17 Burst results for "Joe Williams"

"joe williams" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"joe williams" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Started my radio career with Irv. Uh and Joe Earth ground, Joe Williams. We lost her in February, 2019. I was in Las Vegas when I got that call it actually I got the call on Super Bowl Sunday morning, which is not a good call to get But Irv really? Made such an impact in this community. Hey, was a baseball coach He taught and coached that are that a high school for I think was 12 years. Won a state title in baseball in 64. But then he got into doing radio and TV and I think that's that's where his true impact was felt. Mark Macintosh Um, is sort of heading up this crew to build the herb Brown champion center. Which is going to be it's a project going on to build an educational facility at our vat of high school and mark who I called Magoo used to do some work with him A channel four course long time ago. Joins us now Markets Dave Rick and Cathy. Good morning. How are you? I'm doing well and thank on ladies and speaking of birthdays today would have been urged 86. Birthday. Wow. I didn't. I didn't realize that I didn't realize that. Yeah, Yeah. No, I was going to say so. Tell us a little bit of I mean, you know, I've talked about this. I mean, I've done part of a video for this, but tell us a little bit about the project. And where did this idea come from? Well, it came from Jefferson County schools. I'm part of a group we founded on educational nonprofit called the Sports Business Academy. And in a nutshell. Where, you know in this day where we know that trying to get kids excited about learning. How do you do that? Right? Well, you need him. Whether interest line we know from The success of school like Science and Technology, International Studies School for the Yards unique kids, whether interest why you can get him excited about learning so we wouldn't know that I school all of 2019. With the sports business Academy that basically teaches kids the business side of sports and the winning side of life. And then suddenly, you know about that time Earth passes away. And as you mentioned Dave Herbs, incredible career began as a coach at our battle High school from 1959 to 1970. Some kind of partnership with Jefferson County School. Who said, Hey, let's build the earth around slapping and center that are about a high school that will house this innovative educational curriculum. For the kids up there. And so that was kind of the birth of the Earth Brown champion center, and so we are in a kind of kicking off the campaign with her brown day. And it's our goal to go out there and raise $2.5 million. It will build the facility and provide scholarships for these kids because the kids that are coming out of a vat of high school that are going through this learning pathway. We're working with metro State on concurrent enrollment, and we can offer these kids College scholarships to go on to college is an offer degrees in sports business, which happens to be what natural state does. So That was kind of the genesis of it. And so we're just trying to get the word out for people and we've got a website that we'd love for people to go visit and see how they'd like to get involved with their time talent in terms of They were talking to Mark Macintosh Mark. Rick Lewis here. Thanks for coming on the show and keeping the ERV brown memory alive. Irv, one of the greatest guys I've ever met. In. Interestingly enough going back to Late seventies, I was calling Long Beach State basketball games. On the radio and know that Herb was a referee then And I actually interviewed her brown at the PC. Double A Conference tournament at the Anaheim Convention Center. Like when a free throws going on, No, no way, got him on somehow, either before the game or after the game because he was a character. Course. And he had that white guy Afro, which really, you know, he really stood up. So we were kind of you know, we were, you know, young guys and thought this dude's really cool. Let's get him out. We got him on and I interviewed him. And then, many years later, once I came here to Denver, of course, became friends with Herb and got a chance to work with her. We called football games together. Um, just probably a couple years before he passed away so great memories, great memories of urban and and and to think that our our Adds crossed You know so many years ago, and then who would have known that later? You know, I'd be friends with him and actually worked with him in my partner, Dave Logan got his first job in radio with her brown, which is pretty cool. Yeah. Yeah, on, you know, and Asia what? We're trying to do it or bad in high school? I don't know somebody. Oh, but, you know, our battle High school is one of the oldest public high schools in the state's been around since 1900. And for a variety of reasons are about a high school is you know it if it's not doing as well as it once did, And there's a lot of reasons for that. We're trying to basically and we looked around Champion center there. We hope bringing kids Mac. There's only about 800 kids going on about a high school today and a building that would seat Almost 2000 kids, So we're trying to give educational legs to herbs, Incredible legacy and spark come back for about a high school and kind of instead of the glory of a school that has a proud tradition. But for a variety of reasons, heretic it's you know, just to kind of school is a choice. Yesterday, kids can choice out another schools, etcetera. And we're hoping that in building the underground champion centers that well, how's this innovative? Works, thematic curriculum weaken, Turn or that I school around and what better way to honor Because Earth life was really the business side of sports, and absolutely do with this curriculum, you know, we teach kids about sports management, marketing, health and performance, journalism and coaching. He's wonderful educational pathways, and that was really urge. Like when you think about it. He was a coach a raft. Uh, it broadcasting and very dear rap more than one ankle and his girl on so you know that's what we're up to, and the website. If people want to go kind of check out what we're doing Earth where in CC for found Champion Center Earth Ground CC got a lord, and they've got a whole bunch more information and David We got a real cook Green have been a video that Vikram Party host. Dave. You're part of it, and Al is a part of it. And we think it really tells the story and we encourage people to go to our website and see what were their own. And then we'd love for people to get involved. I think you know, we we live in such a fast society. And and people. They want instant gratification. They want to remember like today, but they can't remember yesterday. I think for a lot of people, maybe you'd have to be over the age of I don't know, 45. Maybe to have to have a real appreciation of earth. Around and kind of his legacy here and and what he accomplished, Mac. You you talked about him coaching it or that a high school..

Dave Logan Mark Macintosh Joe Williams Rick Lewis Dave February, 2019 David Dave Herbs 2019 Jefferson County School $2.5 million Denver Super Bowl 1959 Las Vegas 12 years Mac 1970 Sports Business Academy Late seventies
"joe williams" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"joe williams" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Put These immigrants and American born white elites in cooperation with each other To such an extent that white workers always could presume an advantage over black workers but when they did push too hard then why employers could use their prerogative to place blacks in jobs that otherwise immigrants Would feel and so. I think it was more more of a dynamic. It wasn't a cut and dried decision. Right there when unilaterally forward But I will say this The creation of the American colonization society in eighteen sixteen. That was a deliberate decision. Which said that? We are going to create A why free-flight Republic and we're going to add to that republic and unfree Enslave black labor force and so what they said in establishing the mission is that will go on to read the country of the free black community and in that way we remove we able to remove from the body politic kind of our constituency and the potential for an alliance between enslaved people and free people that could challenge the institution of Slavery. And so there was a way. Of course they did. Try TO Isis isolate the enslaved population in such a way that they would Feel powerless In the struggle to gain their own freedom because there was always an ongoing relationship between people who became free and people who remained enslave and on the in throughout and even in these urban areas the end flav blacks had relatives who were free and those relatives intern played a role in establishing strategies. That would free their own relatives and also opened the door for greater emancipation for african-americans. More generally and this this a little bit I mean this is there's A. There's a some time ago I to be honest with you. I can't remember but it was Within the past couple years Interviewed Anna Lisa Cox. Who wrote a book called the bone sinew of the land which told the story of Of many black of free black farmers between eighteen hundred eighteen sixty that were that were building sort of more of a rural story but they were free men who were having success in farming in what were then the Northwest Territories and we see a concerted effort by the white population to dispossess them of these lands because of their success as opposed to you know e because they have to swoop in because of supposed failure. Well I want to jump forward here because we we don't have too much time left here but one of the things that I was struck by is the is the picture on your on the book of of of Workers of African American workers working on a train. They are women and this picture from from nineteen forty-five which es which coincides with an era when the the The the Phil Randolph's Union. He was the leader of the Union of the Brotherhood of sleeping car. Porters and May And that we just talk about that fight because I'm fascinated by this dynamic where you know this is around the time where we see the You know things like social security implemented which of course sidelined essentially we purposely left out. I think the history now shows us African American workers by not including domestic workers not including any farmworkers at that time and particular. Were sort of dispossessing. I guess African American women and this story of this union battle did the same thing right story. Yeah it very briefly Brotherhood of sleeping car. Porters was initially the Brotherhood of sleeping. Call Porters and maids so it recognized that the we're both male supporters and the women who worked in cleaning the real The cars once they reached the station and did pretty much the household Labor for the trains and the The Port cars But in the negotiation with the union worst the company Foreman Company the Brotherhood of sleeping car. Porters made a great compromise Which undercut the lives of black women? the port is by the way we're able to sustain and Organiz movement and to succeed as a International Labor Union because they had created this tremendous On the women From family members and workers in the railroad industry wise of the Forties and so on they had created a women's auxiliary and they were the one that raised the funds and Disney promotional work That helped the Union Randolph and others sustain this organized labor movement focused on black workers in this railroad industry but once the competent negotiated with the The Brotherhood The company of course wanting to eliminate as many concession to the unionistic could and one of the thing that the. Union Conceded is that the women In these sleeping cars in the Household kind of workers around the cleaning women and so on Janitorial custodial that they would not be included and in fact they were going to drop The death they nation. Brotherhood of porters and maize and they were just GonNa make it the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car. Porters an all male union That really push women to the side. And somebody underscored how limited Along GENDER LINES WHILE THE BROTHERHOOD. Someone that period. Yeah I found that fascinating because we have these different moments in the history where we see sort of you know a You know the a dynamic where you get a sense of where you know where where people have to climb over other people To get what what little they can out of capital essentially we saw that with that wave of immigration that that pushed black craftsman down. And then we see it in this context. You your history takes us all the way up Close to the present day when you recount where as in nineteen sixty four following the civil rights act and The Slow Mansa patient of of women as well entering into the workforce with any type of meaningful power and and black folk Without the you know the the the civil the ability for for folks discriminate against them At that time we saw a maybe coincidental. Eight contraction of the manufacturing base and so sort of like a double squeeze on workers across the board but the sort of. It's like I wouldn't say quite getting to the promised land in finding that all the water has run out as it were but there was a quantity of that right. I mean there was. There was a bit of that. Is The story right exactly? It was that history has produced all these moments of of movement forward and then SPAG nation and decline. You know so We as historians have to just Document these complicated currents of progress and You know And backward slots and so on. So yes you're absolutely right. The nineteen sixties seventies star to see The way the industrial order was on unraveling and the way black workers women workers and all workers who were in the industry system. White workers were losing their footing and the establish manufacturing centers and they would have to face the music of reorienting themselves to emerging new economy. That was marked pretty much. You know by the globalization of these processes and they're always Contain an element of trans nationalism. But now you see the opening up of the economy To the disappearance of some of these industries into other countries and the way in which workers affect about that and in fact Next week or I should say this week relatives when this is going to run we have. The Nevada caucuses which are dominated by a unions. That are service unions. Which is the sort of the the next iteration of of that story but professor. Joe William Trotter. The book is workers on arrival Black Labor in the making of America. A thank you so much for your Time Today. Really interesting stuff. Okay thank you appreciate it..

Union International Labor Union institution of Slavery Union Randolph Phil Randolph Anna Lisa Cox intern Joe William Trotter America professor Disney Foreman Company Nevada The Brotherhood
"joe williams" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

17:39 min | 1 year ago

"joe williams" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The of the black working class that did not come out for Hillary Clinton particularly in in in three states. Which have a long history of of the of a black urban working class. And I'm thinking about like Milwaukee and I'm thinking about Michigan and I'm thinking about Philadelphia amongst those three cities in the states that they're located in. That was the difference in the election in terms of the actual electoral college. And so how much does knowing the history and having a greater awareness of this cohort implicate politics in the current day? I mean do we need to know that to understand the relevance and maybe the desires or those factors that would motivate those people to come out and vote so You a question then I want you to clarify. Are you talking about those people who didn't vote? Yes that allstate at home. I mean okay. Well you see thing at home is always a form of voting right. It's a form of of decision making that people make so it doesn't mean that they are Would boat you. Don't know how they would have voted right if they had gone to the polls and so what we need to do. I think is to recognize that the number of people who come out in any election we have Those a big discrepancy between the number of citizens who are eligible to vote and the number of citizens who actually vote and so I think that but among African Americans seem racial world But what I would say. Is that The nature of the Mobilization and grassroots efforts within communities is an important factor and verbal and the number of people who actually show up at the polls But I think that we do have to consider Not just the fact that they didn't vote but reasons. Well let's let's go to the The the history that you tell in in the book and it starts with a I guess your addressing what I think is somewhat counterintuitive. At least for people who have not looked into this is that there was a substantial amount of of of of urban black Labor that was constructing colonial cities that we have this perspective of of of of of black workers and Black Labor being particularly before the Great Migration A rural phenomenon but there was also a substantial amount of black workers in developing American cities. Oh yes I'm very good Question and I'm glad you focused on that because in fact the book. is really geared toward understanding better The history of black workers in the urban economy and politics of the nation From the beginning from the colonial period that you suggested and One reason for that is that We do have quite a bit of research that underscores the ways in which black people working in rice production cotton sugar and tobacco among other crops. We know much quite a bit. About how enslaved workers on those plantation enrich Americans both rural and urban and the way in which they were a factor in the wealth and power of the nation. And for. I'm trying to do in. This book is to suggest that that process that existed in the rural areas was also a process that unfolded and cities proper. And that from the beginning in these colonial cities not just Charleston New Orleans and Baltimore and other Southern cities but African American Labor. Help to fuel early. American cities In the northeast. New York Boston and Philadelphia. So there's a way in which the book tries to capture the nature of the Labor that African Americans contributed to the urban centers across the country doing several different moments and US history. And when you look at it Black People Health to be over what? I call the pre industrial or colonial and early American cities before the civil war but they also helped to fuel the rise and expansion of these industrial cities after the civil war including Chicago Detroit Pittsburgh and other cities of the industrial mid West and North East. And so there's two moments sort of a pre industrial moment and industrial moment. Very important in terms of black workers helping to really and there are energy to the Engine of American Urban Capitalist Development in the Twentieth Century and let me say this also We we this book also tries to make sense of what all that meant and one of the things that admit is that it helps us to counter certain enduring stereotypes about black working class and poor people in America For example there remains a widespread belief that African Americans have a poor work ethic particularly poor and working class blacks and that they do not contribute substantially to the wealth and power of the nation. There was this image of poor and working class blacks as sort of takers rather than contributors or givers. We heard this bit. This is Mitt. Romney's famous you know. Forty seven percent are takers. And they were fifty three percent to forty seven percent and and and we hear it in a myriad of different ways but yes yeah exactly and that they are liabilities right instead of assets invoked and they consume rather than produce. And so. There's this image. And so what this book tries to do is to recapture the Labor and contributions of African American at the bottom of the American economy From the beginning of the colonial era Through the emerging digital age but I also like to make the point that they contributed as enslave workers in both cities and the countryside but before the civil war they also contributed as free blacks who had managed to crawl their way into freedom before the civil war so by the time of the civil war and leaves a half million African American could claim their freedom papers so that when the civil war actually hit. Emancipation came about at least a half million of them. Say you know the emancipation. Proclamation did not Legally free me. I was free Earlier and all of these This entire generation before the civil war they were not just general laborers. You know household servants Cook but Waiters and so they were also skilled artisans and between the roughly the American Revolution and about eighteen twenty they were substantially employed in these Autism job as carpenters blacksmiths hoover's and so on and so that there is a way in which the Labor that we're talking about was not just simply the general what we might call the unskilled labor but it was labor that had come about through a process of training and apprenticeship as craftsman and some of these craftsmen were building up on skills that they brought from Africa while others were actually apprentice under European audience Under the system of enslavement And that's a really. I think intricate and complicated kind of history of how black people contributed to the building of the nation but the documents clear that they were there from the beginning. Can you off to title? Because I'm actually particularly fascinated by the ebben flow of how the black worker had more More of a hold or foothold in the skilled In in the skilled artisans in the skilled not professions but jobs and labor because that provided out craft that provided them the sort of the ability to to generate to to you know theoretically to be entrepreneurial right to establish their own wealth in source of wealth and create their own businesses. And how? They're what to to what extent there was a consciousness of that so when we allowed in a lot more migrants and sort of squeezed Black folk out of those those. Those are those crafts. Let's say Ryan denied them and push them back down into sort of unskilled labor pools. As opposed to you know where they. How can you talk about how that how that black participation in those crafts expanded and contracted at different times and to what extent was there a was that a conscious to what extent was increase migration immigrant allowing immigrants in a way to sort of like replace black rockers? Who have had who established a beachhead in those in those crafts right. Exactly the good question because this is one of the great moments in Nineteenth Century. African American history when You know millions. I think an estimated four million European immigrants mainly from Germany and our Alan they migrated immigrated to the United States Between the Revolutionary War and the civil war and their numbers just escalated and they went in High and disproportionate numbers Into the urban centers were African American for located and they Enter jobs that had become African. American foot hose During the period right after the American Revolution for example White Workers began to exit The bothering trade which was considered by them serve our kind of occupation that was not fitting for new independent white male citizens of the new republic. You know so they. They felt that they had to give up that niche And and move into higher Callings and so they opened a vacuum more by black workers dotted to occupy some of these law wrong jobs that were considered household Service type jobs like bothering and also as Cartman you know just traveling and transporting goods and materials across the city And just General Labor Kinds of jobs Those jobs became important for blacks but with the immigration of Germans and immigrants in the German Emigrant By the way they were the ones and fuelled people who displaced The black artists and so between the American revolution well roughly between eighteen ten and the civil war that is for the ball of African American faced a downward spiral in the Ability to hold on to the artists and crafts. And so you know I'm I'm trying to tell two stories here about the impact of these immigrants. These immigrants will come into America under duress as well. I mean they were looking to improve their position in the world and to establish a footing that will give them a better living But at the same time they would take to take advantage of a very sharp turn in the racial system for the black people were increasingly the victims of a kind of racism that undescored a movement to actually export In at least this free blacks out of the country. And so. That's another story about the American colonization society. But my point here is that the book talks about how black were not only displaced from artists in job as Brick masons blacksmith barrel makers and so on they were also displaced from what was considered these lower level quote service jobs the bobber trade which had opened up to blacks had nearly closed again. By the onset of the civil war and Frederick Douglass he actually had a striking commentary on that process and he says something to the fact that a few years ago and he was talking to an eighteen fifties and he says something to the effect that a few years ago Why Bob would have been Sort of an oddity or some kind of exceptional figure and then he said but recently in the context of this immigration of of Germans and Irish into the country. He said the bothering stand everywhere and that black. Barbara's so beginning to lose their footing. And how much of that do you think was a by design? How much of that was. Good heading An awareness by the US government and the various different forces. There that we we're we're increasingly becoming you know coming to this inflection point about about about slaves and it's creating this tension and there's a movement at that time to perhaps like send You know The are the African Americans to Liberia or whatever it is. How much of of of was in them the mind when we we had this mass immigration. How much of that was a function of an awareness of like we? This is a method of of of shaking African Americans from that foothold that they have established in these crafts. Okay well you know. I don't have the document that was say. You know outright that it's time to move blacks out of all these occupations. I think it was a little bit more complicated and and nuanced Than that. And I say that simply because African Americans free blacks and enslaved people. They remained a factor in the competition between White employers any leads and white workers and so black people Were part of a broader set of negotiations and conflict and so the owners of industry businesses They were not in my way of reading the record prepared to totally dismissed the ideal of using black strategically to empower themselves and undercut the capacity of these white workers to become too comfortable and too empowered that they would challenge the power of elite. So I think there was a complicated Set of circumstances but overall the racial dynamic put These immigrants and American born white elites in cooperation with each other To such.

Black Labor White Workers Black People Health African American Labor Philadelphia Hillary Clinton allstate US Milwaukee American Urban Capitalist Deve Michigan America New York US government Charleston Romney Africa
"joe williams" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

Absolute Advantage

13:01 min | 1 year ago

"joe williams" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

"Financial scarcity is nothing but an illusion in the world we live in today and and the Times that we're living in the country that we live in depending on where you're listening to this in the world. You're probably in a country that is fairly westernized and modernized a you. You know we have the resources around us if we are resourceful at all and I think that's the real critical quite`revealing making all this work. I love that such an excellent point. Let's start moving into really the the book and and so first off. I wanted to ask that question. You mentioned action the word legacy. you know the gift that you're leaving the world so for you. What is it that you are looking to do. What was that driver for you. You as far as legacy was concerned well. I think it's actually taken a couple of different twists through the years going back US earlier about how I got into all of this let me clear about something I am not a naturally born public speaker at all by eighty stretch of the imagination now I am I had incredible state Friday when I was first starting out my late teens early twenties trying to navigate and learn how to do this thing that I saw with the broader point though I think of your question I saw the the fact that every great leader could do it and and I knew that probably pass in life was going to be one of leading. I didn't know how I didn't know who I didn't know why didn't aware but I thought to myself wow. If there's there's one master skill of great leaders. It's that especially in times of peril especially in times of difficulty great leaders who can move groups of people emotionally with their words with their stories with their their visions it became something that I knew I had to figure out a way to do and so I think to answer your question around about way the one of the first big reasons for be be doing what I do is the bird of wanting to leave a legacy of not having public speaking be this thing that everybody claims scares you more for the dying. I found it as it a true. Let's be let's be real. That's not really it's cute. Though it's cute it's fun. There's lots of misnomers out there around public speaking and and that's one of them but on the other side of that when you're a nineteen year old kid didn't even finish high school because he had to figure out a way to put food on the table for he and his sister and you're fair skinned and so you have a horrible stage fright what that shows up as she stand up to speed. You can't read your heartbeat out of your chest. I turn fourteen shades of red. I do not lie well at all because I wear my a by my my feelings on my face in that you know I'm fair skin so I flash quickly and everything else so it was such a battle for me that I think one of the legacy pieces uses at I was let me help others overcome this what I found was with really focused effort and coaching from somebody who really knows what they're doing. You can really find. We're GONNA groove as a public communicator in a few days now. stagefright is one of those things. I always say. It's kind of a curable disease. It's never going to go away completely blake for most people but one of my legacy pieces to just be that look you can get in here and a couple of days we can jeff to speed and have you to a point where you're writing despite called presentations in public speaking. It's a bite that you never forget how to ride just like a regular bicycle. Once you have it you own it for life and originally one of my the biggest legacy pieces was. I just wanted to provide that for others so they didn't have to struggle way that I I was starting out and then I think the second legacy piece then has become once I hi Natalie made a career and a life out of impacting people's lives by self but I started helping others do it and I saw you know hundreds of my students going going out and being successful public speakers Authors and and and mentors and trainers that my legacy became really allowing some people to know a path find a path and then and then execute on a path that could bring their own gifts toward people through the Gift of Speaking Taking Coaching Consulting. I love that it's so important as I know in the introduction we talked about your kind of mission and helping leaders and people people in general become world class communicators and that communication being just the cornerstone of of great leadership so that before we started started recording today we had a little three call we're talking about who our listeners are and and a faction of those being folks who are loving their their roles and and they are in their calling within their organization and said they don't have a desire to coach or consult or uh become a professional speaker but they're looking to become better at communicating by within their organization so I wanted to visit a little a bit about that and then I also want to make sure that in our time together today we talk to about those folks were listening like what are some of the steps if they are like yes. I am at that point. Were I want to create kind of my own path in my own message so can we address both of those listeners here and talk talk a little bit about communication as it relates to. I the group that are just thrilled where their APP at one and become better communicators and you know and lead better as a result of those better communication skills yeah absolutely absolutely where do you WanNa start on all that so I think with the internally as far as leaders are concerned like how important is like you said on speaking is so important as far as great leaders are concerned especially in times of difficulty so let's talk a little bit about what are some of the things that we can do to begin to make a greater impact as speakers within our organizations to help people get on board award with the vision or you know. I know that that's a challenge for some of our leaders who are listening where they're really doing a great job of articulating or having a motion behind sharing the vision of their organization with their teams yeah well so there's two really two phases would back up for a moment so. I'm nineteen twenty year old kid I start realizing oh I got to learn how to do this thing that I hate to do so much and so I did what normally the people do in that situation and I took out in join toastmasters. I took go carnegie. I took up thing was called the Buckley school executive communication skills and all of them. All of them had great stuff. That got me started. That's probably the first best first thing to say the thing that was frustrated. Though by is all of them followed what what is considered kind of an outdated model for giving presentations are speaking to groups and that was scripted out memorize is it rehearse it and deliver it exactly the way you've scripted out and rehearsed it kind of a of a theater model if you will meaning you know somebody's nobody's rehearsing for my kids are real big community theater here in the Boulder area and that's the model they follow. They get their lines. They rehearse it they memorize horizon and then extended up and delivered the audience could be there are not be there and they would still give the same performance. If you know what I write totally of what happened when I started try to get some some professional training. There was nothing out there though inherently I knew again that the greatest time you need this skill is when you don't have time to script rehearse. It's the off the cuff. It's the at times where you know you're. You're standing in a out in front of you know a building. That's just come down. You've got to find the words to motivate the people of a nation you know what I mean. Those are the defining moments and there's not room in there for the the scripting and rehearsing and all of that stuff so what I began navigating for myself and then with others was there's really an its core essence. There's two things you gotta understand about yourself as a communicator that you that you can then build from number one is you've gotta understand the mistakes aches and I do that with air quotes around my my head as I say mistakes. You've got to eliminate the mistakes. What are we going by mistakes. All I mean is the things that you or I are are doing that are causing a break in connection with our audience so when I took those toastmasters carnegie they would say hey if you put your hand in your pocket once that's a mistake. I don't really I don't really buy that. I understand that if a person gives a presentation both heads buried in their pocket Gigli changed rocking back and forth that we got a problem with hands in the pocket. He ended a pocket every now and then it's not the end all be all mistake. Here's what's a mistake doing something so distracting that it breaks the connection that you have with your audience. Will that's a mistake we got. We've got eliminate that so that's the most basic thing I work with people on in the first couple of days. Let's just say out of four or five days that are being worked with them. The second thing is though you gotta. Find Your strengths your unique talents and abilities that which makes you uniquely you at your absolute best and then work on rowing that exploding that out so those two faces legs is it takes a lot of the self awareness that we talked about earlier. It takes a lot of being able to step out of your own sense of judgement for how you should be and how you should look or shouldn't look at instead say okay what I actually got to work with here raw material strengths and weaknesses and then they're gonNa bled though into a style that is my own unique style that can speak to an audience in a way that nobody else oh sonner quite can as well as I can intern so we have those two first pieces that really becomes the basic building block of everything else that I do with a person excellent excellent so and does that this this would be the at the foundational level so again those two things to understand eliminating your mistakes so anything that breaks a connection with in communication and is that cannot be a verbal tic cannot be a you know away you're moving or maybe you're shaking your leg. Is You're talking or anything like that anything that you do so much that it becomes distracting and indoor off putting to a group of people that could be your audience. We have to rein that stuff in a little hand in the pocket the 'em every now now and then for instance you could mention verbal tics comes or one of the things that people most commonly happy worked with him on I can help a person handle their homes in the N. thirty. Seconds is a one time learning experience. It does involve some public humiliation exactly what it is. 'cause you know these are tools of professionals. Folks trying this but you know there's enormous amounts of verbal tics now on our society society like for instance you know is is on the rise beginning sentences with so. I don't know if you've noticed over the last twenty years how more and more common this is becoming our our culture where someone says yes so so so what I'm hearing is Blah Blah Blah. It's just another version of the old filler words that we used to call comes at odds and things like that so once you make a personal aware of those things and the reason most people will say or or so or like is unconscious. They're thinking about something else they don't even hear themselves saying it so when we bring it into consciousness and they begin begin to hear themselves a once they get over the initial embarrassment of Oem saying a lot then they can actually cause and use the silence which which is one of the most powerful tools idioms. Havis in the caters and smooth out some of those rough verbal tics for instance as an answer to your your question and then in there I say on as as a transition so certain amount of this though that's human nature and I would a person is an becomes completely absent of any traits that make them human. That's when we start to wonder if you know the robots have taken over in and we're not outliving t to at this point what you know number. We're up to terminator movies but you get my drift. Come off sounding like nope..

the Times US Buckley school Boulder Natalie Gigli intern executive nineteen twenty year nineteen year twenty years five days
"joe williams" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

Absolute Advantage

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"joe williams" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

"Joe Is professionally responsible for helping his clients create over fifty billion with the B folks in new business so the with out further Ado Joe Welcome. We are so thankful to have you on the show absolutely Kelly. Thank you so much for having me on excellent well. I'm excited to on dive into your book the impact awakening but before I do and maybe this will lead us right into that book. I love your story and and and I have a feeling we're GONNA end up talking about and it's going to lead us to digging in deeper to your book but would you mind before we go there. telling telling our listeners your journey sharing with us. What's got new from where you've been to where you're at now yeah yeah look to well. You know I probably a good example of when you start at a young enough age. You can jam quite a bit into a and you'll live by the time you're fifty. I just turned fifty a couple of weeks ago and I actually started out of necessity when I was sixteen years old weekday turned sixteen both of my parents went into into prison for tax evasion charges sister and I were kind of out on her own. I worked Domino's pizza for two weeks and realized that was not going to pay the bills or keep a roof over our head and so I started little janitorial service and in my twenty s I started over a dozen companies. What if we took public in nineteen ninety-six. When I was twenty six years old kind of `obediently I realized I am not cut out to shuffle around an office and a lot of people who are really good at that. I am not one that is just not and and so I sold out of that company and was GonNa take a little hiatus actually and a friend of mine through a weird twist events I stumbled into an opportunity to start training people in creativity through a friend of mine who is one of the top creativity trainers in the US and that was really the start of knee beginning to speak consult train right around the same time as well through a weird twist of events Tony Robbins and I had become real good friends and he asked me to start doing some speaking for him as well. that was in about nineteen ninety eight. I went fully feet first into the world of professional speaking and in training that year and never looked back in the early two thousands. I had people come up to me when I would be on stage somewhere and say. How can I do what you do so Mike created a four day very intensive event. The Master Your Message Speakers Boot camp that was designed to teach people how to become professional speakers and then I took that same material applied to business leadership executives and took it in corporations for about ten years as well and about five years ago decided added as a stepped away from my my time with Tony still really close friends real good friends but I got burnt out of the travel quite honestly of being a professional speaker meagher and so everything we do now around helping people who have a calling. They feel like they've got a gift to give the world got a story about a message but they just don't have any idea what's actually do with it a lot of people in their forties and fifties kinda recreating themselves in a second act. That's the majority of the people we work with now and yeah yeah so. That's kind of the nutshell excellent well no. I absolutely love this. I love would you share your story so in the in the preface of your your book. I'm I'm really that moment for you. That was like this isn't working for me anymore. Because I know that there are a lot of people who are listening that there are many who who are doing extremely well and in their leadership role and loving it and then there's also that faction like you talked about just a moment ago that that that key audience that's in their forties fifties and is like okay. There's more here for me. I've got more to give. I'm not quite sure what that is so. Why would you talk doc about like that moment for you where it was like okay. This isn't working for me anymore. Yeah Yeah I mean I it was in about twenty thirteen and I had been restless for a few years inside of the the rhythm of life as a professional speaker that I was. I was living out so from June until December every year for about the prior ten years. I've been on the circuit with Tony. That was kind of my my six months that I would a lot of stuff love speaking for him for six months. A year would be all my own stuff but then I would feel other things around my time with Tony in in that latter six months so suffice to say I was away from home a lot. I was away from two hundred two hundred fifty nights a year. Maybe and I've been yeah I was I was I had some incredible you know united mileage staff baggage services right so I could walk into any airport on earth and get on a flight but by the same token I just now what was I burn out on the travel and and everything like that I felt like I was living the same year over and over again and had been as they say for about ten years even though on the surface I loved not on the surface. That's not a good way to put that on the surface looked like I had everything what I should have said was. I love what I did. I was incredibly gifted and blessed for the opportunities ladies I had and that had been one of the biggest things that frankly held me back from stepping over into this new life. That was Kinda dreaming of is. I thought well you know Joe you. You'RE GONNA look a gift horse in mouth like this. I mean your head trade her for you know arguably the biggest personal professional development brand toady on on the planet. You don't wear also you're gonNA go and yet. There was still something inside. There was like a burn or an issue that I couldn't scratch you know if you if you will burn that that I just couldn't put out with fire or you know. which was there something else that I meant to be doing? That is my own path my own message not helping someone else carry their message forward award as great as his message is and I was in London one night and it was a whole variety of things that had happened. It was a pretty tough trip and hub. I remember I called to my wife and I just said I can't do this anymore. I in fact at the time I said to her. I think I'M GONNA go get on a flight tomorrow morning and come home and she said no no no. You're not you're gonNA finish the event the JOE agreed to do. You're not gonNA leave. Leave it hanging. Which of course that was the right thing to say yeah. I knew that something had to I had to do something differently. I was forty five years old. at that time Komo got as I've come to realize a lot of us really take stock and begin to say what's my legacy GonNa be. What is the what's the gift that I'm GonNa leave the world through this life and is incredibly gifted as I've been telling her blessed is probably the best way to put it as I've been with opportunity. There's something else that I've got to recreate myself into this new thing and so that's what I did. I took about a year and a half and we completely changed everything in our business model title and and brought her all to helping others that were really in that same position step out and do it on their own as well excellent. Now I love that so much and there's one I wanna go one layer deeper for those listening that are feeling like you are right now before we really get into kind of the meat and potatoes of book itself which is Okay so how let's talk a little bit about courage and and taking that leap and and so and and you had some stories going on like who am I to like look this gift horse in the mouth so to speak you know love so can can you talk with our audience a little bit about about that about what that process looked like for you in terms of being able to to to live into that most courageous version of yourself so that you could go in pursue this you know again to be clear. I have lived anything but the normal life of you know that would lead somebody to be employed by the same company for twenty or twenty five years. Even though I guess in a roundabout about what I was with Tony in some capacity for twenty plus years I have always lived a life where I did not have a a lot tether me mentally from making ships and yet by the same token any sort of change on that scale walking away from you now now as you can imagine several hundred thousand dollars a year at least in in Cobb. was a scary thing to do. I did pad a little the savings knowing that I could take six months and really dig in and hopefully make make things income lives come back up to meet where I had been which actually took a year but to your question of of courage I kind of you know I have a tendency to Kinda jump up and then figure out how to build a plane on the on the way down that really is by nature and so I think I have a much easier time with making je leap like that but a lot of people do at the same time that doesn't really help somebody who's sitting there cleats. What do this Joe. Thanks that's great for you. But how do I do it and and here's what I think you've gotta know. You've got own yourself to the core as in got. No you're good at you. GotTa know what you're bad at notre strengths. Are you gonNA which weaknesses are and what I to try to do with myself as well as people who I work with and I mentor is to own a thousand percent so you can develop your own for lack of a better term `courage orig- strategy. What does it take. What would it take for you to have the courage to be able to go after that life of your dreams. Is it a certain amount of money in the bank well in the grand scheme of things. You're probably not ever going to get to the point where it's all thousand percent the way your house needs to be in order for you to walk away and pursue your dreams so I guess the question becomes what what is it can. Allow yourself to take that risk. Take that gamble. What are you have to know what you have to have on your side and I think knowing yourself knowing your nature in the face of that. Is One of the most important aspects of being neighbor find the courage. I love that that just that total self-awareness so for example like if I know one of the things for me that is important as some level of certainty he then making sure then that you're covering those bases like okay well. What would the absolute worst thing that could happen if this doesn't go my way or what would what would create read enough certainty for me that I could make this leap and have the confidence to do that so so anyway. I love exactly what you've yeah that whole idea of self awareness how important that is in general but also to as a leader so that you can really again live into that best version of yourself yeah. I'm also a big Fan. I have to say of trying to think of the the guy from Shark Tank Damon John is that he has he has the when he calls the power of broke. Invite you know your ultimate our ultimate resource idiom us our ultimate resources always resourcefulness. It's not time it's not money. It's it's not contacts. Per Se it is the resourcefulness the grit that determination the creativity the innovative thinking the knowing vice self so well so that you know how to motivate yourself to get up out of the bed. Make your commute into the upstairs bedroom where you have an office in wind it out for ten hours that that resourcefulness is really. I think the root of the root of courage and and I think there's a certain amount of magic that comes uh-huh from not having unlimited amounts of resources meaning Taivon money when you make a change like this right I tend to like I tend to like that's why I tend to a jump out the window and build the plane because the browns coming up real freaking quick and so you know we better. We better build that thing right away. I tend to get I find people get really resourceful where they in government place now if somebody steps out and they're petrified and that fear throws them into constant scarcity mentality have none of what I'm saying. It's GonNa work. None of what I'm saying so you've got you've got a note. It's all illusion to scarcity..

Joe Tony Robbins US Kelly Domino browns Mike Damon John Komo London Cobb. six months ten years thousand percent hundred thousand dollars twenty five years forty five years twenty six years
"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When sunny gets blue. Joe williams. Sunny. Bobby heads tuned by Rila may songbook on WNYC lie, Paul Cavalcanti, Ella, Fitzgerald, and count Basie are buttering eggs combination, and they clearly have fun luxuriating in space on this record of them. There is the band gets to do something elegance to call out and stretcher vocal range. It's a good meeting all around the Saturday night. Encounter that I hope works in your world with WNYC. First time a look too. Third cute way. You're flirting with. Then make me feel. Happy blue. Blue. No. With. You what? Then. Then danger lurks there. That down. You bet. They're about. Now..

Joe williams Rila Paul Cavalcanti Bobby Basie Ella Fitzgerald
"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"No. That is Joe Williams.

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pass and just friends and Sarah Vaughan, body and soul. I didn't mean to be Boris Karloff. Like when I said friends scored, but it is, and we're friends, and I thank you for joining me on a September Sunday get it while you can they're going out of business. This is the September twenty eighteen going out of business edition last days arrived, and we're in with Ella Fitzgerald, Joe Williams, count Basie orchestra. Lee y be smart. Hey, heart upset your car when she so close. Me. Sweet. I don't. Up your. He's too close. Comfort. Again. Due clo. No. Way. For. On you. While they're such..

Ella Fitzgerald Boris Karloff Sarah Vaughan Joe Williams Lee
"joe williams" Discussed on Who Charted

Who Charted

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on Who Charted

"Blood. Five seconds of summer to take show. I'm not like that's got energy to it. Right? Yeah, it's positive. That was fun. Then you should've said post Malone. That's the phone one that was a, you know, the bugle I felt like I was like at like a soldier marching the bugle year. Now. Probably think Jay rub you. Bugle. All right. So here we are. It's the hot picks chart. This is where each of us brings in a recommendation to say, this is what we like. This is charting with us. That's right. And we're going to start this week off. Number five or five fights. Brody's pick weezer with Africa. Yeah. A singer drummer, I can feel it. You know how to amazing drummer? Yes, Steve loro Jeff, Vaccaro the late jet Bacar. My neighbor was a photographer for TOTO used to hang out next door. They would come over and I would hang out with total. I went to their concert and I won't will you at this era? I was like in eighth and ninth grade, you're an eighth grader hanging out at the Todo photo shoots TOTO. Thank my neighbor was a photographer, John. If there's a bio pic about you? I would like it to be one of the initial see Hollywood life, Hollywood life of the yet. Even. To real Todo play at the universal amphitheater and they opened for my backstage. Yes, I was well. See. You like Michael Jackson had MacAulay Culkin you were that for TOTO TOTO either from the valley they went to grant in this I met them would say total had Brody. Yeah, but I remember she, I created Todo three thousand audience, warm ups. I say it was around at times. So your energy health TOTO there already big before me. I just knew that like Steve Luca third, this when like the beastie boys came out, he's pretty cool. He was like licensed ill, Steve Lucas. There's really respected. There were like great studio musicians. In fact, Joe Williams elite singer. He didn't sing on Todo. I think those David patient, these big songs, but Joe Williams son of John Williams, Star Wars composer. He was the lead singer of TOTO for a few years and we hung out his name was Joe Williams, and we went to Burbank, and we went to a shooting gallery. You're not gonna find many things in LA and influenced by Steven Brody Stevens. You know, story shooting gallery about heroin and Elissa heroin, no guns like a gun. It's still there and Bert on Burbank on like victory and Burbank boulevard. He somebody checkout Todo, make sure they're on the up and up to take in young kids around gun stores. Backstage golick for Joe Williams. The lead singer is now, but he was, but I got to hang out with them. No was it was pretty cool. Sorry, real question. Headshots on the walls at any of your cleaners or or shooting ranges, or any any arby's local Rb. Card shops. I have my head shot up at a baseball court shop. Check out the headshot, show episodes still alive on YouTube in the former defunct meltdown. Yeah, I know honestly, like TOTO. It's like I hitched my trailer to them early on, and it's funny like now they're coming back. They're even more popular than maybe they were before. Thanks to weezer and weezer loves receipt, and I went to receive a high school and I always talk about how people picked on receipt a and now receipt is cool again with the independent wrestling. Dare I'm not saying I did that. I stuck with receipt. I think once boogie nights came out, mercy became cool again, and I just kinda like just kept that percolating, but then it went from recede to like kind of representing the whole valley and I grew up in the valley and but people would always like put the valley down. So whenever I see these connections to cool things that are foundation based in the valley, just like the people are Nagasy in TOTO, very cool or not TOTO in pot Palino's. All right. What are we. Got what would you say is next up number four in at number four? Number four. It's Nate's pick Anderson POC with bubbling..

TOTO Joe Williams Steven Brody Stevens John Williams Steve Lucas Malone heroin Steve loro Jeff Burbank weezer Steve Luca Africa arby Jay Hollywood YouTube LA Michael Jackson Nate pot Palino
"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Honestly kinna i would venture to say that most folks just think the record is ella and basie 'cause it's huge letters on the cover but the album is called on the sunny side of the street it's the record on verve with ella and basie or just sitting an abnormal cup of coffee and the music on it is just so beyond that plebeian experience but anyway we seem to have fallen into a little bit of abassi many concert here because we've heard the record just there on the sunny side of the street sung by ella fitzgerald with count basie orchestra arthur price sock with count basie i could write a book these are on verve now comes joe williams and count basie together as we slept the count basie many concert continue who would put a stop to that seriously right here on wnyc avenue is speaking do all man.

ella ella fitzgerald joe williams basie
"joe williams" Discussed on The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

"Overlooking at the draft board alone arms cross just staring and i swear when i saw that scene you know what i thought of john nash in a beautiful mind because he was seeing something and i don't know what he was seeing and i just went over and i i was so grateful to the forty niners because they never said hey just stay in the back of the room you know they let me go hey why did you just do that you know and so kyle shanahan was looking up and i said to what are you looking at he goes the running backs and i said i don't said joe williams k and i said geez i don't see him there he said yeah he's off our board is a discipline case off our board and i said well what did he said i i want joe williams we went back into john lynch's office and shanahan made his strong case john the next guy we were picking we've got a big joe williams and for those who don't know joe williams kit going was was a was a running back at brigham young who quit the team in his last year and was having significant depression issues because of a family situation where his younger sister died and he thought and she died in bed one night and he thought if he had been more proactive in trying to save her she would be alive today and so he was just all screwed up from that and he had had big problems he had been at uconn previously and he had been arrested for stealing a kid's wallet and using his credit card on his team so we got kicked off the team at uconn and and kyle says joe williams i we gotta have this guy we have and john lynch is saying kyle come on we got the working on this for months.

john nash joe williams john lynch john brigham uconn kyle shanahan depression
"joe williams" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Let joe williams son when he senior highschool yeah john's a very good that was nineteen eighty six while the car was new how house dow's gutsy now it's vintage which actually work more years old is it worth more oh yeah please the okay you know what i hate so your your you're backing him out already i'm good yeah no he can yeah i want to sleep we've got to check traffic what i want to talk about the hot the senior boy dating the soft more girl okay i i want to get a mother's perspective on the l k yeah yeah i potatoes our time we are going to step aside and the check a little traffic coming up here on koa newsradio we say good afternoon john morse good afternoon dave high suzy we got ourselves a pretty good drive today's weather is much like yesterday's weather at least the forecast is but the outcome is nowhere near as bad as it was yesterday afternoon west side of town getting a break today got hammered yesterday you have a little bit of slowing eastbound c 470 coming down from alameda down to 285 but not the panel earlier him like it was it c 470 and i seventy yesterday i 70 westbound is heavy as you make your way down floyd hill down in idaho springs and then pass and up toward georgetown lotta people had for the mountains your downtown drive pretty heavy on i 20 by trump spots right now although as outta town big backups from kipling on eastbound i 70 they're doing so emergency road work on eastbound i 70 at harlan two left lanes are blocked that's causing big backups and we got backups on page you boulevard right now from i 70 up past a fifty six you've got an accident there and traffic your cbs 4 weather light snow possible tonight down to.

john john morse idaho springs joe williams dave alameda georgetown harlan
"joe williams" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

"Hold onto sanders and thomas cut cg anderson save a lot of money for your cap that's the right move but it i digress to the anderson possibly being cut and then they filled that in with they want davante booker to be their guy which sounds great for my dad is seen yeah if we value so if you're in a dynasty league go see if you can buy oh i fear in a dynasty league i a cheap book your or if you can get him cheap but i was gonna say if you can sell booker right now off of this hype train and get something that you deem better i would probably do it and we so i i think booker has a potential but we also saw when he was given the opportunity is rookie year he just didn't hold up davante booker kenneth dixon joe williams how would you order those for your dynasty landscape i think you ordered them that was it booker body exists in airlines dixon's a better player but that's a lot of baggage hasn't played football bonnie years laud running backs they are now in rob dim off ski s p and packers reporter says that now might be the time for green bay to move time montgomerie back to wide receiver obviously earned jones damola aims in the back field yes i've speculated my belief that rental cobble be out the door a perfect opportunity for time montgomery to go back to the slots so i can i could see it this is why in best ball leagues are really like drafting tie montgomery because i feel like he will be involved even if punter all even after dramatically anger is takes over that starting role i think that they know tie montgomerie's valuable asset to the team and and will be utilize in in some fashion i'm sure we will answer more questions in talk more about this on tomorrow's joined the foot dot com episode mailbag episode marie.

sanders anderson davante booker dixon reporter jones montgomery montgomerie joe williams football packers marie
"joe williams" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WLOB

"Video seven twenty seven you'll see you one hundred point five fm debbie davis gordon draper state representative rid sibra joe williams from wd un a gainesville georgia and david jones good morning one and all and worn out early only got about three minutes left in the segment joe let me ask you this david pogue the chairman of making main great again the political action committee the supported president trump's election here last fall how is trump received down in your neck of the woods over 80 percent approval rating in the state of georgia eighty percent of new and i i would think it's greater than that in the northeast corridor where we are the death like the uh we love to hear of the metro aries like atlanta athens may be savannah although all the densely populated area all right well that's interesting eighty percent of the people support president trump while it's crazy viscount state come on down a visit how you're willing to do that here in vain guys sorry wake up smaller the look with george do well that's exactly right and then we got to know you and your wife bj because of the sixth congressional district rates the special election tom price who hadn't abdicated that's each takeovers the secretary of health and human services i didn't actually go so well freedom he's out of a job now but he's a doctor he's all said and that was an an unusual race there was so much money pumped into that seat crazy on the democratic side the guy that ran did not even live in the district it was that one of the.

secretary athens president david jones gainesville state representative gordon draper debbie davis health and human services joe williams tom price bj george atlanta trump chairman david pogue georgia eighty percent three minutes 80 percent
"joe williams" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Combination of that oh there's a good framework in place for that help bill they really mo a lot of different advocacy groups to come out against what the republicans are proposing it the the opportunity for democrats to recap into that already built a network of individuals to really push forward that the opposition to the tax reform it could be a little bit more difficult because health care is a very court in all issue and his don't relieve at the same kind of extreme spun at the healthcare bill dead so while they even definitely habit network available that they could tap into it the matter we will they be able to really energized that base to come and out opposition to it and i think that is really the main question that democrats are right out it how two how to really ryo up that base to get them you know again taken to the streets in two members opposite is to about their concerned for the participation we're speaking with joe williams senate leadership reporter at roll call he's written a piece entitled democrats face messaging hurdles on gop tax plan a senior represent before going to be the standard democratic message about issues like this is a tax cut benefits the wealthy so it's a kind of comes down to i think you alluded to it who's got the simpler overruled message for voters right because republicans will say middleclass tax cut and relief creating jobs growth possible who who's who's got the simple message get your fina republicans grapple at that a little bit right now there's a lot there's a few at looked of their proposal that they're doing combat minute weeks to the one that got the most attention it they'd originally intended to remove that they immobile acted out shed and their water in that back up amid opposition not only from democrats are for members of their own ardy who did not want it be that deduction or removed uh republicans really wanna be able to introduce that bill you know very minimal controversy among equipped how among their own party at really be able to sell that as a bill that helped lower middle class individual place joe joe williams senate leadership reporter at roll call this portion of the program is brought to you.

joe williams reporter gop joe joe williams
"joe williams" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Naturally a get to know what so what kind of mobilization or messaging could there be reserve out like a a paid one or just like a lot appearances on tv talk shows what could be a combination of that dared to eight we work in plate for that health bill day really mo a lot of different ethnic groups to come out against what the republicans are in it the tea the opportunity for democrats to recap into that already built a network at individuals to really push forward the top it into the extra form it could be a little bit more difficult because healthcare is a very court in all issue and tack who don't relieved at the same kind of extreme extremeright spun fun at the healthcare bill dead so wall day you definitely habit that work available that day could tap into it the matter will we'll we'll be able to really energize that pays to come and out opposition to it and i think that is really the main question that democrats are figure it out with it how do oh how to really ryo up that baid to get them you know again taken to the streets in two maverick up to about their concerns or the legislation we're speaking with joe williams senate leadership reporter at roll call he's written a piece entitled democrats face messaging hurdles on gop tax plan a senior represent before going to the the standard democratic message about issues like this is a tax code benefits the wealthy so it's a kind of comes down to an i think you alluded to a who's got the simpler overruled message for voters right because republicans will say middle class tax cut and relief creating jobs and growth possible who's who's got the simple message get your fina republicans grapple at that a little bit right now there's a lot there's a few at hooked of their proposal that they're doing combat minute weeks to the one that got the.

joe williams reporter gop
"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 4 years ago

"joe williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Whoa remember little brain aw whoa who long this guy it is oh mm lava oval lava back lava come back come back yeah joe williams i were him back to me about that sri jettisoned on and tenor tenor sax roy you've sheldon plays well the fact is that was soon the guy altogether jimmy forest these these two albums have been crushed together in release my joe williams and sweet jettisoned is all over the place here oh sweet jettison my g not nadal a whisper about jimmy first but i should have no my fault the ranakusuma don't know love until you main and there you down you don't know how lives until you get hands and then you've land now you throwing here you tell me how hartsburg for love that diana had never as these no.

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