20 Burst results for "Joe Weber"

The Murder of Racing Legend Mickey Thompson

Past Gas

06:03 min | 2 months ago

The Murder of Racing Legend Mickey Thompson

"It's Mickey Thompson Time. I'm. Pumped. Islam. Dive welcome back to pass gas everybody I am your host Nolan Sykes as always joined by the other host of the show. Got James pump free mustard on a beat. That's right. Going through your new, your new catchphrases definitely yours no one else's and puck that big MAC truck inside my little garage. and Joe Weber flared up also wink wink nation and what's. Keep it use. Keep it. You bitches juice keep it juice. Joe You had to postpone good staff. Make. Good. Gory non-appropriation Mega. Like. That's your thing. Okay. That's the alike. A love that. May encounter that how that? All right. So what are you? What are you guys? Familiar, rather you guys with Mickey? Thompson? I know that he makes the tires the drag boys. Does he make? Did they make off road tires? and then I, know that he had a gold mine. Well really actual, Gold Mine at some point. Yeah I don't know about that because wasn't he the one who went and like. got smokey eunuch in a gold mining. Maybe. I remember smokey had one but that sounds vaguely familiar thompson who who like got smokey into the into the game I. Believe I haven't heard of any of this. So I'm excited to dive into this and I. Always feel. That way. But this one is like, I should have known about this dude there are no google results for Mickey, Thompson Gold Mine but that you know maybe it's true we have to go find Mickey Thompson's gold. City slickers to. All right So let's just get into it. Mickey Thompson was born Marian Lee. Thompson Junior on December seventh nineteen twenty eight in San Fernando California. He went by Mickey and not marrying because in his own words quote a girl's name would mean even more fighting. I do like the name Marian it's pretty cool. Yeah. Like that, he said even more five eighty. We'll see. Yeah, he. Likes to get into it the San Fernando Valley home to Ventura. Boulevard and Mulholland. Drive was a fitting birthplace for a kid who would become defined by hot rods and dragsters. The valley is one of the original cradles of Car Culture I. I will say it still is today it's very like I went to see us you northridge up there in the valley and it is a muscle car town everyone drives either a charger challenger Camaro or Mustang it's pretty cool. I haven't met many people from the Valley with a valley accent most liked. Girls and Valley boys that I've talked to are from like Hollywood and Venice specifically. Venice. But never really never never from the valley there's I. Mean there's a lot of people. See us you northridge is a commuter school. There's a lot of people from that area that go there and I never really heard that typical valley you know yeah, I think it's kind of a pass a kind of thing. Now it was big at a time I. Don't think it's as big anymore you gotta meet some people from Venice. It's very much alive while not Nevada is on saying I think that the the new thing is. Not New but like the the big vocal fad was the vocal fry God. Yeah. Dashing vocal. John. We Sold our show got. Because we have less views per episode than Donut does perfect. Indirectly, Kris Kardashian directly sourced us. Did you see that onion article that was like the show ends when I wanted to? Rise into, the ocean. I will say Kendall Jenner Architecture Digest open-door episode is pretty cool. She's got a cool house and that's all say on that that rich girl has a cool how it's not just a cool house James. There's a difference like if you watch those videos, there's like real people houses and then there's there's rich people houses with no taste and then as rich. People houses with actual taste and define style, Kendall Jenner, and then Mark Mark. Ronson Mark Ronson Mark Ronson is the best very cool. House is not annoying at all I would like to hang out with Mark Ronson I. Don't know much about a hundred percent want to go to that house hundred percent did anyway that's that's our only Hollywood digression for the episode. California's on fire right now guys so much so that I got gotta check engine light yesterday because I was putting on the new intake, my car, and then like I stopped because I needed another tool and then I put my older back together. But I didn't tighten the thing for the math enough and I just sucked in a bunch of ashish and it like Oh. No. Covered my maths I have a math cleaner if you need it. I had a check engine light a few days ago. Was not fire related. It just turns out that when my coil packs was bad and I had to change it out and not fixed it. So I'm pretty happy. It didn't take long to discover his love for both driving and working on cars and age. Twelve Mickey and his dad entered a soapbox Derby Mickey's first race also became his first car modding experience

Mickey Thompson Mark Ronson Mark Ronson Thompson Gold Mine Venice Mark Ronson Gold Mine San Fernando Valley Nolan Sykes James Marian Lee Kendall Jenner Architecture Di Joe You Joe Weber Smokey Hollywood Kendall Jenner San Fernando California Kris Kardashian California Northridge
How Japanese Street Racers Created the Best Car Magazine Ever

Past Gas

03:33 min | 2 months ago

How Japanese Street Racers Created the Best Car Magazine Ever

"Kaku gasoline. Kogyo Gossioux is about cars is what? I thought did for a split second. I was like, oh. My God James is about to do the rest of that theme song in Japanese. Oh. Yeah. I just speak I speak Japanese. I see. Just. Everything you speak every language perfectly. So welcome back to pass gas everyone I'm your host Nolan Sykes joined as always by my co hosts James Pomfret Chug a Chug to. and Joe Weber keep it juiced. Dan. New One. Wow you're just like. God. Catch after. Catchphrase. Print money. Money. As I said in the INTRO WE'RE GONNA be talking about option magazine today admittedly a topic I don't really know a lot about I'm more familiar with their video content on Youtube that's made its way to youtube nowadays. But yeah, I didn't really grow up with this. I was more of a hot rod magazine kind of Guy. If you can imagine that do you guys know anything about option magazine? I you're going to ask if we know anything about hot rods. A lot of the story I'm excited to. Find Out and talk about it. But option. Option to is like the first really nerdy thing like the first like really car nerd thing that I did when I was, I was order Japanese magazines and videos off of Ebay. Because I am old and was in highschool before Youtube was a thing. So you. It wasn't like a subscription even for you is more like you had to find old issues ordering old issues me and my friend Nathan. Order old issues. And we were like what the? The pages go backward. I don't have I don't have too much context on it I. The only thing I know is from researching. For different videos and I think the H K s up to speed talk a little bit about it but I know about like Daijiro but only in the context of like the early eighties like trying to set. Speed records and stuff. So I know he's crazy dude. I'm excited to see like more of his history. He's the editor in chief. Yeah. I'm the editor in chief of donut. So sounds like pretty similar types of guys. He sets land speed records. I have a sixteen pound Golden doodle pretty similar. I bought a baby pool. Last weekend. Yeah. What to do with that baby pool? Who I wait till the sun warms up and then I, lay in Baby poor record for. Longest Soak. Actually it's. It's it's too cold. Over me background that hose waters chilly Boyd's it comes from underneath the ground I just put my feet in it. Casey cocktail hour. Okay. Let's let's. Option. Actor Jonah Hold Digression about how I wish I had yard to put a baby pool into half cocktail hour but it's not so much. What option magazine covered that EXCITES US although we obviously love tuner cars and the JD M. Market. It's the way that option talked about cars that was most revolutionary.

Youtube James Pomfret Editor In Chief Kogyo Gossioux Rod Magazine Nolan Sykes Jonah Japanese Jd M. Market Ebay DAN Joe Weber Boyd Nathan
The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

Past Gas

05:05 min | 3 months ago

The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

"Welcome back everyone to pass gas As always. I'm your host, Nolan Sykes joined by my friends. One Joe Weber. What's up? And I'm sorry, I'm trying I'm trying to bring the energy, but this is also a very somber script already, and so I want to be entertaining Bhai also want to. Honor respectful. Done that. Be Entertaining, but respectful. And James. Humphrey. You hear him talking now. To, two. The river. All right anyway. gas. So today's are two part our second part of our story on the Isle of Man. T T we're talking about the Dunlop family, are you guys ready to get into it I? Am I think I just want to point out I. Think you're man is the one of the six nicknames I've ever? That's a great and I said well good. It's so it means it means you're a nice guy. It. Yet. It's a rare nickname that sounds really cool. But it also means you're Nice Kylie. Guy that the go-to guy whenever anything needs to be done. Man He's your man. Love it. Great. Start to great episode. Let's dive into it when Marjorie and Ian Forest and their twin teenage sons moved to their house on Douglas Road on the isle. Of Man. One. Of the things they look forward to was the opportunity to watch the legendary I'll of man tourist trophy races from their front yard after all, it's not every day that you can watch the best road racers in the world. Take a corner, your corner in front of your house at speeds of over one hundred, twenty miles an hour. Unfortunately, the forest family had no idea what they were in for on a practice day in two, thousand five, they heard a crash outside Yawkey Carlson, a Swedish racer had run into their gate and flipped into their garden. The Swede was severely injured. Medics rushed to the scene, but there was nothing they could do Carlson's name joined the two, hundred, fifty plus other men who had died on the t course. The horror didn't end there though officials told the forest family that was to logistically challenging to delay the practice and move Carlson's body instead who Carlson was zipped into a body bag on the Front Garden for ninety minutes as the road marshals waited for practice to end, all the garrisons could do was closed their curtains and forbid their sons from looking outside. We'll I got. Doubts pretty awful. there's no way around it. Motorcycle racing is dangerous. Even riding a motorcycle daily traffic puts you at risk of dying in a crash twenty, nine times higher than that. If you were in a car at the same time, motorcycle riders and racers understand that danger. In fact, it's part of what draws them to the sport. Unfortunately, there's no real way around risking your life unlike cars where technology has greatly improved safety and driver protection motorcycle crashes, you're basically experiencing the equivalent of a no seatbelt through the windshield accident every single time. And as dangerous as motorcycle racing is the Isle of. Man. T he stands out as a full degree of magnitude more dangerous than the rest. First of all public road courses like the Isle of Man were writers have to contend with what they call the furniture. That's sick. They're talking about telephone poles, ditches, garden walls. These are much more dangerous than closed circuit courses or dirt bike riding and racing. While those races do see fatal accidents there hasn't been a deadly crash in a speedway race since twenty sixteen and in the twenty years before that, there is an average of less than one year similarly motocross raced at much lower speeds also sees lower fatalities unlike public road races. These courses are designed with plenty of room to minimize danger to the writers. So if Motorcycle Race Games skydiving public road courses are like base. Base jumping in a wing suit taken an already dangerous activity and bringing it as close to the edge as possible. However, even among public road races, the Isle of Man is easily the most dangerous in the twenty seven years. The T T was part of the World Grand Prix, championship thirty, six racers died on the isle. Of Man. Obviously. More than one year. In comparison at Imatra, there were two fatalities in sixteen years at Hockenheim, three deaths in twenty six years. The second deadliest race after the man was a circuit day SPA francorchamps which. Baby Franker Jam Cams, which saw ten deaths in thirty five years making the Isle of Man and average four times deadlier than even the second most deadly race.

Yawkey Carlson Nolan Sykes Bhai Joe Weber James Grand Prix Humphrey Front Garden Imatra Marjorie Ian Forest
"joe weber" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

02:28 min | 9 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Past Gas

"A lotus more like a Lotus I. It just seems like the seventies he was just such a powerhouse. Yeah he is like the dude he was the guy I mean. Still one of the greatest automotive mines have absolutely twenty three one hundred percent one of the most influential guys in all of cars and I still. I still really admire him. Despite the one hundred percent and petition young GM guys didn't like his lifestyle and possess. But I like yeah. That is out pizzazz. Makes you like some pizzazz? Yeah I love like the WHO the because that Guy Yeah? I think a running theme with this show is like if you're a maverick and you make like million dollar decisions that affect a ton of people's lives like dash always backfires always. There's always something that trips you up like. I don't know but when you're huge personality and you're like everything I've done up to up to. This point has been gold then. You don't have that like foresight to be like well. Maybe this isn't a great idea. Yeah kind of go with your ego. They've gotten to where you are by not questioning yourself and then you don't question yourself when you should have. Maybe yes oh is the is the lesson then to not question yourself. I don't think questioning yourself. All the time is the correct and something that I've been kind of trying to focus on lately is second guess myself less isn't always trips me up but maybe just having a friend tell you hey totally like check something you know what man at the end of the day. I honestly believe it. Dude lifer ride a live. Check US out every Monday. Were doing an episode of this show everywhere that podcast or streamed check out our youtube channel. If you haven't done it media. We also have a whole channel dedicated to podcasts doughnut. Podcast the OPPO known on Instagram Twitter Nolan J site. Follow me on both those adding Humphrey Fellow show at dark webinar on instagram Joe Weber on Joe Wetter. Joe I I there's many Joe Evers out there I there's no platform where I have. Just Joe ever we'll put the Joe's Info let's go to follow donut on everything at the media.

Joe Joe Evers Joe Wetter Joe Weber Instagram GM Humphrey Fellow youtube
"joe weber" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

01:31 min | 10 months ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Past Gas

"Really disheartening. To learn that like all these automakers are probably doing us all anybody honey. WHO's dealing in? Billions of dollars is a piece of. There's not ways about it. Robot like a cunning robot like a robot robot and the thing that you care about isn't a thing that helps anybody else in the world. There's no such thing as like a billionaire with good morals. Because because they were human at all they wouldn't be a billionaire. That's not how it works That's that's our primer on diesel. Geico all right so I have been Nolan sites. You can follow me on Instagram and twitter at Nolan J sykes follow Joe Weber at at dark underscore webinars on instagram instagram and Paula. James at James Pump Frey on both twitter and instagram followed. If you don't if you don't watch our youtube channel for some reason check us out out at Hermitage donut media on youtube videos. Pray Carpio's in fact. I think so. Yeah really fun. I love him. Follow this podcast. podcast Oh yeah. It's doughnut podcasts. If you're watching this if you watch youtube I guess you already hear both your watch subscribed yet subscribed to don podcast please with an with an ASS donut podcasts. All right I love you next time..

youtube twitter Carpio Hermitage donut James Pump Frey Nolan J sykes Geico instagram Joe Weber Paula James
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Live from the first big news Ascom, Bill Maloney, Charles. Our we thank you very much. Bill Maloney to hear live breaking news over your Bloomberg type squawk S Q U A W K on your terminal. I'm Charlie Pellett. That's a Bloomberg business flash. All right. Thank you so much Charlie Pellett. You are listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek all right to now's the time in the show, Carol where we welcome. Our steamed editor 's a Bloomberg BusinessWeek jolt, be your boss, your boss. Yeah. This week. You're my boss. I'm like working through this. Yeah. Exactly. Joe Weber is here with us along with Patrick near another one of our phase to highlight a story that's in the magazine. And I think it caught all of our attention this morning when it hit the terminal and a lot of readership is well, the headline why is the stock market so old mega caps are one reason? So Joseph this force. So one of the reasons that I think this story is really well timed as the ongoing interest in the IPO's, right? The unicorns are sort of leading their magical forest lift beat Uber out or is edging towards that. They're not alone. Obviously Airbnb is another big one in and it's also speaks to the bigger trend of like, basically, the lack of IPO's for a long time now, and that has big implications on public markets and another thing that's happened is I get the sense of like, it's a pond, right. And you've got these big behemoths the Amazons of the world and they like eating little guys. And that's basically what's been happening instead of IPO's, we get. So Patrick near is it a pond, or is it a forest what's happening here? Both. Defined in a forest the willingness. Well, in some ways, it's like when you're buying a stock in many cases, if you're buying one of these big companies that you're buying a fund. Yeah. You're getting these companies that are well, it's an it's an online market, but it's also a grocery store chain. And it's a cloud services business. I'm talking about Amazon, of course, and about fifteen other things. So, you know, in some ways people who are buying stocks are almost kind of getting these diversified entities. The minute the minute, they buy something, and it seems to be heading possibly in effect on what the market looks like the volatility in the market is like, I think that's a really perceptive thing. And I hadn't really thought of it that way when you buy Amazon think about all the businesses Amazon's then it's effectively an index fund at that point it rolls up everything. And so how does that change market behavior about about everything? Right. Because that one stock is a lot more than that. When I also think about just all the companies that are staying private so much longer because we talk about so often how much money is out there. That can fund startup companies. So that they don't have to public sooner rather than later, and I do wonder about how the market gets kind of old dated in terms of representing what are the future technologies the industries and businesses that are going to be around for decades to come one of the tensions is that. While you may have any given company is more diversified entity. Or at least these mega caps are if you're out there and your money manager and you're trying to buy a diversified slice of the entire market. Right. One part of the market. Just isn't there for you to buy? It's it's in private equity. It's it's owned by hedge funds. It's. An early stage venture capital, and for a lot of these fronts, particularly the ones that are the most popular now, which are big index funds..

Bloomberg Bill Maloney Charlie Pellett Amazon Patrick Joe Weber Airbnb Amazons editor Joseph BusinessWeek Charles Carol
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Tobacco. If you look at what's down today. You some of the biggest. I know I'm trying to make sense of that Brennan, what does that tell you? That's Dave makes a really good point. I mean utilities. I think are your best performing group for the year. Overall, followed by healthcare quarter for sure. Yeah. And we're seeing them being beat up big time. What does that say to you? Well, I think some of this driven by that year end tax loss. I I do think we have a general shift from growth to value as part of this rebounds, kind of global rebalancing away from the US into say emerging markets. But also you're seeing the growth tax FANG led rally really go into these more value plays. I I think on the short term. I think these stronger performing value more defensive centers just getting caught up in and really just say downdraft day. There's no place to hide because I'm going to point out the value for the five hundred value index. It's down about eighteen percent from its high back in September. Dave. And this is something that we keep talking about right? There's nowhere to hide in this market environment. Well, exactly, and there's been somewhat of a shift toward value in a way from growth, but it really has kind of hesitated last couple of months, so it really becomes a question here. That if the market's going to get out of the funk, it's kind of phone into what's going to lead the reversal, especially when you have, you know, the Bank stocks take him hits today. I mean, they've managed to bounce back a bit. This whole issue that comes up because the Treasury Secretary calls the CEO's and asked about their liquidity sort of raising an issue that really wasn't front and center until he brought it up in a tweet on Sunday. Now, our editor Joe Weber over at the magazine business week magazine, we had a cover over the summer, which was a picture of secretary of the treasury Steven Mnuchin and behind him was lettering. Everything is fine. Everything is fine. Everything is fine. And we've often seen him kind of come in and clean up for lack of a better word. You know, once the president says something, how do you though view what happened over the weekend attack, a continued attack on the fed secretary Mnuchin coming in to kind of fix things up just got about thirty seconds here. So I think to your point you're seeing a defensive play on trying to moderate some comments. There's really unfettered access via social media to the president's inner thoughts. But but there's a consequence to that. I think you you have Powell who is a more hawkish. Ultimately, maybe they should have stuck with.

Steven Mnuchin Dave Brennan president US secretary Powell fed CEO Joe Weber editor eighteen percent thirty seconds
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Kelly. Al-massar? Welcome to the weekend edition of Bloomberg business week this week. Jason we are bringing highlights from the Bloomberg year ahead summit 2019 brings together leaders from business from politics. Speaking about the issues that are going to be on their mind in the coming year. It was a really fun day here at Bloomberg headquarters. Just a lot of energy lot of big ideas. We heard from dirt Vanda put he's the CEO of mon- delays. And also we spoke with Mindy Grossman. Of course, the CEO and president of WW, formerly known as weightwatchers. This has been a big year for getting the company to make some transitions and a lot of that's going to be rolling out in two thousand nine great to hear from her as well. I also caught up with John gray. He's the Blackstone president and chief operating officer recently installed. He's got almost half a trillion dollars at his disposal to put to work in. What may be a volatile year? But volatility it's good for business. Those guys like that. Right. You know? It was interesting the conversations we're able to have in Joe Weber gets a lot of credit. For this first conversation this conversation that we're going to listen to because it's with David Segal. He's the co chairman of two sigma investments, but he wasn't in the finance section. He was in the tech section. Yeah. And of course, Joe Weber is the editor at Bloomberg BusinessWeek, David Segal as you mentioned of two sigma. He has some very interesting thoughts about the regulation of search and social media companies, and he's really drawing on his background in the financial industry for some cues about what to do when it comes to that world, search and social media. So we sat down with him talked about a lot of things including about the timing for necessary tech regulation. Listen up is it time for the Google's and Facebook's. And the Twitter's this world to be regulated. Well, it certainly time for these incredibly successful companies to take on the digital responsibilities for how they interact with our society. And I think that they're all forms. Of regulation. I think that it may be time for these firms to create a set of ground rules that will make society more comfortable with what they're doing. Well, it it it might feel to some people smart people consumers business people, it might they might find it surprising that they're not really regulated in the way that we might expect it traditional media or a regulated in a lot of. So have they been able to kind of get away with it for a long time that have how did it happen? Had we get here. I think it worked the right way. These firms are all new they're young technology. Innovation is driving our society forward in general and a great way, and it's moving very rapidly. So these firms just a handful of years ago were not particularly big and important firms if the financial markets the media marketplaces, these business models have been around for. Forever. And people have been thinking about the rules of the road for a really long time. But the the big tech companies are brand new you talk about maybe looking at the financial industry. There's a lot of analogies to be made with the financial industry to maybe how we wanna handle oversight of the search industry of the social media industry. Search and social media in a way are information brokers. They're in a position where people provide information to them people consume information from them. It's almost like an information marketplace. And so when I think about what these firms are doing I begin to think about how the financial markets are connecting essentially people together for the purpose of not only exchanging information, but exchanging money, right? And then if you think about the regulatory structure of the financial marketplace, what you see is that there organizations like FINRA, which are self regulatory organizations which have missions to protect the integrity of the marketplace. And I see analogies to particularly FINRA for the social and search space because it's interesting, and we are certainly seeing in places around the world were social media's is is creating distrust, right? And if you take it back to the financial industry, right? And you have to have trust in the system for it to work. You have to have a level playing field for eight to work that you can refer back also to search and social media. Absolutely. And the the good news is that when you have that kind of trust and integrity, then the businesses thrive, and they make a lot of money. So this is not anti-capitalistic. This is not trying to create some enormous big government arm that will cry. Rush innovation. This is actually a model. I think that will promote future innovation. Well, and I have to say for someone who has been so successful as you have in the financial industry. You we we do this a lot, you know, we're not used to someone especially of your ilk. In your stature coming in and saying, you know, we need more regulation, but we we don't hear that a lot. So what prompted you what was your catalysts personally to to think of this? Well, I've been the analogy would be when you're driving on the road. I actually prefer the fact that their speed limits the rules because it makes my driving safer me to I would want it to be a free for all on the roads. And so I see from my own spot in financial world that the rules of the road have promoted a healthy financial ecosystem, and I think everyone benefits from it. It is important for the industry to be involved. Because if not you're going to have what country by country making up rules. It becomes kind of chaotic becomes expensive for the companies involved in the. Search and social media space if they don't somehow step in and kind of lead the way that's already happening Europe has said its own rules with regard to privacy. You could imagine look you want to essentially have a follow the leader model here. So if the industry itself were to create a set of rules that everyone played by that in general people liked than the rest of the world will say, okay, great. We can live with these rules, and this is happening in the financial markets. You know, the United States has shown leadership in creating level playing fields and finance and most of the world has adopted more or less the US way of doing it, which is great for US financial firms, and that was David Segal founder of two sigma well-known hedge fund I venture talking about regulation that might be smart for the technology world Callen twenty nineteen. We.

David Segal Bloomberg president and chief operating Joe Weber CEO FINRA Mindy Grossman Vanda United States Bloomberg BusinessWeek Kelly. Jason Twitter 2019 Europe John gray chairman Google
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol massar. Welcome to the weekend edition of Bloomberg business week this week. Jason. We are bringing highlights from the Bloomberg here ahead summit twenty nineteen bringing together leaders from business from politics. Speaking about the issues that are going to be on their mind in the coming year. It was a really fun day here at Bloomberg headquarters. Just a lot of energy lot of big ideas. We heard from Dirk van to put he's the CEO of mon- delays. And also we spoke with Mindy Grossman. Of course, the CEO and president of WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers. This has been a big year for getting the company to make some transitions and a lot of that's going to be rolling out in twenty one thousand nine hundred great to hear from her as well. I also caught up with John gray. He's the Blackstone president and chief operating officer recently installed. He's got almost half a trillion dollars at his disposal to put to work in what may be available year. But volatility it's good for business. Those guys like that. Right. You know? It was interesting the conversations we're able to have. Joe Weber gets a lot of credit for this first conversation this conversation that we're going to listen to because it's with David Segal. He's the co chairman of two sigma investments, but he wasn't in the finance section. He was in the tech section. Yeah. And of course, Joe Weber is the editor of Bloomberg BusinessWeek, David Segal as you mentioned two sigma. He has some very interesting thoughts about the regulation of search and social media companies, and he's really drawing on his background in the financial industry for some cues about what to do when it comes to that world, search and social media. So we sat down with him talked about a lot of things including about the timing for necessary tech regulation. Listen up is it time for the googles and the Facebooks and the Twitter's of this world to be regulated. Well, it certainly time for these incredibly successful companies to take on additional responsibilities for how they interact with our society. And I. Think that they're all forms of regulation. I think that it may be time for these firms to create a set of ground rules that will make society more comfortable with what they're doing. Well, it might feel to some people smart people consumers business people, it might they might find it surprising that they're not really regulated in the way that we might expect it traditional media a regulated in a lot of ways. So have they been able to kind of get away with it for a long time? Did that have how did it happen? How did we get here? I think it worked the right way. The needs firms are all new they're young technology. Innovation is driving our society forward in general and a great way, and it's moving very rapidly. So these firms just a handful of years ago were not particularly big and important from the financial markets. The media marketplaces, these business models have been around forever and people. I have been thinking about the rules of the road for a really long time. But the big tech companies are brand new you talk about maybe looking at the financial industry. There's a lot of analogies to be made with the financial industry to maybe how to handle oversight of the search industry of the social media industry. Search searching social media in a way are information brokers. They're in a in a position where people provide information to them people consume information from them. It's almost like an information marketplace. And so what I think about what these firms are doing I immediately begin to think about how the financial markets are connecting essentially people together for the purpose of not only exchanging information, but exchanging money, right? And then if you think about the regulatory structure of the financial marketplace, what you see is that there organizations like FINRA, which are self regulatory organizations which have missions to protect the integrity of the marketplace. And I see analogies to particularly fenra for the social and search space because it's interesting, we are certainly seeing in places around the world were social media is creating distrust, right? And if you take it back to the financial industry, right? And you have to have trust in the system for it to work. You have to have a level playing field for a to work, and that you can refer back also to search and social media. Absolutely. And the good news is that when you have that kind of trust and integrity, then the businesses thrive, and they make a lot of money. So this is not anti-capitalistic. This is not trying to create some enormous big government arm that will cry. Rush innovation. This is actually a model. I think that will promote future innovation. Well, and I have to say the for someone who has been so successful as you have in the financial industry. You we we do this a lot. And you know, we're not used to someone especially of your ilk. In your stature coming in and saying, you know, we need more regulation, but we we don't hear that a lot. So what prompted you what was your catalyst personally to to think of this will be the analogy would be when you're driving on the road. I actually prefer the fact that their speed limits rules because it makes my driving safer me to I wouldn't want it to be a free for all on the roads. And so I see from my own spot in financial world that the rules of the road have promoted a healthy financial ecosystem, and I think everyone benefits from it. It is important for the industry to be involved. Because if not you're going to have what country by country making up rules. It becomes kind of chaotic becomes expensive for the companies involved in the. Search and social media space, if they don't send how step eight and kind of lead the way that's already happening Europe has said its own rules with berko to privacy. You could imagine look you want to essentially have a follow the leader model here. So if the industry itself were to create a set of rules that everyone played by that in general people liked than the rest of the world will say, okay, great. We can live with these rules, and this is happening in the financial markets. You know, the United States has shown leadership in creating a level playing fields and finance and most of the world has adopted more or less the US way of doing which is great for US financial firms, and that was David Segal, founder of two sigma. Well, known hedge fund venture talking about regulation that might be smart for the technology world might be Kevin in twenty nine thousand nine. We.

David Segal Bloomberg president and chief operating Joe Weber Carol massar United States CEO Dirk van Jason Bloomberg BusinessWeek Mindy Grossman FINRA Europe John gray chairman Twitter
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol Massar. Welcome to the weekend edition of Bloomberg BusinessWeek this week. Jason. We are bringing highlights from the Bloomberg year ahead summit. Twenty nineteen brings together leaders from business from politics. Speaking about the issues that are going to be on their mind in the coming year. It was a really fun day here at Bloomberg headquarters. Just a lot of energy lot of big ideas. We heard from dirt Vanda put he's the CEO of mon- delays. And also we spoke with Mindy Grossman. Of course, the CEO and president of WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers. This has been a big year for getting the company to make some transitions and a lot of that's going to be rolling out in twenty one thousand nine hundred great to hear from her as well. I also caught up with John gray. He's the Blackstone president and chief operating officer recently installed. He's got almost half a trillion dollars at his disposal to put to work in. What may be a volatile year? But volatility it's good for business. Those guys like that. Right. You know? It was interesting the conversations we're able to have. Joe Weber gets a lot of credit for this first conversation this conversation that we're going to listen to because it's with David Segal. He's the co chairman of two sigma investments, but he wasn't in the finance section. He was in the tech section. Yeah. And of course, Joe Weber is the editor of Bloomberg BusinessWeek, David Segal as you mentioned of two sigma. He has some very interesting thoughts about the regulation of search and social media companies. He's really drawing on his background in the financial industry for some cues about what to do when it comes to that world, search and social media. So we sat down with him talked about a lot of things including about the timing for necessary tech regulation. Listen up is it time for the googles and the Facebooks and the Twitter of this world to be regulated. Well, it certainly time for these incredibly successful companies to take on additional responsibilities for how they interact with our society. And I. I think that they're all forms of regulation. I think that it may be time for these firms to create a set of ground rules that will make society more comfortable with what they're doing. Well, it it it might feel to some people smart people consumers business people, it might they might find it surprising that they're not really regulated in the way that we might expect it traditional media or a regulated in a lot of way. So have they been able to kind of get away with it for a long time? Did that happen? How did it happen? How did we get here? I think it worked the right way. These firms are all new they're young technology. Innovation is driving our society forward in general and a great way, and it's moving very rapidly. So these firms just a handful of years ago were not particularly big important firms like if the financial markets, the media marketplaces, these business models have been around forever and people. Have been thinking about the rules of the road for a really long time. But the big tech companies are brand new you talk about maybe looking at the financial industry. There's a lot of analogies to be made with the financial industry to maybe how we want to handle oversight of the search industry of the social media industry. Search and social media in a way are information brokers. They're in a position where people provide information to them people consume information from them. It's almost like an information marketplace. And so when I think about what these firms are doing I immediately begin to think about how the financial markets are connecting essentially people together for the purpose of not only exchanging information, but exchanging money, right? And then if you think about the regulatory structure of the financial marketplace, what you see is that there organizations like FINRA, which are self regulatory organizations which have missions to protect the integrity of the marketplace. And I see allergies to particularly FINRA for the social and search space because it's interesting, we are certainly seeing in places around the world were social media is creating distrust, right? And if you take it back to the financial industry, right? And you have to have trust in the system for it to work. You have to have a level playing field for it to work, and that you can refer back also to search and social media. Absolutely. And the the good news is that when you have that kind of trust and integrity, then the businesses thrive, and they make a lot of money. So this is not anti-capitalistic. This is not trying to create some enormous big government arm that will cry. Rush innovation. This is actually a model. I think that will promote future innovation, and I have to say know for someone who has been so successful as you have in the financial industry. We we do this a lot, you know, we're not used to someone especially of your ilk. In your stature coming in and saying, you know, we need more regulation, but we we don't hear that a lot. So what prompted you what was your catalysts personally to to think of this? Well, I mean, the analogy would be when you're driving on the road. I actually prefer the fact that their speed limits the rules because it makes my driving safer me to would want it to be a free for all on the roads. And so I see from my own spot in financial world that the rules of the road have promoted a healthy financial ecosystem, and I think everyone benefits from it. It is important for the industry to be involved. Because if not you're going to have what country by country making up rules. It becomes kind of chaotic becomes expensive for the companies involved in the. Search and social media space if they don't somehow step in and kind of lead the way that's already happening in Europe has said its own rules with regard to privacy. You could imagine look you want to essentially have a follow the leader model here. So if the industry itself were to create a set of rules that everyone played by that in general people liked than the rest of the world will say, okay, great. We can live with these rules, and this is happening in the financial markets. You know, the United States has shown leadership in creating a level playing fields and finance and most of the world has adopted more or less the US way of doing it, which is great for US financial firms, and that was David Segal founder of two sigma well-known hedge fund I venture talking about regulation that.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek Bloomberg president and chief operating David Segal Carol Massar United States Joe Weber FINRA Jason CEO Mindy Grossman Vanda Europe John gray chairman Twitter
"joe weber" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"It could be a star that spinning and it's not symmetric. You know, maybe it's not completely spherical or more dramatically. It could be colliding black holes or neutron stars could be a supernova that goes off in. It's not completely symmetric. So any change in a mass configuration will emit gravitational waves. The trouble is their size are amplitude is. And as you said, they are indeed space-time undulations or ripples. They could be there different kinds. They can be rare factions and compressions like sound waves are with their molecules they or they could be transverse waves like lightest all the different modes vibration are possible with gravity whites. But when you go through the math, the amplitude the size of the. Deviation of the space time is is ridiculously small, and in fact in the lie, go detector, they're detecting. A space time ripple that's thousand times smaller than the nucleus of an atom. And again, if you've just propose to do that before they actually did at people would just laugh, so and then of course, it's a it's a ripple in something that's invisible. I mean, we don't see space time space space time is vacuum. It's empty, and so the idea is seeing a distortion or ripple. That's that small in something that's not visible in the first place. It just sounds outrageous. And so, you know, lie go is truly the most spectacular scientific experiment ever. I think just because the the DASS ity of trying to do it and in then succeeding, it's just incredible. And even and then I would of course, said they ought acidy of the will to get close to a billion dollars out of hard nosed funding agencies in skeptic. Title congress people that's pretty mazing too. So they succeeded in many ways, it's, you know, it's it's one of those interesting things where I'm in my mind, kind of drugs deposing, the the statement that you made about Einstein, you know, really, maybe requiring these things as part of the theory, but not having a lot of confidence or even or even honestly, a guess that they either really do exist and artifacts, or if they do exist like, you know, saying this is probably something we'd never be able to measure anyway. And then like you said the audacity of the architects of the LEGO go experiment, which is of course, the two big arms. We were talking about saying, you know, what I know. It's a long shot. But yes, it's worth as you said all of this massive financial investment because I really think deep down we're gonna get a detection like, that's it's I don't know. I I don't know if I would have put money on it, would you? I think I don't know if. I would either and the and the story of that project is fascinating. Because of course, it did not happen overnight at took decades. There were false starts. There were particularly bidder false start because Joe Weber of very well known physicist at the university of Maryland claim to have detected gravitational ways in the mid nineteen sixties. And then it turns out that it was impossible with his instrument that he could have detected them. And so he was looking artifacts or noise. And unfortunately, he sort of doubled down and continued to claim that detection and his career went in the toilet. Because of that is kind of bitter story in physics astronomy. However, ironically, although the fail his failure in the sixties could've trash the whole field forever. It actually inspired these experimenters. These are basically experimental physicists doing this work to just say law. We can do it. You know, they were challenged by his failure. And by their belief not shared with Steiner earlier on. On that these were really were detectable and real effects of relativity..

Joe Weber Steiner university of Maryland physicist billion dollars
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thirteenth Barbara Kusak. This is Bloomberg BusinessWeek with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio. And after the debrief in this week's issue. Jason Al Gore is the subject and environmentalists for decades his book and Academy Award winning documentary an inconvenient truth really alerted the world to global warming. And some say, he kind of re energize the environmental movement. Well, and interestingly he's gotten into the investment business, and he sat down with Bloomberg BusinessWeek editor Joe Weber, and they talked about the money and the business of saving the world. The sustainability revolution is the largest investing opportunity and the largest set of business opportunities in all of history, and many companies are also becoming aware of the the risks that have been understated continuing with the fossil fuel economy with the exploitive of business models that ignore ways to ignore pollution, ignore exploitation. Of communities and workforce's. By the way. When companies do get with this program and adopt. These kinds of goals. All kinds of benefits come to them, including recruitment and retention the brightest and best young women and men wanna work for companies that give them.

Bloomberg Jason Al Gore Jason Kelly Barbara Kusak Academy Award Carol Massar Joe Weber editor
"joe weber" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"People have their eyes on this to see if they can pull it off it's it's amazing affair tactic against the rockefellers at this point i'm curious in this enviros it's bigger than not really because because will the rockefellers art of the rockefellers brothers fund we who are this is all about has exxon tr noon something about climate change and done nothing about it so there are multiple people who would be interested in being on that side of the conversation and that rockefeller brother fund was just inviting other people to have that conversation attorney general's among them environmental activists among them and that's where exxon is trying to seize on it and say that's conspiracy holy industry as well that's coming to fierce criticism surely if a president were able to be here it would have thought launcher implications than just one hump and that's why it's such a need to know and i love it a little bit of exxon saying that they had a right to free speech this place into in as well so so much stuff place under that here because at the same time wall you know you could call that a strategic meeting right we'll isn't exxon having strategic meetings about the other side of this so it's really a you know such an interesting dynamic and we'll have to see what happens right now it's just seventy for just positions and even that's being contest time is being bull targeting exactly right we'll see how this works out acts that jol of that was be megs editor in chief joe weber you're listening to bloomberg business week coming up in a strange twist in.

attorney exxon president rockefeller editor in chief joe weber bloomberg
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of trying luxury automakers are finally figuring out how to appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be meg business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine and you'll let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try sector of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing the health steve trevor era biggest guys around and this the details are out this still remain kinda hazy how you know what's going to actually be the solution in healthcare how are they going to try and fix us and they're trying to find a ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between the three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so dan interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within that industry because the health care industry is like amazon's out the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked up no what we were expecting from thouray into the house can we should meet the pontiff at the moment digest tackling this situation with individual companies scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual players hit is the pharmacy benefit manages the middlemen particularly carla and that is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of guess what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shortest strove all right and speculation is like there's an middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus the this 'triumvirate could bring to bear yes 'cause the big tom i say it's not our problem we not miss pie thing the drawn by a lot of the money he gets creamed by the guys in the middle the insurance that benefit manages he point i feel like when it comes to check pricing it's all like oh my god.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon carla editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond jp morgan
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of trying luxury automakers are finally figuring out how to appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be like business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine until let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try sector of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing the healthcare stuff tremblay right biggest guys around and this the details are others still remained a hazy happ what's going to actually be the solution and healthcare how are they going to try and fix us and they're trying to find a ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between the three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so than interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within the industry because the health care industry is like amazon's out the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked up and is not what we were expecting from thouray into the house can we should meet the point that the movement digest tackling this situation with the individual company scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual plays hit the insurance the pharmacy benefit manages the middlemen it's a pharma camera two that is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of guess what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shortest straw of all rank and speculation is like there's middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus the triumvirate could bring to bear yes because the big pharma failure it's not our problem we not miss pie thing the drugs by a lot of the money he gets creamed by the guys in the middle the ensures that benefit manages he point i feel like when it comes to check pricing it's all like oh my god this is totally makes sense right because you talk about the.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond jp morgan
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A bold one man is designed to almost be a fear tactic so they're trying to spread fear among the likes of the attorney general of new york have massachusetts he names they can get them to back there wow so it's amazing a legal maneuver that a lot of people have their eyes on this to see if they can pull it off it's it's amazing affair tactic against the rockefellers at this point i'm curious in this enviro it's bigger than that because because it will the rockefellers art of the rockefellers brothers fund we who are this is all about has exxon trump knows something about climate change and done nothing about it so there are multiple people who would be interested in being on that side of the conversation and that rockefeller brother fund was just inviting other people to have that conversation general's among them environmental activists among them and that's where exxon is trying to seize on and say that is because pierce whole industry as well that's coming to fierce criticism said shortly if president were able to be sat here it would have thought launcher implications than just won't comp and that's why it's such you need to a pass and i love at a little bit of a exxon saying that they had a right to free speech this place into in as well so so much stuff puts under this yet because at the same time wall you know you could call that a strategic median right will isn't acts on having strategic meetings about that the other side of this so it's really a you know such an interesting dynamic and we'll have to see what happens right now it just seventy for positions and even that's being contest time is being bow tie right i will see how this one works out acts that jol of that was be megs editor in chief joe weber you're listening to bloomberg business week coming.

new york massachusetts exxon president attorney rockefeller editor in chief joe weber bloomberg
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of trying luxury automakers are finally figuring out how to appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be like business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine and you'll let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try sector of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing the healthcare it's definitely whether a right biggest guys around and this the details are others still remain a hazy how you know what's going to actually be the solution and healthcare how are they gonna try and fix this and they're trying to find their ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between two three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so dan interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within the industry because the health care industries like amazon's out the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked are not what we were expecting from thouray into the house can we made the point that the movement that just tackling this situation with the individual company scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual place hit the insures the pharmacy benefit manages the middlemen particularly that pharma and that is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shorter straw of all right and the speculation is like there's the middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus that triumvirate could bring to bear yes because the big pharma say it's not all problem we not knees pie thing the drug fly a lot of the money get screened by the guys in the middle the insurance then renovated manages he point i feel like when it comes to check pricing it's all like oh my god it's doesn't totally makes sense because you talk about the drug companies setting a pricing then there's refunds that come into play and the relationship between the big pharma the pb ends and health insurance companies it's been a cozy relationship there and it's very opaque right and that's why this 'triumvirate there.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond jp morgan
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be like business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine and you'll let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try factor of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing the healthcare tell you about a tremor right biggest guys around and this the details are others still remain kinda hazy how can actually be the solution and healthcare how are they gonna try and fix us and they're trying to find their ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between the three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so dan interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within that industry because the health care industry is like amazon's at the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked up and this is not what we were expecting from thouray into the house can we should make that point just tackling this situation with the individual company scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual plays hit the insure is the pharmacy benefit manages the middlemen particularly former who that is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of guess what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shortest straw vault rank and speculation is like there's the middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus doug this 'triumvirate could bring to bear yes 'cause the big pharma say it's not our problem we not needs pie thing the drugs by a lot of the money he gets creamed by the guys in the middle the.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon doug editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond jp morgan
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be like business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine and joe let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try sector of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing in the healthcare system talk about it biggest guys around and this the details are others still remain kind of hazy happ what's going to actually be the solution and healthcare how are they gonna try and fix us and they're trying to find a ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between the three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so dan interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within the industry to health care industries like amazon's out the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked are not what we were expecting from thouray into the health can we should meet the point that the movement that just tackling this situation with the individual company scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual plays hit the insures the pharmacy benefit manages the middlemen particularly pharma too that is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of guess what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shortest strove of all right and the speculation is like there's an middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus the triumvirate could bring to bear yes 'cause the big farmers say it's not our problem we not needs pie thing the drugs by a lot of the money he gets screened by the guys in the middle the.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond jp morgan
"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"joe weber" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Are finally figuring out how to appeal to women by not trying too hard that's in our pursuit section but fast we tend to be like business week editor in chief joe weber to hear about some of his favorite stories in the magazine and joe let's start in the business section a story that really fascinated came at a couple of weeks ago but it's about a try sector of individuals wellknown individuals warren buffett jeff bezos and also jamie diamond talking about fixing the healthcare iran biggest guys around and this the details are others still remain kind of hazy happ what's can actually be the solution in healthcare how are they gonna try and fix us and they're trying to find a ceos still who can spearhead this initiative between the three companies amazoncom berkshire hathaway and jp morgan so than interesting and where we try to pick up the narrative is the reaction within the industry because the health care industry is like amazon's at the door this is a big deal now and that's where we picked are not what we were expecting from thouray into the house can we should made the point that the movement digest tackling the situation with that individual company scale but as you point out what does this mean ultimately fool the individual place hit the is the pharmacy benefit manages the natal nn particularly pharma and who is all of this is just like this massive cocktail of gas what is happening in healthcare why are you prices keep getting so much higher and consumers feel like they're getting the shorter straw of all right and the speculation is like there's middlemen pharmacy benefit managers and that is where there seems to be a focus the triumvirate could bring to bear yes because the big farmers say it's not our problem we not miss pie thing the drugs by a lot of the money he gets creamed by the guys in the middle the.

jeff bezos berkshire hathaway amazon editor in chief joe weber jamie diamond iran jp morgan