21 Burst results for "Joe Weber"

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:28 min | 1 d ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This one is heart wrenching and disturbing. It's in the latest issue of Bloomberg businessweek. It's on how TikTok's viral challenges, specifically the so called blackout challenge, are luring young users to their deaths. Bloomberg investigative reporter Olivia carville reveals how the company behind the most popular app in the U.S. is responding to these horrifying cases and the consistent failure of the platform's age verification mechanisms, Olivia and Bloomberg businessweek editor Joe Weber, join us with more. This is one of these things that everyone just assumes, the kids are not going to find themselves in places that they're not supposed to be and just truly scary some of these corners can become. Olivia bring us into how you went about reporting this story because it really involves some tragic elements. Yeah, it does. I started reporting this piece by trying to get a sense of what happens inside TikTok after a child dies participating in an online challenge and maybe there's been a headline and some local news reports connecting tech talk to that death. How does the company respond and what happens internally? And the way to answer that question was to try and build sources on their trust and safety team. This is the team that is built within TikTok to handle the worst case scenarios. These are the fixes of the Internet, the people who come in and clean up the mess, protect the companies, reputation, but also try and protect users. And I spoke to more than two dozen current and former trust and safety insiders to get a sense of what happens at TikTok and that's how we were able to tell the story is really through the lens of their trust and safety team. Your piece starts out with just the tragic story of Ariana royo. Can you share her story and what her family has gone through? Ariani was a 9 year old girl. She lived down in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and she loved TikTok. You know, this is the most popular app in the world, and it is hard to deny the success of this company. 70% of teenagers in America are using TikTok and they're using it more than all of the other apps out there, Facebook, SnapChat, Twitter, so ariani, like most kids, fell in love with TikTok, and she was using the platform on a daily basis and she really enjoyed participating in the trending challenges. In February of last year, she attempted the blackout challenge, which as we had children try and choke themselves with household objects until they black out and then filmed the adrenaline rush or the high they get regaining consciousness. But at the age of 9, ariani, unfortunately, was unable to save herself. She had choked herself with a metal dog leash and she tragically died. So Olivia, obviously TikTok is aware that there's a challenge here and that things have happened. There's been lawsuits. What is the company you have to say about it and with their official response and then what are others saying about that response? Yeah, I mean, these dangerous challenges bounce across platforms. They exist on TikTok, but they insist on all the others as well. And he uses actually try and sidestep safety restrictions by doing things like misspelling keywords, so rather than writing blackout challenge, which has been banned on TikTok. The old right blackout with a zero and try and get around the artificial intelligence or the systems that have been set up to try and protect kids. So TikTok really doesn't want this content on its platform. It's done what it can to train its moderators to take down any content relating to the blackout challenge and it also prevents anyone from being able to search for blackout challenge related content in the air. And it's set those safety restrictions in place at the start of last year after the first ten year old girl died at doing this particular challenge. But unfortunately, kids are smart and they know how to get around these safety restrictions and they're doing that and that means that the challenges continuing to spread across social media platforms and the most recent cases that we could find of deaths associated to the blackout challenge was August of this year, so despite all of those safety features being implemented, the deaths have kept happening. Where do you think we need to go from here to get on top of this? Well, that question of age verification is like the elephant in the room. This is one of the hardest things for these social media platforms to do. How can you tell the exact age of the person who was on the app? Using that device and don't forget that children's content is allowed on TikTok. You can film your children or your siblings who are under the age of 13 in post about it. Every social media platform in the U.S. at least has a role that sees you have to be over the age of 13 to use the product. They call it within the industry, the age gate. And it's very hard to enforce that. So these companies are trying to find ways around it, but this is one of the biggest challenges that social media platforms face. That was Bloomberg investigative reporter Olivia carville and Bloomberg business week editor Joel Weber on this week's cover story. Just head to Bloomberg dot com or check it out on the terminal for a full length video feature on this piece hard to stomach, but I got to say important for the parents of young kids to see and know about. You're listening to Bloomberg business week. Coming up next, we shift gears and take a look at a key area of the consumer economy. The travel and hospitality sector. Tim, we get a post Thanksgiving pulse check with priceline CEO Brett

Bloomberg businessweek Olivia carville Olivia TikTok Joe Weber Ariana royo Ariani SnapChat ariani Bloomberg U.S. Milwaukee Wisconsin Twitter Facebook Bloomberg business Joel Weber Tim priceline
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:30 min | 1 d ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Story also a Bloomberg big take from the past week. This one is heart wrenching and disturbing. It's in the latest issue of Bloomberg businessweek. It's on how TikTok's viral challenges, specifically the so called blackout challenge, are luring young users to their deaths. Bloomberg investigative reporter Olivia carville reveals how the company behind the most popular app in the U.S. is responding to these horrifying cases and the consistent failure of the platform's age verification mechanisms, Olivia and Bloomberg businessweek editor Joe Weber, join us with more. This is one of these things that everyone just assumes, the kids are not going to find themselves in places that they're not supposed to be and just truly scary some of these corners can become. Olivia bring us into how you went about reporting this story because it really involves some tragic elements. Yeah, it does. I started reporting this piece by trying to get a sense of what happens inside TikTok after a child dies participating in an online challenge and maybe there's been a headline and some local news reports connecting tech talk to that death. How does the company respond and what happens internally? And the way to answer that question was to try and build sources on their trust and safety team. This is the team that is built within TikTok to handle the worst case scenarios. These are the fixes of the Internet, the people who come in and clean up the mess, protect the companies, reputation, but also try and protect users. And I spoke to more than two dozen current and former trust and safety insiders to get a sense of what happens at TikTok and that's how we were able to tell the story is really through the lens of their trust and safety team. Your piece starts out with just the tragic story of Ariana royo. Can you share her story and what her family has gone through? Ariani was a 9 year old girl. She lived down in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and she loved TikTok. You know, this is the most popular app in the world, and it is hard to deny the success of this company. 70% of teenagers in America are using TikTok and they're using it more than all of the other apps out there, Facebook, SnapChat, Twitter, so ariani, like most kids, fell in love with TikTok, and she was using the platform on a daily basis and she really enjoyed participating in the trending challenges in February of last year. She attempted the blackout challenge, which is weird children try and choke themselves with household objects until they black out and then film the adrenaline rush or the high they get regaining consciousness. But at the age of 9, ariani, unfortunately, was unable to save herself. She had choked herself with a metal dog leash and she tragically died. So Olivia, obviously TikTok is aware that there's a challenge here and that these have happened. There's been lawsuits. What is the company have to say about it and with their official response and then what are others saying about that response? Yeah, I mean, these dangerous challenges bounce across platforms. They exist on TikTok, but they insist on all the others as well. And users actually try and sidestep safety restrictions by doing things like misspelling keywords. So rather than writing blackout challenge, which has been banned on TikTok, the old right blackout with a zero and try and get around the artificial intelligence or the systems that have been set up to try and protect kids. So TikTok really doesn't want this content on its platform. It's done what it can to train its moderators to take down any content relating to the blackout challenge and it also prevents anyone from being able to search for blackout challenge related content in the air. And it's set those safety restrictions in place at the start of last year after the first ten year old girl died attempting this particular challenge. But unfortunately, kids are smart and they know how to get around these safety restrictions and they're doing that. And that means that the challenges continuing to spread across social media platforms and the most recent cases that we could find of deaths associated to the blackout challenge was August of this year, so despite all of those safety features being implemented, the deaths have kept happening. Where do you think we need to go from here to get on top of this? Well, that question of age verification is like the elephant in the room. This is one of the hardest things for these social media platforms to do. How can you tell the exact age of the person who was on the app? You know, using that device and don't forget that children's content is allowed on TikTok. You can film your children or your siblings who are under the age of 13 in post about it. Every social media platform in the U.S. at least has a role that says you have to be over the age of 13 to use the product. They call it within the industry, the age gate. And it's very hard to enforce that. So these companies are trying to find ways around it, but this is one of the biggest challenges that social media platforms face. That was Bloomberg investigative reporter Olivia carville and Bloomberg business week editor Jill Weber on this week's cover story. Just head to Bloomberg dot com or check it out on the terminal for a full length video feature on this piece hard to stomach, but I got to say important for the parents of young kids to see and know about. You're listening to Bloomberg business week. Coming up next, we shift gears and take a look at the key area of the consumer economy. The travel and hospitality sector. Tim, we get a post Thanksgiving pulse check with priceline

Bloomberg businessweek Olivia carville Olivia TikTok Joe Weber Ariana royo Ariani SnapChat ariani Bloomberg U.S. Milwaukee Wisconsin Twitter Facebook Bloomberg business Jill Weber Tim
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:18 min | 2 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business week editor Joe Weber. It's the cover story of the upcoming issue, Bloomberg, business week. We did afternoons at two eastern. These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar. Those Apple numbers continuing to come in. One Bloomberg radio, the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com. Florida's governor says his plan sending illegal immigrants to Martha's Vineyard finally got the attention of The White House. Republican Ron DeSantis says he's amazed that only 50 immigrants being sent to a rich island caused President Biden to scramble. He noted millions have crossed the border and caused chaos but The White House has ignored that for months and months. White House spokeswoman karine Jean Pierre reacted Republican officials should not be using human beings as political ponds. The chief of FedEx is predicting a worldwide recession. Raj subramanium told CNBC FedEx expected demand to increase after China opened up most of its factories with COVID in decline, but demand actually fell. His comments sent stocks tumbling. The bidens are heading to London tomorrow for the funeral of Queen Elizabeth, the state funeral is set for Monday in London's historic Westminster Abbey. The queen's body is lying in state at the Abbey. I'm Brian shook. And I'm Charlie pellet at Bloomberg world headquarters. This was the worst week for the U.S. stock market since hitting a low for the year back in June, FedEx is warning added to growing concern over outsized Federal Reserve interest rate increases. At CMC markets, chief market analyst Michael hewson is not optimistic about company earnings. As we head towards the end of the quarter and we look towards October and the upcoming earnings season, I think we could see quite a few more downgrades. Michael Houston of CMC markets as for the economic backdrop Lindsey PX is chief economist at Stifel Nicholas. The fed has been very clear that they will continue to raise rates regardless of the cost to the underlying economy in order to get the bedrock of the economy price stability, reinstated. So should we see prices remain at these elevated levels or worse, push higher from here. I do think the fed could be poised to raise rates significantly above earlier expectations. Steeples, Lindsey P exile, FedEx shares plunged today having their biggest stock drop since at least 1980 after withdrawing its earnings forecast on worsening business conditions a potentially worrying sign for the global economy. Jonathan Chappelle is an analyst at Eva corps. To be clear, we do have an outperform rating on the stock, but we also initiated a tactical underperform trade on August 23rd with the anticipation that there was risk to the fiscal first quarter 23 earnings and also to the guide for this year. Now what we didn't expect was a 33% miss to one Q&A 50% guide down effectively to second quarter. Have a corps, Jonathan Chappelle, FedEx down 21.4%. Stocks lower, S&P was down 28 down 7 tenths of 1% the Dow down 139 down four tenths of 1% NASDAQ down 104 down 9 tenths. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Charlie pallet. This is Bloomberg. Your list name to Bloomberg business of sports from Bloomberg radio. This is the Bloomberg business of sports show where we explore the big money issues in the world of sports. I'm Michael Barr. I'm Scarlett foo. And I'm Damien SaaS hour. On the show today, we're talking with the dick ever saw former head of NBC sports co creator of Saturday Night Live has my best done Pardo and creator of Sunday Night football. Let's dive back into our conversation. So let's tear up the script here. I mean, now that we're just railing on baseball, we may as well rail on the Olympics as well. I mean, you are the person who brought Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic flame to television. I mean, you are The Godfather of Olympics. And yet rating for the Olympics have really come down in recent years, you know, I'm curious, what's going on there? What's going wrong? I mean, the Olympics are just such an amazing event, a way of connecting different countries across the globe. What can be done to improve the product to make it more digestible from a viewer standpoint? Well, you won't like my answer. No. One of the keys to my success with the Olympics is that I really talk to viewers all the time, whether it was by encouraging them to write me or making frequent appearances where there could be an interchange. And the one thing they always said about the Olympics, they wanted to watch them when they were available to watch. And I think now due to the pressure of some in the media, like The New York Times. There are two wrapped up in getting them on live when they're aren't that many people available to watch. And I always stack them up so that when you got home at the end of the day, all that stuff was lined up for you to watch from day 5 30 in the afternoon till 11 o'clock at night and that's not always the case anymore. I have to talk about your reason why and our newspaper wrote this and it is very true. One newspaper referred to you as the man who keeps America awake. That's you, because I want to thank you for that because Sunday nights now I'm up late and Saturday nights. I'm up late. You found it Saturday Night Live. I found this Saturday Night Live with a really, really talented partner. Either the comedy and that's Lorne Michaels. Yeah, exactly. Story about that is that my mother and father and I saw the premier episode with George Carlin. My mother and father didn't have a clue what I was watching. They didn't know who George Garland was. They didn't know what this show was going to be. I did because I saw the tomorrow episode with Tom Snyder. Now what was coming up ahead for this show, I am amazed that today we are close now to almost 50 years of Saturday Night Live. Did you ever envision that it would go on this long? I don't think there's Lorne or I had any sense. That this would last on and on and on because it was aimed at a younger audience and would they grow up with us and they did. And it's proven to be a show that has, in my mind, a lifespan that will probably chariot well beyond my lifespan or Lawrence. I think about how young people watch Saturday Night Live and they don't necessarily watch it live. They watch the clips from YouTube NBC in particular. Really let Lorne and I do the show. Up next on the show, we've got more with dick ever saw the straight ahead on the Bloomberg business of sports. Michael Barr, you can follow me on Twitter at big bar sports. I'm on Twitter at scarlet fu. And I'm Damien Santa, so I'm on Twitter at D, Sasha. And don't forget to catch our podcast that's Monday's Wednesdays and Thursdays on all your podcast platforms and right here on Bloomberg business of sports Bloomberg radio. Market coverage circle is spraying together developers and entrepreneurs from around the world. Join us in San Francisco for

Bloomberg FedEx Bloomberg radio Jonathan Chappelle CMC markets Olympics Joe Weber Ron DeSantis President Biden karine Jean Pierre Raj subramanium Federal Reserve Brian shook Charlie pellet Bloomberg world headquarters Michael hewson Michael Houston Lindsey PX Stifel Nicholas
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:23 min | 3 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Was welcome on YouTube no matter how extreme their views. But as the social giant became one of the most visited sites on the Internet, the company has consistently struggled to adjust. In some staff say they kept a double standard when it came to moderating extremism on the platform. It's interesting. I feel like we've heard this before with social media platforms in general. Well, this is the subject, though, of Mark Bergen, a Bloomberg, his upcoming book, the title, like, comment, subscribe inside YouTube's chaotic rise to world domination. An excerpt of the book is featured in this week's edition of Bloomberg businessweek magazine, Mark and business week editor Joe Weber spoke with me and Bloomberg senior markets reporter Katie greifeld. Jill started by asking why YouTube has worked to combat extremism, but not all types of extremism. It does get a bit like very fascinating dilemma. It's not just YouTube is dealt with it, I think, more than any of the company you just given its size, but it's something that's affected all major Internet platforms. And partly, I think there's a couple of different reasons. One is just the nature of the way the government's work, as it has been a lot more in western governments, pressure and willingness to sort of tackle Islamist extremism. And we saw like there are sort of tech collaborations that in mind there are repository there. Sorry, there are lists of known terrorists that YouTube uses and they can ban these certain figures. There is YouTube is a gigantic digital advertising is very responsive to its advertisers part of the book's opening scene is this is June in 2017 when they're in the middle of this major boycott over video some of which were like ISIS, allies that household brands were sponsoring. And these advertisers pressure on YouTube and how to force them to act in a way that they hadn't before. And then once they were able to clean up the system to make it a metabolism, these ads might warrant sponsoring videos that marketers wanted, there was less pressure for them. So I think there's a combination where it was sort of very easy politically addressing white nationalism is a more complicated, especially in the U.S. contemporary politics problem in this thread and there was less pressure from regulators and advertisers at the time. How do people and machines do this? There's a passage from your book and indeed from this excerpt in the magazine that includes the phrase use your judgment when talking content moderation. That's not a necessarily a prescript rule, right? Yeah, I thought that was so YouTube is really, it's hard for us to appreciate, but this was in 2006. I started towards 5006 as I think when this is they ran like some of their first sort of policy frameworks. And this was really before content moderation existed at the size and the Internet and YouTube had a problem that Facebook and other sort of tech space didn't have, which is they have video and they have moving images and they have complications and all that brings. And so this was a team that was pretty scrappy and sort of inventing this on the fly like a lot of them are pretty well versed and they're like weird dark recesses of the Internet. And so use your judgment was there were at the time a lot more of a human sort of you can call it editorial perspective and judgment about where the lines withdrawal and this was sort of viewed YouTube as this was a community of users and video broadcasters and they sort of wanted videos that fit within the boundaries of the community. Fast forward a few years that they've become this global platform and moderation is this very complicated process. So it's a complicated process where the company increasingly wants to rely on machine learning systems as much as possible in part because machine learning systems can just process so much video, better, faster than humans. They're impartial and they're less Google can not be accused of bias more if they can point and say, like, listen, we have a we have a policy rule book and we have machine systems. We don't have humans with biases making us decisions. One of the things that YouTube often says is that dealing with the threat of Islamist extremism on the platform proved easier because multiple governments agree on those standards, right? Whereas with white nationalism, there isn't that same unanimity. So I'm wondering, where does that leave things? Because it means that there's more reliance on AI and the code, ultimately, the code is what runs everything here. Does that really leave things as society continues to have these massive flare ups? Yeah, I mean, I think that they've made some significant changes and partially because of some tragedies that they witnessed. The Chrysler exceeding we talked about in the story, even the most recently buffalo shooting, like every time there is an incident like this that is like the often sometimes these events are like live statement live stream on YouTube. So they have taken action because of pressure from their employee base and from politicians and from some of these big moments. That was Bloomberg technology reporter Mark Berg in his book, like, comment, subscribe inside YouTube's chaotic rise to world domination. It hits shelves on September 6th. You're listening to Bloomberg business week. Up next, we take a look at the world of cloud servicing and how companies are transforming the way they store their data. We're all

YouTube Mark Bergen businessweek magazine Joe Weber Katie greifeld Bloomberg Jill Mark government U.S. Facebook Google Mark Berg Chrysler buffalo
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With Bloomberg business week editor Joe Weber. It's the cover story of the upcoming issue, Bloomberg, business week. We did afternoons at two eastern. These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar. Those Apple numbers continuing to come in. On Bloomberg radio, the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com. The White House is blasting the Indiana's new abortion ban in a statement press secretary karine Jean Pierre called it another radical step by Republican legislators to take away women's reproductive rights. The largest wildfire in California so far this year is now 30% contained. The McKinney fire near the Oregon border has destroyed nearly 90 houses in the calamus national forest. Hundreds of people who were stranded in Death Valley are finally able to go home about a thousand people were stranded in the park when floodwaters bury their cars in mud and debris. A cord is granting the family of the late Naomi Judd and order to have her death record sealed. Judd's husband, Larry Strickland, and her two daughters wynonna and Ashley wrote in the filing that the records would cause emotional distress if released. I'm Trey Thomas. The great season of mets baseball continued on Saturday. They take not one, but two games over their rival, the Atlanta Braves, they get an 8 5 win in game one and they cap it with a Max Scherzer dominant performance in game two. Tied his season high with 11 strikeouts over 7 innings. Final score was 6 to two, Francisco Lindor had three hits and three RBIs and Pete Alonso had RBIs in both games. So the mets moved to 30 games over 500 on the year and they pad their lead over the braves in the national league east. Not so good for the Yankees though. They're struggles continue. They stop in St. Louis lose to the cardinals one zero and they had just two hits in the game. They are now on a four game losing streak. That is their longest of the season. The pro football Hall of Fame inducting 8 people in the class of 2022 on Saturday, 6 players. Leroy butler cliff branch, Tony bissell, Bryant young, Richard Seymour and Sam mills, they were joined by coach dick vermeil and the first official to enter the Hall of Fame, art mcnally, giants rookie Marcus McAfee, turns out his ACL is torn and he is now on the season ending injured reserve list, terrible news for the Giants. Their preseason schedule starts later this week. Kyler Murray back on the field after his bout with COVID-19, he was out for 5 days and the PGA Tour will not allow suspended Liv golfers on site at the FedEx playoffs next week. That's your Bloomberg sports update. I'm Dan gutowski. Your listening to balance and power with David Westin on Bloomberg radio. The decades long

Bloomberg Joe Weber karine Jean Pierre calamus national forest Naomi Judd Larry Strickland Trey Thomas braves Francisco Lindor mets Pete Alonso Death Valley wynonna Max Scherzer White House Judd Indiana Apple Oregon
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:34 min | 7 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business week profitable Let's dig into it with Bloomberg business week editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg business week We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in On Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com This is balance of power on Bloomberg television radio I'm David Weston as we all know the fed is due out in about an hour and 34 minutes from right now with this fed decision The latest decision on rates in them to be followed by a news conference And so we're going to take a look at the markets in advance of that return to critic Gupta So one of the markets doing Gritty Well the markets are down David and this is really strange because traditionally at least going back in the last year every time you've had a fed meeting you've had this kind of risk off ramp up and then the day of the fed meeting you've seems a little bit of green on the screen This time around you see the exact opposite You've had two days of gains and then some positive or I should say two days of gains and then some moves down this morning as well And really when it comes down to what they're going to say about their dual mandate for our TV audience you're seeing a graphic on your screen about the unemployment versus the inflation You can see that they've really done that but a lot of these comments today are going to be about the jobs market How tight is too tight at a time when you're actually seeing a lot of concern about the jobs market I believe the statistic out is almost too open jobs for every one unemployed person So it's really interesting to see that this tightness of the labor market that was really praised pre-pandemic now really called extreme and considered something to address data At the same time having the markets priced in an awful lot of tightening at this point is there a chance that actually they could react with some favor depending on what Jay Powell says what the fed says I believe they call this jawbone How much has the bed really prepared the markets for what they're going to hear today 50 basis points is what's priced into the market for the next I believe three meetings for sure 75 basis points is where it really gets tricky because you do start to see these market calls for 75 basis points at some point you even saw some market pricing for that And the Federal Reserve has already shown even with the last interest rate hike that it happened 25 basis points in the last meeting you really saw the market far far ahead of it the fed had to do some catching up So if the market is pricing in 75 basis points will the fed catch up and that's really what we're waiting to see any comments in that direction or if they completely kind of throw that out of the window that 50 is as big as they're going to go Okay thank you so much for setting it up for us That's critic Gupta on the markets ahead.

Bloomberg Joe Weber David Weston fed Gupta Jay Powell Apple David
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:30 min | 8 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dot EDU Carol master This stock has been on a tear since early May Tim's Geneva So take us into the economic impact of this along with reporters and editors who helped make your business week profitable Let's dig into it with Bloomberg business week editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg business week We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in On Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com This is a special report the Russian invasion of Ukraine The president of Ukraine is pleading with President Biden for missiles and airplanes speaking to Fox News president zelensky said Biden should not bother sending helmets but he should send missiles and airplanes He went on to complain that he wants Ukraine to join NATO but it won't admit us U.S. State Department spokesperson Ned price is emphasizing Ukraine's autonomy and said the U.S.'s primary focus in Eastern Europe is supporting the country and looking toward a diplomatic end to the conflict We are supporting and supportive of diplomacy but it needs to be the Ukrainians who are in the lead here We're not going to make decisions for Ukraine It is going to be up to president zelensky A Ukrainian official says talks between his country and Russia led to a prisoner swap agreement The talks between delegations from the two countries took place in Istanbul turkey This week this has been a special report I'm Brian shook And I'm Charlie pellet At Bloomberg world headquarters It was an up Friday a choppy session equities advanced in the final minutes of trading treasury old surged as a solid jobs report boosted the fed's case to use aggressive rate hikes to tackle inflation Payroll slightly missed expectations the march on employment rate fell to 3.6% Sarah house's senior economist at Wells Fargo securities I think this is a still solid report So yes it was a little bit lighter than expectations but only by roughly 60,000 versus the Bloomberg consensus So that's not a big miss in the grand scheme of the post COVID recovery And I think importantly it showed that we still have pretty decent momentum Sarah House of Wells Fargo securities so just how much can the jobs picture improve Rick rader is chief investment officer at BlackRock financial management So to bring people back in it's going to be hard to see 500,000 jobs Heading to any of these subsequent months is there's 11 million jobs opening job openings It's that you've got a labor market There's just on the people that can come back in So you're going to start to see these numbers decline a little bit but the unemployment rate I think is going to continue to decline So it's a white hot labor market There's no other way to describe it BlackRock's Rick reader As for the market outlook Anastasia amoroso is chief investment strategist at I capital This has been a very strong rebound in the markets but if you look at all the headwinds that are building I'm not saying they're imminent but I think we're in this environment where it's just not easy anymore You don't have an easy fed And to propel the markets and we have to contend with this growth slowdown And a station chamois so of high capital S&P today up 15 up three tenths of 1% the Dow up 139 up four tenths NASDAQ up 41 up three tenths Global used 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm Charlie palette This is Bloomberg.

Ukraine Bloomberg Joe Weber Wells Fargo securities President Biden zelensky U.S. State Department Ned price president zelensky Brian shook Charlie pellet Bloomberg world headquarters Sarah house Geneva Sarah House Biden Fox News Rick rader Tim
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:17 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dig into it with Bloomberg business week editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg businessweek We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in On Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com This is a special report the Russian invasion of Ukraine Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky is rolling out a plan to help people displace by the Russian invasion in a video message on Friday zelensky said the Ukrainian government is developing a program to help those fleeing or those who have lost their homes in the war The program will also help them find jobs Zelensky said at a minimum they will receive reimbursement of their utility expenses The sister of an Idaho man killed in Ukraine says Jimmy hill decided to stay there despite the war because he was staying with his sick partner His sister Kaitlyn hill told CNN that his partner has multiple sclerosis and he was not going to leave her side The 68 year old was shot by a Russian sniper while standing in a food line earlier this week In China is still not showing its cards on whether to align with Russia during the ongoing invasion with Ukraine I'm Jim Forbes Now this Bloomberg sports update south region 9th seed TCU got its first NCAA tournament victory in 35 years easily defeating the 8th seed seton hall 69 to 42 the pirates really were never in this one TCU led 33 21 and a half time and began the second half of the 15 to four run the pirates set a record for the fewest amount of points scored in a tournament game with 42 the previous low was 52 Not that much in the way of a surprise on the second day of the tournament on Friday in the south region top seed Arizona advances to the second round along with Houston Illinois Villanova and Ohio State from the east region Purdue and Texas on to the second round Saint Peter's takes on Murray state at 7 45 tonight in their second round east region game From the Midwest region Wisconsin Iowa state Miami and auburn all events Notre-Dame after defeating Rutgers in the play in game on Wednesday defeated Alabama in the west region 78 64 also advancing out of the west Texas tech duke and Michigan state In the NBA the nets defeated the Portland Trail Blazers one 28 one 23 at the Barclays center Kevin Durant scored 38 points Seth curry returned to the lineup with 7 three pointers in his best game has a net as the nets rallied to beat the Trail Blazers curry finished with 27 points his most since coming from Philadelphia last month in the James Harden Ben Simmons deal Andre Drummond and Bruce Brown each added 17 for the nets Meanwhile if the garden Julius Randle scored 18 points and grabbed 17 rebounds RJ Barrett had 18 points and the next outlasted Washington 100 to 97 The Yankees opened their preseason schedule losing to the Pittsburgh pirates four to three earlier in the day the Yankees traded first baseman Luke Voight to the San Diego Padres for a pitching prospect but the Bloomberg sports update I'm Tom Rogers I'm Barry Rudolph your listening to masters and business on Bloomberg radio My extra special guest this week is Darren Palmer He has been the general manager of battery EVs at Ford helping to oversee Ford's $50 billion shift to electrification So let's talk a little bit about batteries You became general manager of battery vs in 2021 tell us about the thinking behind that new job and where it's going Yeah so that job I used to be the product development director for team medicine So my role was in the design and development of the new cars leading teams obviously a large team is involved in that But in 20 later on they decided they would like me to take the vehicles to market because there's so many elements there that's the.

Bloomberg Ukraine Joe Weber Vladimir zelensky zelensky Ukrainian government Zelensky Jimmy hill Kaitlyn hill Jim Forbes TCU seton hall east region Purdue nets Portland Trail Blazers west Texas tech Seth curry multiple sclerosis Idaho Ben Simmons
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Terms of explaining the fed what they do and the implications but I do wonder Christina you know so many people have come on air and said how does the fed conduct monetary policy when what's going on with supply chain disruptions and a lot of the inflationary pressures are way beyond their control Well I mean that's what's been raised in a lot of countries and one of the stories within the section also was about Brazil where they've been hiking now They've done more than 800 basis points of hikes And more coming and inflation is taking a while to come down But I think this idea of anchoring expectations is really important and it's important everywhere in Latin American countries It's tougher because people are used to it But this paper that Matt mentioned about Wilcox it was really interesting to me because it brought up the idea that in the U.S. there's people who have never experienced inflation So they don't have this kind of knee jerk responses like that that they had in the 70s where people had been actually for several decades experienced pretty high periods of high prices So I think I would say the American consumer is I said flustered But not panicked Necessarily And if you look up projections you see people seeing prices moderating That's just super important to what the feathers Are you saying transitory I didn't hear that character Nobody wants to be in that camp now I'll say it And that's this week's Bloomberg businessweek editors roundtable are thanks to business we get it or Joe Weber along the economics editor of the magazine Christina Lindblad and Bloomberg news fed reporter Matthew boesler Still ahead on Bloomberg businessweek with energy prices soaring firms in the renewable space are getting a big lift The question is are they ready to fill the void of traditional fossil fuels right now That conversation with SunPower's CEO on the other side This is Bloomberg Niall's You could say big when you bundle your home and auto with progressive But when we just come out and say it it feels like it falls a bit flat so we're gonna sing it We're singing words.

Christina fed Bloomberg businessweek Wilcox Brazil Joe Weber Christina Lindblad Bloomberg news fed Matthew boesler Matt U.S. Bloomberg Niall SunPower
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You guys do so well and I think about you know in terms of explaining the fed what they do and the implications but I do wonder Christina you know so many people have come on air and said how does the fed conduct monetary policy when what's going on with supply chain disruptions and a lot of the inflationary pressures are way beyond their control Well I mean that's what's been raised in a lot of countries and one of the stories within the section also was about Brazil where they've been hiking now They've done more than 800 basis points of hikes And more coming and inflation is taking a while to come down But I think this idea of anchoring expectations is really important and it's important everywhere in Latin American countries It's tougher because people are used to it But this paper that Matt mentioned about Wilcox did it was really interesting to me because it brought up the idea that in the U.S. there's people who have never experienced inflation so they don't have this kind of knee jerk responses like that that they had in the 70s where people had been actually for several decades experienced pretty high periods of high prices So I think I would say the American consumer is I said flustered But not panicked Necessarily And if you look up projections you see people seeing prices moderating That's just super important to what the feds Are you saying transitory I didn't hear that character Nobody wants to be in that camp now I'll say it And that's this week's Bloomberg businessweek editors roundtable are thanks to business we get it or Joe Weber along the economics editor of the magazine Christina Lindblad and Bloomberg news fed reporter Matthew boesler Still had on Bloomberg businessweek with energy prices soaring firms in the renewable space are getting a big lift The question is are they ready to fill the void of traditional fossil fuels right now That conversation with SunPower's CEO on the other side This is Bloomberg In a world that's a little simpler comes the tale of vel tema fungicide swift simple and secure It's a corn.

Christina fed Wilcox Brazil Bloomberg businessweek Joe Weber Christina Lindblad Matt Bloomberg news fed Matthew boesler U.S. SunPower Bloomberg
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You guys do so well and I think about you know in terms of explaining the fed what they do and the implications But I do wonder Christina you know so many people have come on air and said how does the fed contact monetary policy when what's going on with supply chain disruptions and a lot of the inflationary pressures are way beyond their control Well I mean that's what's been raised in a lot of countries and one of the stories within the section also was about Brazil where they've been hiking now They've done more than 800 basis points of hikes And the more coming and inflation is taking a while to come down But I think this idea of anchoring expectations is really important and it's important everywhere in Latin American countries It's tougher because people are used to it But this paper that Matt mentioned but Wilcox did it was really interesting to me because it brought up the idea that in the U.S. there's people who have never experienced inflation So they don't have this kind of knee jerk responses like that that they had in the 70s where people had been actually for several decades experienced pretty high periods of high prices So I think I would say the American consumer is I said flustered But not panicked Necessarily And if you look up projections you see people seeing prices moderating That's just super important to what the feds Are you saying transitory I didn't hear that Carol Nobody wants to be in that camp now I'll say it And that's this week's Bloomberg businessweek editors roundtable are thanks to business we get it or Joe Weber along the economics editor of the magazine Christina Lindblad and Bloomberg news fed reporter Matthew boesler Still ahead on Bloomberg businessweek with energy prices soaring firms in the renewable space are getting a big lift The question is are they ready to fill the void of traditional fossil fuels right now That conversation with SunPower's CEO on the other side.

Christina fed Wilcox Brazil Carol Nobody Bloomberg businessweek Matt Joe Weber Christina Lindblad Bloomberg news fed U.S. Matthew boesler SunPower
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business week editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg business week We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in on Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com This is balance power on Bloomberg television and radio I'm David Weston We've been watching the march closely all week long because of what's going on in Ukraine for a reaction Today we've got stocks up We've got commodities down so to explain it all to us we welcome Bloomberg's Abigail Doolittle So what is happening It seems that we have a pretty strong relief rally in our hands That S&P 500 right now up 2.6% the NASDAQ up even more up 3% The NASDAQ excuse me the S&P 500 headed to its best day since June of 2020 So that's pretty strong buying and similar to what we were talking about yesterday after the announcement of the ban on importing Russian oil It seemed to sell the news moment because into that oil had gone up you know had really been going bonkers I think over in 8 days or so it had been up 33% but after the soft headline up more than 18% Right now we have oil down 6.3% We have wheat down 6% We have copper down so that commodity complex coming in providing some relief for stocks on the idea that maybe inflation it won't be so bad but we have CPI tomorrow We do get CPI exactly That will be interesting discussion on it So one day it is not a trend make It's not The ten year is up over 1.9 So it doesn't look like people are too anxious at the moment Well I'm so glad that you're always keeping an eye on bonds because we've been talking about this over the last couple of days even while stocks yesterday hugely volatile up and down more than 1% the day before sell off as commodities were surging for the most part Bonds the whole time selling off So that tells you that some investors not all that worried and that they weren't really focused on the headlines or sadly that humanitarian crisis in Ukraine they're thinking about next week The fed what will the fed do right now traders thinking that at least one hike is going to happen What if there's a surprise of two Yeah that was a real possibility a month ago It was two weeks ago It was a real possibility And the CPI number tomorrow was going to be tied to fed in all likelihood Definitely That's number will be hugely watched It could be really a game changer for markets Thank you so much for having to do it for that report on the markets coming up Sarah.

Bloomberg Joe Weber David Weston Abigail Doolittle Ukraine S Apple fed Sarah
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:42 min | 10 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Council This is a Bloomberg money minute like vacuuming carpet cutting the grasses monotonous and not very rewarding work and like vacuuming mowing the lawn is caught the eye of some robotics entrepreneurs Bloomberg reported Sarah McBride says building an autonomous lawn mower isn't as simple as making a Roomba that cuts grass We're all good in the path of the lawnmower It can rain and outdoor lawn mower has to adapt to all kinds of things And while there are some autonomous mowers available for home use start talking at around a $1000 Some of them are pretty finicky San Francisco based electric sheep robotics is targeting the commercial market with a device that enables existing mowers to operate autonomously at a time when human operators can be hard to find If charging by the month in line with what it would cost to hire human laborers to mold the lot McBride says not only do the robots help ease the labor crunch they free up human workers for more challenging tasks Larry kofsky Bloomberg radio and JIT makes innovation happen It also makes entrepreneurs like Anya o'dwyer founder of innovate a tech driven civil engineering and construction management firm Anya says and JIT is defining the future Extremely important as a hub of disciplines all in one space with all of these brilliant minds and GIS raw is huge when it comes to defining the future and power from an interdisciplinary point of view They have it all there whether it's the innovation hub the maker space and it is already creating bash collaboration between the disciplines and you have civil engineers speaking to programmers speaking to electrical engineers And together they're creating advancements that we wouldn't have been able to do without those three minds coming together and solving a problem as one rather than solving it in isolation And JIT New Jersey institute of technology learn more at nj IT dot EDU Carol master This stock has been on a tear since early May Tim Steve So take us into the economic impact of this Along with reporters and editors who helped make your business week profitable Let's dig into it with Bloomberg businessweek editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg business week We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in on Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com What is dedication My daughter is biological and my son is adopted I love them both so much from the morning when you wake up to putting them to bed at night and every moment in.

Sarah McBride Bloomberg electric sheep robotics Larry kofsky Anya o McBride dwyer JIT JIT New Jersey institute of te Anya San Francisco Tim Steve Joe Weber Apple
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 11 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Strategy senior editor at Bloomberg business week She joined us along with business week editor Joe Weber The way that this whole project starts is they take this massive universe of companies that they cover more than 2000 And basically start running it through their spreadsheets and it's just like this gigantic filtering effect to come up with these 50 And really excited about them because it's not they're not hard calls Buy and sell recommendations That's not what we're going to get from Bloomberg intelligence I think it's more interesting and perhaps nuanced than that because we think of them as just companies to watch Some of them have positive sentiment some of them have negative sentiment but they're just ones that we think in the year ahead are going to be really really really interesting companies Yeah so Rebecca come on in here and talk a little bit about some of these companies here I mean the one that I want the one that jumped out at me was Airbnb because I feel like I've been watching Airbnb for years at this point after it's huge IPO and the way the company was able to recover during the pandemic after laying off so many people How did Airbnb make the cut Yeah I think Airbnb will be quite familiar to a lot of us who wanted to travel during the pandemic but didn't feel safe at a hotel for example So bookings have been up and interestingly they've done really really well with long stays So people staying for weeks on end Now the bunker intelligence analysts feel like Airbnb sets itself apart from rivals with its brand advantage So it's very recognizable and it doesn't even really need to spend that much in marketing So that's where Uber intelligence has investors should be watching this company Okay so another one that I love And by the way can we just all say when it's like whatever the weather was it was at 19 It feels like it's like single digits Like I'm ready for travel.

Airbnb Bloomberg business Joe Weber Bloomberg Rebecca IPO
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol met here This stock has been on a tear since early May Tim's done event So take us into the economic impact of this Along with reporters and editors who helped make your business week profitable Let's dig into it with lumber business we get editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg businessweek Wait afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in on Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com And JIT makes the workforce of the future and Greg's solder a member of MJ IT's board of overseers and president of engineering firm WGA says MJ IT graduates have the in demand skills that drive today's tech powered workplace Our world is moving to a place of connecting the physical with the digital in the field of engineering and infrastructure There's not a thing that we do that's not being changed by technology We've gone from two dimensional renderings to immersive augmented and virtual reality solution sets used to be solved one at a time Now we can run nearly an endless alternative analysis and optimize the output and how we construct that future from autonomous equipment to three and 4D printing And JIT students graduate with that critical understanding of the cyber physical world and how we move between them But with that all important grounding in applied stem principles New Jersey institute of technology Learn more at MJ IT dot EDU Broadcasting 24 hours a day Bloomberg dot com and the Bloomberg business act This is Bloomberg radio Now a global news update A new worldwide scare concerning.

Bloomberg Joe Weber Carol JIT WGA Tim Greg Apple Jersey institute of technology
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Marine biologist and stem teacher talking about a deep sea dive she'll never forget It's funny When I was a kid I was afraid of the ocean and there I was two miles below the surface But as a scientist you prepare for that Using our training and a little creativity we fix the sub and finish our experiments The dive was just too important Every diet gives us glimpses at things few people ever get to see Lowy creatures fiery undersea volcanos When we got back to the surface I kissed the ground and called my mom of course But you know what I wouldn't trade that diet for anything Doctor figueroa uses her passion for stem to discover new things and make the world a better place She can stem so can you Check out she can stem for more stories and inspiration A message from the ad council Carol masse here This stock has been on a tear since early May So take us into the economic impact of this Along with reporters and editors who help make your business week profitable Let's dig into it with Bloomberg business week editor Joe Weber It's the cover story of the upcoming issue Bloomberg businessweek We did afternoons at two eastern These are retailers that have been on everybody's radar Those Apple numbers continuing to come in on Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com This is the story of a very special woman just a few knew about her superpowers in a matter of seconds she turned herself into a great mathematician She masqueraded as a regular person at work but as a superhero at home Everyone knows her Gabriella I still call her mom Your hero needs you now and.

Doctor figueroa Bloomberg Carol masse Lowy Joe Weber Apple Gabriella
Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

Past Gas

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

"To pass gas. I'm your host known sites trying to always by james pump. Frey hello there. Everyone it is i james and not an pasta and joe weber. What's up wink wink nation. I'm here for you. And i am fired up and as as the boys have been Saying we are talking about ninety supercars today on this episode. We were talking before we started. Recording i think like we're a little bias as far as the nineties. Being the greatest time for supercars that's like saying like the nineties is the best time for cartoons. Yes because that's when joe and i grew up at least win win. Did you grow knowing how old a year you're six years six years old Yeah i mean born in ninety three so like my k- yeah you're the first time when you realize supercars where thing was in the nineties. I sure i heard third eye blind on the radio is what you're saying about three eleven. Her three eleven to okay got it. So like like the diablo's the labor gyn machines. Those are big big parts of your formative years for sure. Yeah now supercars are a lot more prevalent. Yeah i feel like within the last ten years like it's blew up again. But i feel like the nineties really set the president the president the president and showed what was possible and kind of like blew the whole supercar thing out of the water because we had just come out of the malays era and people were like. I want something fast and flashy and purple and green are really cool right now so. Let's just make cars like debt for sure. And i think you know from the sixties to the eighties like cars. That would be considered supercars today. I mean there are just called sports cars you know. Yeah 'cause they were. They were really fast. Yeah not the ninety s great supercars because it literally defined that genre. That's when he started seeing like dance materials carbon fiber the. That's it that's it really for me only carbon-fiber that's the only qualifier. I think we should just get right into it. Yeah let's go. let's go so so. How did we get to the nineties. Being the definitive era of supercars the term supercar itself isn't really official it. Roughly describes a high performance. Luxury or exotic. Sports car generally a two seater with at least an eight cylinder engine. Although that'll probably change here the trend towards these vehicles started as far back as the sixties when detroit started shoehorning big block. v8's into sedans and turning the results loose on the american public and of course we know those as muscle cars across the atlantic european manufacturers were also busy refining. their lightweight. sports cars what. These smaller cars lacked in displacement and seating they made up for easily in handling and driveability as a sixties turned into the seventies. Those massive motors became liabilities with the looming gas crisis and clean air act of nineteen seventy then the second oil crisis in nineteen seventy nine. The industry yet again. An american cars continued to get smaller and more efficient manufacturers in the. Us knew they had to do something. So they're carburetors. Were replaced by fuel injection and distributors being swapped for coil packs. But we weren't there yet after all the one thousand nine hundred. Five corvette made her on the same horse. Power as a well-equipped twenty twenty. Camry the so-called malays era when autos reached a low point of reliability and performance was in full swing. New emissions equipment was starving the motors of their power. And even in the instances where these new cars had style. The eighty-five corvette being a prime example was under. The hood didn't match up that being said the eighties were still an impressive decade for supercars. Just not in the united states. American consumers still reeling from the death of the muscle car scene started looking abroad for inspiring performance. Every decade is a reaction to the one that came before in the eighties shoved back. The seventies with an absolute explosion of high performance supercars a handful of imported performance. Cars like the lamborghini coon tash for testarossa and the lotus esprit were blowing enthusiasts minds and with the stock market. Looking like pikes peak. There were selling faster than cocaine in wall. Street bathrooms by the nineties. A lot of that pesky emissions tech that was thrust on manufacturers was starting to get smarter as we're onboard computers and fuel injectors the progressing technology let engines breathe better and pass their gases in ways. That didn't starve the performance. Nice if you if you like stories like this check out. Our podcast passed gas. Celebrities enrich folks. Were having a hard time justifying spending big bucks on stiff bucket seats and jarring track suspension setups and manufacturers took the hint burr example lamborghini spent the late eighties upgrading. The coon tauch into the diablo. The coon tosh is often derided for having a borderline unusable only tight interior that overheats quickly so they lengthened diablo to improve the comfort ability in the cabin. The word is this comfort. Yeah right after ability never heard of that. Is that a diablo right there. This is a blow right here and it's purple too. Yeah that's the blister. That i had

James Pump Joe Weber Frey James JOE Detroit Motors United States Esprit Lotus Lamborghini
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And and it's really interesting to see that evolution because we've we've talked about it a lot like you said with the social media companies. A lot of conservatives are concerned about too much. Cutting off of people who have accounts. A lot of people on the Democratic side are concerned about the hosting of illegal activity and people who are inciting violence and And the balance is really what is it? Is an issue here. So looking Valley companies have a reputation for being really mission driven, and I think a lot of employees have had a personal reckoning over the last few years. Is it ethical to work for Facebook? Is it ethical to work for Google if they're working with the Defense Department on No, uh Putting people in cases of the border. There have been a lot of of new debates about what it means. If you work for a company that has certain requires certain vendors, certain contracts and host certain voices. And so we have seen employees the almost the more forceful voice against their leaders and even the government because the government can't can't really Be clear about what they want everyone days in check power, but they don't necessarily have a clear direction of what would be a good resolution. Whereas employees they're mostly they're mostly liberal. They're well educated, and they're saying Hey, I don't want to work for a place that support something like this, and we saw an open water from Twitter employees to Jack Dorsey asking for bigger ban on Trump. They had previously only been home for 12 hours, and now that he's permanently banned And we've seen we've seen Amazon employees right to their employer about parlor. It's saying, Why're we hosting parlor? We should We should take them off. And I think that that power should not be underestimated because of how hard it is to recruit Silicon Valley. The best talent Well and what's to stop. I don't know. Like I don't know whether there's oranges to oranges, apples to apples, but another company from saying, I don't like. Well, I guess companies do that, right if they don't wanna work with the supplier, or if they don't want to work with something, they have that opportunity to do it. Sarah, I'm just trying to Understand the differences or not differences from another company. Kind of banning something. You know whether they don't sell to a certain customer. They do that all the time, right? Well, sometimes who? Okay a few years ago Cos We're happy to just work within the bounds of the law. There are sanctions against Iran. We won't sell to around. But that was like you know is it's illegal. We won't do it. And that was how Facebook and Twitter thought about content a lot in the early days, you know, remove his little as possible. All right, Tim. Safe to say, social media really rethinking some of its playbook. We saw that this week, right? No, no doubt about it. Yeah, That's right. I mean, I've really surprised to see big moves from the biggest tech companies essentially deep platform in the President. Really remarkable, All right, that was Bloomberg News technology reporter Sour friar. She joined us along with Bloomberg Business Week. Editor Joe Weber still to come as social media banned the president, the U. S. Has voted to impeach him for historic second time We'll hear from a top aide to former Democratic Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and the author of Kill Switch, The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy. Timely Book. You're Listening to Bloomberg Business Week..

Facebook Twitter Bloomberg Jack Dorsey Sour friar Joe Weber President Bloomberg News Google Defense Department Silicon Valley Harry Reid Democratic Majority Tim Nevada Iran Sarah Trump Amazon
The Murder of Racing Legend Mickey Thompson

Past Gas

06:03 min | 2 years ago

The Murder of Racing Legend Mickey Thompson

"It's Mickey Thompson Time. I'm. Pumped. Islam. Dive welcome back to pass gas everybody I am your host Nolan Sykes as always joined by the other host of the show. Got James pump free mustard on a beat. That's right. Going through your new, your new catchphrases definitely yours no one else's and puck that big MAC truck inside my little garage. and Joe Weber flared up also wink wink nation and what's. Keep it use. Keep it. You bitches juice keep it juice. Joe You had to postpone good staff. Make. Good. Gory non-appropriation Mega. Like. That's your thing. Okay. That's the alike. A love that. May encounter that how that? All right. So what are you? What are you guys? Familiar, rather you guys with Mickey? Thompson? I know that he makes the tires the drag boys. Does he make? Did they make off road tires? and then I, know that he had a gold mine. Well really actual, Gold Mine at some point. Yeah I don't know about that because wasn't he the one who went and like. got smokey eunuch in a gold mining. Maybe. I remember smokey had one but that sounds vaguely familiar thompson who who like got smokey into the into the game I. Believe I haven't heard of any of this. So I'm excited to dive into this and I. Always feel. That way. But this one is like, I should have known about this dude there are no google results for Mickey, Thompson Gold Mine but that you know maybe it's true we have to go find Mickey Thompson's gold. City slickers to. All right So let's just get into it. Mickey Thompson was born Marian Lee. Thompson Junior on December seventh nineteen twenty eight in San Fernando California. He went by Mickey and not marrying because in his own words quote a girl's name would mean even more fighting. I do like the name Marian it's pretty cool. Yeah. Like that, he said even more five eighty. We'll see. Yeah, he. Likes to get into it the San Fernando Valley home to Ventura. Boulevard and Mulholland. Drive was a fitting birthplace for a kid who would become defined by hot rods and dragsters. The valley is one of the original cradles of Car Culture I. I will say it still is today it's very like I went to see us you northridge up there in the valley and it is a muscle car town everyone drives either a charger challenger Camaro or Mustang it's pretty cool. I haven't met many people from the Valley with a valley accent most liked. Girls and Valley boys that I've talked to are from like Hollywood and Venice specifically. Venice. But never really never never from the valley there's I. Mean there's a lot of people. See us you northridge is a commuter school. There's a lot of people from that area that go there and I never really heard that typical valley you know yeah, I think it's kind of a pass a kind of thing. Now it was big at a time I. Don't think it's as big anymore you gotta meet some people from Venice. It's very much alive while not Nevada is on saying I think that the the new thing is. Not New but like the the big vocal fad was the vocal fry God. Yeah. Dashing vocal. John. We Sold our show got. Because we have less views per episode than Donut does perfect. Indirectly, Kris Kardashian directly sourced us. Did you see that onion article that was like the show ends when I wanted to? Rise into, the ocean. I will say Kendall Jenner Architecture Digest open-door episode is pretty cool. She's got a cool house and that's all say on that that rich girl has a cool how it's not just a cool house James. There's a difference like if you watch those videos, there's like real people houses and then there's there's rich people houses with no taste and then as rich. People houses with actual taste and define style, Kendall Jenner, and then Mark Mark. Ronson Mark Ronson Mark Ronson is the best very cool. House is not annoying at all I would like to hang out with Mark Ronson I. Don't know much about a hundred percent want to go to that house hundred percent did anyway that's that's our only Hollywood digression for the episode. California's on fire right now guys so much so that I got gotta check engine light yesterday because I was putting on the new intake, my car, and then like I stopped because I needed another tool and then I put my older back together. But I didn't tighten the thing for the math enough and I just sucked in a bunch of ashish and it like Oh. No. Covered my maths I have a math cleaner if you need it. I had a check engine light a few days ago. Was not fire related. It just turns out that when my coil packs was bad and I had to change it out and not fixed it. So I'm pretty happy. It didn't take long to discover his love for both driving and working on cars and age. Twelve Mickey and his dad entered a soapbox Derby Mickey's first race also became his first car modding experience

Mickey Thompson Mark Ronson Mark Ronson Thompson Gold Mine Venice Mark Ronson Gold Mine San Fernando Valley Nolan Sykes James Marian Lee Kendall Jenner Architecture Di Joe You Joe Weber Smokey Hollywood Kendall Jenner San Fernando California Kris Kardashian California Northridge
How Japanese Street Racers Created the Best Car Magazine Ever

Past Gas

03:33 min | 2 years ago

How Japanese Street Racers Created the Best Car Magazine Ever

"Kaku gasoline. Kogyo Gossioux is about cars is what? I thought did for a split second. I was like, oh. My God James is about to do the rest of that theme song in Japanese. Oh. Yeah. I just speak I speak Japanese. I see. Just. Everything you speak every language perfectly. So welcome back to pass gas everyone I'm your host Nolan Sykes joined as always by my co hosts James Pomfret Chug a Chug to. and Joe Weber keep it juiced. Dan. New One. Wow you're just like. God. Catch after. Catchphrase. Print money. Money. As I said in the INTRO WE'RE GONNA be talking about option magazine today admittedly a topic I don't really know a lot about I'm more familiar with their video content on Youtube that's made its way to youtube nowadays. But yeah, I didn't really grow up with this. I was more of a hot rod magazine kind of Guy. If you can imagine that do you guys know anything about option magazine? I you're going to ask if we know anything about hot rods. A lot of the story I'm excited to. Find Out and talk about it. But option. Option to is like the first really nerdy thing like the first like really car nerd thing that I did when I was, I was order Japanese magazines and videos off of Ebay. Because I am old and was in highschool before Youtube was a thing. So you. It wasn't like a subscription even for you is more like you had to find old issues ordering old issues me and my friend Nathan. Order old issues. And we were like what the? The pages go backward. I don't have I don't have too much context on it I. The only thing I know is from researching. For different videos and I think the H K s up to speed talk a little bit about it but I know about like Daijiro but only in the context of like the early eighties like trying to set. Speed records and stuff. So I know he's crazy dude. I'm excited to see like more of his history. He's the editor in chief. Yeah. I'm the editor in chief of donut. So sounds like pretty similar types of guys. He sets land speed records. I have a sixteen pound Golden doodle pretty similar. I bought a baby pool. Last weekend. Yeah. What to do with that baby pool? Who I wait till the sun warms up and then I, lay in Baby poor record for. Longest Soak. Actually it's. It's it's too cold. Over me background that hose waters chilly Boyd's it comes from underneath the ground I just put my feet in it. Casey cocktail hour. Okay. Let's let's. Option. Actor Jonah Hold Digression about how I wish I had yard to put a baby pool into half cocktail hour but it's not so much. What option magazine covered that EXCITES US although we obviously love tuner cars and the JD M. Market. It's the way that option talked about cars that was most revolutionary.

Youtube James Pomfret Editor In Chief Kogyo Gossioux Rod Magazine Nolan Sykes Jonah Japanese Jd M. Market Ebay DAN Joe Weber Boyd Nathan
The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

Past Gas

05:05 min | 2 years ago

The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

"Welcome back everyone to pass gas As always. I'm your host, Nolan Sykes joined by my friends. One Joe Weber. What's up? And I'm sorry, I'm trying I'm trying to bring the energy, but this is also a very somber script already, and so I want to be entertaining Bhai also want to. Honor respectful. Done that. Be Entertaining, but respectful. And James. Humphrey. You hear him talking now. To, two. The river. All right anyway. gas. So today's are two part our second part of our story on the Isle of Man. T T we're talking about the Dunlop family, are you guys ready to get into it I? Am I think I just want to point out I. Think you're man is the one of the six nicknames I've ever? That's a great and I said well good. It's so it means it means you're a nice guy. It. Yet. It's a rare nickname that sounds really cool. But it also means you're Nice Kylie. Guy that the go-to guy whenever anything needs to be done. Man He's your man. Love it. Great. Start to great episode. Let's dive into it when Marjorie and Ian Forest and their twin teenage sons moved to their house on Douglas Road on the isle. Of Man. One. Of the things they look forward to was the opportunity to watch the legendary I'll of man tourist trophy races from their front yard after all, it's not every day that you can watch the best road racers in the world. Take a corner, your corner in front of your house at speeds of over one hundred, twenty miles an hour. Unfortunately, the forest family had no idea what they were in for on a practice day in two, thousand five, they heard a crash outside Yawkey Carlson, a Swedish racer had run into their gate and flipped into their garden. The Swede was severely injured. Medics rushed to the scene, but there was nothing they could do Carlson's name joined the two, hundred, fifty plus other men who had died on the t course. The horror didn't end there though officials told the forest family that was to logistically challenging to delay the practice and move Carlson's body instead who Carlson was zipped into a body bag on the Front Garden for ninety minutes as the road marshals waited for practice to end, all the garrisons could do was closed their curtains and forbid their sons from looking outside. We'll I got. Doubts pretty awful. there's no way around it. Motorcycle racing is dangerous. Even riding a motorcycle daily traffic puts you at risk of dying in a crash twenty, nine times higher than that. If you were in a car at the same time, motorcycle riders and racers understand that danger. In fact, it's part of what draws them to the sport. Unfortunately, there's no real way around risking your life unlike cars where technology has greatly improved safety and driver protection motorcycle crashes, you're basically experiencing the equivalent of a no seatbelt through the windshield accident every single time. And as dangerous as motorcycle racing is the Isle of. Man. T he stands out as a full degree of magnitude more dangerous than the rest. First of all public road courses like the Isle of Man were writers have to contend with what they call the furniture. That's sick. They're talking about telephone poles, ditches, garden walls. These are much more dangerous than closed circuit courses or dirt bike riding and racing. While those races do see fatal accidents there hasn't been a deadly crash in a speedway race since twenty sixteen and in the twenty years before that, there is an average of less than one year similarly motocross raced at much lower speeds also sees lower fatalities unlike public road races. These courses are designed with plenty of room to minimize danger to the writers. So if Motorcycle Race Games skydiving public road courses are like base. Base jumping in a wing suit taken an already dangerous activity and bringing it as close to the edge as possible. However, even among public road races, the Isle of Man is easily the most dangerous in the twenty seven years. The T T was part of the World Grand Prix, championship thirty, six racers died on the isle. Of Man. Obviously. More than one year. In comparison at Imatra, there were two fatalities in sixteen years at Hockenheim, three deaths in twenty six years. The second deadliest race after the man was a circuit day SPA francorchamps which. Baby Franker Jam Cams, which saw ten deaths in thirty five years making the Isle of Man and average four times deadlier than even the second most deadly race.

Yawkey Carlson Nolan Sykes Bhai Joe Weber James Grand Prix Humphrey Front Garden Imatra Marjorie Ian Forest