which is very far away from everything and probably the most diametrically opposed place to my nature doc Emrick I'll I'm as linear desert personnel almost in Rhode I- interview here I've had a guy who is going by the name of feelers south I don't know if you knew him I've had knicks relative in front of all of you went to New Zealand for and got educates there that's amazing it's funny there's you know there's an interesting job of New Zealand the bill de there and the wireless they're there housing in the no no you go on I interrupted you sorry you went to New Zealand so in New Zealand and and I always say that New Zealand's beautiful place and lovely place and if you're interested in tramping in camping in the outdoors it's probably you know very much a place that you enjoy being but I personally despised the countryside I love the city nature doesn't particularly just me so I'm very much at home in this this sort of Lisa fearing cathedral of the city where I live now London studio I think it's the most wonderful city world and so they do come back to the UK or come back come to the UK and started living there at four years ago okay longer already okay okay okay so now you're an established Londoner Yeah I complain about the Tube and so that London is I was GONNA say that's typical London today okay so and you you are you in London now and you also have on your website a you're not you're saying you are you're an artist of visual artists officer and so let's also speak about that before we go a bit further into the occult maybe into because of course as you know this this podcast is about to western military traditions so we should also be about the involvement that you have there but before that may be of course does things cannot be separated but how would you define art visual art what what a what techniques to leave there and what's important for you by a yourself as it'll be through largest I am a sculptor I'm trained as a sculptor I did and and an anonymous so my main medium is sculpture and that could be clay or could be acts or it could even be digital I over time did a lot of work with digital sculpting and then three D. Printing for for foundry casting so my training was actually an an art was as a as a classical realist sculptor I did a degree in anatomy and drawing and then went to the Florence Kademi Vartan seren going I went to the floor it's Kademi bar did sort of a chillier style learning which is the style that you would learn the manner in which you learned sculpting in the nineteenth century before sort of the idea about house completely destroyed Arts Education and then after that Cadaver Lab at University of Utah Medical School and also Lake Merritt Medical School About sixty hours of cadaver they section and so I would describe my working very influenced by sort of sacred art you know the Ah Catholic iconography Byzantine icons and I really like the idea of representing the the object or the unsettling or the UNCANNY couched in this sort of ambiance of the sacred of beautiful and the doors that's kind of how cataracts at work can you define what it is that attracts you in in that definable for your is just dare it's a natural inclination but I think if I if I would sort of intellectualize dissected it's just there's you know I I love the idea of the the object being raised to at the place of the sacred for example you know a lot of times he's he's considered to be very sensationalistic but then there was the photographer Joel Peter Witkin and he was huge in on me when I was very early on because what can would take cadavers he would take people from the fringes of society he would take sex workers he would take criminals people who had physical differences physical deformities take transaction rules and transvestites and he would pose them and recreate these beautiful classical images and to me I always took that as being alchemy he was taking these people on these these images these things that we cast off or consider to be on the periphery of the edges of society and he was enshrining them in this sort of these these the iconography being literally the images that we laud as being the finest images in Western Art yeah he has with do Botticelli for example but reproduce it you know with these these these people that would otherwise you would pass on the street and and try and avoid or you would try and keep out of sight people don't want to acknowledge I always love that sort of chemical aspects there and I think that's what what draws me to the idea of the the object is being sacred right that's an interesting to say it was that were chemical I find very very interesting approach yeah so you speak a lot about sacred to sacred you speak about nine thousand nine hundred century you speak a lot about the dark side if I may say the individual in Cliche way so I I consider myself so full of light consider any of its dark no not at all I think I always very careful not to be in darkened I think that there's a huge difference between the dark and being in darkened and being encumbered and being Ordinary and slow and plodding simone vile quote about you know imaginary evil Colin Rail Evil really able maybe we should together find assigned to bench words for dark because offer me something negative I don't mean that they could whole darkest just I'm a hermit assist myself you know pat for me is just less light but light is not a good thing like this just something and goes it's where it goes it's bright way doesn't go dark so it's not a quality itself but what what would be the word and what would it be that you choose to to replace dark in the context of diamond I take any I'm not trying to be difficult because it's always they feel like the you know there's so much of a you know there's so many people don't take that nuanced approach to it they don't think about light and dark in that way they don't I think they think there's a lot of time and effort spent on being very or is Jake Stratton Kent spells it d it'll only don't and I realized just how terrifying and just how all encompassing and just how nightmarish beautiful vibrant could be as a big epiphany for like fifteen year old admittedly was quite darkened so it so sacred nineteenth century or whatever is dark dark how how do you it dad what what what brings step combination in you ext and oh I think because of sorry I think it just happens to be the era where I found so much art and literature that I had with I think you know it's it's just before you know the tasks tabled for one absolutely changed Europe for the worst more than two which was just a sequel anyway happened as a result of that the change I remember reading a collector of Victorian paintings he was trying to purchase a Lord Leighton that was in a a thrift shop and bring it home and his grandmother wouldn't let him bring it home it was like the nineteen fifties I think he's like I won't but I think that it's a very interesting moment because I think it's best summed up because it's it's modern and it is modern but it's also not it's also hearkening back to for better or worse for real or not a golden age and there's this this static the sort of I for some of their and I think.

France Mississippi Nikkei Leeann Belgium Ken gene America Dale Demimondaine nine thousand nine hundred cen fifteen year sixty hours four years ten years
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

13:13 min | 1 year ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"A a nonprofit organization that supports documentary and fine art photography and visual storytelling were based here in Santa Fe that we serve national international population yes something con coming up called review Santa Fe photo festival yep yep that's right so starting on Thursday were gonna have a bunch of public and private events and we want to invite the Santa Fe public in people from Mexico to come on out and see some great photography and for each night there is there's different things happening so would love to to tell you more about it it's on Thursday we have we start out with an exhibition what currents new media and of the collaborative exhibition with center called shifting perspective and the directors they're Frank in Marianna chose work from hundreds of photos submissions from all over the world and it took about six artists of varying styles to show what they're gallery and can you run into six canyon road so come on out from seven to ten PM for the opening about exhibition all right where can people find all of this information we're going to give them so go to our website visit centers dot org and fair if you go to our review Santa Fe pages there's going to be a lot of information there they can they can get this info but I'm about to tell you and then also they can download our program guide is a great program that people can get there the work of a young spry young man by the name of Joel Peter Witkin is this still part of what you're doing yeah so Joel with part of our events last year he was he gave a talk in and we fear honored him I think you celebrated eightieth birthday this past September and but Joel did give a beautiful princess photographic prints to be part of our pre raffle and yeah so people can spend as little as twenty dollars and perhaps schedule Peter weight can photographic image so yeah people can purchase tickets throughout the week on Friday and Saturday and then Saturday night we're gonna happen the raffle drawing to get that print and some other award winners print found the great opportunity to get some valuable artworks now is this going to be you can is gonna have raffle drawing where is that going to be made the jury plaza hotel and that Saturday probably about seven thirty okay what's going on there so one of the jury is there a place in the conference so that's where there's a thousand and one on one meetings between vetted photographers from all over and curators from like the Smithsonian and the International Center for photography as well as editors from National Geographic in The New Yorker wired magazine HuffPost what is your name now home yes it is like twelve different editors from the hi distribution magazines and newspapers that come out to meet with these photographers because they're sort of the first ones on the scenes the witnesses to these today's critical issue so they're looking for the effect under reported stories and for their publications in their books and their and their exhibitions so how to add a people come come meet these you know if you have the photograph in and that under reported story from I don't know anywhere in New Mexico maybe right here in Santa Fe is there an opportunity come meet some of these incredible people yeah yeah so well at this time that festival passes have sold out this year but that was one way to do it is to get a festival past nine you can be part of all the receptions and all these formal and informal events to to mingle with the is a re we column reviewers because a review photographic portfolios but everybody's going to be there the four hundred photographers and all of the reviewers on Friday night so this Friday October eighteenth sixty eight at the farmers market pavilion everybody will be the photographers will be laying out their work opening up their portfolios and you get to meet with these hundred dedicated photographers in visual storytellers and you know the reason that it's interesting that's more than just pictures of more than to photography these are today's sort of important stories you know under reported issues around the world and that's why those editors and curators and everybody come out to to see them and to meet with them and so we also invite Santa Fe to come out and and talk with these individuals about their about their projects and yet that's Friday six to eight at the farmers is a ticket that's free it's open to the public no way yeah yeah it's all free and also that night so we're really excited we're doing something new this year we're kinda like activating the railyard with photography so we have a an axe and out Dore exhibition kind of that site specific installation of photographic art works called climate truth in the anthropocene and we're gonna have the large seventeen foot banners in those shades structures there in the railyards so so look for those and were asking everybody also sort of respond to the theme about climate truth in about climate justice by using the hashtag reveal the truth two thousand nineteen more I would love to see somebody from Santa Fe bringing them each a and an a story and pitch it and you know that would be the beginning of the big journey so what kind let's say you know if you have a hundred phone photographers coming to laid out their portfolios this week and what kind of stories what kind of images or are they showing well there's a variety we have all climate change no no it's it's all different subject matters it's all different types of approaches there's historic processes like IBM in process to visual multimedia multi disciplinary and photo sculpture there things like stage narratives by an editorial photographer whose name range shooting who do something called tableau response to black and white beautiful and traditional images and processes about trauma by men well it pains there is you know the year that big large scale banner that I mentioned the woman named amber opposed to pain who's showing environmental Texas city near Silicon Valley and Jamie stealing the local photographer who's come through the program he did you know Sir John style photography and photography from yeah hi showing all different types of solutions to these here in our environmental situation photographing Cuba Chile and other places that have solar panels and different ways of getting renewable energy that is a nine yes you have to answer the phone yes a little busy right now but nobody else is getting that okay but yeah and on Friday also so in the railyard that nice guy come out to some photos inside the farmers market men outside we'll be axle contemporary the mobile gallery they're showing group exhibition of photography multiple exposures compound exposures miss a lot of several really well known photographers are going to be in that exhibition and then another fun mobile not gallery but the darkroom that is funny photo program it's called free phone USA and this is great they're passing out black and white film for people all for free explain what film is the people who don't know South Jersey for silver gelatine and that yeah well anyway so the people are passing out film and they are going to be a big sort of mobile air stream to look for the airstream there and the rail yard and are giving people the prompt red white and blue cell photographing vat but whatever it inspires you ever hear a red white and blue black and white and black and white yeah man I guess what it means to be an American right now what's happening and then they'll process it as well so they so they give you the phone they ask you to make some pictures and then they process it and then it becomes part of their big project their larger project going across the USA and asking people all different types of people young people old people people that are professional photographers and people that are not and putting it into hopefully a book and an exhibition that will hopefully travel so yeah there's a lot of really cool stuff going on the image that popped in my mind or was of a local wonder bread would you like because you know the wrapping was red white and blue yeah yeah more Presley from the center is is our guest so I mean all kinds of amazing things going on so once again I want somebody from Santa Fe to bring their image in their story and get recognized start an amazing journey so Laura what if if that there is that one person from Santa Fe do you have to have it your your image printed out on the very best paper and everything just absolutely perfect and and framed and mounted and all that or can you just bring your phone or tablet something like that to show your images and kind of put your story yeah you know people that are not prefer you to be that it's either submit your images you want to be part of this hostility on the part of the conference complain about so and so but that's all done digitally now so used to be that when I started like many years ago that they were slides and an actual a prince but now everything is done through this online judging which is pretty standard but yeah and people bring different things so they they will bring their actual portfolios that are various sizes with beautiful handmade prince and some will just bring their laptops and show their you know portfolio that way to the reviewers but yeah if if any of your listeners are interested in being in reading Hey but every year in January we put out a call for entries and we love new Mexicans come out we always have a really great showing Mexico residents because there's just a great tradition and history of art from photography here New Mexico on a lot of really great practitioners so even though it's a small state there's always a really great showing of a Mexican so and we have scholarships so there's a big scholarship program so people all different types of people of financial circumstances can it can attend yes the people know mystic in the subscribe to newsletter yeah yes I just go to our website mayor at the bottom subscribe to our newsletter we printing out about once a month and yeah we have something going on every single day this week at the end of the week Thursday Friday Saturday and Sunday and I forgot to mention Sunday so Sunday were having a book fair so a photographic book fair so if people are interested in talking more with the artists directly with artists they can do that is going to be a number of vendors people like chronicle books to independent sort of book publishers no make books and probably some others that you haven't heard of and a local publishers like radius books and photo I will be there so that's what the jury so that the tree plaza hotel parking should be free just come on over it from ten to five and then the book signings will be from twelve to three PM well the the one on Friday night the real your job is very exciting I I think I'm I mean I I have to show up that six eight o'clock it's free and I think it's gonna be pretty exciting you know it makes me think of another event coming up in about a month journalism under fire that's going to take place all around town he combined photo journalism with journalism and and kind of the you know the the movie numb I don't know if you know it is all changing so rapidly lord you know the images in journalism and deep fakes are now coming out and you know it is all kind of evolving in this weird kind of environmental political you know it's kind of field field here and it's it's exciting and scary at the same time yeah yeah we talked about having like a healthy media diets and that the media and there's just so much that goes out we all have like a very high media metabolism so we digest what information rapidly which I just more information and that we need to be careful about the kind of information that we can and share yeah and share exactly yeah yeah that's a great program and their one of our collaborators to Santa Fe council international relations yeah yeah there's a there's definitely some crossover with content related to journalism in photojournalism specifically all right for a chance to win a photograph by the young sprite Joel Peter Witkin you can buy a.

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"The host of this week show I have a PR company here in Santa Fe called V. media and I am I am happy to have Laura Presley on the show today she is the executive director of center so Laura we talked a lot about what center does and the upcoming review Santa Fe so you're bringing in photographers from all over the world you have panels of experts and you just said that there's like part of the professional development side what you offer to the photographer to the photographers are one on one meetings with their friends experts in the field right that's right yeah so there's about one thousand one on one meetings that happened between the hundred photographers that are chosen and the editors curators and publishers that we bring out to the event so yes so that's one of the interesting things is that there's nearly fifty people that we bring in from major metropolitan museums too hi distribution magazines like National Geographic and wired and other places that and book publishers as well that come out to you sort of find new talent well that's yeah that's a close to where does everything happen so that particular part of the conference is happening at the jury plaza hotel right yeah so as well as our photographer presentation so our award winners are going to be giving of very interesting new kind of picture could just style cool reason Tatian to the public so let's go down the path look schedule and if you're listening and you want more information right away you should go to visit center dot org and you can see everything that's going on you have there's a beautiful program but they have you can download a PDF of see all these amazing photographs that so this year the public events that are happening yeah so well starting on Thursday October seventeenth there's going to be an exhibition at currents new media which is I think eight two six canyon road so Thursday evening I believe it's seven to ten there's going to be an opening of photographic exhibition there that's awesome we love the folks occurrence yeah yeah and then Friday there Friday night October eighteenth at the farmers market pavilion all one hundred photographers are going to be opening up their portfolios to the public so come on down to the farmers market pavilion between six and eight PM so you could go walk around and say hello to all the photographers are coming here from lot of them from the United States but I think you said like ten to twelve other countries you have out there and have their work so you can actually see their work and talk to them at the farmers market billion yeah and it really gives people the public an opportunity to sort of get behind the scenes on some of today's critical issues right yeah interesting so would like what kind of critical issues you mean work about the environment there's projects about the central American migration crisis projects do personal projects dealing with death in group grief all different types of works that can be seen yeah so soon so interesting row okay and then on Saturday so Saturday we are doing that photographer presentation and it's gonna be the jury plaza hotel from one to five thirty so you can kind of pop in and leave anytime between one and five thirty and there's going to be eighteen photographers presenting their award winning work okay so are these photographers ones that you all bestowed awards upon said these are your young so throughout the year you have people who are nominated and and and then you all select the different award winners and they all come here and this is that part of that yeah the word system that yeah that's part of the words that they get to come to the conference and also present their work publicly so yes this is an opportunity to hear from them directly about some of those issues and and dialogue with them so right merry stats or who is the curator of prints and photographs that you and art museum is going to be the moderator so after each of the award winners gives their five minute presentation than Mary's going to ask some questions and invite the audience to also ask questions that eighty nine of the photographers so can you mention a couple of the award winners this year is I don't know I mean I know you have a lot going on so I might be yeah but you know give you an idea of a couple of the people who have won a war and yeah so one of them for our new award winner is me and eve and her name is Laurie Hawkins the award is called me an even excuse me and she has a project called too far to walk and it's about maternal mortality in Kenya why and so should be speaking about that there's also project by rocky McCorkle it's called you and me on a sunny day and he was our excellence in multimedia award winner so there's all different types of approaches out and you can see that in the PDF download and then if you're going to have these I'm sure you're gonna have these printed versions of the of the program the catalog for the review so if you're interested in in learning more about who those award winners are who will be presenting on Saturday October nineteenth from one to five thirty PM and that's at the jury right yeah that's what the jury in so you can go in is there a big ballroom or something at the jury yeah well the meetings are happening in the ball room but this will be in the Lamy okay so yeah so you can just go and and there should be parking available and and just asked to go to any room cool okay and then Sunday Sunday we have a new program called the it's the photographic book fair so it's an opportunity for people to collect images to at an affordable price well so there's going to be publishers independent book publishers as well as larger publishers like chronicle that'll be there and on Sunday from one to three will be book signings with the artists so you can come in get assigned bug bites the artists no that's great and then you have a scholar presentation as well right on Sunday yeah so John Jacob who's the curator at the Smithsonian museum will be speaking on call the box of ten photographs the Odyssey of Dion Arbus and to remind us of who she is so she is an American photographer who is a kind of a a legacy and she's got I don't know a number of different types of photos that deal with sort of the subverted parts of society different kinds of individuals who are unique and other odd it is sin and so this presentation draws on on John's research on the box of ten photographs and the first exhibition to focus exclusively on the portfolio cool yeah so these are all free and open to the public programs was so indeed I remember reading some place that you're having a raffle at some point to say so is that something you can buy tickets to the public of answer yeah so you can get raffle tickets these are to get prints of our word winners as well as one of Joel Peter Witkin's prance laughs and it's to support our photographer scholarship fund and the raffle will take place on Saturday night but you don't have to be you don't have to be present to win I you can get tickets anytime just come to the jury plaza hotel it's ten dollars per ticket and yes it's your opportunity to get an award winning photographic print cool that's what and how much are rough tickets are ten dollars each so what that's yeah right okay so you can also a few yeah if you're in really interested in photography and learning more and being kind of in the know about what's going on you can become a member center to because you are nonprofit organization and so what do members on what do members receive so members receive mainly discounts on the programs we also have special members exhibitions that we DO and projections during a program we do call for a summer and members also receive benefits to other nonprofit organizations and museums so you can get a free admission to the George Eastman house for the International Center for photography remember reciprocal memberships for other photographic focused organizations that's right cool and yeah so membership also just help support our programs at center and we are working towards going into a new direction which is bringing photographers in schools and doing more outreach programs here locally yeah be great you know I remember doing a little bit of research a few years ago when I was were doing some work for the Santa Fe photographic workshops and I learned of this place called Boston Jim Sullivan which is they still sell all the chemicals for doing actual what do you call that darkroom photography yes Sir and I'll turn their prices right in palladium yet you know yeah they're still here yeah yeah so it just goes to show how much there is around photography and there's been a lot in New Mexico for a long time and I'm so glad that you all do this wonderful work you can enjoy the review Santa Fe you can go to some of the public programs and see a really wide variety of photography starting on Thursday October seventeenth all the rate all the way through Sunday October twentieth.

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Projects documentary projects fine art projects we have a number of grants for photographers as well as a an award a new word called me and eve which supports women and female identified individuals are over forty years old right that's a special award that has been created so you do so you do you receive applications for the different awards and the different yeah so at the beginning of the year we put out a call for entries for all of our different offerings we have several awards as well as those grants and we put out a call for entries for applying to the review Santa Fe photo festival which is coming up and so under one cover at under one deadline we have you know this call for entries that goes out to all over the world and I read your entries from all over yeah we got all over the world the hundreds of entries yeah so then in them we have jurors from mean of jurors from museum of modern art as well as editors from like The New Yorker National Geographic from all of these institutions of photography that pick these are these award winners and grant recipients and then they're invited to come out to the festival later in your present their work so that's what goes on during the year and so it's really interesting because New Mexico just has been a center again as really a place where the Darfur's common have been really attracted to I guess the light is one thing the light out here in New Mexico so we have gosh a long list of photographers like Ansel Adams and Paul strand had requested Edward way yeah in who brought Tina Modotti up from Mexico and they all hung out around here in it today we still have so many talented people around we were talking about the old college Santa Fe in the Merion center for photography and I think Marian reading is still involved in your yeah merry and reading yeah she was I think the director of the photographic per ram there and she's still she's on our Advisory Council and now she's the director and curator at the Turchin center for visual art so and North Carolina but he's so she's going to be coming back to be one of the portfolio reviewers Sir I have forty aids editors curators publishers all different types of professionals in the end in publishing and curating and exhibiting that will be coming out to review portfolios right out of me and Marion's going to be one of those individuals that'll be reviewing portfolios in teaching a workshop and that's for the program that center puts on every year that's called review it's called review Santa Fe yeah review Santa Fe photo fastball reviews family yeah and so it's interesting because there are there's a private component and a public component of reviews so you tell us about I mean tell us about you know the the private part what photographers come out and what happens with what what they end up doing yeah so there is a selection process there's a selection committee that chooses and rank I should say that rank all of the applicants to review Santa Fe so all these photographers from all over the world apply and the the selection committee comprised of usually an editor publisher curator ranks all of the work and the top one hundred ranking projects are invited along with our award winners every year and so though that's comprises sort of the conference and professional development part of the photo festival so that's a hundred photographers and yeah they bring their portfolios so they first they compete to be able to come to be invited to invited to come and then they come that's right and then there's a review process by your committees of different professionals yeah and then it so they come out because review Santa Fe is known all over the world to help photographers sort of reach a broader audience so they wanna come show their portfolios they you know the art form of photography is special in that people can bring their work in a small you know travel size portfolio and then show it's to these editors and curators that they wouldn't normally have access to all in one weekend right so it's a really efficient way to make these professional connections and for career development opportunities yeah and so the kinds of photographers and the kinds of photography that is being made is across the board right you have to you have some people who do like travel photography who are always trying to sell their work to the travel pubs as well as fine art artist yeah so there's I'd say primarily it's fine art photography as well as photo journalism and documentary photography yeah it's mostly that there is some commercial work but mostly people are showing their personal photographic projects and trying to reach places like Huff post and National Geographic and as well as publishers book publishers right yep right so if you are just tuning in you're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie RC were always dreaming at Santa Fe dot com and I'm speaking today with Laura Presley who is the executive director of center and center is a place here in Santa Fe that it does all kinds of things involving photography you give grants so you support different photography projects different photographers there's different prices that you give each year and you have entries from photographers all over the world and so for reviews Santa Fe which starts on Thursday the seventeenth this upcoming Thursday and then has events all through the weekend you end up having do you have photographers from all over the world or yeah I'd say we have photographers usually representing like ten ten to fifteen different countries so I was usually yeah a lot yeah usually people from Japan Canada we have people coming this year from England Belgium Germany and yeah so there's a number of different and also a number of different states you write is represented as well well yes I do yeah you have I'm sure a good number of people from the United States so the review Santa Fe is a festival that happens each year at the same time I know last year as we talked about Joel Peter Witkin there was a special dinner that Joel Peter Witkin did he get up did he talk at yeah he got up and he he gave a presentation and he also did a walk through because we had an exhibition at the same time and Sir Hugh went around and did an artist talk around his his work which is really nice yeah there had been a a what can exhibition a solo exhibition here in New Mexico for at least ten years and I think I saw one of and that's really how I got to know him so he he lives in Albuquerque and I think he teaches at U. N. M. and can we do scribe his work in so he does like humans have blows right that are kind of grotesque anyway it Joe Peter we can and you're interested in photography you've got a Google him he was part of the review Santa Fe festival last year and you have a print I think that's going to be part of your raffle which we will talk about in just a little while so thanks for joining us today here on coffee and culture I'm your host Jennifer V. L. and I'm here speaking with allure Presley who's the executive director of center Santa Fe and the big review Santa Fe is coming up beginning on October seventeenth this Thursday and it runs all weekend and we're talking about all the different things that both the photographers will be taking part in in house center supports photographers here in Santa Fe as well as a lot of other public events where you'll be able to go in and see some of the portfolios rates yet yeah so yeah there's a few public events so we're going to talk about those yeah we'll get it we're gonna talk but those in the second segment your listing to coffee and culture and will be back in just a few minutes aw there are no rules Pat.

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"But at the same time if the atmosphere is doing its job, and we're not quite sure if we're in some sort of dream state a lot of that can be written off as just not knowing what we're looking at reality is the technologies quite there for these effects. And that Kim pull you out of it not me. I mean, I loved it. I thought all the preachers look great when the cop finally catches up with her and they're trying to arrest or and then you just you hear it first. And then you see the silhouette of this like wobbling like a weeble you guys remember weevils wobble. But they won't fall down. They don't have arms in. This thing is I think it's pissing acid or blood or something something is leaking between where the Jeddah. Taylor would be that you would expect it to be going to the bathroom and. Yeah, all of this stuff. I mean, it feels like finally someone gave a lot of money to Clive Barker, these feel like Cinna bites creatures that we've seen in horror movies edgy horror movies, where they didn't have enough money. How nice that they finally look alive. I find the character. Designed to be rather dull the one thing that hit me when coming back to this. It's just coincidence. But I was at San Diego in New York comic con recently. And I literally had the thought to myself. I haven't seen that pyramid. Head dude. In a while what game is he fromm? And I really couldn't tell what game he was from like was he in the resident evil movies was either one at the gate trying to break down the door and part four when they're all trying to escape on the helicopter to get to the aircraft carrier. What was that pyramid headed guy from and we were talking about venom just a couple of weeks ago and thinking about the tentacles that lashed out? From venoms hand. And I'm like, yeah. That's kind of leg how nemesis in resident evil shot out his stuff. And in the end, I feel that around the turn of the millennium, and maybe it's heavily influenced by Senna bites. That's when the tortured souls foil was coming out too. But resident evil silent hill quake all of these monsters doomed to a degree feel like the all just come from central casting of monsters. You know, like there the day laborer monsters in any design could go into any of these properties. I couldn't disagree with you more strongly. These are better monsters than I've seen in most films of this time, I can agree with both of you. I think somebody like pure mid head could be taken out and placed in almost any video game series, any scary movie and stand out as that character any sprayed. I mean, can we agree? It's what's striking about it. Is you have a body? A human physiology. That's feels very organic. And then you have something very geometric as its pinnacle. That is such a weird juxtaposition to see a triangle top a human body, the two forms would never are Ganic like meet it just feels inscrutable and fantastic that we have this Garrett rate. I think the other thing that silent hill does well for a monster design point is the twisted faceless, human bodies. That's something that I will. After seeing these movies will always associate with silent hill. And I'm sure there directly from the games. Yeah. Resident evil they were just central casting zombies they work distinctive. And the other thing if this were a resident evil movie all of the sudden rose would be finding to guns and doing ninja flips. I'm not saying this movie's interchangeable with resident evil at all. I'm saying that take away the Zambia's thing about the monsters of resident evil that it got more into. We got a wave from psalm. He's and got more into things like nemesis. And all of that. That's what I'm saying. Is just these designs here, I'm not saying the movies feel the same at all. They do not, but the creatures I wouldn't be surprised of nemesis walked onto the set here versus being on the Senate resident evil they all copy Joel Peter Witkin nego- watched his photography stuff. And that's where Trent residence started copying them in his music videos..

Jeddah Joel Peter Witkin nego Kim Clive Barker Trent residence Senate Zambia Taylor San Diego New York
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"From eleven to five pm, and those will be our award winning photographers, and there's about seventeen of those he'll be speaking about their projects. So photographs on your website. The website is visit center dot org are photographs or the winners any any kind of information on your website about this this you yes. Yeah. Any information you want to find about us find on our website? And then one other really exciting thing is we have an exhibition by Joel Peter Witkin up at El museo right now, and that's really fantastic show. So it encourage everyone to get out and see that it's it's quite unique and be able to see his photographs close up is is really a treat. Yeah. I mean talk about trouble-makers this guy. Huge Joe maker this guy got this guy got called out on the floor. United States Senate. Yes. Yes. Yes. So he's you know, he's a in terms of his personality. He's just quiet out there as as art. So now, he's still around lives in Albuquerque. Yes. So he's basing Albuquerque, and he is going to be the speaker at our fundraiser that is happening this Saturday the twentieth. Where's that going to be? So that'll be at the plaza hotel. And that's I registered you have to register and buy a ticket for that. How much is the ticket? They range from one hundred and twenty two hundred and thirty five okay. Fundraiser for our organization your organization because guys are nonprofit, correct? We are we are so weird dedicated to offering all the educational services and professional development services to petard refers to help them get to the next step. Right. So once again, besides the fact that this gigantic troublemaker, this guy's only eighty he's a troublemaker. His name is Joe, Peter Rick. He's an he's he's like he's like thin who's eighty eight. He's also joined trouble. Maker. As well. All right. So the show's going on main show people can go see Friday night at the farmer's market pavilion. Be all these all these different incredible photographs from one hundred jury foot, photographers, correct? Correct. And then you'll actually be able to meet the photographers too. So they'll be there to talk to everyone about their projects. Now, there was something about when when Laura was on with us, Angie that there was something about people from Santa Fe can bring their photographs. Yeah. We have something called the festival pass rare. You can basically by the festival passion that gives you access to more professional development services. So we the main purpose of this event is for these photographers to meet with all the influencers and decision makers in the field. So that's creators and editors and publishers and so on and then that's how they get their portfolios out there. And so if you buy a festival pass would have access and be able to access that part of the the the event I was mistaken. I thought it was something like I could show my phone and go live with is do what do you think about this? What about this? Does it? So it's not that. No, no, no. I mean, you could you that if you want but not the primary parolee get punched in the face. Tell us about some of these amazing one hundred photographers, Angie. Yeah. So we have we have a couple is photographers that I'm really excited about we have one photographer named just t- Dugan who photographs aging transgender adults, and there's some really beautiful portrait. And it's the project of you know, a community of people. That's that's fairly invisible. You know, in our culture, you don't really see images of older adults in general. So it's really interesting project, and she's she's just very thoughtful on her take with it. And she is from sorry to check really quick we have a hundred. So I have to you know to keep track. She's from Saint Louis smelter eagle. Yeah. And. Yeah. And we have another photographer named Jerry taco gawa-, and he's from Carmel valley, California. And he has a really great a project that is about Japanese interment camps, and basically the history of that. And and all of his artifacts from his family because his family was involved in that. But the project is really really beautiful. So I would encourage anyone to come and check that one out as well that really I mean, they're all so different. And there's some great like aerial photographs. That are really interesting. Yeah. I think it's. His name is Alex Sander Highlander, and he's from Baltimore. And and he's photographing from the air all of those islands and Dubai and also off the Cape in Florida of these man-made islands. So that are basically for you know, upper class and wealthy people to have the housing developed developments. Fantastic. So there are too numerous opportunities to specific opportunities Friday night to see these works at the farmer's market pavilion. Also, the jury plaza hotel and events of the jury plaza hotel one dollar Saturday includes Mr. Joel Peter Witkin, who apparently also included some of his work or comments about his work included in a film about fashion designer Alexander McQueen apparently also made a really cool thing called the raft. And it has Chevy Bush in it. So he's done a lot of really controversial work, including body parts that he's put back together. But they were all apparently, legally harvested body parts and all that kind of stuff. But apparently a rather controversial figure lives in Albuquerque..

Mr. Joel Peter Witkin Albuquerque Angie plaza hotel El museo United States Senate Peter Rick Alex Sander Highlander Dubai Alexander McQueen Jerry taco gawa Chevy Bush Saint Louis smelter Dugan Laura Baltimore Santa Fe Florida
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Reception dinner at eight thirty as Laura said, visit center dot ORG does Peter the Joel Peter Witkin does he have a website of his own where he shows his pieces are his pieces his photographs for sale year round. Yeah. Joe? Well, what what typically happens with these types of articles that they work with various galleries. And so I don't think that Joel sells directly we will have images for sale and very images that are almost sold out. We'll be at El ni sale. But if they wanna get on some of Joel's works they can do so by going to the Katrin Eshelman gallery, which is out of Chicago. She's one of his major dealers and more. Closer dealer is another one named Terry. Atherton the Atherton gallery, which is out of Tucson. And like I said we will have images for sale at Ellen. Who CEO and proceeds go to center, which is a nonprofit organization and directly to the artist. Well, you guys are if I want three what other projects are you working on anything else? You wanna share with us while we have you? Yeah. Yeah. So one other thing I didn't mention that. We're really excited about. So we have forty eight. VIP reviewer. These are some of the best people in the photo business. We say, you know, people from before to editors and directors of photography from National Geographic and time magazine NPR have post as well as curator's from all over the US and publishers and people come in internationally to come source talent here in New Mexico. So all of these really wonderful, photographers who are vetted as well as the VIP reviewers come for these meetings. We call them portfolio reviews, and so if people have their own photography projects that they wanna show to some of these reviewers and get feedback and hopefully start a connection they can do. So at this event and one of these reviewers her name is live asteroid, and she is the director of exhibitions from the Nobel peace center. She's coming all the way from Oslo Norway, and she's also going to be giving a talk, and this is open to the public. So we invite everybody to come to that. That'll. On Thursday, October eighteenth from three to four pm called picturing peace crafting, the annual Nobel peace prize exhibition photographing presidents, dissidents and disarmament's. So please come out and join us for these exciting toxin programs happening here right here in Santa Fe. All right. Let me just get this straight. So if you're an aspiring artisan as sparring photographer, and you wanna get some some feedback on your work. You can come to this event at El museo. Well, now, this is that. Just an ex exhibition. So then in two weeks October eighteenth nineteenth and twentieth. We have our review Santa Fe photo festival and the exhibition sort of kicks off the festival, and so yeah. So people can come to the photo festival. Get a festival pass and meet with some of these, you know, these industry leaders at the review Fe photo festival events. That's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. It's really one of the most prestigious events because it's vetted just like one hundred and fifty two photo festivals. All over the world is this huge proliferation of this type of event because people love photography and practice photography and this one review Santa Fe, and then going on that's one of the longest running. It's if eighteenth year, and because of the sort of legacy of excellence in photography in New Mexico, and because of the just the quality of the event, it's one of the most well. Amount. So that's why people come from all over as well as these really high profile VIP reviewers come to to talk about photography to look at work to meet with others. So it's a really exciting weekend. And yeah, so we plan all year for this event. So we're excited to get this going. Yep. One thing I just found out Laura is that we need to have you on more often people need to know more about center. Yeah. Thank you so much. I'd love to thanks for having me on. Now. Appreciate it. Visit center dot org is their website once again. The artists being featured at El museo is Joel Peter Witkin, which if you have a night at state Senator stand up at the Senate floor, and and talk smack about you that you're a you're a bad impression your bad influence on American society. That's about the best thing you could possibly ask for right, right? Thank you so much take care. All right. You too. Quick time out. We'll be back. Many things to talk about local things national news still breaking today. A lot of weird stuff going on. But maybe my favorite story today has to do with a goblin astride a real.

Joel Peter Witkin Santa Fe Laura El museo director New Mexico El ni Katrin Eshelman gallery Nobel peace center Joe Atherton gallery Chicago NPR CEO Ellen Terry US Norway Tucson Oslo
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Does center is it the Senator or just center, it's just sent her and it is a five zero one c three nonprofit organization that supports gifted and committed fine art and documentary, photographers, so we are a photography organization. We do exhibitions and grants awards all different types of programs to support photography, obviously, photography, hugely popular. In Santa Fe, a lot of people take photography, lots of people collect photography a lot of people like to go to exhibits. Now, you're gonna have an exhibit of gentleman who has been well known since the eighties, but he's the well-known in New Mexico. Yeah. Definitely among the the collectors and the NFL tiger fee, and sort of art kind of sores Joel Peter Witkin is his name. And he's he's one of the most well known photographers probably still living now. Well, known for weird photography and weird. Subject matter. Yes. Yeah. He he's controversial primarily because of a few reasons, I think one is that during the culture wars of the nineties Jesse Helms got up in front of congress to Joel's as well as Andres Serrano and several other artists work as examples as obscenities and the should not be natural talent for the arts. I should say should not be funding. These types of artists, and he sort of misrepresented Joel by saying that Joel mutilated bodies and did all of these different types of like horrible atrocities to corpses for his work. Now, Joel does use body parts and various bodies in his work, but he they were legally sourced through a hospital in Mexico, a medically prepared. So so so that's one of the reasons Joel's work is so controversial that. And he also he sort of works at a lot of the subverts of society, different types of transgender people before that term, I think was even widely used and known and other others on the fringes of of society, he photographs so he says that he loves the unloved. So that's Joe's working nutshell. Laura Presley's our guest executive director for center, they'll be showing Joel's work wearing win. So that exhibition is opening this Friday from six to eight PM at El museo. They censor Fe, and we invite everybody all your listeners to come out. And see this this exciting show. He hasn't had one in New Mexico and almost five years, and before that I think the last time he had a he was shown any Mexico wasn't like nineteen ninety nine. So he's shown more widely internationally. And known more widely and collected in various cities across the US and Paris and other European cities. But we're really excited to be showing his work here in his home state at the museum. If.

Joel Peter Witkin New Mexico Santa Fe Mexico Senator El museo Andres Serrano Jesse Helms US Paris NFL Laura Presley Joe executive director congress five years
"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"joel peter witkin" Discussed on Channel 33

"Well i say the ages of like age twelve and thirteen i was i was just really really obsessed with horror films like i would just exhaust the horror section in in every video store what was your preferred sort of like subgenre form of you know did you lean towards i've really was looking i think for like visceral like i was obsessed with the grotesque and you know at the same time i was getting into joel peter witkin in g and i you know i we g the photographer photographer not the board would be reasonable in this competition too but i was always drying like very morbid imagery and but there were a few films that really really had kind of a devastating impact on may in know one of them was ryan diplomas carey that when really troubled me and it's funny because i i saw it again recently and i was shocked at like how campy it was and i see it now is like this very very sad comedy but like deeply deeply sad like a really there's like a level of kitsch to it too it's also like so imprinted on pop culture now that we see these things happening that are referendum referencing it so specifically so you can't when you're eleven years receiving so differently right exactly and i think i've always been troubled by kitsch and department i mean like diplomas always kind of like skirting the edge of he's he's like he's putting like one toe in kitsch and i mean even with like pino dinacci of score which like so sentimental to dripping with sentimentality it's a gross like it's it's really it's really it's beautiful but then at the same time it's like i don't know it it's dramatic right it's it's really millage how do your how do you how does your family feel about an eleven year old ari becoming obsessed with kerry and then really gory horror films well well with carrie i was less i was obsessed with it but i wasn't i i didn't like it i really regretted seeing kerry because i just it it was keeping me up for like years like there were images in that film that would not leave me.

joel peter witkin pino dinacci kerry carrie i eleven years eleven year