10 Burst results for "Joel Achenbach"

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:21 min | 2 months ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

"K two vision RLE. Thank you for joining us tonight. As we look at these top stories, The White House says President Biden does intend to run again in 2024. The president reportedly telling the reverend Al sharpton last month he will seek reelection while the two pose for a photograph in the Roosevelt room at The White House. White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre reiterated this on Tuesday today, saying that Biden himself has said that he intends to run in 2024. Big sports headline tonight, Yankee slugger Aaron judge is now the all time single season home run leader in the American League after hitting number 62. He broke the tie he had with Roger Maris after a Homer against the Texas Rangers in Arlington this evening. And Red Cross volunteers from the northwest have landed in Florida to help communities impacted by hurricane Ian, they are assisting with shelters food and cleanup. The Nobel Prize in physics awarded to a trio of scientists today, including one American Joel achenbach is covering the story for The Washington Post and spoke with our Taylor van size. Joel, the award recognizes these three men for their work in quantum information science. It's a bit of a heavy science topic that most of us probably didn't learn in the classroom. What were these men able to accomplish? Yeah, it's kind of a classically heavy, the will during brain boggling topic, quantum mechanics. Essentially, they're all three experimentalists. They did their work first when John clauser, who's the American, he did his work in the late 1960s, early 70s. They built this contraption, this apparatus beamed photons, light particles in opposite directions and showed that essentially what happened to one would affect the other. Supporting this whole quantum mechanical theory called quantum entanglement. It's counterintuitive, essentially these particles are not in contact with each other. So why would affecting one affect the other? Einstein said no way that spooky action at a distance he didn't believe it, but Niels Bohr and Schrodinger are some of these other famous physicists from the 20th century said, no, that's just how reality seems to work. And so their experiments supported that. I'm sure that was totally clear to you. I'm just telling you, it is pretty obtrusive. You know, it's better than magic school bus could have done Joel. I think I appreciate that. Like you said, this experiment that's work that they did is more than 50 years old in some cases. How is it going to impact future scientists? Well, it already has. I mean, essentially a lot of the technologies we use today employ quantum mechanics. I mean, a lasers in transistors and all these things they follow quantum mechanical principles, which and I think the audience is probably heard about nature being kind of a probabilistic thing. It's not all classic billiard balls rolling into each other and having an obvious reaction. So this theory is well supported in reality as we discern it and technologies as we use it, but the way it can be used in the future is with quantum computing and cryptography, codes that can never be broken, encryption that can help be broken. And that people are really excited about that. That's a big field right now. And finally, Joel, unfortunately, it sounds like there's just more rain for the parade of those who wanted to hear Beam Me Up Scotty. No teleportation in the future. It looks like you might be able to send some information somehow, but you have to be able to beam down to the planet with the people eating purple plants on them, whatever, no. You're going to have to stay on the spaceship. Darn. Okay, well, maybe next Nobel Prize, then we'll have something different. You can read about this year's quantum information sciences, Nobel Prize for physics online at Washington Post from Joel auchenbach. And as northwest news radios, Taylor van Sykes. Students at Bayley gets her elementary school are running a little faster with a new pair of shoes on their feet. A nonprofit shoes that fit delivered about 350 pairs of Nikes to students their Nordstrom is going on 12 years of partnering with nonprofits like this one to help provide new and well fitting sneakers to kids in need and local communities. The Seattle storms, very own jewel Lloyd, was there to help give out shoes. It's

President Biden karine Jean Pierre hurricane Ian Joel achenbach Taylor van White House John clauser Joel Roger Maris Al sharpton American League Texas Rangers Biden Yankee The Washington Post Nobel Prize Red Cross Arlington Aaron
"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

"Access. Democrats, Tim kaine, of Virginia, and kyrsten sinema, Arizona teamed up with Republican Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska on the measure. Abortion rights would be protected federally up to viability, and even passed that point if the mother's life is in danger. Viability nor the woman's life being in jeopardy is defined as a doctor would be the one to determine those things. The proposal comes weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court voted to overturn roe versus wade, the decades old decision which legalized abortion in the U.S.. If you get hit with COVID-19, how long are you contagious? If you use president Joe Biden's recent relapse as a case study, it's easy to see how confusing the guidelines can be. Joel achenbach has taken a closer look for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Joel, before his relapse, The White House was out in front saying that they've done more than the CDC requires to make sure that the president wouldn't infect anybody. And yet here we are, what are those CDC guidelines in the first place? Well, first of all, the guidelines are under review and they're going to put out some new ones. I don't think they're going to change the key guideline for exiting isolation. This is the one that we really focused on in this new article, which is right now it says, you need to isolate for 5 days and then you can come out of isolation. The problem is that's just an average and approximation of the period of time when you're likely to be most contagious. And for a lot of people, yeah, if you isolate for 5 days and come out, you probably won't give it to someone else except that the research shows people keep shedding virus on average until about day 8. They're less infectious in those later stages, but even that is an average. People can go ten days, 12 days, 13 days, and still be shedding virus. So the best way to know is to take a rapid test and get a negative result, which is what happened with President Biden last week. He had two back to back tests that were negative and then he had his event in a rose garden. He said, hey, I'm back. And what's the CDC's position on testing after infection? Because I know like for our company, for example, if you get sick, you need to test before you're going to be allowed back in the building. Does the CDC have that position too? No, the CDC says, well, you might want to take a negative and take a test and if it's positive, you need to extend your isolation to ten days. But they don't specifically recommend it. It's a bit of a puzzle, many of our expert sources who we talked to said, this is weird because it's a direct piece of evidence about how you are not still infectious as opposed to this timeline guidance, which is just an average. The reason the CDC isn't pushing for everyone to get a negative test has to do with their concern that not everyone has the opportunity to have those kind of tests, because not everyone has access to the test. And a lot of people, they need to be back at work or they need to be taken care of family members or other duties they have. And I think they felt like the guidelines they put in place last December during the omicron wave, they didn't want to change them again. And so we'll see what they come up with next. But this is definitely a point of tension between the CDC and many people in the infectious disease scientific community. And when those updates come out, we know we'll be able to find them online at Washington Post dot com from jollof and Baku's

CDC kyrsten sinema Joel achenbach Taylor van zeiss Tim kaine Lisa Murkowski Susan Collins President Biden U.S. Supreme Court Joe Biden wade Maine Alaska Washington Post Arizona Virginia Joel White House U.S. jollof
"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:42 min | 5 months ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

"The coronavirus pandemic isn't done with us. The new BA 5 version of the omicron variant shows a knack for evading antibodies and reinfecting us. Joel achenbach is watching it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Julia caught a professor at Scripps research who says that this is the worst version of the virus we've seen. Why does he believe that's the case? So yeah, so this virus, this version of this sub variant, BA 5, it has a lot of mutations in it that allow it to escape the immune immunity we have either from being previously infected or from vaccination or both. And so it's not a totally new virus, obviously, but if you've been boosted and in fact, or if you've had a previous case, you're still vulnerable to getting infected again with BA 5. That's the problem. Now, when Eric topol, the professor says it's the worst version of it and arguably no, when we the virus first showed up two and a half years ago, that was the worst version because we had no immunity to it at all. It would never abide to never seen it before. We didn't have vaccines yet. We're in this dance with the virus right now where it keeps mutating in response to our immune system. And the result is a lot of infections and a lot of reinfections people who are getting excited for the second or third time. Do we know yet how widespread the BA 5 variant is in the United States or is that data just not there? We do actually have an idea of the percentage of cases right now that are being caused by BA 5. It's a majority. It's a little bit over half according to the latest CDC estimate, which always runs a week or two behind. So I think that the latest news we hear is that most cases are BA 5 or there would be a four, which is almost the same. It has the same spike protein as BA 5. So these two together are driving the wave of cases and the real question is how many cases are there? I mean, how many people right now are getting infected with the virus. That is a really interesting situation because people are testing at home and they're not reporting the results of the tests or they're not testing at all. They don't want to know if the thing that they are suffering from at the moment is COVID. So but the exports are telling us that it could be half a million people right now infected with the virus, which is a very large number. That's a big wave of cases. And it's why anecdotally, you probably know people who have had COVID in the last few weeks. Yeah, I can think of two or three names just off the top of my mind right now. Why is BA 5? So adept at reinfection. Do we know that yet? Well, we know the specific mutations on it that kind of alter the structure or chemistry of the spike. And there are some other parts of the virus that are also a little bit different, which may be part of that kind of slippery nature of it. It's not been Supernatural. It's just evolution. I mean, evolution happens in the virus is constantly making copies of itself and eventually it lands on a recipe or just to random mutations of the amino acids. It lands on a version that does a little better in terms of infecting people or replicating in their cells. The new version is BA 5 Joel achenbach reporting on it in The Washington Post and you can read more online, including about why this may impact our calculus around developing new boosters for the COVID-19 vaccine. You can find more online at Washington Post dot com. Joel, thank you

Joel achenbach Taylor van zeiss Scripps research Eric topol The Washington Post Julia CDC United States COVID Joel
"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

"People chanted and held signs here outside the Supreme Court spilling from the sidewalk on to first street My sign says your wife matters abortion is wrong Tom Bryson drove here from Michigan for this I'm hoping they overturn roe versus wade My sign says abortion how you want it when you're on it Jessica Olsen drove from Chicago to be here What I would hope is that they would understand that we've already settled this issue It is settled law Outside the Supreme Court John Aaron W TOP news William and Mary law professor Neil devons tells the implications of this case extend beyond abortion rights he says if rose overturned the decision could affect the future of the high court itself It will call into question what justice Kagan said which is whether the court is a political court and presidents can change doctrine through appointments And that may raise a specter of other issues involving court reform There's a commission that President Biden has approved as making recommendations governing the court size and other issues and calls for court reform will grow much louder as the court overturns roe not to mention what might happen with the abortion case itself and the abortion right itself William and Mary law professor Neil devons We'll talk about the nation's first confirmed COVID omicron case with The Washington Post Joel achenbach coming up just after traffic and weather for 36 Today's cloud report how a multi cloud approach can give you the freedom of any cloud with the simplicity of one provided by VMware Here's Keith's knockout Sony federal strategist for VMware When federal agencies talk about multi cloud transitions the conversation usually centers on technology but a true multi cloud environment is holistic It requires rethinking your approach to cloud agencies need to reexamine the skill set of their teams which were often built under legacy IT environments Now teams need to be multi disciplined in cloud solutions agencies set up skill their workforce revise business processes and policies can help shape the agency's culture and deploy a true multi and.

Neil devons Tom Bryson Jessica Olsen John Aaron Mary law Supreme Court justice Kagan President Biden William wade Joel achenbach Michigan Chicago rose VMware The Washington Post Mary Keith Sony
"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

"Where it's 75 degrees Now, Homo news time 5 36 along feared outcome of the pandemic isolation came true, according to new numbers from the National Center for Health Statistics. Joel Achenbach. Reports in the Washington Post that more than 93,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2020. Joel joined Cuomo's Taylor van size. How big of a jump is this compared to the 2019 overdose numbers? You have to remember the 2019 was a record year for drug overdoses. I think they had about 72,000 deaths across the United States from drug of this overdoses. Most of them were opioid. A lot of it is is just sentinel that's really dangerous. Synthetic or really did have been flooding the country and particularly the Western U. S. So the numbers were already really highest. But it jumped from 72,000 to 93,000 in a single year, which is a very I mean it's It's an appalling numbers. And I've covered this story. You know, for several years now you know what the opioid epidemic in the drug overdoses and I am astonished by that number. And I I know Francis Collins of the NIH, the director This morning told me, you know, it's just heartbreaking and there's a lot of human tragedy in those numbers. And we've been talking to you for. But those years as well as you've been covering this, and I got to wonder if this is More potent fentanyl or car fentanyl that's coming into play or are drugs other than opioid, starting to gain ground and kill off people as well. There are several things happening at once. So you think about when the pandemic hit Suddenly, all these social services get shut down. He's allegedly not essential services like drug treatment people going to methadone clinics, people who normally would be seeing, you know counselors. Or just their primary care physician. A lot of people lined up, you know, being alone. They're they're isolated, and maybe they're addicted to a drug and they're using it and there's no one they are. To help them if they overdose, And so, you know, there's no one there with the Narcan to save them so that the pandemic is a big part of it on the supply side. I think I don't have not heard that The Sentinel is any different. It's already really, really potent stuff I would be. There's been a rise and other drugs to like cocaine and my family ketamine. Sometimes they're used in tandem or some combination. We do have some sources say that there is a federal contamination in some of these other drugs, you know, And of course, it gets mixed in with heroin. I think we'll really see though in these new numbers is the pandemic effect. And the lack of access to treatment and social services that associated with the shutdown and then just saw the chaos of the pandemic. More money will be coming to to fight the issue through the Purdue Pharma settlements. But are the feds doing anything to refocus efforts on addiction problems? The bad administration just yesterday named the drugs our nominee and has has said they're going to put more money into it. I think if there's one good thing that comes out of this new report, first of all, it's not shocking. Be in the sense that we knew that overdoses were up. But this you know, this is the first time we've seen all the 2020 numbers. It's gotten a lot of attention today a lot of headlines and I think that you'll see the leaders of the country. I don't have to respond to this because it's nearly 100,000 people in a single year dying of drug overdoses. I mean, that's more than twice the number of people. It's about twice the number of people who die in auto automobile accidents. It's a really big number. The Luckenbach with us on common news reporter for The Washington Post, and you can find his coverage today. Online at Washington post dot com. Joel Thank you. And that's Ko most Taylor van site 5 40 now into the Beacon Plumbing sports desk. Cuomo's Bill sorts with us with more hoops there. It is Round ball Wednesday night for the man. It's Game four of the NBA Finals Coming up on KOMO TV four at about 6 15. The Bucks are coming off an impressive 20 point win at home, but there's still down 12 against the Phoenix Suns. Women's All Star game in Las Vegas tonight Different format. Now the WNBA's top players go against the U. S national team that's headed to the Olympics. And that is a squad that includes the Seattle legend Seubert. I think this is similar more similar to the Times we've played the All Stars with the USA team versus when it's like a full on All Star team were both sides are just WPL stars. So to be more similar to that bird looking for her fifth Olympic gold medal, and we have to wonder whether she might be a USA flag bearer in steamy Tokyo. Certainly Sue would be the coolest literally. Ralph Lauren has build a personal air conditioning system into a roomy white jacket and the U. S athletes would wear these during the opening ceremonies for the Olympics. And Paralympics. We needed that in Seattle about two weeks ago when it was 110 If you're Pacific Time Zone golf fan, we better take a nap right now are chug energy drinks round one of the open championship in sandwich England tees off at about 12 30 just after midnight our time sports at 10 40 After the hour, Bill Schwartz. Come on. Thank you. Bill 5 41 coming up more in depth on the arrest of Richard Sherman..

Richard Sherman Bill Schwartz Joel Achenbach 2020 Francis Collins Joel 2019 National Center for Health Sta Phoenix Suns 75 degrees Las Vegas 20 point United States NIH Wednesday night 72,000 Olympics Seubert Tokyo Sue
"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

"The latest government data shows that last year more than 93,000 people died from drug For doses. That number is more than 21,000 more than the number of deaths in 2019, marking the biggest year to year increase in overdose deaths in American history. Prescription painkillers once drove the opioid epidemic in the US, But now it is the dangerously powerful opioid fentanyl. Well, joining us to talk more about this Washington Post science reporter Joel Achenbach jolts Good to have you back. Thank you so much. Well, thank you for having me and let's start with you giving maybe some examples here of how the pandemic factored into this big increase. Well in so many ways. There was a complete collapse of the usual systems for trying to allow people to get treatment. For example, we saw there's a new report out today that there was about a 30% drop in people entering addiction programs designed to help them if they were if they were addicted to drugs. You have prisons in jails that were letting nonviolent offenders go without normally sitting there at the way they would normally do send them to treatment programs and just all the other ways that the pandemic caused our society's normal programs to sort of shut down. You had a lot of people using drugs alone away from other people, which could be very dangerous. That's another factor. Is just awful. The previous number from from 2019 was an unacceptably high number. You know, like 72,000 people died in a single year from drug overdoses. Then it jumps to 93. These are appalling number. In light of recent reopenings around the country. Is there any optimism of the situation getting better? Well, the one thing that you know you have a really grim statistic like this that represents So many individual tragedies. I think there's gonna be some new attention to it. I mean that that this was not unexpected. We have written over the past year and a year and a half about the rising number of drug overdose. Fatal drug overdoses, but hopefully you'll see, you know now that you know the pandemic is still going on. We can't take our eye off that ball. But I think this is going to get some new attention from the by the administration from Congress and from the state health departments and the local health department. In our final 30 seconds we mentioned fentanyl is now a huge factor in all this. Elaborate on that a bit. Well, finally, just a little bit can kill you, if you you know, take it, And sometimes it gets mixed in with other drugs stories. Part of, you know, cocktail or people use cocaine under use my pen instead of meat, And sometimes they also used to spend all there was a big surge of it, particularly to the Western U. S. New statistics show. California, the most populous state had a 45% year to year increase in fatal overdoses that is largely driven by by Sentinel. All right. Thank you, Joel. For your time, as always. Thank you for having me. Washington Post science reporter Joel Achenbach will check sports Next. Why is.

Joel Achenbach Joel 2019 Congress US 45% last year 93 72,000 people California today more than 93,000 people Sentinel 30 seconds 30% Washington Post Western U. S. more than 21,000 more American past year
"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on WTOP

"Guidance, saying vaccinated teachers and students do not need to wear masks inside of school buildings. That comes amid a national vaccination campaign in which Children as young as 12 are eligible to get shots, as well as a general decline in covid hospitalizations and deaths. The CDC is not advising schools to require shots for teachers and vaccine eligible kids. However, again, the CDC saying vaccinated teachers and students do not need to wear masks inside of school buildings. Well, some recent developments may have many people raising questions about the fast spreading delta variant of coronavirus and whether a booster shot is needed. Detection fighter is about to seek US authorization for a third shot of its vaccine after an Israeli study showed effectiveness of that shot wanes over time. Joining us live now as Washington Post science reporter Joel Achenbach, Joel, the FDA and the CDCR saying fully vaccinated people for now, don't need a booster. Is this the case where it's possibly everyone is right. Uh, we're hearing from federal health officials and from Pfizer and from other studies, could everybody be right here? Well, clearly, there's a little bit of a of a spat going on between Fizer and the federal agencies because Pfizer yesterday put out a statement saying, we think That you'll need a booster 6 to 12 months after your fully vaccinated and I think the federal agencies or like hold on, you know, this has not been established. Scientifically. We're going to make the call here, not Pfizer. Advisor hasn't shared all of its data from its own clinical trials. And, you know, it does have a A, um you know, a financial interest in and selling more, You know, booster shots. So this is an interesting moment. I mean, the scientifically we know that over time. Your antibodies start to wane against, uh, you know anything out there. The delta is a problem because it already has a little bit of slippery, You know, vaccine of Asian mutations, so we probably will need a booster at some point, But when is the question Yeah, That is the question. What do we know about Johnson and Johnson's one shot vaccine against Delta? There's a lot of talk about the RNA shots from Pfizer and Moderna. What do we know about J and J's one dose vaccine? How well is it holding up? Well, I can tell you what Paul often told me and he's at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is a vaccine expert. He says. He don't need a boost or if you've had the J and J the There's no evidence that you need to go out and get An mrna a shot if you've had that J and J. And the reason is that one shot of J and J gives you a essentially the protection you need against serious or severe illness that you get from two shots of the M R. N A. S The You know, One shot of the fighter or the Madonna doesn't give you as much as one shot at the J and J. There are some differences. The vaccines that J and J is not as protective against, you know, I mild case, and so I understand why people are concerned about it. You know, I think that you know it's all about probabilities in numbers and percentages. Here. There's no way to absolutely protect yourself. Absolutely against an infection with SARS. Kobe too, But if you if you're vaccinated you you should feel good about your your chances. That makes any sense. You know, vaccinations work. The vaccines are great. They do protect against the variance, even though the variants do have a little bit of, you know, slippery quality to him, so get vaccinated. If you haven't done a sense of already, Joel, we appreciate it. Thanks for your time. That's Washington Post science reporter Joel Achenbach. Let's get a look at Wall Street. Jeff Clay bar now is up 385 points the S and P 500 is up. 1% Money news in 10 minutes on w T o p Sports at 15 and.

Joel Achenbach Pfizer FDA Joel 6 CDCR Paul yesterday 385 points 10 minutes two shots One shot J 12 months one shot Jeff Clay CDC one dose 12 third shot
"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on KOMO

"News center. Hundreds of New Yorkers learning they got expired doses of Pfizer vaccine, the city's health department confirming that almost 900 people got expired. Covid 19 shots at pop up sites around Times Square, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says he's listening and hopeful about ongoing Bipartisan talks on infrastructure. The Kentucky Republicans, saying that he's anticipating that Senate Democrats will use budget reconciliation, which would mean they only need a simple majority to pass a bill on areas where they don't agree. Just when did the coronavirus entered the United States? Up to now? The first confirmed patient and first major outbreaks were confirmed right here in Washington state back in January of 2020, But it's Joel Achenbach reports in The Washington Post. A new study from the National Institutes of Health found evidence that the virus may have been in the U. S as early as December of 2019 and Joel joins me on the KOMO news line. Good afternoon. Hey, Thanks for having me. What exactly did this NIH study find? Well, it's a really interesting thing. They they have this program called All of us in which volunteers give blood samples and you know, And do they allow themselves to be studied? They have several 100,000 people signed up for this thing. As a way of advancing precision medicine, which is kind of their customized medicine just for a single person, rather than the kind of one size fits all medicine that they typically do. In any case, they looked at these old blood samples from early last year, and they found nine people who had signs antibodies to the coronavirus. In that first couple months of the year, and the first one was January. 7th. It was an Illinois a person in Illinois on January 7th 2020, and they think sort of did. It probably took a couple weeks for the antibodies to form. And so they're saying, you know, maybe, um, around Christmas Eve 2019. You could have had someone in Illinois, you know, with the infection from the coronavirus. Any indication at this point, whether it's from that person in Illinois or any of the other folks with those antibodies that they were traveling, or maybe cut it through community spread. Well, that's exactly the right question. You know, it could be that someone had been in Wuhan in China and had flown back to the United States, and that's what they're picking up, and it's very unlikely that that early you have community spread, but they don't know that I'm trying to do a follow up to see if they can. Nail that down, you know, try to get some travel history from these nine people. Um, and it's also possible to some of them are false positives. In fact, it's likely that maybe even one or two is a false positive of those nine. What's interesting, though, is it They don't think it's statistically likely at all that they're all false positives. And it kind of confirms what we've known, which is that the virus was here and possibly spreading earlier, Suzanne, then we officially knew that we documented you know we had some problems with testing. The CDC had sort of limits on who should get tested because because there just wasn't much capacity to test then and it's likely that there was more virus, Uh, circulating or present in the US In January and February before we really saw the big outbreaks in March. I was really interested, though, to see from your report that none of those positive results of those those blood samples from the NIH came from Washington state where the outbreak started. That's correct. Now, keep in mind what they looked at. I think 24,000 blood samples From across the country. And yet none of them came from. Uh, one of them came from those coastal states. It doesn't mean it wasn't there. It just means that you know, they they're probably wasn't very much and you know, this is a very Um, spotty survey of blood samples so you could have had you know the coronavirus and you know it was in Washington state because it was detected there. Uh, this is a pretty, you know, it's not a very finally meshed net that they threw. These are just you know some blood samples from across the country really interesting study and worth reading about online at Washington post dot com. Joel Achenbach, the reporter on that piece, Joel. Thank you. Hey, Thanks.

Joel Achenbach Joel National Institutes of Health January of 2020 United States Wuhan March February Times Square January 7th 2020 January. 7th NIH Washington Suzanne 19 shots December of 2019 Illinois US January Mitch McConnell
"joel achenbach" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"joel achenbach" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"We are in position globally that we're detecting these mutations. We know that there we have vaccine technology that potentially can overcome. Joining us now is Joel Arkin Bark science reporter at The Washington Post. Thanks for joining us to all Thanks for having me. We have kind of this good news. Bad news thing with coronavirus were seeing numbers of cases going down. We're seeing hospitalizations Go down. All great news were the Vaccine rollout is ramping up. We're starting to get about a million a day. Now it seems it's starting to get a little better on that front. But these Corona virus variants are still very concerning. We just have a new study out with some information on the UK Varian basically saying that it's doubling the infections it has here in the United States every week, and we already saw the CDC say that by March, this probably will be the dominant strain here in the United States. All the info is pointing to that. So Joel tell us a little bit more. It is a good news. Bad news situation. I am trying to focus on the good which you laid out very nicely there, Which is the numbers are going down. We are emerging from this catastrophic and very long. Surge that began, you know, back in October, the surgeon cases in hospitalizations and deaths. The final part of that the deaths are only now starting to Go down, but you know we were having 3000 or more people die every day of Cove it and so there's the natural sort of epidemiological way for you. Eventually you had a peak and the numbers start to come down for various reasons, including so many people have already gotten the virus and so on some, But now we enter this. New factor the variant. So what's it going to do? Well, it's not going to help. It may not cause another search. That's a complicated equation. But it does look like it's more transmissible and the B 117. The so called UK variant is spreading in the U. S. When we talk about location in the United States, we see that Florida has the highest estimated prevalence of this pairing, and I think California might be after them. California has a fair number of cases just wrong number of cases, but it was not doubling in speed as fast as Florida or is the benefactor assed? Fast is the country on the whole? I guess, because California maybe a little better about restrictions because he's gone to this whole crisis with so many cases recently that the big surge The statistic is a little hard to grasp. We say it's doubling. We're talking about its prevalence among positive test results. So just a few weeks ago, it was less than 1%. Positive and test results of infections confirmed infections less than 1% was this UK variant. Now it's close to 10% in Florida, so it's just taken off like crazy about every 9.8 days. Nationally, this variant doubles in prevalence. So it's on track to become essentially just take over and become the dominant strain that's moving around. That doesn't mean that every 9.8 days there's gonna be twice as many Corona virus infections because these other strains are going down. And here's the other good news. Bad news thing about it when it comes to the other strains, so the UK strain seems to be more prevalent now this one. While it's more transmissible, they say that the vaccine's effectiveness against this one is still about the same. The more troubling ones seem to be the South African and Brazilian strains. They have a specific mutation that maybe people are getting reinfected more by this one and that one. Also, they say that the vaccine's effectiveness might not be as much. Be 1351 for those tracking the numbers. That's the South Africa strain of the one first identified in South Africa that has a mutation as called the E 4 84 K. They call it the EAC mutation, which seems to allow the virus to escape some of the antibody response, either. Through natural infection or from vaccines. And so the vaccine's still worked to some degree in May stop severe disease, But they may be less effective at stopping an infection and the one seen in Brazil, known as the P one that also has that same eek mutation. That mutation has been seen it only in a handful of the United Kingdom vary it and so everyone's watching that closely. It's important. Understand that, you know, we think we know what the map is. Right now, where the variance are and what we're dealing with. But the virus is constantly mutating. It's this is a moving target. So you know, I don't think there's anything to panic about with these variants because the vaccines in general work and you can retool them, But I think it's all kind of sobering that This is gonna take longer to get through this pandemic because the virus is gonna find work arounds, and so we'll just have to stay on top of it. The concern now is for public health experts is the easing of restrictions. You know, when we're seeing it all over as the cases they're going down. I think it was Iowa. They lifted their states. Partial mask mandate. So the little things like this have experts worried. That these new variants could, you know, help some type of boom going again. I think people should still be cautious and assume if you're around strangers. If you're close to other people, you know that you need to wear a mask you need, you know, wash your hands and Try to stay socially distance. I realized that there are people who can't do that, because they work in a hospital or their essential workers there at the grocery stores that you know the drugstores, some people, they can't be totally protected against possible infection. The new B 117 this UK variant It looks like it could be 35 to 45% more transmissible, but it's not gonna fall out of the sky. It's not lurking in the bushes. You know it is this. This is common sense measures to protect yourself. Ideally and try to limit the amount of new infections. That's that's. What we really need to do is a country is toe put the clamp down on this thing and also cut off the viruses. Opportunities to mutate further. Joel Achenbach, science reporter at the Washington Post. Thank you very much for joining us, but thank you for having me. I appreciate it..

UK Florida United States California reporter Joel Arkin The Washington Post coronavirus Joel Achenbach Joel South Africa United Kingdom Brazil CDC Iowa
Do you need a mask? The science hasn't changed, but public guidance might

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Do you need a mask? The science hasn't changed, but public guidance might

"The latest is the CDC is considering recommending the general public wear face coverings in public the key word there being coverings joining us now is to help sort things out is Washington post science reporter Joel Achenbach Joel thank you as always for your time tell us where we are with the face with a mask or face covering recommendations now when it comes to both health care workers and the public thanks so much for having me in all explain it is as well as I cannot believe it a little bit up in the air as to what the CDC will actually say we're we're waiting for their guidance they clearly are mulling this over there looking at some proposals have gone up from the CDC to the White House in our reporting indicates that there will be some kind of new recommendation I'm gonna eat I don't want to get ahead of the news so I it'll probably cover like what should you do if you go to the safe place because the giants are going to CVS you're going out into a public place should you wear something over your face and I think that they will they may advise people to do that that doesn't mean you have to we have a mask if you are going to the living room the dining room or if you're walking on the sidewalk in the dock I don't see I think it's it's really about when you go into a public place where people are coming close together that seems the most plausible thing that they've been made to this a lot of discussion about this and it's kind of a grass roots movement a pro mask movement thank god we are faced with a cost there's a lot of concern about it to the experts we talked to say don't give a false sense of security these masks the Alexa cotton homemade mask is not going to protect you from the virus the late in ninety five you know respirator mask do would do that you know so it's it's all it will do though is it might make it harder for you Durrance acted to infect someone else yes so the the feeling what we think is generally that if if you have a homemade cloth mask it's better than no mask better than nothing well it did it the thing is you can review spread the virus is spread person to person typically with the respiratory droplets you know and let's just say that you've you've spent two feet away from someone you're talking to them you know you can be kind of you know spreading virus that was that's what it say stand six feet away but you could imagine that you're at the checkout line at the safer you're doing a self check out you know you can be spreading droplets as snow without realizing it just from speaking and so on and this is the way of kind of you know of containing that a little bit with with a clock it won't protect you but it might help protect other people Adam got to be the advantage of you won't touch your face is often if you have a mask there are some downsides though to like you you have people work that well the masks could become infected and handled by other people they may not be worn correctly it in there I think the really concerned that people will say hello I'm wearing a mask now I can you know do whatever I want to do is I mean the best advice the standing advice is stick to the social distancing don't get within six feet of other people wash your hands all the things we know will work in and really will work including the and flattening the curve

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