7 Burst results for "Joe Werner"

"joe werner" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"joe werner" Discussed on Science Friction

"And they stay to protect their assets and a very committed to remaining. Ken Accuse that a better understanding of the seven different types of evacuee could lead to more effective emergency messaging. That's tailor-made to your particular evacuation tied. The emergency services. Still push hard on. You should leave leave early. It's safer to leave early. Which is absolutely true but the act types works suggests that the emergency services can better target and communicate with people at that stage at the stage of influencing their preparation and planning by identifying their particular interests that beliefs the likely responses. And really recognizing that saying. We know that this is how you feel. These are your motivators. This is perhaps what you can do to better prepare. So it's really saying we understand you. Had you identify the people because I mean I guess that's the trick like had you know ahead of time if someone's going to be a threat denier or worried waiver it's a great question the cf? I in in Victoria is actually being doing work for a couple of years now since we identified the targets in the post season surveys. They've talked to other two thousand people in Victoria and identified the archetype so they're looking at their programs and how people respond to their programs using that data. I've recently finished a large project under the safer together program which recommended that we actually develop an online tool to allow practitioners or householders themselves to establish their archetype. So that's work to be done but yeah hopefully be done on their way to the main evacuation center in Basements Bay will flatmate mobile reception for the first time since the crisis kicked off earlier that morning so we stopped him suddenly making a lot of calls and messages. And the so my mom straightaway and it was bad because it cut out a sin as a cold and all I got through his mom saying you'RE K. Thank God and mazing mom and cut up. And that's like my mom was just thinking some kind of panicked final phone call don't will was able to call it back soon. After and gave a brief update before continuing onto the main evacuation center. Once they arrived they found well equipped and not too crowded. They had the Red Cross disaster welfare and it was a really sex bought and so we had some food and there was some beautiful moments there because I was sitting next to someone and they said have you into the briefing said. Oh no no but I heard this Blah Blah and I said oh. Where do you live? And then they said we're on Lilly pilly as a same and then they said their address sent here actually three houses up for me. It's quite funny. You can know your immediate neighbors but after this we started knowing the Hull Street. So that was quite lovely. So willingly slap may bunket down for the night. I decided to stay in my car that not my flatmate winning these ten. I think it was about ten o'clock at night brushing my teeth and I had this moment. I thought Shit. He's my knees. Haven't even had a drink today in the past at ten o'clock because I was so exhausted and then it's there wasn't my car news. Eight laughing going. I can't believe this. This is just ridiculous. Thank you so much. We'll Hawk for sharing your story so generously with Joel and to inspector Ben Shepard from the hardworking New South Wales Rural Fire Service. Dr King's drawn and photographer Alex Coppell for his audio of the fires. He's instagram sought by the way is really something to behold on the tesha Mitchell. Talk to me on twitter at Natasha. Mitchell and you can catch Joe Werner producer of today's science fiction and the sum of pots. Podcast over on twitter at Joe were in until next week..

Alex Coppell twitter Victoria Joe Werner Ken Lilly pilly Dr King Basements Bay tesha Mitchell Red Cross Mitchell New South Wales Rural Fire Ser Ben Shepard producer Natasha Joel
"joe werner" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

14:39 min | 9 months ago

"joe werner" Discussed on All In The Mind

"It says. Three trolls in this apartment. Right right now door. They hear the machine saying they here. Where do you think it could be hiding? They hiding in l.. Well it is house no the right here now has now food. I don't WanNa live in a tunnel. Where did they make the tunnel? Should we go and have a look back. They don't dare. Let's try this these terrorist reggie off the COB would shoot telescope can say the trolls. I like it gets ride a fun to leading this this footprints leading into the bathroom. And what set on the wall. Is that the opening to a troll. Tunnel should be go through it alight but can in what okay. What are the clues that the trolls of thing he? What can you say in the toilet a hole in in the toilet? What are the clues? Can you say that would let us know that trouser am laughing that. Why are there any footprints towards out the out a fourth day Kisangani Fannie trolls slime around? The word was no slime around. My Day went somewhere else. There's twelve to tillerson off. They went next door. Di Di okay. Should we go and have a luke wrong guy. Very talented oil small. Wait till mom gets home. Good plan chief troll investigators Joe Werner and his son Fem- you with with all in the mind on our in Amnon Malcolm today delving into the mind of an infant Alison Gopnik professor in psychology and philosophy. Happy from the University of California. Berkeley Studies held babies and young children's minds work. In fact she likens children's brains to the most most powerful computers on the planet. Yeah so one of the things that we're doing now is we're collaborating with people in Computer Science purply elsewhere where because the big advances in artificial intelligence the things. There's been so much excitement about have all been because we figured out ways to actually design machines that could learn but the machines that learn even the most powerful ones the ones that can learn how to do things like play chest or can figure out cats and dogs. It's on the Internet. Those machines are still terribly primitive compared to even the simplest the youngest baby or child so those machines can do is take enormous amount of data and pull out a statistical pattern from the data. But what they can't do is think up new ideas or understand things abstractly or for makeup possibilities that are not in any of the data that they originally saw and children with much less data with much less information are doing a much better better job of thinking up new ways the world could be understanding something like that. A machine could work in an unusual strange kind of way. And what we're trying to do now is figure out what's is it. That's going on in the children's minds. Let's do that and could we use that as a clue for how to design smarter computers so one of the other things that children do. ooh That's kind of like what scientists do they do experiments. They actually go out and try and get information about the things that they wanna find out about. But when they do the experiments we call it getting into everything or playing and one of the things that you know about babies. They're just insatiably curious. You know even at the risk of their survival they'll l.. Just get into everything and try and figure it out and experiments leapt on and other people have done have shown that when they're just kind of playing around they're actually doing doing just the right kinds of things that they need to do to figure out a task so one of the things that people are doing now is trying to design curiosity based artificial artificial intelligence that work by just intrinsically trying to figure out how things in the world work in some ways the is that we have now are a bit like children who have very controlling tiger mom because they have a programmer. Who saying do this and do that and now you're doing better now you're doing worse? And that's not what kids are like. Kids are doing most of their learning just reading off by themselves and playing and exploring and if you wanted to get a system that really had the kind of intelligence of humans. That's the kind of system would need. So Oh you are observing the way children think and applying that to develop more sophisticated. I that's exactly right. So one of the big granting agencies in the United States Darpa which was one of them places where the computer was first invented just have sent out a call to get people like me who the study babies and computer scientists together for time that those two groups have really been interacting to try to see what the next horizons are. And you've suggested suggest that babies or young children and adults have a different style of consciousness. Can you describe that different style. Yeah so I think. The new work suggests that there's a child intelligence. It's really different in many respects from adults elegance. One way that people talk about this in in computer science and neuroscience is a difference between exploration and exploitation so the kind of intelligence that you need to get things down to act swiftly effectively actively the way grownups do is really different from the kind of intelligence you need to just figure out how the world works. Find out as much as you can about. What's going on around you so to be an Out All it's really a good idea. For instance to have very focused attention. Just pay attention to the things that are important in ignore everything else. That's going on around you and we can show that grownups. GROWNUPS actually are literally blind to the things that they're not paying attention to. If you're paying attention to one thing you won't see anything else that's going on around here when we look at babies and young children what we. She is a much more distributed. Kind of way of being in the world they're interested in and perceiving much more of the world a way that you could think of it is if you think about adult nope consciousness as being like a spotlight. It's just lighting up a particular part of the world. The baby's consciousness is more like a lantern it's illuminating everything that's going on around ended and there's been some lovely studies that have shown for instance that children are better than adults at remembering something that they haven't attended to so adults are better than children if you tell them okay remember. What colored card was? They'll be better but if there's something else on the card you know there's a little heart in the corner you're and you don't point that up to the adult they just forget about it whereas the children will actually remember even the thing that they weren't paying attention to so human children have a Longer period of being dependent and helpless almost than other species. What can evolution tell us about the value of having these really extended dependence right? Well it turns out that there's a relationship between how long a period of childhood and animal has an how large brain they. They have basically how smart they are. And we're kind of the best example of that and the idea. Is that if you think about this. Trade off between exploration and exploitation creature like us that relies on learning needs to have this protected time this period when all they have to do is explore not worry about food not worry about actually succeeding. Not Worry about getting on in the world and that exploratory period is what we call childhood. An interestingly went people are designing computers. They they have also result this explorer point trade off and one way of doing it. That's comes up again and again is start out by exploring start out by considering lots of possibilities abilities and only later narrow into just the things that are going to turn out to be most important and evolution seems views that kind of strategy first explorer that exploit right in creating babies. So there's a really good argument for allowing children to be children for as long as they need to be absolutely so one of the sort of bitter irony Ernie's being a child psychologist lately has been for the last thirty years. We've been telling everybody look. These children are so brilliant and they learn so much understand so much an often when you say that the message that people take is oh we should put them in school so we should make preschools more like schools. We should give them flash cards or train them the way that that we do in school and in fact a message is just the opposite the messages if anything. You'd want school to be more like preschool. That the natural play and exploration Russian in a safe setting with people who love you. That's the context in which young children learning the most and certainly but for about six in preschool kind. If period that kind of wide ranging expiration and play seems to be the secret to being able to use these amazing learning abilities that we see in young children so so what is the potential for using some of your research findings in that way to inform and apply to our approaches to childcare and into schooling to education. Yeah exactly I mean I think we have some very very good models of things that people sometimes call inquiry based education or Montessori schools or my personal favorite is. What's the Reggio Emilia program? These have been around for fifty years. And I think intuitively good preschool. Teachers understand Dan that when children are playing when they're exploring that's when they're learning the most but I think often those teachers are kind of caught in a pincer movement between the parents who really really want their children to do well. And the policymakers who want to have you know a major a standardized test that they can use to show that it's worthwhile investing in young. The children and what the science says is that that kind of standardized test is not catching the thing. That is what children are doing. What children's play and exploration exploration are doing is a labeling to be creative and to be resilient those are things that are kind of hard to measure in kind of standardized way? But I think we've now got some really good evidence that it's that creativity and resilience that gives the children the great start that will let them continue to thrive later on so they must be lots of things that adults else can learn from children in terms of being more open minded learning imagination creativity. How can adults colts retained some of those qualities? Yeah so it's important to say I'm obviously really sympathetic with the With the babies. But of course you wouldn't want a baby to be running running your faculty department or your country. You want people who have that ability to focus into explode into make things happen but even for adults. It's one of the things particularly for human adults. We go back and forth from being in that state of okay. Now we're really focused on just getting things done to being able to consider sitter a wider range of options and some of the things that we do with children like putting them in a safe space where they don't have to worry about outcomes right away those. Those are the sorts of things that seem to enable adults to be able to explore so a university or a science department is. It's really is kind of like a preschool for grownups. It's it's a safe place where you can play and you can find things out. Another thing is getting back to not knowing too much part of the reason why children can learn so much because they I don't know very much to begin with. They have much more open minds. So it's putting yourself in new situations at Olsen challenging yourself. Exactly now. I think another thing is hanging out with babies is a really good idea so I have three grandchildren. Now who are seven and five and four war and if you spend time with a four year old you will get your mind expanded because you can get to participate in that kind of wild crazy place where nothing is quite quite what you would have thought in the first place. And he's three year old Fina Gin he tells his Dad Joel. What's in the sky above the leaves on the trees space for sure we jump straight to space? And what can you tell me about. Space everyone float on float in space space conscious have property and they flow to float Nadeau. Falwell why can you tell me how gravity works five hundred eighty such thing down to the. That's exactly right into what happens when you go up into space. Everyone run float. That's cool. I'd like to do that. Fly Teeth face. Flying Around one day may need the don't l. in a logic to it. The Dr Five Four Way Too Long Wall stall the day died two different flats right okay. So what are the planets Phoenix of laws drew. Guts Sadden What about Pluto? Here's don't Dole trying to Willie really and why can't we go to the Sun. The Sun is really really hot. We taught that told Raft. Aw stay warm in the sun and what else can you tell me about space. What's beyond the planet I land? Hey Aliens Aliens look like play always and some have two and some have one and and do they speak like we speak like if you met an alien. Could you just go hello and INDIGO. Hello in and you'd be able to have a chat..

University of California reggie United States Darpa Alison Gopnik float Nadeau luke Reggio Emilia Amnon Malcolm programmer Joe Werner Dan Dole professor Olsen Falwell Joel Fem Willie
"joe werner" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"joe werner" Discussed on The Science Show

"Yes so that that's a really good question in Hawaii. The Hawaii Volcano Observatory have a number of sauce. Moment is on on the island itself but there are no seafloor seismometers seismic activity from Louis Volcano is often a precursor tour options and Tom that we would diving Louis. He was quiet so we were taking the risk but it wasn't very calculated risk. Would you find we found the deposits of the nineteen ninety-five eruption of Louis and to be honest they want that spectacular it looked exactly as would inner terrestrial setting and so we use the man submersible about eight days took our samples might Arabs ovation's and got back on the ship and went home. Why should it be different from what you get on land? When volcanoes are underwater? They're often at depths of hundreds to thousands of. Of Maters and the confining pressure of the water column overlying noise volcanoes he's quite significant so when magma's arising from the deeper into the shallow earth they're not only under pressure associated with the column I'm of Rock but they're also under additional pressure associated with the depth of the water so the prediction knees that Magma's litter opting really deep settings should not be explosive they should just erupt relatively benignly onto the safe law because the gas can't essentially expand foss enough under that increased pressure Lord but nonetheless would it goes to Nami eruptions can trigger tsunami if volcanoes relatively shallow depth but most of the dangerous soon lamis that have been derived drive by volcanic processes for example at crocodile or in places in the Mediterranean. They've actually been triggered by collapse of a flank of the volcano so an actual shifting the landmass. That's driving that tsunami wife when going next so the next voyage is in August September this year we're going up to the coral sea northeast of Australia and we're trying to look for the source of Mantle Plume Volka Newsom that occurred about about sixty million years ago so going to a place called the Lewis Plateau which just need Papua New Guinea and that's thought to be the birthplace of an outpouring of luminous magma that happened about sixty million years ago good luck and give my love to the Blob wlob thank you Rebecca career senior lecturer in Earth Sciences at the University of Tasmania in Hobart and a very brave rock scientist and here's Joe Werner son Fin. Some parts is a podcast where we ask questions..

Louis Hawaii Volcano Observatory magma Louis Volcano Hawaii University of Tasmania Hobart Nami eruptions Volka Newsom Lewis Plateau Australia senior lecturer Joe Werner Earth Sciences Tom Papua Rebecca Mediterranean scientist sixty million years
"joe werner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"joe werner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dow, the s&p NASDAQ all venting stocks flirting with record stocks rise on China trade and stimulus hopes says some p up now by twenty eight points. A gain of one percent. The Dow up three hundred fifty three best loved of the day, though been up more than four hundred ten points in the end. No gain of one point four percent. Nasdaq up one hundred eight that's Vance of one point four percent, tenure of ten thirty seconds, yield two point zero five percent gold. Also higher today, five percent thirteen forty six ounce. Sam west Texas intermediate crude up four point two percent, fifty four ten now for a barrel of west Texas intermediate crude. I'm Charlie pelletan. That is a Bloomberg business flash. Charlie, thank you so much. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek and Jason Kelly just want to bring you some headlines from Washington. President United States speaking to reporters with the first lady, he's on his way. Down to Florida for that. Big reelection campaign kickoff talking a little bit about the withdrawal of Mr. Shanahan from the department of defense consideration says he did not ask a Shanahan to withdraw moving onto foreign policy. He talked the basically said, we'll see what happens with Iran. He's talking to a number of people about that says that China talks are working out as he and -ticipant, this, of course, following a common earlier from the president, where he said that he and president Xi, we'll have an extended, quote unquote meeting at the G twenty. He says China wants to make a deal and that he indeed has good relations with president. She said the president United States, speaking to reporters on his way to Florida. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek here on Bloomberg radio. All right. Well that's what's going on in markets. A little bit of stocks. Joe Werner is here with us. He's the president of peer beat canal in company. They've.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek Mr. Shanahan Bloomberg President Charlie pelletan president Xi Dow China Joe Werner United States Florida west Texas Texas Shanahan Jason Kelly Vance Washington department of defense
"joe werner" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"joe werner" Discussed on Science Friction

"It's called some of all parts or soap that's nickname. And it's host while I would say Joe Werner, you are a man of many obsessions and music has to be Scholley one of them. Yeah. Music's definitely up there. And while some vol- parts is a show about numbers. I think numbers and mathematics in music is so interwoven that occasionally it ends up being a bit of a music podcast as well. And that's definitely the case with the story with featuring today. Yeah, it's a shy with really rhythmic pulse often because you do beautiful sand design and at the heart of this story is a genuine, rockstar. Who discovered an obsession himself, kind of mid Korea robot Schneider is huge in India Saint so it means that, that's not so huge. But he, he is a big deal in the right circles. And he kind of walked away from this very successful music career to focus on an obsession. He has with mathematics. Let's take it away..

Joe Werner Korea India
"joe werner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"joe werner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"It's a think stand up comedy, you think of a guy holding a microphone acting as if he's thinking. Jokes for the first time. Right, right. That's the sort of standard convention and you're doing the performance lights choreography, prerecorded music again, doing you're making commentary about yourself while you're doing it the next special before that is what it was. Yeah. And is that form where you started off? I mean, you can sort of see you getting more elaborate and more rehearsed and more better at it, but is that again what you were doing when you started off doing stuff live? No, no delay or no? No, that that that was that was discovering comedians discovering discovering a lot of like European and Austrailia and comedians stand up in Europe and Australia is much more theatrical and sort of, but it was going like I like, I don't get to do any of this stuff. I, I used to love theater and I did the-the or an I have to stand up here and talk and sing songs like that sucks. And then I'd be like, what I really missed in theater was dialogue listening. I don't get. I. One day I was like, I don't get to listen on stage anymore. Just talk the whole time. So then I thought of backing vocals. So I'll have voices speak to me on stage so I can listen or lights and props and and music used all that. How much work does it take to write rehearse mount something like make happy? Well, it's an interesting that that was an interesting one. And that was like, because what we used to do is just be me and my tour manager, Chris Scanlon, and we would go around for what that early show would, which had like fifty or sixty cues in it. We would go into every venue and just like piece the show together the day before this new show each time around it was literally like, technically it was like, okay, what lights they have. Okay. How can we make this queue work with the setup that's happening. And it was all just a written beforehand and it would make happy. It was like. I had the show vaguely written. I had like sixty minutes of material. And then we brought in like the production of the special is the production at toward with us the whole time. That was that wasn't just for the taming, like we had those lights and that set up. I had Joe Werner my sound guy, Chris Galante. My my lighting guy, and what we did is we would we toward the full technical show, but we were, we like, worked the show out and wrote the show with the lights. So we do show and then we'd all get together after going. Okay. What worked what didn't know k. tomorrow, let's try this spot hitting this time. Let's try green and then Greenwood. Didn't, but we would. We tested the tech of the show like you would work out the material of a show. That's what I was thinking about watching it because I'm a comedy nerd. And even if you're not, I think you might be familiar with you now that someone like Seinfeld or a Louis c. k. or Chris rock spends a year developing thing. And you know, maybe you're used to go to the small comedy club and they try stuff out over time. They they build a year to build it and watching you and against them. It looks sort of casual and relaxed, but obviously they've thought through every long. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And your thing is there's there's no artifice that it's that casual, right? Oh, yeah. It's very, very, very rare production. And the.

Austrailia Louis c. k. Chris Scanlon Chris Galante Europe Joe Werner Chris rock Greenwood Seinfeld sixty minutes One day
"joe werner" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"joe werner" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Of an exhibition at the morgan librarian museum in new york titled i'm nobody who are you the first line of one of her most famous palms who was amalie dickinson scholar mark joe werner offers yes she is the constant some then this to me to think that when angle edge and it's precise smith and not only it's precise miss but it's power if you're the day fifteenth guys resume the old here visitors can listen to readings of the poems a little madness in the spring is wholesome even for the king well examining remnants of the sure come scribe nineteen century life lived almost completely and one town yeah merced massachusetts the only known painting of dickinson as a child with her siblings i did gira type of her as a young woman the only i think to catered photo of the power like there's also a lot of her auburn hair a replica of cock in pressed but tentacles specimens and another of the rose wallpaper in the bedroom to which you were treated in her later years this exhibition was someone hundred rarely seen items he's eager to percent a different fresh kang get consent home generator carroll invaders his stereotype that was attached to her very early on obsessed total rackley is seth us woman and why to never of last term bathroom to and these using vs like an impact young almost in total for creation has really stuck to her better late in the half are fighting that or just three had and the context a little bit this amalie dickinson engaged with her times including the civil war years through her reading and a constant correspondents with friends leading think carson others often she shanked poems sentences kansas and entire problems written on scraps of paper an envelope even chocolate wrappers a new book envelope palms as well as the recent the gorgeous nothing's document this aspect of her work barring goal i had she broke the glass ceiling and that in poetry and and when dickerson it's like a can of we're a ball power that will not.

morgan librarian museum new york mark joe werner amalie dickinson kansas dickerson massachusetts auburn seth civil war carson nineteen century