17 Burst results for "Joel Clark"

"joel clark" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:14 min | 5 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Sherry Preston President Biden laying out pandemic inequities in his prime time address to the nation. Last night 20 million Americans lost her job in the pandemic. Working and middle class Americans at the same time, roughly 650 billionaires in America. Saw their net worth increased by more than $1 Trillion in the same exact period, the president pushing a $4 trillion package that would put Americans back to work, he says, building roads and bridges while at the same time providing universal, pre K paid family leave and more money for education. Baby sees Karen Travers This was really the call for now Congress to take action to take his ideas and run with it. This speech, of course, comes on the eve of his 1/100 Day in office, so it's apart victory lap for him. He really talked a lot about what he says he's delivered so far. So much of that is focused on the pandemic, bringing covert writes down, delivering relief funds to Americans in need, and this immense effort to get Americans vaccinated. But he also looked ahead at what the next 100 days could look like in the next 3.5 years could look like Republican Tim Scott from South Carolina delivered the Republican rebuttal. Our best future will not come from Washington schemes or socialist dreams. Will come from you. The American people. The president leaves today to sell his ideas for stop the state of Georgia. More protests in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, after a judge ruled against the release of full body Cam video that shows local sheriff's deputies involved in the shooting death of Andrew Brown Jr. Brown's family says it only saw a snippet of what happened. Those who live near former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani as his apartment was being searched by federal prosecutors yesterday. Very like police just leaving the voting and then just like walking around the block Southern District of New York investigating Giuliani's ties to Ukraine and the former Soviet associates, police officers confiscating many of his electronic during the search. You're listening to ABC News. I'm Joel Clark, a slight quote agent with the true story that could save you hundreds of dollars a year. A woman named Linda just called Her husband. Ray has a group life insurance policy but is changing jobs and he can't take it with him. Well, I went to work and found Ray, who's 40 and takes medication to control his high blood pressure..

Joel Clark Linda Karen Travers Sherry Preston Congress 20 million $4 trillion 40 America South Carolina Giuliani Ray Georgia more than $1 Trillion Andrew Brown Jr. yesterday Tim Scott Last night today New York
"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"They are not subject to having Viruses on them. Like you have with a mac book or a windows computer. Joel clark bob in virginia says i've found your advice to be solid however having been an automotive dealer for forty three years i think to make a few points. Fear consideration are heard. You recommend car vonda for a used car purchase. Please check out their. Bb reviews as their service and quality of vehicles are not very good. They're very poor next. I heard you recommend carmax. And although their quality is much better their prices are based on the highest book value available with no negotiation. Not good for an unknowing. Consumer both of these sources seem to have become a finance play ping lower credit consumers with high prices and in the case of carbon awful quality and value which brings me to a third point over the years. I've heard you advised that people should never cosign for anyone. Parents should be willing to cosign for their children's first card to help them establish and handle credit otherwise children at the mercy of buy. Here pay here dealers. Thank you for all your items that you pointed out and You bring very valid issues to the table on the mentioned about. Let's talk about carmax for a second Carmax the thing that traditional dealers have always sat about tarmac says. Hey they sell vehicles for more money than we do so. It's not a good deal for consumers. What i've learned over the years is consumers. Love the very simple. No pressure way. That tarmac sells their vehicles and the ability to bring it back for a full refund If you don't like it so attractive that people are actually willing to pay more for the vehicle than they would pay to a traditional franchise dealers used car operation. My feeling is been offer. The ultra customer friendly policies. That carmax does and you'll be able to price your used vehicles higher as well and there's nothing wrong with you making a good living off of what you do. The financing thing has always been something that i have spoken about not just with carmax von but with all vehicle purchases. It is a convenience when you finance a vehicle at any dealer and you're paying for that convenience arranging your own financing in advance will save you a ton.

carmax Joel clark vonda bob virginia
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:33 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"I am. I mean those things are so hard to go through while you're going through them you get you make it through and then you're stronger. You're smarter and then you really. You're more cautious. I mean it's it's almost like the the success is sweeter cliche but it is because of the pain. You're not kidding. I mean it. It totally is because i think the you know if it would have come easy i just i don't know i i wouldn't appreciate it quite as much you know. Yeah when you think about this. This believable journey right. I mean close to bankrupt ten years ago. Probably never really sure whether you'd be financially secure and you are. I mean this business has made you and presumably your family and cameron financially secure for life based on your mom's pancake recipe. Do you think that this happened because of of your hard work or do you attribute it to lock man. You know what i say. Sometimes is people always say that fish. Don't just jumping your boat. But you know what i actually believe they do. But but here's the thing you gotta be out fishing for that to happen right and so i think it's both it's such a combination of both. It's like we have had some lucky breaks i. I'd have to attribute some of this to luck. Definitely yeah well. You got really lucky that nobody wanted to buy you. Yeah totally it's funny. You say that because it's like you don't think about those closed doors as luck. Sometimes do you. I mean you think about those disasters or yet another failure like oh my gosh and you go home and you're like okay. What do i do now to keep going. This business can is going to continue. Presumably continued to grow your in your mid forties. You can do a bunch of other things You can sell your shares and walk away and start something new you can stay on. I mean what do you think. Gee think you want to be in in the kodiak cakes business in ten fifteen years. That's a good. That's a great question has been look. It's been my life rate. I mean. I've put everything into this my whole career but you know. Am i the guy that runs. Kodiak cakes it five hundred million dollars a billion dollars. I don't know. I mean i i don't know. How long do i write this. But i i've got. I've got quite a bit of gas in the tank for a while so it's still really fun. I love the people. I work with. And i i love this brand. That's joel clark. He's the co founder and ceo of kodiak cakes and by the way if you saw their episode of shark tank you may remember that the actually brought their bear mascot into the pitch there is literally a human sized bear on the set with them and the bear costume has been through quite a lot over the years. You check out. Kodiak instagram page. You can see their giant mascot shopping at costco riding horse lifting weights dancing tiktok style to a song by drake. Thanks so much for listening to the show this week you can subscribe wherever you get your podcast if you want to write to us or email address as h t. Npr dot org. If you wanna follow us on twitter. It's at how i built this hat. Guy ross and instagram. It's at guy dot ross. Please also remember to visit donate dot n. p. r. dot org slash built and give directly to a local npr station. Our show is produced this week by jc howard with music composed by routine arab. Louis thanks also to liz metzger. Gareth gaels juliette. Carney neva grant and jeff rodgers. Our intern is faira safari. I'm guy roz and you've been listening to how i built this. This is npr. Let's be honest. this year has been hard from covid. Nineteen to the presidential election. So much of our energy is spent just getting through the day. Join us for a new season of the story. Core podcast from npr to hear conversations from people who have faced challenges. Come out on the other side learned some meaningful lessons along the way..

joel clark cameron Guy ross jc howard costco liz metzger Gareth gaels neva grant jeff rodgers drake instagram Carney twitter roz Louis npr
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:51 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"To your mix or race yet at first of all. It seems like a no brainer. Now like a brainer at protein to to to breakfast pancakes but that was a really innovative concept. How where did that come from. So i remember one really. It was just. I was home one morning. And i was looking at this. Vanilla protein powder that we had and we we. I was trying to incorporate more protein into my diet. and we're making. We're adding protein to our smoothies in the morning at home and stuff like that. And when day i'm just looking at this protein powder going. I wonder how that isn't a pancake. I wonder if it's good. So i made it right there and i. It was great. This is awesome. I think this could actually be a product. It was that simple. It really was but in terms of the concept was totally that simple but now but after we and so what we did is we came up with the name power cakes and then we went ahead and trademark. That and it did great. I mean it really read out of the gate. It started selling really really well and did you. Did you know you were kind of riding this wave. This cross fit you know. High protein diet wave. That did you know that you're kinda riding that wave yet. No i'll be honest. We didn't know that it was gonna be this. Big we were watching. Cameron was watching protein trends on google search trends and just kind of seeing seeing the searches. Go up and up in more people interested in protein. But we weren't really sure how big it could be an. We were also kind of living in the dark. We didn't have a lot of data like we didn't have a lot of store level data to really watch trends daso. We were kind of just making some assumptions. But yeah the time. We didn't know how big it would be all right. So you're growing and presumably used. And and i think you even start to expand out right beyond beyond this powders a key. Think you're starting to frozen waffles and muffin. Makes his and more products. Right right yeah. We started to. We really started to go into more categories and where we felt like our brand do well. I have to at this point after shark tank after the protein power cakes after the you know the other products in the other categories you start to get investment firms private equity firms knocking on your door. Oh yeah totally. Yeah we were a lot of people. Sprints all your like knocking on doors and people are slamming for twenty years and elvis said now everyone wants to be your friend totally jso. I'm assuming you you started to look at some of these offers and you did eventually decide to take outside money in two thousand sixteen from group. what was the thinking. Man that did you. Did you feel like we need to take this money to to really scale. Yeah we were growing really really fast and so it's not like we were out of money we were. We were actually making money but we started to look at this business really growing started to think man. We need some resources. We need some i kind of you know. Even personally i felt like. I need somebody to share the risk i. My house was still on the line. For example for you know for a business loan yeah you know like every little bump you know kind of starts to rattle your cage. you know. you're filling your feeling like the business is so vulnerable abbey's years in my mind shifted and man. I was just like. I've got to unload this so i can not be so worried about the business but you know start to become a better leader and so you know we we we fall like let's go find somebody that has some real experience in the space in. Let's get a partner honestly. That was incredibly healthy to do that. You know this business now and are you still a am. I mean you and your family members still majority owners of the business we. we're not. Well yeah if you if you include myself my dad and my brother and cameron majority right chevrolets right. Yeah saint by twenty eighteen. You were like the top pancake seller at target like you were bigger than aunt jemima and bisquick at target. You were like the fourth-biggest pancake mix brand in the country by twenty eighteen right. We were blown away. I mean we were our numbers at target. Were incredible and so we you know. We took that story out to the rest of the market and we started to gain distribution and really started to make an impact into the category so so twenty nineteen for many companies record year. I mean for most companies or on. How bill this and then twenty. Twenty for a lot of companies especially nonfood items. This has been a disastrous. Yo totally right. And what about for you. I mean people are not going to walmart and target and costco as much. There's more purchasing. From amazon people are to the isles of stores to not meandering. They're going in and out and taking a hit. Well we've we've been pretty fortunate now because as people eat away from home like restaurants less right people are home or eating at home more so yeah the grocery stores have been up so the pancake. Mix categories drumline. I mean we've seen a big boom in that space people making pancakes at home. Exactly now you have more time. It's fun like usually it's a weekend thing right. It's like a heavy user of pancake mixes in the past been maybe three or four times a month on average but now it's like it can be a couple times a week not that long ago like ten years ago you were drink really nine years ago. Meet your dad like bailed you out with that fifty grand. I think you know you're projected to do one hundred million dollars in revenue or maybe did last year. That's pretty crazy. It's insane and you're projecting two hundred million dollars in revenue this year. Yeah we should go over that this year. Wow it's incredible like i mean. It really is incredible. And i think about i think about that time. Yeah going from. I mean it took sixteen years to hit a million dollars in revenue. And it's like come on like what the heck what the crap was. I doing man like like those. Were some really hard years. And it's like man you should be able to grow quicker than that then you look at the context. It's like no capital. No money to put in no expertise and it just going to school like the distractions and all that stuff. But it's like we finally got there and then over the last ten years issue. It's like that now. We're going to break. We should go past two hundred million this year. I mean it's it's incredible. And i think as we've kind of talked about this journey say there's so many different phases and i mean. Even though it was hard. I almost gave up a lot. I try to sell the business a couple of times and we almost just died a couple times. I mean i'm actually grateful for all that. Yeah.

Cameron elvis jemima google abbey cameron costco walmart amazon target
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:15 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Decision. That cost the business. Fifty thousand bucks. Is that true man. You dug deep guy. What did you do. I made i made. It was kind of an innocent mistake but what happened was so i decided to exercise my right and take it back and i put together a promotion at safeway. It was going to be a dollar off. it was like a. They had a christmas display in his unique products on these tables for the store and so kodiak cakes was going to be on there and we were going to offer a dollar off rate so but what happened was somehow that promotion got doubled in the system and it was. It showed two dollars off on the shelf. Well that's a huge discount. As a deep discount and so consumers were people were buying like crazy and suddenly. I got a call one day from my distributor rep. And he's like joel. He's like looks some mistake. Happened in your promotion. Got doubled in the system and to. It's been two dollars and worked celena. So he's like so. I i turned it off before it got worse and i was like. Oh man you gotta be kidding me. you know. i'm like oh crap. This is another near death. Experience that we're going to be going through. And when i found out you know the bill was fifty grand man i was like what am i gonna do be did sell a lot of pancakes probably though we did we ton. So yeah so the silver lining. She gave away a ton. I should say we did so i. So my dad came down. He was key. I had gotten a teeny tiny one-room office downtown salt lake. And i just said to my dad. I said dad. I told him what happened. And i said look. I've got this fifty thousand dollar problem. Man i i i saw in an office man. My dad is in their cup interior. Now just thinking about it but it was just it was just. I thought about just all the years i've put into this thing instill it was just barely getting. I just quit my job man. I'm sorry guy. I'm just like you know my dad's in there and i just gave him a huge hug and we just. We sat there for a couple of minutes and it was hard because i thought am i going to. I guess i'm done you know for you know. I thought there was a possibility and he went down. I talked and he you know we were talking about. He's like look joel. It's just. I've got a home equity line on my house and i'll go get your fifty grand and my dad was not a rich guy. You know he. He had been careful. My parents were really careful with their money all those years and so they their house was paid off and so he's like he's like look. Let's just let's do it. I'm gonna. I'm gonna go to the bank or get your check and let's make it work. Let's work through it and so did you check for fifty grand and we made it. You know i put in the bank. I kept going. I paid him back at. You know six months later whatever. Yeah i'm kept working at through. And i think you know. He was the body near death experiences over these years and that was that was a big one channel. Did your wife ever say the you. Maybe we should just like. It's too risky. She should've you know it's funny. She never did. I mean to her credit. She was great so she was always just steady consistent. Cheerleader and i think man that made all the difference. Because i think no. It's really funny. It's like you know. I was listening to one of your other episodes and andy done from bonobos said it man he said it better than i could of. He said companies. Don't die because the companies fail. They die because the entrepreneur gives up. And i remember thinking now i remember thinking if i can just figure out how to give this business enough time. I think it will work. But it's but it's the practical element of can you give it enough time and luckily my wife colleen choose a huge support. Did you I mean still at this point. Two thousand nine. You're doing one product still one product right so my dad was well. My dad and i were working together. We launched a second pancake. Mix and then we had. We had a brownie. Mix in cookie mix so we have four four items all right so you get to two thousand nine which is like this is not a great year for most businesses that year. You met this kid named cameron smith. He just graduated from university of utah. And you hired him. Who who's cameron. How did you meet him. Why did you hire them. So i my dad was by this time about seventy and he's like look i need to. I need to retire joel. And i'm like. Yeah you should add and so i needed somebody to help me and i didn't have the money to pay for some super experienced person so i went to the university of utah career services department where you can quit. You can post job postings there and so i posted a job up there and i think i called like marketing manager or something like that i talked about hey come join a small entrepreneurial business and have an entrepreneur experience something like that helped me build a business all right so you put this ad up and this guy cameron smith response. And what did you hire him to. So when i taught he came into our little one room office and he was wearing a suit and a tie. I was wearing jeans and i just thought man this kid sharp. I mean we just connected. I really liked him. I thought man. He's a good person. He seemed to have a ton of energy and drive. And i thought he seems like the perfect fit so i immediately kinda put him in charge of some sales and i gave him this list of small gift shops that we sold to in the past and my hey call these guys and if you can sell some products by the case to these little gift shops well cameron. He thinks ahead and he by the way is exactly what i needed because i needed. I needed somebody to come in and bring a spark of new energy. He's he started really thinking about. Look you know. I can do more. Can i start calling grocery stores. And i'm like yeah so he started putting together this list of the top grocery stores in america and he started thinking really strategically about it like at a really young age and i started going disgrace. Greet he was like you when you just got back from your mission fearless but totally right fearless in. Blinders didn't see the obstacles. Yeah if you saw me didn't care. So why did he have any success getting into bigger grocery stores. He he really did so one day we had a we were at a trade show. And i got the buyer's name for target and cameron reached out and got an appointment and he's like. Hey it's going to be this day in november. I think this was around two thousand eleven. Something like that doesn't eleven. Two thousand twelve at placement for target in minneapolis. Yes appointment we're like oh man way to go. I mean this was a big deal to go pitch cody cakes to their buyers. Yeah and did you guys go on a plane together. Well i couldn't go and so he said at the time and i'm like man i can't remember what i had had usually would have dropped everything there was. I cannot remember what i had. I couldn't make it so. I'm like just just just go on your own. You'll be fine. You know so so. He went into the meeting. Her name was an placed at and the way camera describes it. He's walked in there and he actually made pancakes for her and he said he was pretty nervous. And he's like he's like man. The spatula was kind of shaking. I cook pancakes for her so so he let her. He gave her some pancakes to try and she liked it and so she decided to bring it in to test it out into forty stores. He locked up a test. Run at target. That was we were. We were stoked and so what how.

celena cameron smith joel safeway university of utah career serv salt lake cameron colleen university of utah andy america minneapolis target
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Does it do had to do. So yeah we ended up opening one in orem which is about forty five minutes south of salt lake in salt lake and the winning. Just it just didn't do well. We had a shut it after a year and a half and then the one in salt lake did better. I mean we. We kept that going for about ten years but it was hard. I mean it was. That was another side hustle. But i had added was spread thin and i was trying to do kodiak k and when i first opened the store i was still working in the consulting world so that was just. I bit off a ton just trying to do too much. Well i have to imagine you lost some money from that venture i did. It was super painful yet in my partner lost a lot more tonight it so it was. It was painful for for both of us. And this plan was to bring you more income for your family ram. But it wasn't working. I read that at one point you went to a bankruptcy lawyer till to explore option. Yeah i did so what happened in two thousand seven. Let me back up just a bit. So in two thousand four. My dad joined me out of retirement. He was sixty five years old. And he's like joel hoppy. Let's do this together. And this is your dad with a phd education teaching religious studies for the church so not a whole lot of business experience. Not a lot. What's dad you always had a little. He had side hustle all those years because he just. He didn't make a lot of money from teaching. So right that. My dad and i managed to build revenue up to around eight hundred thousand so we had some pretty good those years right and eight hundred thousand still pretty small but two thousand seven was a hard year. I think what happened. Was i actually tried to sell the business in early. Two thousand seven. It didn't work. Gas prices went through the roof in two thousand seven. Eight white prices went crazy wheat. Prices went up. So i was just. We were getting squeezed at our margins. Getting just getting hurt and so when we were getting squeezed. I remember this phone call on valentine's day from our producer and he goes you guys. Manufacturing kodiak aches. And he's like joel. Are you sitting down. We've got some bad news. He's like we have to raise your price by eleven and a half percent today and i was just floored i was like got to be kidding. Me it's another. I don't know how i'm gonna make it and and so i. It was valentine's day. So i didn't tell my wife. We went to dinner that night and i didn't want to tell her because i didn't want to wreck the night because i was so stirred up and just concerned about it and i. I decided that i had to quit. Kodiak kicks in in early two thousand eight. I took a job and left kodiak cakes. Licensed the brand over to another small business to kind of manage for me and to pay me a royalty because you couldn't find a buyer summer by you out. Yeah i couldn't find anybody to buy it and so this this royalty deal with great on paper. It was like okay. I don't have to sell it and somebody else can manage it pay royalty. I can go get a job and make more money just wasn't making it. I wasn't making an ati. You're like thirty three thirty four. This had kids already. Yeah three kids by then in two thousand eight and probably not a whole lot of savings like nothing. You know just squeaking by trying to make it in. It was hard. So i took. I took that job or the job he took so i went and ran a home. Healthcare agency in salt lake and i had found this company. They were looking for somebody to come in and run the business. So i took it and meantime you licensed the the brand kodiak cakes to some other manufacturer and did you make any money off that a little bit. I was making is. I think we did like a five percent royalty so yeah. There was a little bit of extra income there. Which really helped because the thing that i did the other thing that really contributed to this whole thing in two thousand seven was i was being distracted entrepreneur a little bit and sold a couple of homes made some money and then we put all the money we made onto a lot bought a lot like a building lot And so two thousand seven. Yeah you're the two thousand seven bad time. Oh you could not have picked a worse time. We thought we got a great deal in the slot that we could maybe flip it. Well not long after that the market just tanked and we were stuck with this law that over the next couple of years i just started to get eaten alive financially from that but then what happened was the licensing agreement that we've put together just wasn't working the company that we were managing the brand kodiak cakes. They had other things to do. And you know it wasn't a massive focus and you know couple mistakes were made and the revenue started to really dip and pricing mistakes went through. We lost some accounts and it wasn't just wasn't complete their fault. I mean there were some. You know innocent mistakes that happened but it did create kind of We lost some. We lost significant revenue. I think we lost about twenty five percent of the revenue. So you you felt like they were mismanaging. The there was mismanagement. And and so you had the right to withdraw the contract the licensing deal and take it back over. That's right but he's my question. I mean you had financial problems mean you had this lot. They were saddled with the cookie business. It wasn't really working You were you know in debt. I mean you don't savings finally get this job paying you pretty well as a ceo of healthcare agency and you decide to leave that and go back to kodiak cakes. I mean that's pretty risky. What i mean. Weren't you worried about your financial situation. I was so worried. I was incredibly worried. But what what what happened is i just. I talked to my wife. And i just thought you know i've already spent eleven years on this thing like What's the worst thing that can happen. And i started to go there. And i started to think well. Maybe i go bankrupt. Well if that's the worst. I'm not gonna die. And here's the other thing guy that was really weighing on my mind was i was thirty. Four years old like those are really prime career building years in. And i not only was i walking into more financial risk but i was walking away. A big opportunity cost to really building my career and that was a fear for me. Because i remember thinking man. If i go into this pancake gig and it doesn't work. What do i have to show for myself. And you. I didn't i wasn't in consulting long enough to to really gain. A skill could command at great income. And i wasn't ceo of the home healthcare business long enough to become a great ceo. And so i was worried about that. I was that was hard. So you come back to the company and This is what two thousand eight two thousand dollars. A year in two thousand eight so financial crisis like the economy's tanking and i guess pretty soon after rejoined hugh actually.

salt lake joel hoppy orem valentine joel ati hugh
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:04 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"This message comes from npr sponsor. Three app who's using science and innovation to help the world respond to covid nineteen. Three m is on track to produce two billion respirators globally by the end of two thousand twenty. In addition three m has also maximize production of other solutions including bio pharma. Filtration hand sanitizers and disinfectants. Learn more at three m dot com slash koby. Three m science applied to life. Thanks also to microsoft windows. Technology can't tell a story start a business or express an idea. Only you can do that and with windows. You'll have the tools you need to do it your way from anywhere whether it's in tablet mode or laptop mode or whether your on your laptop or phone whatever you do make it you with windows. See how at windows dot com slash ten. Thanks also to squarespace. Squarespace is dedicated to helping you turn your cool idea into a modern website. Visit squarespace dot com and use the offer code. Npr to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain writer. Bear sunday thurston says this democracy experiment requires more than just voting. This is incumbent on all of us it takes to it. Takes two to make a thing go right outta sight. And both parties and national level discourse both sides have to still remain committed how to be a good citizen. That's on the ted radio hour from npr and one more thing the new york times bestselling book. How i built. This is now available. It's a great read and a great gift for anyone looking for ideas inspiration wisdom and encouragement to have the courage to put out an idea into the world. it's filled with tons of stories. You haven't heard about how some of the greatest entrepreneurs you know and respect started out at the very bottom. Check out how i built this the book available wherever you buy your books. Hey welcome back to how. I built this from npr. I'm guy is so it's the early. Two thousands and joe clark has brought in his very first investment in kodiak cakes a check for thirteen thousand dollars and he's starting to gain some traction getting his pancake mix into stores in around salt lake city. I managed to get it into smith's grocery stores around here that was seventy stores and then The distributor for these dance stores took it in and then we got some alberson's store. So i think i was able to get it into maybe around one hundred and fifty grocery stores. During that year the revenue was around week. I got up to about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars in toll revenue and it was a one product was pancake mix. That was tricked. One skew like one product. I read that around this time. You actually like decided to go attend business school in in the uk at oxford. And you've got someone to to keep the business going in salt lake while you were gone And then what like you you just came back to utah and and picked up where you left off. I did yeah. I came back salt lake and i actually went back to. I went back to the consulting company. How well you went back to doing consulting because it was a steady income right but still working on kodiak and was i guess around this time. Slot two dozen three. You start to think about jumping into kodiak fulltime and just doing it just focusing on that business. Yeah i really wanted to so lake after. I got back from school so i got home in the fall of two thousand and two and went back to the consulting firm for almost two years just over a year and a half and while i did that. My brother-in-law ran it time out of my inlaws basement. So i'd help him and we'd work on it at night together and he kept going during the day so in two thousand four. I had been working on sales part time. And i've been working with safeway. And i sent some samples out to this buyer. Hurting was donna sullivan. She called me. Joel we're going to bring your pancake. Mix in twelve hundred stores about to like fall out of my chair. Wait let me just get the straight how did you. How did you pitch your product to safely to just kinda blind cold. Call them and yeah. That's exactly right so i would cold call buyers. I just get on the phone i. I'd call the headquarters office and say hey who's the buyer for pancake mixes or whatever and i sent her samples. I don't even know if i spoke to her. Initially or if. I just left a voicemail and sent samples then when she called me and told me she wanted to bring it in. I had never even met with her. And usually you need to meet with these people. Yeah and i'm just curious when you send some like we've done lots of products like tate's cookies or angie's boom chicopee when you send a sample of that. All the person us to do is open the bag and eat it with you with your party like somebody has to take that to a kitchen. Add water and make pancakes like that's not and they must get hundreds of pitches every week people sending them all kinds of things. I'm just surprised that they actually made them and tried them totally. The odds are kind of piled up against you. When you have. No one knows who you are. You have no track record. What we had going for us was great packaging. It was so unique. And finally donna calls me and says hey joe we're gonna bring this into twelve hundred stores and i'm like but we've never met you want me to come down and meet you. She's like now. We're beyond that we're good. We're we're gonna be the head so that bright then twelve hundred safeway stores. This is real. So i'm assuming this is when you decide. Okay i got to focus on this full-time the happened. I'm like okay. I think i can live on this so you know but keep in mind. It's one skew right and so it sounded like awesome. Get but i. I really didn't know. I didn't have a great feel for how much i was going to sell. And what kind of order. how much. What was the amount of money that they were going to spend on this. It was probably in the realm of twenty twenty five thousand eight bucks. You're thinking twelve hundred safeway stores. You're a millionaire. No no this is like a twenty thousand dollar order. Yeah 'cause you're still even when you're not sure that this business is going to make this plant right like alec. At this time you were still like flipping cars and and you started to flip houses. And then i read like around this time. She started like a whole new business like a cookie company. Won't what was the coach company. So it was called ben's cookies and it was a. it's a company that exists in england. It's a great business. Great product and my wife and i were regular customers when we were in graduate school over there and so one day. I sat at the coffee shop with the owner before i was leaving grad school to come home and i said hey i'd love to start one of these in utah. So you started a branch like a brick and mortar. Ben's cookies shop in utah. I did we opened up two of them. And you put all the money behind it. No i put some. I didn't have a lot so our the rest. I had a little bit left on my student loan to go and so i took the rest of my student loan and put it towards it. And then partner Put the rest. He lent the business the rest of the capital to start ben the apartment. His name's chris. Oh critic called it was the original founder. Who started her son's name was ben and so she named after him. I'm looking their website now. You're i'm ginger dark chocolate lemon orange and milk chocolate cookies. Wow so are awesome awesome. Cookies and How.

npr bio pharma alberson safeway donna sullivan joe clark thurston Npr kodiak angie's boom chicopee salt lake city new york times utah microsoft oxford
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:13 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Dollars toll revere for the year yup and so we were selling these this limited number of stores. That aren't moving a whole lot of units per week because people would they would get it on vacation right and go home. And they couldn't get it but yet we could see. The people really loved the product so mad if we could just figure out how to hang in here on this long enough and how to get some distribution going. This could work so how did that. I mean it's your brother right so it's beyond the family but did did i've talked to co-founders did you sit down and kind of formerly divided up. Well look you know. I started it so i still own seventy percent. And you know you're gonna get thirty percent or was it just kind of like here. You go and it was very informal. It was actually informal but well it was. It was informal that way. But you don't. We did what we did to actually formalize it. We actually made a little contract in. John literally sold the business for a dollar so so he basically gave it to me. And i think you know i think in his mind it was like i'm gonna shut this thing down. Yeah so what the heck give it to joel. See if he can do anything with it and at the time it was it was running it as a sole proprietorship which means we hadn't even incorporated the business. And so you know it was not until about nineteen ninety nine that i actually incorporated the business and then i went back to johnny gave him half the shares. Back all right so you you become sole proprietorship and by the way you're making the pancake mix yourself or do you have somebody make it for you. We actually we did. Have somebody making us in salt lake city to they had the recipe your recipe and they would make it for you and Same thing where you like hustling on weekends and and because you're a student right. Yeah i was going to school. I was working a part time job. And i mean for me. I wasn't i wasn't married. I i had a pretty. I had time. I didn't have as many obligations and so i started to drum up more gift shops end and just try to get as many accounts as i could and then started thinking about. Okay how do we. How do we get this into grocery stores right so yeah i would work. I was working nights on this thing every day it. This is the late nineties. Did you think that this had legs that. This could be something really huge or did you think did you think well. It's my side hustle. But i'm going to probably pursue something a little bit more stable. So yeah do you know what's interesting is when i first took it over. I thought i mean seriously. I was like i'm gonna make this thing go now but what happened was like it was. It became the reality check. Hit pretty hard. Pretty fast as i got into it and i started to realize that holy cow. This is actually gonna be a while. This is going to get hard. And what were your. I mean besides obviously money. What were the other limitations that you were facing at that point. Yeah yeah right money. His was huge. We had no capital to put into this thing But you know i think the limitation was. I was twenty three years old with no experience like i had zero experience. The only thing. I really had was a lot of enthusiasm and some confidence which is which is good but man i do nothing about how. Get a food product off the ground. Nothing while you were. I mean running. This is a sole proprietorship. And then there's a small business and still just you in the early two thousands right right. How're you actually. Earning a living if revenue is still fairly low. So i write out well. During my senior year at the university took job working for a management consulting firm downtown salt lake and after i graduated they wanted me to take a full time job there and i told him i look how about if i worked thirty hours a week and then that way i'll still have time for my little my little side hustle the pancake business and so they were good with it so i worked there to make money and then you know on the side. I was slipping cars to try and make extra money. Fine cars detailing. I'm fixing them up and that's eight. Mcdonagh saved our bacon man. Because i was married at the time i got married fairly young. Yeah taught standard probably average. They got married just before i turned twenty four and did you. Were you telling people like. Would you talk about this to people you got this pancake makes business going like at the at your job and with friends you talking everybody back or we kinda quiet about it you know i was never like i would talk about it just if people would ask but yeah i talked about it. It was it was fun. I bring it up you know and i wasn't shy about trying to go and get publicity. Either i really did try hard to go and get publicity. Just couldn't no actually did. I actually had some pretty good success with it. I remember somebody one day said. Hey joe you could probably go get a newspaper. Columbus and this is like nineteen ninety eight right ninety eight one thousand nine hundred nine the internet's out there but not a lot so i i'm like okay. I'll see if i can get a newspaper article so i remember. I called up the desert news one day and i got this paper in salt lake by the gap exactly. Yeah desert news big newspaper. I got the the food editor on the phone and i just started telling her my my story in our story about this pancake mix and she said oh. That sounds really cool. I i may want to do a story. You can send me a press release and i go. What's a press release that she goes just type type up the story kind of win. You talked about senate to me. So i did. And then she called me up and she's like. Hey we're gonna run a story on you. We're gonna send up the photographer out and You know. I was at work this morning. That the story had she told me it was gonna hit and i. I can't remember what did in week it was. But she told me in advance. Hey we're gonna run the story it's gonna hit you know tuesday or whatever it so. I'm sitting there at work and often i get this phone call from dan's grocery store the on foothill drive in salt lake and the the grocery measure calls me. She was like joel. You gotta get over here. We sold out your pancake. Mix by by ten am. And wow more. And i'm like oh my gosh. You've got kimmy. I didn't even think about like getting more product miss store. I had no idea what this newspaper article do. And so i told my boss. I'm like I got to go. You know so i i left work and i went home and i grabbed because i was delivering the pancake. Mix into these five grocery stores five. Dan's grocery stores among everything else. I was doing that was so they called me up. And i went in and i- i- reloaded the shelf and i and she's like. I'll take like ten cases in that okay. They're usually go in and take one case a week or every other week and dan's was your biggest distributor at that point in salt lake. It was we had my brother. John had gotten the product into ufc grocery stores up in seattle prior to me taking it over so they were our biggest right. So it is chew thousand and you you. You had not taken any outside investment at this point and maybe we're not able to attract outside investment this point because you were so small right but I guess a friend of the family gave you like a check for thirteen thousand dollars. What's the story so yeah. The sky is named gary owner. A neighbor of my parents loved kodiak cakes. and he'd bytedance down the road and He he would. He started talking to us and he's like hey. I love this pancake mix. This is awesome. You need investment money and you know john and we would talk. I was running it. But we would talk all the time. And and i remember thinking yeah it would be really nice to get a little bit of capital to try to do some do some advertising try to some marketing and just try to help kind of kick start this little business and gary john. We all started talking in in. Gary said art guys all put Thirty five thousand bucks in for. I can't remember eighteen percent of the business or something. He's like look. Let's start with thirteen thousand and then when you need more you know we can. We can give you the rest of the money..

revere salt lake salt lake city joel johnny Mcdonagh John dan's grocery store miss store Columbus kimmy joe senate gary owner
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Basement. We made this little makeshift warehouse down there right. So this is his side hustle. You're a student. And where are you going to try and get people to carry your pancake mix. Yes so. I remember the first day john to work and i was going to go out by myself. I started downtown salt lake. And i started going into hotel gift shops and i remember thinking man. We have no idea how to sell a product. I'm just gonna walk in and start talking to people right. Yeah and so. I started going to this hotel gift shops and people were like. That's actually really cool. You know leave me a sample here. I'll talk to my manager about it right and we'd get a business cards we could follow up or whatever so i started there and then just a few i remember. I went into a flower shop in salt. Lake had gifts and a furniture store that had gifts and so that was kind of my first day out was right in salt lake. This like just going back to your mission. You're right it's so true. That's really funny because man. Yeah i was fresh home. I've been home a month. I was ready to go like that. That did not faze me at all right walking into these stores and so you start with just like hotel shops and small gift shops here and there and and mainly in salt lake or did you did eventually lake so the first day or you know. Maybe a couple of days. I was in salt lake. And then on december i nine hundred ninety five. John and i took a trip to jackson wyoming. We left at like four. Am four or five am. We got in his car. And i remember he had this. He had this mazda sixty six and it would hold exactly nineteen cases of kodiak cakes and the cases were i mean they were thirty pound cases back then and so. We're putting like almost six hundred pounds of product in his car. By the way a mazda six two six a sedan was a sedan truck. Okay yeah so low that thing with all this pancake. Mix and jonah there and we both just kind of went out and started walking. All these gift shops in jackson wyoming selim pancake mix so by the end of the day. We sold all nineteen cases of product. Do all these gift shops and so we were like yeah. That was a that was a successful day. So you'd go in with a bag of pancake makes because normally would go like you think that you know you you sample right like if you're selling soap or cosmetics but you've got a bag pancake mix but you can have prepared pancakes you. You weren't able to hit. Try this pancake rice. We was a bag mix. That's exactly yeah we couldn't make it right then and but what happened is these people looked at me like this is the coolest packaging. Oh man this will work great in here. But even then i mean for every thirty customers or fifty customers and a gift shop forty of them really there to buy breath mints are cigarettes or you know whatever they played lie maybe one out of fifty would by the kodiak holy so so i mean how are you going to get any attention for it. I mean honestly that was tough. I mean we we did. We picked up a few more. We went sun. Valley idaho the next weekend and do the same thing and i think we ended up picking up about maybe fifty gift shops in the first few weeks. So we're like okay cool. We've got fifty gift shops. And and then. I think that was really one of the hardest. Things was gift shops. You don't sell a lot. I mean just what you were saying. You don't sell a lot in a gift shop. Yeah and by the way when when they were placed in gift shops. Have the work with gift. Just pay you when they sold the bag. No they would. They would by the case so they would luckily pay us so they say take a case or two and then they we'd give them thirty day terms or whatever and then they they pay us right and they were selling. Do you remember how much they were trying to sell. Or they would sell the bag for the retailer for. I think that we sold those bags into the stores for two ninety nine. And then they would say they've double they'd basically try to put a fifty percent margin on there and try to get five ninety nine out of it right and and in general. Did you have any feedback from those stories about how sales were doing. Actually yes people loved it. I mean people love the product for a gift shop. It was doing well. And i think the best feedback. We started to get where that people started to write letters in and that was just incredible. I mean we. We started getting letters in the one day. John got this letter from tombo debt. The guy that does as a spokesman for motel six and he he lived in alaska and he wrote the coolest ladder and you know he had sent a picture of him in girlfriend in their cabin. Up in alaska. Making pancakes on this cast iron griddle. It was so cool but but these letters started to come in and people say the best. Pancake mix i've ever had. Wow how do. I get more. But i mean clearly. You guys are not becoming millionaires through the occasional gift shops and ski towns. An and i guess after a certain amount of time i mean the stress of running the business becomes kind of overwhelming for your brother. Yeah so i mean. After a couple of years it was just it was becoming. Yeah he was spending so much time at it and he was working fulltime and he had a little baby and he wanted to go back to graduate school to pursue an mba. And just you know key building his career and this was taking so long one day he was He was in his basement. Just kind of thinking about how much he had put into this. And you know we talked about fourteen hundred bucks from a truckee flipped. And then he took. He scraped together everything else that he had from some retirement in some savings and some you know smaller contributions from family members and ended up in the twenty thousands. I can't remember exactly how much he'd spent. But you know it was everything he had for. Twenty eight twenty nine year old person is like so one day. He's down there and he just had a breakdown and he just was in tears and he's just sitting there going man what do they do. Why did i waste so much time doing this. He had all these boxes of pancake. Mix still down there in that little. Makeshift where else in his basement. And he picked up a bunch of boxes and he just threw him against the wall and they just exploded and he really did. He just had a breakdown. It was hard because he started. You know the commission that just realizing that you know. I can't keep going with this. I've put so much time. And so much everything. I had in and he worked on almost every night for years. Three plus years on this thing and so you know that that's when he realized i've got to shut it down or find another path for it. He actually tried to sell. It didn't work and so that's when he came to me and said do you wanna you wanna keep going with this thing. Did you immediately say yes i want. I want to take it over. Yeah i'll run it. Yeah it was a media for me. It's probably it's funny when you're that age you don't always think through the long term implications as well as you should and sometimes that's good right because if you do then maybe you don't take risks right as much as as you would but yeah i mean when he when he talked to me about it i was like absolutely i'd love to do it and i had a real entrepreneurial mindset. I mean i really did want to do something. Start a business someday. I just. I didn't know what was going to be then. I kind.

mazda wyoming Valley idaho jackson salt lake jonah John alaska Lake john sun
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:16 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Don't remember how it how it sort of came about that. I was going to do it. I just remember we're having this conversation. It's like hey do you wanna go sell these. So we loaded up this I have this old red wagon. We put all these bags in there. And i went out and started knocking doors in the neighborhood and asking people if they wanted to buy by the pancake. Mix and by the way. How much do you remember how much she sold these bags for. You know. i wanna say five dollars but that sounds a little expensive for nineteen eighty two. You know but for hand milled wheat. That's pretty true. And so this is eighty two held you at the time i was eight your sees and so i'm imagining you pulling red wagon full of of pancake. Mix and did the neighbors by them. They totally did. I remember. i knocked on us. We lived in a cul de sac. And i went around to all the neighbors in the sack. And i and i think everybody bought one. I'm this eight year. Old kid right and i was actually pretty outgoing as a kid like that didn't bother me at all and so i remember doing that then. Going around to some of the other neighbors outside of our street. And i ended up selling all the bags that we have all right so now there's a a viable business and so does this become like a family affair at this point so you know what happened was so we you know we sold all the mixes in the wagon. Get within. we didn't keep going with it. You know we kind of just let it die now and and and didn't keep pursuing at that time and that was it. That was the all right. See you go on. Start your life. Get through School and did you do a mission when you're eighteen. Yeah i did. I left when i was nineteen month after labor day. Yet and Yeah i did. I went to australia. Wow that's pretty great. I was stoked about that. That was that was like perfect right. Go foreign language and you know we. We've talked about this on the show a little bit and i. I love this example people who listen to show about this young mormons who go on missions. I think are very well prepared to become entrepreneurs because you're knocking on the thousand doors. A week in nine hundred of them are just like slamming in your face and you still need polite right you do. It's so hard one of the hardest things i've ever done in my life. I mean yeah. You're just doing that over and over and trying to talk to people trying to get somebody to listen to you. And you get all this rejection. Yeah sometimes people are nice but most of the time people are nice but every now and then you get someone who's who's just upset and they're just like man get outta here and you know it's it happens. And how long did you spend in australia. Was a two year mission. It was two years. Are you you come back from your mission You go to college at the university of utah. And then i guess while you're in college Your your older brother. John is like hey i'm gonna start a business selling pancake. Mix based on mom's pancake recipe. That's exactly what happened. It was is actually. He started thinking about this while i was still on my mission and so he started talking to my mom about how he wanted to start a business and my mom was the one who kind of planted the idea of you know. Hey john one it you take the pancake recipe and make a real product and start a business on that and just as what was the value proposition. Here was there was anti mima. And there's plenty of pancake mix bisquick and whatever you know out. There was this. This was different because it was whole grain. Pancake mix and that. That wasn't really out there. Well yeah so. The way john thought about it was he thought he didn't think there were enough. Really great grain options out there. We're just true. The pancake category really didn't have much in it in the way of healthy items but he also thought look if i can get a product that tastes awesome. That's number one that is healthier number two and then convenience was the other thing he was really going for so he he wanted a product that was just add water and he felt like if he could get all three in one then. He really accomplished something. And did you say did you can reach at timothy. Hey i wanna i wanna join you well. The timing of this was so perfect. Because i was getting off of my mission in october of nineteen ninety-five in so i went and stayed with with john and his wife temporarily. Until i could figure out what i was going to do and so right then. That's john was about ready to go out and start selling this pancake. mix it. He'd been working on. You know while i was gone and so timing that was great and john said hey joel. Do you want to want to help me. And he wanted to kind of you know obviously evolve at from where we did it of the red wagon. Yeah make a real product. Create a brand and they'd go start selling this in stores. And how how did he have any capital to do this. I mean he. He was a bit older than you. At that point. he was probably in his late twenties. How did he ever cash to even start this app. It was incredibly tight. So john was about twenty eight when he started this and as he got ready to to really start putting money into it. I helped him find a truck that he was able to flip. So i used to flip old trucks and make money on them and do it actually. It's pretty fun. You just by truck and fix it up by an old truck fix it up. Sell it and make money on it. I did that all. I mean i did that all through college in a paid for my mission that way most of my mission that way and what i would do is look. This is really funny. I would go around. I drive around neighborhoods. Let's see truck on the side of the house. And i'd walk up to the door go. Hey do you wanna sell your truck. And then i had so many people. Say yeah actually. We're not driving that truck anymore. And often you'd find him in really good condition so they would just need like a detail being cleaned up. Maybe a little bit of paint top or yeah so usually minor things. Ah so. I found this truck for john in john drove around for a while and then he He sold it and he made fourteen hundred bucks and so he was kinda like look. I think i can actually start me business on this on fourteen hundred dollars on fourteen hundred bucks. Yeah so you're in college. He's starting this thing up and you want to be involved with it. What do you do. So i had time in. So john was ready to go. he was ready to. He had found a little producer in salt lake city to produce the first kind of run of of kodiak cakes and by the way was he calling them that. Ah by that point. Yeah actually by. Then he had created the brand created the first product. And how did he come up with name. With the way. John approached it was what he really wanted. Something that was rustic that was wholesome that had a bit of a western rugged. Feel to it and so you know he. He and my older brother. Tim my oldest tim. They were talking about it one day and kind of just brainstorming ideas and tim said john. Hey john what about bear cakes and kind of hearing stories from our dad who lived in alaska when he was in his early twenties on a survey crew and he tells these stories about kodiak bears and that evolved into kodiak cakes. What are the package look like so it looked pretty similar to what it looks like today. The logo hasn't changed a lot of has a big bear on the front round craft. But what was different about then is it was in a paper bag. Like a printed kraft paper bag and it was like sewn across the top. You know to to seal it off. Oh yeah the bag was so nice you to like. Cut it off her. Take the string out exactly. Take string out by the way that logo if anyone listening can picture writers that bear growling and it says kodiak cakes has got like a maroon rust colored circle around it with wheat and basically what it looks like. Today was what what he made in. Nineteen ninety five. We've been just some subtle changes over time. But i mean in the bear hasn't changed at all for example. So tell me how did you guys as you kinda started up this business. Where did you go to To mean would you just go door to door to little shops. That's that's basically exactly what i did so john. John had a fulltime job. Still so we had this product ready to go which we stored in his.

john australia university of utah John timothy joel salt lake city Tim tim alaska
"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:49 min | 10 months ago

"joel clark" Discussed on How I Built This

"Idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built guy roz and on the show. Today how joel clark into every roadblock you can think of on his way to building kodiak case a pancake mix based on his mom's recipe that he grew into eight two hundred million dollar brand. There are crucial moments in the life span of business that almost every entrepreneur encounters moments. When you face a hard decision when does your side-hustle become your main hustle. What's the right moment to make a pivot in your business model. Or what is it time to give up. Learn from your mistakes and start over. This last question is probably the hardest. Because in many cases it makes sense to cut your losses and move on if mark. Constantine hadn't shut down failing mail order cosmetics company. He probably wouldn't have started lush. If topa wattana didn't give up on his feeling e commerce site selling backyard grills he might never built county which just got valued at over a billion dollars and stuart but had stuck with his money. Losing video game concept glitch slack may never have become business but then there is joel. Clark co founder of kodiak cakes. The brand is best known for its pancake. Mix and for more than fifteen years. Joel struggled to make his business. Sustainable sometimes has you will hear to the point of folly at one critical juncture. He launched a second business selling cookies just to keep kodiak cakes alive but when the cookie store failed it almost took kodiak cakes down with it in two thousand seven joel thought he could fund the business by investing in a piece of real estate but months later the real estate market collapsed he tried to kickstart sales by launching a product promotion but it ended up costing him thousands of dollars and to help pay the bills. He even took a job running a home healthcare company for a while to be perfectly blunt. Jol had every reason to give up during a fifteen year long streak of failures and struggle and yet something kept pulling him back. He really believed that his whole brain pancake mix could really take off and the thing is is hunch was correct because today kodiak cakes is one of the best selling pancake mixes in america and the company is approaching two hundred million dollars in annual revenue. And the thing that got him there yes perseverance and yes lock but also protein specifically kodiak protein power cakes that happened to enter the scene just as a high protein diet craze was sweeping the country and it all started as a simple pancake mix created by joe's mom. Joe grew up in salt. Lake city in the nineteen seventies. He was the youngest of five kids. His dad taught religious classes for the church of jesus christ of latter day saints better known as the mormon church and his mom took care of the house where she made sure there was never any junk food lying around. I remember my friends. Come over to your house and it was always like. Let's look for food. You know you're always that's what you do when you're growing up to my house and you open up the fridge and it's full of lettuce and vegetables and my sister used to say everything we eat is green and brown. So i always loved going to my friend's houses because they always add all that stuff open up their pantry and they like gummy bears and jelly. Things torito's orios my friends. Houses pantries fill a junk. It go back to my house. We had barely same house s. That's funny so what kind of things which are which make you every night. We had a salad every night. And i remember her saying you know you should eat a yellow vegetable every day so we had a lot of carrots or squash and things like that and then she baked bread like whole wheat bread. We had a week grinder in the garage. We didn't have a lot of white flour and white sugar so everything we ate was clean and whole in real and i remember her saying that like it's about eating real food. I guess her whole wheat pancakes for like a family kind of favorite and then so good that other people would ask for them when they come over. Yeah we well. We loved the holy pancake recipe. So i have fond memories of waking up to the smell of that like that was an exciting morning. It's like oh yes mom making pancakes and they were really good. She beat the egg whites like in separate those beat them up so they're nice and white fold those into the batter and was a great breakfast. I mean that was an awesome meal. All whole whole-wheat freshly ground. She would grind the wheat for her. Pancake mix yeah. We had a week grinder in the garage. In that thing was turned on a lot and was pretty loud you could hear it like unmilled grains of wheat and then make flour. Yeah just the the whole wheat throw it in the grinder and it would turn out this first ground. Flowers awesome in so yeah friends would come over once in a while and have those remember like my brother's friend having breakfast with us a couple of times and i mean i think it was. Some of the neighbors probably asked. I also think it was my mom. Kinda feeling like there's a need out there for more real food products made with whole grains and there's probably an opportunity to sell this has recipe as a mix says she was making this pancake. Mix and decided. Hey maybe all like packages up and try to sell it door to door right. She would shop it natural food stores looking for real ingredients real food raw sugar things like that and the mainstream supermarkets really just didn't have a lot of options you the whole grains were out there but they just weren't that common and so you know i think that's how she why she thought of this would be a good niche but i think she also thought there's probably maybe she could make some extra money doing it because money was tight for us growing up. It was very tight so she basically said look a package us up. And how would she sell it so she started packaging. These things up. And i think the initial plan was. Hey let's try sell these two neighbors and see how it works if people like it and which by the way. That's a good question. I don't know if we even had a name for it. What's your mom's name her. Name's penny penny. She can call pancakes. Blessed with a name penny does to be used in marketing advertising and she didn't use her own name seriously. Penny should have done that. So you're she's going to putting them on like brown paper bags like lunch bags totally so she packed all these brown paper lunch sacks on the counter with the freshly ground wheat dried milk and other ingredients saw making powder stuff like that and then she hand wrote on these bags. I my mom has the most incredible handwriting and she literally hand wrote on every bag out how to make it should so she hand wrote every single bag the announced actual out all right. So you got all these bags. Yeah so she came to me and she said hey. And i remember doing this project and i.

joel clark wattana Clark co cookie store mormon church Jol Constantine stuart Joel joel Lake city joe Joe america Flowers
"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Not a lot and it allows somebody to have less risk in owning a second home. The COMES ANYTIME WITH A quarter share. Some of them will be eighth share is that when you go to sell the market is less fluid. And is not a broken market like timeshares are the normal timeshares but still a higher risk venture the you could lose a meaningful amount of money or have difficulty selling your quarter share at a later date a you also don't have good control over what happens with expenses. So it's not. The terrible terrible event of buying a timeshare. But it does have significantly more risk than buying a standalone property that you own. Completely. Joel Clark Michael in California says, I'm twenty five years old saving for a house. I currently have ten thousand dollars saved want to invest it in a CD to get a higher rate of interest. In searching around found a website called Linus and they offer a really high AP. Why have you heard of Linus it's safe to put my money there. Yes, and they must be promoting themselves pretty well because we've had Of questions about them and this is not anything like a CD or a savings account. You are an investor and you have clear market risk that you could lose some or all of your money. So the return being offered have you seen Joel what they're promising right now I think it's four and a half percent. See you're exactly right so as they say, earn up to. Four and a half percent. It is not. Anything like putting money in a CD or savings account this is a completely different kind of venture support for this podcast comes from Twi- Leo really businesses all over the world are trying.

Joel Clark Michael Linus California
"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"This is from Chris in Georgia and Chris says, my mother-in-law has been contacted by her power company requesting than she agreed to grant them an easement across her yard, which would add to the existing road. Right of way, they've offer to pay her several thousand dollars for the Eastman. My questions are, are there any downsides to refusing to permit the easement and if she was agreed granted what's a reasonable payment and also are there any other complicating factors that we should be thinking about? Could hurt the value of the property significantly and what I recommend anytime you're approached by utility that says we got a deal for you. We want this easement we wanna pay you so many thousands of dollars. Go, find a warrior who has expertise in easement issues. There are lawyers that work both sides of the street that represent utility companies and companies looking for easement, and then there are those that represent consumers. There are people that do both of those things depending on if you have an issue involving someone's not a client of theirs because as a consumer as an individual homeowner, we are incapable of knowing the full implications of an easement that is being requested of us and what is fair payment for it and what our rights are. The rights will vary depending on the jurisdiction in state you live in. And the amount of money that is reasonable for you to receive vary so much the closest example I can give you that we had a lot of questions about last decade and not nearly as many of late is about people who have land de one of the Cell Phone Tower Companies WanNa put a tower on. and. The companies low ball. And get you to sign these waterfront agreements that give them unbelievable privilege and you ridiculous responsibility people who hire someone who's an expert in that area end up getting a much more fair agreement and significantly more money for allowing the rental property for that cell phone tower. The closest equivalent I can give you to win you're presented with an easement request. Joel Clark Mark in Ohio says I was just asked by a friend about taking a side job opportunity. The position is to sell index universal life insurance and also..

Chris Eastman Joel Clark Mark Georgia Ohio
"joel clark" Discussed on Damn Good Brands

Damn Good Brands

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"joel clark" Discussed on Damn Good Brands

"You know it's like. What are you really get out of that? Because I think if you can you, you can create I mean the more if you if you just create a brand solely based up research in focus groups than you might create the best vanilla brand out there. Right. If you're going to get so much input that you know you're going to be chipping away this chipping away at where. You can't be things to all people on a really great brand. You gotTA. Resonate really well with a core group. Yeah. It makes a lot of sense. So there was a story about you guys setting up a booth at a at at one of the Expos at one of the trade shows and it's involved the fog machine and I feel like this story is very, very revealing. Could you tell that story and also talk about what it taught you and what it instilled into you guys because I just loved the story and I feel like it's there's a lot of lessons in here about showmanship and entrepreneurship and facing hardships. I mean there's a lot a lot of good stuff in that story. And you eat nick. That's funny. He found that story. That is really funny. So yet cameron and I were at a trade show and I think we were at Expo West possibly one of the biggest natural food show and we had a small booth that we hit create. We built it at the Home Depot and put all this work together meet like an old cabin. And it was actually it was cool. So we had this smokestack in their old pot belly stove and so what we did, we wanted to create this. We wanted smoke right and so it was it was cool. It put this fog machine up to it and we were blowing smoke in our early on. We deluded the smoke because we were trying to finish it out. So it wasn't so happy. Later. We're like, no way man this is not enough what's just blow it out. Let let's just smoke this thing out and people loved what's going on? What are you guys cooking? You know Jan cakes smoke. So. This is the guy behind us was just not happy. You know he was not digging are smoke. So the next day we can't we came to the show and we turn on the fog machine and our whole entire booth just filled up smoke. So we looked like what the heck's going on. So we pulled the fog machine out from the pipe that was blowing smoke up into and somewhat jammed a whole bunch of paper towels inside of that pipe to kind of sabotage us, and we knew it was this guy because he'd been complaining before you know. So I. GotTa be kidding me man. So we pulled the paper towels out and we just blasted the smoke the whole rest of the day, right? Didn't even Guinea. Make Apopka. It was just like. It was a great way to kind of bring people into the booth. It was an authentic. Cool Cabin, Mike thing to do and have smoke and we were like. Sorry. This is what we're doing and we don't really care that much. It worked. I feel like those trade shows very few people put in the effort to be to differentiate themselves and do a have a cool booth or have something even remotely been at enough of them. I'm always blown away at how similar everybody's booth is, and it seems like there's no care put into the showmanship of your presence at these booth. So was really cool that you guys built that you basically built a small cabin in your in your office and brought that over, but it was cheap and looked. Awesome. Nice. But the fact that somebody's always GonNa WanNa step on your success i. feel like is a big part of of entrepreneurship and the fact that that guy trying to plug your chimney seemed to even make you get more aggressive and go blow even more smokeout I. Just love that there's big lessons there. There is the other thing is too though like you think about it, we were bringing people over and he was by that. So he should have embraced acts like dude, we're bringing people over him. We want people embrace it man you'll be able to feed off of that right and we can. We can lift each other. Yeah to mindset. Totally. Well what a lost opportunity for him. So on your on your success what was the worst advice you ever got in the best advice you ever got from an entrepreneurial standpoint. So yeah one thing that comes to mind on some of the worst advice that I've gotten and. I remember once I was at as I was at a trade show and a food broker. Those guys were there like independent sales reps that help you sell your product. So this food broker comes over and he's like, Hey. You know. It's he's kind of giving me some of biases. packagings it's all a bit like I've been doing this for thirty years. It's all about cosmetics. That's what it's all about. You know it's all that's everything and I'm like. and. I just thought about that Mike you know that's maybe a quarter of what it's all about right in other words he's saying. You're packaging is what you're packaging your designs every day. And I'm like you. That's maybe a quarter of what it's all about. The packaging needs to represent the depth behind the brand, and if you don't create that depth, you don't create a great culture if you don't create a great brand identity and brand positioning and real differentiation with your products. Then then that great packaging is just it's shallow. And it will not be sustaining. It won't sustain you long term and so the real the real what really matters is if you have those elements and then you have some really great packaging in. Branding that goes along with an awesome Easter because then people will walk into the brand and want to become part of that tribe for the long haul, and then it's then you know people love that. So I I'd say that would be some of the worst. I'd say some of the very best advice that I have received was early on. From. An entrepreneur that I was talking to who'd been pretty successful and he said Joel you need to surround yourself with great people. In, I. Think we all we do here that that's something that we hear a lot and so it's not like this unique. You know bit of advice probably for a lot of people. But the reality is I think it is some of the most important advice around because I think as an entrepreneur sometimes early on entrepreneurs kinda think they have to be the one doing everything. They have to be the person with all the ideas they have to be the creative one and. Early early on kind of do because you're alone. But but but to really start the scale, that's when you need to start bringing people on people around you that are better than you at so many at so many different things and what you need to become good at is finding great people. That's what she got to become good right and then, and that's how you scale is creating great culture which helps. You. Attract really great people. So I think that's why cody I mean. Really at the end of the day that's why Kodiak cakes is where it is. Today is because we have been able to hire an incredible honestly like an incredible team people and we've built what what I would say is a really really great culture that you know that's empowering that that. You. Know that that embraces people it's come as it's a come as you are leave better culture it's collaborative. There's a high degree of psychological safety where people feel like they could challenge. Challenge, the status quo, they can bring up their ideas not filling out. I'M GONNA get trampled on if I do yet. There's there's also high degree of accountability. So people are working we have a great. Reporting and accountability structure were able to really compete get things done. So I think those are those are the two things that I that I would say well, it sounds like a very critical balanced strike where there is a a heavy work ethic at the company and heavy expectation, but also transparency and the. Just, kind of a culture of people feeling like they can. They can speak up and be themselves and challenge things. I think that's the that's huge. Yeah. We're really I mean we we really making efforts. It's deliberate. It's obviously never perfect. You know and I think. Anyone managing culture has to you have to, you have to realize your weaknesses. But what you do is you create a standard. So you have to you know one thing that we did three years ago we wrote our culture down and. You know now it's a standard and we hold each other accountable to it i. mean everyone's bonus fifty based on living the Kodiak Code we call it it's our culture, and so it's half of what if your bonus is what you do what you accomplish the other half is how you do it and so know that's what really matters so much and it creates a really fun in productive work environment for people. To last few questions when it comes to entrepreneurship, there's a lot of a lot of business books and a lot of resources out there, and it's easy to get.

TA Mike Apopka Guinea Home Depot cameron Expo West Joel cody
"joel clark" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"joel clark" Discussed on WSB-AM

"With and know that a name storm has different coverages then you're going to have with a non name storm Kim Laurie in Georgia says that she's been shopping around for used ATV and she keeps running into these ads were the sellers say they have to go through eBay motors but then when you get down to the nitty gritty the eBay the email that comes from eBay supposedly says that you have to pay for it with eBay gift cards in increments of two hundred dollars each is this a scam that you've ever heard that it is a scam and it's so good that you saw the warning signs that's a case where an individual is just flat out trying to steal money from you there I'm I likely is no ATV they're actually selling and it's a problem the if it this is a listing you saw on eBay motors or on eBay you need to report this to eBay and let them know that there seems to be a scammer and the Mets it's not good for them to have crooks on their platform there is no legitimate reason that a seller would want you paying with any kind of gift cards instead of paying the real way through eBay motors which would be typically through the PayPal platform Joel Clark Judith in Connecticut says my husband and I are sixty eight and seventy years old respectively and.

Kim Laurie Georgia eBay Mets Joel Clark Judith Connecticut PayPal
"joel clark" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"joel clark" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"If you go to Bankrate dot com and you click on best savings rates you're going to see what's going on around the country there are a number of online banks that are really close together on their rates then they'll be a few trying to attract deposits that are paying generally about a quarter point higher I would say a quarter point higher is enough that maybe what get one that is separating itself from the crowd with a higher rate when you go to Bankrate dot com and you look at these rates you'll see right on the front screen savings rates click on it it first they'll show you who's paying to being listed first and those institutions usually are paying below what others are paying slide down a little more and then you'll see the list of who's actually paying the most never put more than a quarter million in any one of these accounts and make sure that any institution you put your money on is either FTI see insured or in C. U. A. ensured Joel Clark Rudy says I want to know if I should buy a new truck now or should I wait till later on in the year in order to get the best deal you're going to find that the best deal with the overhang in inventory is yours through probably the end of June early July there are special situations in the market place especially if you are interested in buying a used truck.

U. A. Joel Clark Rudy Bankrate
"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"joel clark" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Okay and it provides him enormous flexibility to put money aside because it'd be good if you each had your own retirement pile oh hi and all my ultra cheap low cost companies offer these selfemployed 401k's on my investment guide he also if that's more work than he wants to get involved in he can do something called a set up but simplified employee pension that is a half page paperwork one time and he can put from nothing in a year to huge amounts of money depending on how his year has gone and so he's got ways that he can participate as well it's time for ass clark that's where you post a question for me at clark dot com and producer joel acid for you got one from joel clark william road any says when freezing your credit the first thing the agency asked for is your social security number and i'm afraid to provide it i have not frozen my credit because of this should i the credit bureaus track you completely by your social security number it is as much as we hate that it's become this social security number is the national identity number and so the only way to freeze your credit is to give them your social security number and then as long as your information validates online your credit will be frozen in just minutes once you get that process started so don't be afraid of that they already have your social security number.

joel acid producer joel clark 401k