17 Burst results for "Joe Shuster"

"joe shuster" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:40 min | 9 months ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"To coast. George Noory with you, Neal Adams. Back with us, an American comic book writer, artist publisher producer. He has had a major impact on comic books around the world. As an industry and as well as being a pro year creative force. He has worked on legendary runs of Batman X Men, Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Avengers, Dead Man, and so many more. His publishing company is Continuity Comics. Published very successful titles like Megalith Armor and Bucky O'Hare. And many of the characters and storylines that Neil created have been used in recent Batman movies, X Men, movies and even the Batman. Lego movie, Neil. Welcome back. Hope You're Well, My friend. Nice to see you, George, by the way I want. I need to commend you on what you did for Jeremy. Yes. Siegel and Joe Shuster, Superman, You went to bat for them. Well, it's uh, you know, this little Corporation, Warner's communications anywhere just not up to it. So that made the mistake of deciding that I was wrong. They were right. They were wrong. They were wrong. Absolutely. These guys created Superman, for God's sake. Yeah, they have nothing. Jerry had Had basically a heart condition he was making $7000 year Joe was legally blind and had to live with his brother slept on a cot next to a cracked window that, he said. And it was ridiculous. I mean beyond ridiculous. So sometimes you have to just roll up your sleeves and say, You know, this is gonna end and do the right thing because that franchise sure made a lot of money for the common How we today. And defend like I took care of it. Pretty good. The family made up find the two boys. Had a lot the last 10 years of their lives. They were pretty happy, and the families who went on to be very happy and rich, So I think we took care of everything. So how did you get involved in the comic book business? Somebody gave me money. I mean, what do you will you an artist before any of this happened? I really actually is interested in science on guy as we'll find out tonight, my friend as we find out tonight, I couldn't I couldn't afford to go to college. I was poor. You know, there was people were poor in the fifties. Some people were still up poor and we were poor troll the time but we were poor enough of the time that there was no chance for me to go out on the college. My dad had left and my mother had had a third grade education so really seriously. Didn't have the weaponry, Tonto to deal with it, so I studied science very, very much. But I also had certain skills, and I thought maybe somebody pays me money to draw pictures. I can do that the rest of my life, and that's pretty much the way it worked out. You started working on the original Archie comic series, then you Well, that's that's how I got after I After I missed doing just about everything I got to work on, Archie. They pay me money and, you know, God bless them. They give me money. That's that's the whole deal. And that was a way to start. But I went on to do an awful lot of things I've done. Ah, lot more than even you get listed in those credits. I mean, I've done Ah amusement park ride designs. I designed the Terminator T 23 d ride. For for Cameron and for Universal Park. I designed state sets. I do an awful lot of things I Ad technology to things that are a simple is comic books but three D comic books, Let's say So because I'm so technologically minded, although not a techie. I can add things that other people can't do. And that sort of makes my skills wanted and eat it and they pay for it. It Z. What it's all about. Neal. What was the demographics of comic book readers in those days? I mean, I was a kid. So I was a reader, but I was in my 12 my teens. But when they took they took the service, they said. Basically that, uh, that the medium range of comic book readers with 1920 22 years old, which was a big shot for the whole industry. Nowadays, it's not that at all, very few kids read comic books and a relative sense because Congress in 1930 to 1953 30 to 63. Uh, attack comic books was right after the Army McCarthy hearings on the Army McCarthy hearings were broadcast on television, and they needed something else to go next. And so they attacked comic books, and I wrote a book called The Seduction of the Innocents. Which he implied that comic books, um may juvenile delinquent sort of like rock and roll. Sort of like computer games. You know how it is. So so this congress when unfortunately Because of the Army McCarthy hearings. They were used to watching this stuff on TV. So all of America got to see how terrible comic books work for their kids. And everybody just crashed down on comic book. So when I came into the kind of book in the street was like, Forget it. We're gonna be going on a year. Jeez. So it's been a It's been a long, hard fight on guess what we now on the world. I mean, we have all the best movies. We have older battery games. We'll have all the best everything. And comic books, or you know what? It's all about him. You're gonna make a movie for over $200 Million. Guess what it's gonna be. It's gonna be a comic book movie that that was tested in what we call floppies, You know, comic but So when are you gonna test? Ah, movie on somebody's script. No way. Not that kind of money. No, you're gonna you're gonna see something that's been tested and bed been read by a couple of 100,000 people and you're gonna make that So comic books to become testing testing forum for new ideas. If I remember weren't they like 15 cents apiece or something like that? There were 10 cents apiece when your eyes are really, really young. Then they went to 15. Now they're like, you know, uh, 3 99 and 4 99. And then they have graphic novels have all kinds of time is just It's a blossom that's really, really incredible. And this is not just America. This is the world. Used to be that all the comic books were done by Jewish kids in the Lower East Side. Yeah, Nowadays we have artists from all around the world. Some names you can't even pronounce as an American because you've got artist from Czechoslovakia in South America and all kind of We basically have gathered in Remember the illustration field is gone. I mean, the list with the illustration feel that you knew when you were younger, and you had movie posters painted by illicit atomic illustrators. Now it's photographs. All movie pushes air photograph you didn't have you don't have Saturday Evening Post. We had Norman Rockwell painting the covers. That's gone. You don't have magazines? Hardly anymore. So where do the illustrators go? Comic books? Best illustrators in the world are doing comic books. I just saw a little drama movie on the life of Walt Disney and, you know it showed about how he started doing also, all the rabbit for a client and then right, And then he did the Mickey Mouse and he was going to call the mouse Mortimer. And I think his staff said no. Let's have something a little more fun, and they started playing around with names and Mickey Mouse popped up and they love that. And look what happened to his career. Well, it takes an individual. Sometimes it takes a group. I mean, we had some of the best creative peoples and the people in the world and we even now have even the best creative people in the world. People who do comic books also do storyboards for films. Okay, look, also write films. I mean, there's a crossover and nobody would when I When I was younger, nobody in an advertising agency, whatever higher comic book artist to draw storyboard Because that's just that when they found that they were not, you know, just funny. Ha ha people, right? Nobody in film or television, whatever higher come Book writer to write to write TV or movies. Now there's a cross over that practically makes comic books equal. Equal and if they don't they're making a mistake. Because the next company will hire those guys and do great on it. They'll get the new computer game and those computer games make more money than movies. I sure that when you did the illustrations, Neil, did you also write the inscriptions in the comics? Sometimes, you know, you know, sometimes it's sort of like if you're a filmmaker, OK? Maybe a zoo filmmaker. You want to write the movie yourself? Or maybe you think you've got a great script from somebody else and you go ahead and take that script. So you're giving a tremendous.

Neil Neal Adams McCarthy writer George Noory America Joe Shuster Congress Archie Bucky O'Hare Jeremy Warner Lego Lower East Side Jerry Walt Disney Siegel Cameron
"joe shuster" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Adams. Back with us. An American comic book writer, artist publisher producer. He has had a major impact on comic books around the world as an industry and as well as being a pro year creative force. He has worked on legendary runs of Batman X Men, Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Avengers, Dead Man, and so many more. His publishing company is Continuity Comics. I'll just very successful titles like Megalith Armor and Bucky O'Hare. And many of the characters and storylines that Neil created have been used in recent Batman movies, X Men, movies and even the Batman. Lego movie, Neil. Welcome back. Hope You're Well. My friend was Nice to see you, George, by the way I want. I need to commend you on what you did for Jeremy. Yes. Siegel and Joe Shuster, Superman, You went to bat for them? Well, it's uh, you know, this little Corporation, Warner's communications anywhere just not up to it. So that made the mistake of deciding that I was wrong. They were right. They were wrong. They were wrong. Absolutely. These guys created Superman, for God's sake. Yeah, nothing. Jerry had a Had basically a heart condition he was making $7000 year Joe was legally blind and had to live with his brother slept on a cot next to a cracked window that, he said. And it was ridiculous. I mean beyond ridiculous. So sometimes you have to just roll up your sleeves and say, You know, this is gonna end and do the right thing because that franchise sure made a lot of money for the common How we today. And the Senate. Like I took care of it Pretty good. The family made up find the two boys had a lot the last 10 years of their lives. They were pretty happy, and the families who went on to be very happy and rich. So I think we took care of everything. How did you get involved in the comic book business? Somebody gave me money. I mean, what do you were you an artist? Before any of this happened? I really actually is interested in science on by Aziz. We'll find out tonight, my friend as we find out tonight, I couldn't I couldn't afford to go to college. I was poor. You know, there was people were poor in the fifties. Some people were still up poor and we were put roll the time, but we were poor enough of the time that there was no chance. Remember? Got me to go out on the college My dad had left and my mother had had a third grade education so really seriously, isn't Didn't have the weaponry to to deal with it, so I studied science very, very much. But I also had certain skills and I thought maybe you somebody pays me money to draw pictures. I could do that the rest of my life, and that's pretty much the way it worked out. You started working on the original Archie comic series, then you well that Zeke after I After I missed doing just about everything I got to work on, Archie, They pay me money and, you know, God bless them. They give me money. That's that's the whole deal. And that was a way to start. But I went on to do an awful lot of things I've done. Ah, lot more than even you get listed in those credits. I mean, I've done Ah amusement park ride designs. I designed the Terminator T 23 d ride. For for Cameron and for Universal Park. I designed the state sets. I do an awful lot of things. I add technology to things that are a simple is comic books but three D comic books, Let's say So because I'm so technologically minded, Although not a techie, I can add things that other people can do. And that sort of makes my skills wanted and needed and they pay for it. Z what it's all about. Neal. What was the demographics of comic book readers in those days? I mean, I was a kid. So I was a reader, but I was in my 12 my teens. But when they took him they took to the service. They said. Basically that at the medium range of comic book readers with 1920 22 years old, which was a big shot for the whole industry. Nowadays, it's not that at all, very few kids recumbent books in a relative sense, because Congressman 1930 to 1953 30 to 73 attack comic books was right after the Army McCarthy hearings on the Army McCarthy hearings. Were broadcast on television, and they needed something else to go next. And so they attacked comic books. And I wrote a book called The Seduction of The Innocents, which he implied that comic books um Made you and I'll delinquents sort of, like rock and roll. Sort of like computer games. You know how it is so so Congress when, unfortunately, because of the Army McCarthy hearings, they were used to watching this stuff on TV. So all of America got to see how terrible comic books work for their kids. And everybody just crashed down on comic book. So when I came into the comic book in the street was like Forget it. We're gonna be going on a year. It's been a long, hard fight on guess what we now on the world. I mean, we have all the best movies. We have older battery games. We all have all the best everything. And comic books are you know what it's all about it you're gonna make that movie for over $200 million? That's what it's gonna be. It's gonna be a comic book movie that was tested in what we call floppies. You know, Comic one So And now are you gonna test Ah, movie on somebody's script. Know where you got that kind of money? No, you're gonna you're gonna see something that's been tested and bed been read by a couple of 100,000 people and you're gonna make that So comic books to become testing testing forum for new ideas. If I remember one thing like 15 cents apiece, or something like that, there were 10 cents apiece when your eyes with you in a really, really, really young Then he went to 15. Now they're like, you know, uh 3 99 and 4 99, and then they have graphic novels. They have all kinds of promises. It's blossom That's really, really incredible. And this is not just America. This is the world used to be that all the comic books were done by Jewish kids in the Lower East side. Nowadays, we have artists from all around the world. Some names you can't even pronounce as an American because you've got artist from Czechoslovakia in South America and all kind of We basically have gathered in Remember the illustration field is gone. I mean illicit with the illustration feel that you knew when you were younger, and you had movie posters painted by military attack illustrators. Now It's photographs. All move. The horses are photographs You didn't have you don't have Saturday Evening Post. We had Norman Rockwell painting the covers. That's gone. You don't have magazines Hartley anymore. So where did the illustrators go? Comic books. Best illustrators in the world are doing comic books. I just saw a little drama movie on the life of Walt Disney..

McCarthy Joe Shuster Neil America Archie Bucky O'Hare Warner Adams. George Lego Walt Disney writer Jeremy South America Czechoslovakia Aziz Senate Norman Rockwell Jerry Hartley
"joe shuster" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Was tossing and turning he had this dream in which he kept having these flashes of a character that we can a combination of Samson and Hercules and a dozen other characters from the Bible to the comic strips to the serials and the movie theater he wrote it all down the very next morning runs over to his friend Joe Shuster styles is artist friend and he tells him the story of the superhero character and Joe Shuster starts making the original drawings two Shuster was a body builder and fascinated with bodybuilding magazines fascinated with images of acrobats tights eight you can see all that in Superman's cost you Jerry Siegel's father died in a robbery when Jerry was a teenager and the perpetrators were never caught so he this very immediate visceral reason to hate crime and I think Superman for him was a character who could in fantasy way prevent things like that from happening Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster I was quite taken I was quite mild and I thought you wouldn't be great if I was a mighty person it is girls to know that this line here is really send somebody special I was very small I would always pushed around by bullies and so forth so that was one of my dreams active forces in bodybuilding and weightlifting I don't know if that helps but I made an effort in the artistic world of the nineteen thirties comic books ring just above the adult magazine industry comics creators.

Joe Shuster Jerry Siegel robbery Jerry Superman adult magazine
"joe shuster" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"He was tossing and turning he had this dream in which he kept having flashes of a character that becomes a combination of Samson and Hercules and a dozen other characters from the Bible to the comic strips to the serials and the movie theater he wrote it all down the very next morning runs over to his friend Joe Shuster styles is artist friend and he tells him the story of the superhero character and Joe Shuster starts making the original drawings Joe Shuster was a body builder and fascinated with bodybuilding magazines fascinated with images of acrobats tights Kate you can see all that in Superman's cost you Jerry Siegel's father died in a robbery when Jerry was a teenager and the perpetrators were never caught so he this very immediate visceral reason to hate crime and I think Superman for him was a character who could in fantasy way prevent things like that from happening Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster I was quite make and I was quite mild and I thought you would be great if I was a mighty person it is girls to know that this fine here is really send somebody special I was very small I was I was pushed around by bullies and so forth so that was one of my dreams which is in bodybuilding and weightlifting I don't know if that helps but I made an effort in the artistic world of the nineteen thirties comic books ring just above the adult magazine industry comic strip creators are very rich celebrities guys like Chester Gould with Dick Tracy out cap of little Abner Alex Raymond with flash Gordon and help foster with Tarzan Siegel and Shuster see this is a golden opportunity they submit their Superman creation to newspaper editors across the country and in turn every one of them promptly rejects it some more than once here's DC artist Neal Adams nobody like this was a this was nobody else was doing and everybody was doing cowboys detective science fiction type these two seventeen year old Jewish kids in Cleveland Ohio created a genre meanwhile done in Selden Liebowitz are about to launch a new DC comic book title they call action comics having all but given up hope of ever seen Superman in newspaper comics Siegel and Shuster now both twenty three sell the rights of.

Joe Shuster robbery Jerry Superman Chester Gould Dick Tracy Abner Alex Raymond Gordon Tarzan Siegel Cleveland Ohio Selden Liebowitz adult magazine Neal Adams
"joe shuster" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"We have the other great magnificent host of the degree program who has been off covering air force hockey, Mr. j Ritchie Jay what's going on this morning. From Cleveland Gerry. How're you doing? I'm doing fine. How's everything in that beautiful community of Cleveland? Well, I'm at the Cleveland airport Hopkins international getting ready to fly back to Colorado, and Cleveland, of course, the home of the rock and Roll Hall of fame. I don't know if you know, but superman was created here in Cleveland Cleveland, a couple of local artists and writers Jerry Siegel. And Joe Shuster back in the nineteen thirties came up with the idea of superman, and there's a big. Setup display here honoring Cleveland at the airport as the hometown of Siegel. And Shuster created superman. And of course, Cleveland is the world headquarters for that up that. Duct tape. Did. You know that? No, I didn't. I'm glad you enlightened me. They always say duct tape is useful for everything. Right. Yeah. What would the world? How could we exist? I could we could we do anything without duct tape. Well, I'm not sure. But now, I was kinda wondering I wonder if superman can out Dr Dustin Johnson out on the golf course. Jeez. I dunno some days. Maybe depends. If he's got his Hooker slice going. I guess, but it's kind of interesting. There's a there's a bunch of fact joy on the wall. Here about superman, and after the superman became a hit, Jerry Jerry Siegel, one of the creators moved to a different address. It said the when kids knocked on his door to ask for superman. He kept a full-size superman costume in his closet to show them. So it's kinda cool. Did he have the right built for it? That's what I wanna know. I I don't think he'd put it up. He he probably showed him while super super super snout here to David is costumes in the closet. There you go. Hey, we had a chance in the first segment. Talk to Julia pine about the junior US girls championships in twenty twenty. They're going to be held. At Eisenhower, golf course. In Colorado Springs at the beautiful air force academy on a military installation. We talked about that last week. But anyway, she was here and she enlighten us. On how things are going as far as getting ready for that particular event. Maybe your your thoughts on this. I know you're very excited about the whole idea of hosting that tournament at the air force academy. Well, I think the cool angle is the USCCA has been around since like eighteen ninety four and this, and you know, I don't know how many events they they put on hosted and organiz Gulf events since then. But this is the first time ever they've decided to have one at a military golf course. And I think I don't know if you ask Julia about this. But hopefully, it's going to lead to more. I mean, there's some great we talked about this on this show last week. There's some really great military golf courses all over the country all over the world for that matter. And it'd be nice to see a few a few of them land some big major tournaments. Well, this would be just a starting point as far as that is concerned. But of course, there's a lot of great golf courses in the civilian world as well. But this is really neat that they selected Eisenhower's the first military installation. Yeah, it's a real feather in the cap of the air force academy and the Colorado. Swings community. I mean, we've we've shown in the past that we, you know. We we love golf, and we support are the tournaments that have had been after Broadmoor for many years and around the state of Colorado. So we get a chance to do that again in the summer of not just telling summer, but the summer of twenty twenty what sixteen fifteen sixteen months from now. Now, you're other gig. Besides doing the TD green golf show. You're also covering air force hockey. And as far as Cleveland is concerned. Have you had a chance to get out there and play any golf in in amongst the hockey games are not no the we usually get here. We were actually in Erie, Pennsylvania. And we usually come out here in January February and there's not much opportunity to play golf. We were in Erie a couple of about three or four years ago. And we got out early. I think it was like November, and we had like sixty five degree day the days we were out there, and that would have been an opportunity, but I didn't didn't get a chance to veteran was kind of funny. Knowing normally when we get to Irie, there's a lot of snow on the ground. It's freezing cold. And we were writing we on the bus going to the rink on Thursday for practice, and we all look to our right? And there was a golf course over their nice, green golf course. And I said jeez. I never knew there was a golf course one of the guys on the bus said. Well, that's because it's usually all white when we go to from all the snow. Yeah. That always does. Pose a problem when the weather doesn't cooperate. Yeah. So I did play a few years back where we went to when we met when we played Arizona state down in Phoenix. I I did get out on the golf course on that. Don't get don't get to play much golf during the hockey season on the different climate. That's for sure. Yeah. For sure. Okay. So anything else that we can discuss this morning that you'd like to highlight as far as the golfing world is concerned. Well, one thing that they kind of jumped out at me a couple of days ago. I was looking reading the newspapers and looking through the USA today, and I was online just scanning some some golf stories, and I I don't know. You saw this. But last week when Jason Duffner wasn't that Jason Duffner? And and Justin Thomas came down the stretch in the last group at Riviera for the Genesis open. They took five hours and twenty nine minutes to play the last round. Why was that? I have. Well, they just slow play. I guess, but that that's kind of ridiculous. And I guess the the CBS guys even commented on the telecast about that. And there was some discussion on the golf channel about it too. But they were they were wavy. They were the last group. So they weren't holding anybody up, but they were way behind the group in front of them. And they just deffers into Torius slow player as it is and Thomas is no whole lot faster. So you had two of the slower players on tour in the hunt for a championship and they just kinda win at their own pace. And I guess there was nobody there that really tried to speed them up. They said we were never put on the clock. But if you go if you play teen holes, and you're right on the verge of being put on the clock every hole you play. Well that adds up to the minute. Are you looking at a five to six hour around? Now you, and I we go out and we play in some media tournaments or we get into some charity tournaments. And there's you know a hundred and fifty people on the golf course. And we take a lunch break is a turn. And we we take thirty minutes or forty five minutes for lunch. We might be looking at a five or six hour round. But that should ever happen that should never happen on the PGA tour, especially with the factor, not taking a lunch break or anything like that. Because you know, I mean, they're Tournament Players. They should one would think that they would be pretty well prepared to make their next shot. Wouldn't you think? Yeah. The thing is a lot of people's. I I don't know if this is necessarily true. But a lot of people say that well, you know, average golfers of the gall. Offers at home watching on TV, see the pros take their time and place slow. So they tend to copy that or imitate that when they get out on the course play. I don't know if that's necessarily true, maybe true, in some cases. But I think most most golfers. You know, if they they're out there on the course, they they might be slow, but they're not they're not slow because they see the guys on tour play slow. Yeah. That's right. But a lot of people, of.

golf Cleveland Jerry Jerry Siegel Cleveland Cleveland hockey air force academy Cleveland airport Hopkins Colorado Joe Shuster US Eisenhower Justin Thomas Colorado Springs Siegel Erie Dr Dustin Johnson Mr. j Ritchie Jay Julia pine
"joe shuster" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"A good one Duff is. I think he got some joke books for Christmas because his stuff is pretty good. Thanks to defecate in the start the joke of the week for two thousand nineteen. I laughed. I cried Duff just played covers on New Year's in a cover band. Nicole cover up with the dudes from green day once again, also working on a solo record based on his recent tour with guns and roses, Duff is a great guy. We're gonna have to get them back onto dogs Jericho. When the time is right. Thanks, the Duff and thanks to read Tucker for returning to talk Jericho to talk comic books. Read came on to talk about the marvel versus DC battle, which he also wrote about it is book slugfests, the epic battle of between marvel and DC great redecorate pod. Cast you should pick up that book and go listen to the show. We did last year talking about the epic war between the two comic book brands and today this week read is back to talk about some of the writers and artists who helped create some of the biggest superheroes in conflict history. But who died completely unknown broke talking? What people Steve Ditto really contributed a lot to the development of Stanley's Spiderman that wasn't just Stanley Steve is involved. Steam, never got any credit or cash how about Jerry Siegel. And Joe Shuster who created superman and died broke and even Batman. But you don't know the name Bilfinger will you will after this show. All these stories are so hard to believe, but totally true and reads also time about the state of comic books today. And there's some great ideas as to how DC can up their game to compete with marvel when it comes to making movies, you no wonder woman and aquaman. Great movies. DC needs to continue in that vibe. So here we are talking comics with Reed Tucker right now in talks Jericho. Spider. Spider. Just my pies. Oh, it so I guess I don't know most very months ago last year had retouched on the show, which is funny because some social media had you listened to Tucker read, and I was like, I think Tucker. There is a guy named Tucker read who's like, the some sort of government official in Brooklyn. I get a lot of his Email. All really, yeah. So he gets a lot of my emails. So I get stuff about like trash pickup and Gravesend, and he gets stuff about like superman shadow to Tucker Reid, if you're listening to sure you aren't but it was you had written a book. About the marvel versus DC war slugfest what it was called. And it was one of my top rated shows of the year..

Reed Tucker Duff DC Jericho Tucker Reid Stanley Steve Joe Shuster Jerry Siegel Steve Ditto Nicole Gravesend Bilfinger Brooklyn official
"joe shuster" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

14:14 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Open lines on coast to coast AM Mark is in Columbia, Missouri on coast to coast AM, Mark. Hi, hey, great interview with Chuck Lavelle. Thanks. I didn't know speaking out peaking out big time. Oh, yeah. Sorry about that. I mean, I was geeking out big time. I really was. I'm totally cool with that. But yeah. And I can't wait for part two of it in nineteen. Let's get them out logger. What do you think? Let's get them on longer. Yeah. At least an hour at least two hours. Yeah. It's time for some phone calls. Okay. What do you think about medical marijuana? We just passed an amendment here in Missouri. All four it off for it. But it's not a panacea, which is interesting. I mean, I know I've had family members who have taken. Medical marijuana for insomnia and for appetite and it didn't work for them. Which is interesting. I kind of thought it was natch, but it wasn't a fit for them by logically. So it's not perfect everybody. I'm all for it should be another. It's another tool in the toolbox. Right. Right. What do you? What do you think of it? Well, I don't use it myself that it's definitely a better alternative than the opioids. Right. And I think. Yeah. Better than alcohol for sure. But I mean for as medicine alcohol shouldn't be for medicine. Well, we all self medicate. No, that's true. I mean, it's a relaxer. It's you know, it's it's. You know, sort of liquid valium. But I do want to say, I think the medical marijuana as I've seen it dispensed. Now, I know it's not true for everybody. But as I've seen it dispensed, it's very targeted, and it has people are going to for specific purposes. I realized that could be abused. But the people I know went in for very specific things like generalized, anxiety and some other stuff and most of them had good experiences. Okay. Just a little music request. Sure. Klay south down. Well, I'm out of bumpers for today. But I'll say I'll try get to that one tomorrow night. No, thank you. Okay. Mark. Appreciate that. Let me get to Kenneth who's in Fresno on coast to coast AM for open lines. Kenneth. Yeah. Hi. Hey. Oh well. Listener glad to have you. What inspired you to call? Well, you guys were talking about the phone the spirit. I saw back off to a radio show house. Listen to Christian radio show. They were debating the same thing. Whether or not there were different or wherever there was a difference train down. And so I was wanted to say that I think that the they're they're definitely different because of what the prophet Isaiah wrote. Zero for the word of God is a disorder. The thoughts of the mind the intentions of the heart. Sharper than any double edged sword able the part the bone marrow and the soul from the spirit. So therefore, the scriptures say by the prophets that they are different. Opinion. But they are connected, which is interesting because that goes back to part of what you're talking about before. The they're connected, but not the same right? Like the ball in the Maryland house. We know it's like inseparable. No, no, no. That's not true. I it's the bone marrow can be separated because they stay often is part of a treatment, for example for leukemia or something. Do that kind of thing. No. I think actually that. That speaks to exactly what we were talking about that the soul and the spirit have a connection the can that. But you know, God is so powerful that God could separate that connection. Yeah. So it's my opinion. God forbid, you lose your your godly spirit and just stuck with your own soul. What would that be like? Who we have both of them. Yeah. Nah. I'm so glad he jumped in. Thanks, man. Those great let me get to Rick in Omaha for open lines on coast to coast. Rick. Good evening in. It's it's an honor to speak to you. Wrench next. Your mother was one of the founders of the Berks society. Is that true? No. I said, my grandmother was a charter member of the John Birch society. Yeah. If you remember fight double o seven the Japanese seven forty seven that was shot down by the Russians wasn't the president of the Berks society on that plane of the John virtuosity. I don't know I didn't hear that. You're talking about the Korean airlines the one that shut down. Yeah. I I believe it was either Japanese Crean airline at believe they're flying from Japan and the Russian shot it down. Flight double o seven. There was a lot of conspiracy about that flight. But I believe the president or one of the high officers the Berks society was on that plane. I'll look that up. It gives you something to do after. I get off the air. Appreciate that. Thanks. Rick. Go to Ken who's in Colorado on coast to coast. AM? Open lines, Ken. And I wanted to talk briefly about the late. Great, STAN Lee. Oh, yeah. Sad. I think history will reveal the most influential writers of the twentieth century. Interesting thought. Yeah. I don't think of him that way. Because he he he didn't always write things himself. He was you know, for a lot of what we associate with him. He was overseeing the creation of it. But yeah, I think that's a very so at very least one of the most influential editors of all time. When you think about, you know. The Joe Shuster and jersey will to invent superman keenum Bilfinger to do Batman. It took care. Professor marston. Do wonder woman Stanley created the tastic four Spiderman I know hired man. We don't have enough time researcher daredevil. There's like so these obscure characters that marvel hasn't found a way to monetize yet the Stanley still created. Yeah. Kid, some people also compare them to Shakespeare Simpson said he was to the masses to the popular people at the time. Oh, without a doubt. That's actually a very interesting connection because we don't think of Shakespeare as being that because of most people don't study Shakespeare read Shakespeare unless there well, unless they have to, but yeah, you're right. He was a populist writer at the time. He was the you. He was the James Cameron of his era. Shakespeare was that especially when it came to staging special effects and other stuff is really into that. So those are good comparisons. And yeah, I was I was following my friend, David Mack who's written daredevil and some of the things in any posted a photo of him in Stanley together. And it was it was neat. We had him on the show. I think George played a clip from it. But I didn't. I would like to have had him on again. It's really that's he he he was a treasurer. Thank you, Frank. Sorry. Thank you can let me get Frank is winning in Quincy, Massachusetts on coast to coast for Whitey Bolger story. Frank. All right. Good morning. Good morning. Yeah. I get well everybody up. Here knows somebody. That knows somebody. Like three degrees of separation with Whitey Bulger in south east. It's true. It's true. Yeah. I think he he got what he got come into him. He had he deserved what he got in prison. But really, I think he knew more about the FBI then. And they want us to know. You know, what did you think of the the Johnny Depp movie? I it's funny. I just watched it last week black mask that. Yeah. That is a great movie. It's very accurate. I think. Yeah. That was interesting. I wondered about that. Especially the part about the FBI how much was going back and forth between those two things is crazy. It's crazy. So did you ever have a personal experience yourself Whitey? But with one of his his one of his top hitman. Yeah. So when I was in the seventies. I was like nine or ten years old, and we'd be playing in the street there Quincy, we happen to live to live next to John mater ano- is family. They had a house there and we used to play in the street in. And I remember Mr. motto Arnaud coming up, and he'd give each of the kids. He'd give us all twenty bucks. You know? It's it's it was weird. It just like the head. But we didn't know at the time, you know. So interesting. Thank you, Frank. Joe is in the Bronx home of a few mobsters over the years. Coast to coast AM, Joe how you doing I'm doing all right? Do you to take us more than a few months? All right. I said, correct. It. Right now, the talk was about it shift the two so. Yeah. No, my theory is this and it's a new theory show. Yeah. What about the fact that when we die or it could be a fact, I don't know when we die. Our? So our body gets exchanged with our soul mate, or one of our soul mates. Will you get there? So and that's Obama's into new bodies, you give a new soul and the new body, and that person gets are so and they get a new body because my theory is that the number of souls in the universe is limited to change keeps going on between other cells where we could get the term old soul. Right. And it just keeps evolving. That's an interesting thought you tie into old soul, which is a concept. I've found very compelling over the years, especially when you meet a child who just they just have this sort of very old soul about them. They just feel like they've been there before that. They're all good. Sure. Go ahead. I'm fine sitting here crying, you know, whatever. And they they just. They're very different than other children. And I think that I've always wondered about that claim for what we would call limited reincarnation that is to say, we're not reincorporated as baby bunnies or sunflower. But we are reincarnated for only other humans, and that limited limited reincarnation model with explain the old souls that they've they're almost completed their route here on earth before they can be considered a completed at ascend. I I don't know. I wish I knew. But that's a great. It's a really interesting twist on that because we weren't talking about that earlier. And there are people like that. All right. Thank you. Joe? Let me get Elaine is in Fort Myers. Coast to coast AM is we run up to the top of the hour. Elating? Good morning in and everybody. Commenters? Just very simple about the soul versus spirit, topics me, the soul is the total absence of you. It's a total essence of you. It is you individually spirit is just a reference to you in a non non physical form you in a spirit form that to me. That's all the spirit word means is you when you're not in a physical form. Spirit forum. It's a soul is really you. Well, that's consistent with something. So hang on for just one second that there's a notion right that the divine breath is what the spirit is. It's actually that spark this noise of this idea that there is a. That there is a divine spirit. Wind is often how it's described and it blows through us, and it it invigorates us where we need it to like a cool breeze. But that the soul is much more important piece. That's so it's consistent least with that worldview. So I think you're onto something we'll go to mobile Alabama. Thank you lane. Rodney is standing by for open lines at the time for two more. After this. Rodney. Brought to you still there. But yeah, I'm here. Okay. Go ahead. You're on open lights. Okay. I want to talk about the human soul and spirit and how everything comes to be. Okay. I don't want to give a complicated weather, but I can take it back to adamant as if I can take it to where we are. Now. So right now with someone is born, okay. Heartbeats beating the women's world experience entering into the body. Okay. Baby is born it has consciousness. That the soul entering the bible. Okay. So man is three beings. If I got it. Okay. Man is body theory. Well, people realize it's our consciousness is our soul. What every week entertain? I hear it plant at our soul. And that's who that's makes us to where we are to be whether it's like music, but are you like this whether you drink all that all those are you planning the soldier solace? Ralph for that stuff to grow..

Joe Shuster marijuana Frank Shakespeare Simpson Berks society Rick Stanley Mark Missouri Quincy president FBI Columbia Chuck Lavelle Kenneth Rodney Whitey Bulger Ken John Birch society
"joe shuster" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"When you think about, you know, chick that Joe Shuster interior to invent superman keenum Bilfinger to do Batman. It took gap. Professor more than I do wonder woman Stanley created the fantastic four Spiderman, I know. Iron man. We don't have enough time. Researcher daredevil? Among others. There's like so these obscure characters that marvel hasn't found a way to monetize yet. But Stanley still created. Yeah. And he kid some people also compare them to Shakespeare and Simpson said he was he told her to the masses to the popular people at the time. Oh, without a doubt. That's actually a very interesting. Connection because we don't think of Shakespeare as being that because of most people don't study Shakespeare read Shakespeare unless there while unless I have to but yeah, you're right. He was a populist writer at the time. He was the James Cameron of his era. Shakespeare was especially when it came to staging special effects and other stuff he was really into that. Those are good comparisons. And yeah, I was I was following my friend, David Mack who's written daredevil and some of the things in any posted a photo of him in Stanley together. And it was it was neat. We had him on the show. I think I think played a clip from it. But I didn't. I would like to have had him on again this really he he he was a treasurer. Thank you, Frank. Sorry. Thank you can let me get Frank is winning in Quincy, Massachusetts on coast to coast for Whitey Bolger story. Frank is all right. Good morning. Good morning. Hey, yeah. I get well everybody up here know somebody that knows somebody. Like three degrees of separation with Whitey Bolger in Southie. It's true. It's true. I think he he got what he got come into him. He had he deserved what he got in prison. But really, I think he knew more about the FBI then. They want us to know. You know, what did you think of the the Johnny Depp movie? I it's funny. I just watched it last week black said, yeah. That is a great movie. It's very accurate. I think. Yeah. That was interesting. I wondered about that. And especially the part about the FBI how much was going back and forth between those two things is crazy. It's crazy. So did you ever have a personal experience yourself? Well, not not with Whitey. But with one of his his one of his top hitman. Yeah. So when I in the seventies I was like nine or ten years old, and we'd be playing in the street there in Quincy we happen to live. I happen to live next to John mater. I know his family out there and we used to play in the street. And and I remember Mr. Toronto coming up, and he'd give each of the kids he'd give us all twenty bucks. You know? It was weird. It's just the. Like the head. But we didn't know at the time, you know. Well, it's so interesting. Thank you, Frank. Joe is in the Bronx home of a few mobsters over the years. Coast to coast AM, Joe. Hey. All right..

Whitey Bolger treasurer James Cameron Joe Shuster Frank FBI Quincy Researcher Johnny Depp Professor Shakespeare David Mack John mater Massachusetts Southie Mr. Toronto Simpson three degrees ten years
"joe shuster" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

12:01 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Thanks for being with us on the program this evening, always a pleasure to welcome back to the Jim Bohannon show, a renowned bestselling author TV show creator and a man who has a particular bet that we've enjoyed on this program, and that is talking with children not at or down to. But with children Brad Meltzer. So great to have you back on the program. Good to hear your voice, my friend. And you have have done it again. Sure. Brand of course, was known for the inner circle book of fate denied other bestselling thrillers. Gooding the tenth Justice the first council the millionaires, the president shadowed his most recent book the escape artist debuted at number one on the bestseller list. Ho-hum as in the what else is new, but. He's also one of the only authors have books on the bestseller list for nonfiction advice and heroes too. And I want to ask you a bit about about the I am series of books because it I suppose it seemed out of character for those who liked to stereotype, folks. Ian Fleming does one type of book Brad Meltzer, does another type of book, and you may never depart the it was probably amazing to a lot of people to to first become aware of these. I am children's books. Yeah. And and I think you hit it right on the head. In fact, so proprio we're talking about nine my first foray out of doing thrillers. Was doing comic books. That's what I did. I even before we did the IM series. And so I always we've been talking about them all day of my friend, STAN late. Sure. Guy I interviewed decades ago. Yeah. Been kind of my career. But I when I was doing one of my thrillers. I interviewed him about the creation of superman because STAN was one of the people that was there at the start. They were all young kids together. These. Kids from New York. Jerry siegel. And Joe Shuster from Cleveland all these kinda young teenagers having this immigrant experience, and and telling their stories, and when I started doing novel, they sent me I always put little comic book references in my thrillers. And when I did my fourth book editor from DC comics approach me, one of my book signs, and he said, would you like to write green arrow, one of the one of the superheroes of DC comics? And I said I've been waiting my whole life for someone to say those words to me. And I love, you know, writing superman and baptism because when I do that, listen, I love my own thrillers. I love the kids books. But when I write the words be a T M A N and put a colon after that. And I get but words in Batman mouth. Jim I'm wearing my underwear on the outside of my pants that day. I'm so excited. And when I first started doing it. I remember there were Hello, novelist. Who sets me? Why are you doing that? Why are you slumming encompass? Why are you doing something different? Right. Just like you said, Ian Fleming. Right, JAMES BOND. You got to keep JAMES BOND, then and the first event that I did I did it with Janet Ivanovich and Walter Mosely were on a panel together and Janelle Monae announced that was writing green our leaned over to me and whispered to me and said, I love wonder woman, and Walter Mosely leaned over to me and said, this green arrow arrows still have speedy which is his psychic has, Robin. And in that moment, I realized there were all these kind of hidden fans of the heroes and everyone was just staying in their lane out of fear right into what it was. And I was just lucky enough to jump out and people like Stanley were kind enough to me as I started. And that's what took me eventually to not just read about superheroes. What's right about American heroes where we started the IM series? Honestly, I think that the the the split in this country is not between those who who read comic books for those who've never read comic books. The split is between those who will admit it and those who somehow are ashamed of it. We all read comic books. Well, that's a year. You're exactly right. You know, the thing. That's so amazing. Is that we it was a time when I was growing up. You didn't admit it. You didn't tell anyone I did. Because I didn't know any better. But I was never ashamed of it. I used to wear you know, I found a bootleg Batman sure, you couldn't even buy one back then. And and to me what what Stanley gave me when I think back on this man who just passed away yesterday. But when I think about Stanley is he didn't just give us the co creations of fantastic four or the X men or ironman or even his greatest creation. What co creation of spider man, but what he gave me or morals to live by it gave me some no center, my belief system. He gave me a creed that I could apply and the reason has stories were so powerful. It wasn't a superhero party. It wasn't a superpower part. It was that I could use those lessons in the real world. And what Stanley and Jerry Siegel. And Joe Shuster create superman wrote about was that idea of being good for the sake of being good, and no politician today. No corporation today. No advertisement today. They're all. Fighting. We're great if fighting in this country, where experts have fighting we learned that lesson. But when you fight for yourself, and you fight for power you for money you've already lost, and what Stanley stood for in those heroes. It was the greatest metaphor is doing good for good sake, helping someone because for no other reason than it's right. And I I hope at what Stanley taught me when I was ten years old with those characters is what I'm still trying to do today with our I series is trying to use my creativity to put good into this world. Dallas was his great legacy. And that's all I'm trying to do today with these kids books. One other thing I would not well, we're on the subject of Stanley. And that is that that will certainly his characters tried to do good, but but they were flawed. I mean, you're superman and Batman these characters were so perfect. I wouldn't think of looking twice at Lois lane because I am bureau of heart. And and then you've got the the the the nerdy teenager. Peter Parker with. Was Spiderman and the like, I think that was the thing. And you've got the the uncontrollable rage that brings out the hulk. It was much more easy to identify with marvel comics characters and that is to say Stanley characters and it was with somebody. You'd never be as perfect as like superman or Batman. Yeah. And listen you, of course, right? That's the that was the defining line at the beginning of marble from DC DC with these lower case g gods. They were, you know, each of them were truly like superman was this these, you know, flash was was super speed of mercury. They each had some kind of like almost daily that they can align with but in the marvel universe. They were like Peter Parker with a young struggling boy who's the cause of his own pain was was him. He was the one who abandoned his guilt that drove him, and you know, ironman didn't care about anyone but himself, and as you said the whole is rage issues the door was sent to earth because you're so full yourself. I'm gonna make you a human man, you're gonna learn to be humble again. And and even the X men were created as an allegory for the so rights movement. They weren't mutants. They were basically African Americans who Stanley and Jack Kirby were trying to show just because you're different doesn't. Mean your awful it should be feared. But we need to have tolerance. And and they use these these great metaphors, they put them in costumes, but suddenly we can all see ourselves, and my favorite issue of Spiderman that exist to this day. I think it's number thirty three right at the start and Steve did go through it and Stanley wrote it, and what happened to the building falls on Spiderman. And he's crushed under the rubble the whole building. This giant big machinery thing is on top of this back. His aunt May's about to be killed in about the die and asked to save her. But he can't get up. The wait is too much. It's you can't lift a building. And he stuck at the bottom of all this rubble and screaming for help. And no one's coming. And he finally realizes no one's coming. And so he just starts pushing and panel after panel after panel of him just struggling and saying I gotta save myself and realize when it's easy everyone can do the easy things. But when it's hard is where you find your character. And I read that story. With my youngest son last night. I read those pages to him. And I hope he got that very clear what that story is arguing that. This isn't a story about Spiderman. But this is a story about all of us in our lot lot that when we fall into a hole, and we all fall in our holes, maybe abuse, maybe addiction, maybe they were betrayed by someone way love. But when we fallen that whole the only way you get out is you gotta find the hero within yourself. Verizon. That is what I love discussion here with Brad Meltzer. And we'll talk about his latest work here. I am Neil Armstrong ordinary people change the world. It is from dial books. But before we do that. Let's take a call from David in Creston, Iowa. Hello, david. Jim thanks for taking my call. Again. I really appreciate it. I know that you, and I are probably the same as you did. I know you remember this guy named dick Tracy vividly, of course, in his two way risk radio. Followed by his two way, wrist TV, of course. Yes. Right. Right. Back. Then when you I regret that we said old boy wouldn't that be needed? We're really add work. Yes. It would. Yeah. Exactly. Great great grandson. He's got an ipad. Now, you have to wonder. Wonder? Yeah. Yeah. Chester gould. I mean, he would I suppose be thrilled to see that. His creation has has come to fruition. If you will in real life, I suppose boy, David and. Yeah, I think we all have fond memories of of such an era eh, the did you read the Sunday comics as well as the comic books Brad Meltzer. Yeah. You know what? In fact, I not only read them. I studied them because I wanted to see what at different times of history was popular. And when I look back, I did my senior paper at college about propaganda comic books as propaganda World War Two and started studying them, and what I found Jim was this is if you look at the heroes of different areas, you can figure out who we are as a culture. So if you look at the great, depression, the old comic strips that were popular we're actually Tarzan and flash Gordon character designed to transport ourselves where we it was a depression. We didn't want to be there. They wanted to be in the twenty th century. They wanted to be in the jungles of. Tarzan, but as World War Two started encroaching on our shores America got scared. We were worried and we needed someone to save us. And a character named superman was created and sue brand sold a million copies ever. No one can figure out why. But it was obvious. We were just we were country that what was looking for a hero someone to be strong at this time of bone ability. And if you look even after nine eleven happened if you remember during nine eleven every in a we'll never laugh again, there'll be no irony, and the very first film that broke through the public consciousness was Spiderman once again, we weren't a country a superman anymore. We knew we weren't invulnerable. But we were a country of Spiderman we knew we were flawed. A man we were going to fight back. We wanted to push back to this day sixteen years later after nine eleven I think it's why we have all this run of superhero movies that have run for the past almost two decades. And even the bad superhero movies makeover one hundred million dollars why because we're still starving for heroes to come. Save us, absolutely. We'll take a quick break and come back with more with. I guess Brad Meltzer his newest book, and this is Sunday, by the way since we're in the holiday spirit here. Some the little stocking stuffer if you know somebody with the big flat square feet would be the book. I am Neil Armstrong. But right now, a subject that frankly effects me, I'll tell you, very, honestly. And if you or a.

Stanley Brad Meltzer Ian Fleming Joe Shuster Neil Armstrong Peter Parker Jerry siegel Jim Bohannon David DC comics Jim Gooding Tarzan STAN Batman JAMES BOND president Walter Mosely Jim I
"joe shuster" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And in fact, I would even go a little farther. I mean, that's what we have to do in congress is the one that needs to do more. I would I would go farther. I think we need to withdraw from the UN treaty that limits what we can do on a silence, I mean because our asylum law, it's the nineteen eighty refugee act. Based on that you win treaty. And the fact is that we can't we can't do because we're bound by this tree the treaty is from the Johnson administration approved by Democratic Senate in nineteen sixty seven. I think we're sixty eight is when they find the okayed it, and it's the same kind of mess is a nineteen sixty five. In other words, nobody neither. President Johnson when he signed that Bill north of senators who voted for ever imagine anything like what we're seeing at the southern border would ever happen. And so that treaty is now creating problems for us that no one envisioned a time. It's long overdue us to pull out of that refugee tree and just set our own refugee and asylum. Rules ourselves rather than be bound by something from the UN. And I think there are probably three congressman who would fight for that. Yeah. Yeah. Maybe anyway, thank you executive center for immigration. Studies marker Corean the chief guy over there. Always a pleasure. Mark have a great day. Thank you. Joe shuster. All right. Let's take a break. We'll be right back choice. Here. The Florida midterms.

UN President Johnson Joe shuster Johnson administration congress congressman Bill north Florida executive Senate Mark
"joe shuster" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on About to Review

"I was going to ask about that because I was trying to find any sort of picture when Disney is arguably the best at when they want to keep a secret. It is on lockdown. Nobody sees anything like with, I mean with others, even with like Infinity partout. We started seeing behind the scenes picture of that a year ago. But those were like people just on the set, but when they want to clamp down and not show anything. But also even with those photos, they don't really give much away just like, oh, does he's doomed differences? And we'll just speculate. It's going gonna happen. You know, kind of head of data. I saw some pictures of the woman playing jasmine. I saw what they did with her costume and that. Yeah, yeah. So I, I just I'm totally on board with this. They did a side by side or actually at the top and bottom comparison to the original opening of the animated movie, and it's live action. It is almost beat for beat. So yeah, totally sold somebody who is not sold on. This is Terry Rossio who is one of the original writers of the animated film. He has some complaints somewhat compulsive about what they're valid complaints. I actually it is. It is. It is kinda valid. So writers of the animated moving are getting nothing with this new adaptation, even though almost everything is going to be the same. And so they're complained, not just him other members of the WGN, the writers guild of America. If you work on something and you create a thing, ten fifteen twenty years later. Disney remakes that thing in a different medium. You no longer get any royalties. Inaugur get any credit. You get nothing. I think it had more to do with the fact that it was a cartoon because one thing he did say is that because at the time that they wrote it, they weren't anticipating. It would be made into a live, of Of course. course, that's why they didn't get any contracts made for the dialogue. Well, his complaint is that when you see the trailer, that dialogue from the cartoon movie is what they use in the live action movie using the same dialogue with not in the contract. Yeah, I mean, it it is tough. That's tough. Yeah. I mean, because any did say in this big statement that Disney paid him and all the writers, what they said they were going to get paid, so he was not complaining about that. It was just he was saying it was hard to hear his words in a new head of knowing that he is not getting anything. What's even worse is that Disney wouldn't even give them up like a park pass. I read that. Yeah. A little bit salty. He dug a little bit more and use like you like, can I at least get a pass to the park? And they're like now teacher net, what I would want is whatever that VIP pass. You get to the front of the line. That is the movie like twenty thirty years ago, but it still is is unfortunate. You Disney isn't like some mom about company. That's not. That's the got lawyers who had all in and it's legally they can't do it because it's not. It's not just about a Latin, right? So if this is some legal precedent to have that's for every live adaptation they've ever done such beauty and the beast. That's Melissa. That's Cinderella. Book jungle book. It's all coming lines. Oh, well can go kick rocks in fairness jungle, but like most of that casper CGI. One of the right at the writing? Oh, yes. So it is going to tough. I mean, but it it reminds me of Jerry Saigo Joe Shuster scenario where they created superman and they got paid for it in nineteen thirty, nine of two hundred and fifty dollars, which is huge. And one of them literally died penniless and it is the other ones. His family was in court for decades ago, so it is tough, you know? So here's a hot tip for anybody listening to this show who is in the field of animation or writing or whatever. Think big when you were putting those contracts with your lawyers be like just in case they do another adaptation, put some sort of language in your contract where you have something going because you no longer own. Once you sell it to whoever. So you don't own it..

Disney Terry Rossio writers guild of America Jerry Saigo Joe Shuster WGN Melissa ten fifteen twenty years twenty thirty years fifty dollars
"joe shuster" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

The Weekly Planet

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

"It's not like in some cases, it's like, who knew. Where was your platform to build this was going to become popular. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster famously created superman and Jerry Seinfeld credits on feld. Exactly. He's doing quite well. Yeah, he's got so many cars. He was wise to go independent of Ma that -solutely, but Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster famously credit superman say, and they they, they gave her over all they rights to it. And now of course it's it's lunch FOX's action figures it's movies or whatever. And for longtime, they didn't say a penny of that. It was just like, well, you got paid for state die without saying another families get it light in the day. A one of them did think like go to light in the day. Yeah, right. Yeah. And so yeah, and it comic books. The comic book industry is famously by work for hire, yes, you pipe, you get pied via dies work and you do the fuck off. Create a character. Yeah, full for one of the big two, they own it, yes. And you don't say any like if again, I put it on lunch boxes, they make a movie or whatever. So like Todd McFarlane who was working on spider man created venom. And so I think Todd McFarlane got a pretty good deal. He was so well regarded like he created. He created that look of Spiderman, which I think is quite stand now, yes, which is a super bendy limbs. The continental area namic look and the data on the webbing and the answer, like trying to him Spiderman swinging down on these web kind of like a trip as honest like all, like kind of angular, like one kind of like a banana. He looked like look like rent olive banana swing in on a pace of string. Yeah, and and taught him a follow was like, because if you look at spider-man's like Molly universe, bio thing, it says he has incredibly elastic limbs. Super, humanly strong or whatever. So Todd, McFarlane clearly read the bone win. We'll just have him. Have him spiderlike having like limbs splayed at and they'll promotions. Yeah. Yeah, unnatural bending of whatever. And yeah, again, this huge spools of wedding, a webbing flying all abound the kind of like so much detail and people clearly respond to that Eric loss. And also he worked on ice bottom end book there, and he had kind of a similar locos really quite dynamic and con of like they brought this energy that on the pri- artist really hadn't. Yeah. And so taught. McClellan code, he's own Spiderman book was just spider, man. I think he got a pretty sweet deal for that, like some decent royalties. But again, like anything you've done prior to that, not selling selling, selling a million copies. May you get you get you for that, what you get and you don't get upset except in this case that area very think. And so rob was actually rub law felt the Michael Jordan of comics as he calls himself. To go to be independent of this situation, studio system are they didn't have. They went all on at I I, but I, the big hit that I wanted to get. Was Jim lay you wear of the the traveling Wilbur. He's the band, the band, the traveling memories. I I have have a a similar. similar. It turns out and image comics have a similar trajectory because a lot of the traveling will breeze teamed up kind of by accident like it was a George Harrison wanted to George Harrison needed to create a base onto one of these singles. And then I think he was like it was in America, and Bob Dylan had a studio. So he's like, I'll just go to Bob Dylan studio and record it. And then he was like, I left my Qatar, this other guy's house, so go and get that he went over and he was like, I'm recording the single do you wanna come over and they went, okay. And then just a whole bunch of them got together and they recorded a song and they're like, this is too good to be a bayside. Yeah. I'm just gonna the best band in the world with the best band in the world for a minute, the Michael Jordan of best bands in the world. That's when Michael Jordan is born. Yeah..

Todd McFarlane Jerry Siegel Michael Jordan Joe Shuster Bob Dylan superman Jerry Seinfeld George Harrison Eric loss FOX Wilbur Qatar McClellan Jim America rob
"joe shuster" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Cereals was a fleeting moment of rather elevated pause. The heritage minute first broadcast in nineteen Ninety-one and produced by the historic Canada. Charitable foundation was envisioned as a history lesson miniature sixty seconds from start to finish profiling prominent person, a significant place or notable episode in Canadian history. Created to be the same length as a television advertisement. The goal was to promote lesser known chapters of Canada's, passed, including often more obscure Canadian contributions to the world to an exclusively Canadian audience. And in the early days, they were pervasive presence not only during the commercials on TV, but also on the big screen during the movie trailers screen to head of the blockbuster film release of the day at cinemas across the country and also in school classrooms from coast to coast, Historica Canada. Estimates third of Canadian teaches us the heritage minutes in some form or another in their classrooms to illustrate that curriculums between two and five new minutes or released each year, the subject of each being a closely guarded secret ahead of its release and the ninety episodes of the heritage minute to have been broadcast date have covered an eclectic array of subjects from a profile of James Naismith of Ontario who invented basket. Born eighteen ninety one the story of Cheney when Jack a twelve year old first nations boy who died while escaping Canada's notorious residential school. System in nineteen sixty six to Joe Shuster the Toronto born comic book, Liz straighter who in nineteen thirty-one created super..

Canada Historica Canada Joe Shuster James Naismith Charitable foundation Cheney Toronto Liz Ontario Jack sixty seconds twelve year
"joe shuster" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Okay so it's cleveland boston goof superman was created by two high school students jerry siegel and joe shuster that was done is at boston cleveland or just goof superman created by we would know that that's a good that's a goof to goof yeah yeah cleveland yup superman was invented in cleveland any place there no number two thomas edison's actual brain is stored at at a museum in this city boston cleveland or just goof thomas edison's brain that's goof when we know never heard that that's a that's a goof yeah we would have heard about that that is stein's brain is on display at the mutter museum in philadelphia his actual brain number three helen keller using it clearly not number three helen keller was born in the rural area outside of this town and she said out loud her first word there which was water is that boston cleveland or just goof think it's cleveland i thought she couldn't speak we'll see how are you kidding me did you never see the miracle worker that's goose i thought she couldn't say goof i say cleveland boston cleveland it it's a goof but helen keller said water that and of the miracle worker yes helen keller bitchy had nothing to do with one of the new there's i got it the expression of people in glass houses actually started in this city where the architect hermann wilder designed and built a neighborhood of mainly glass houses is that boston cleveland or just to goof class houses people shouldn't tros dole's glasshouses that is boston because boston's pretty architecturally advance goof boston nothing's built in cleveland made it up.

boston boston cleveland cleveland stein mutter museum helen keller hermann wilder jerry siegel joe shuster thomas edison philadelphia dole
"joe shuster" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

"So he he does more marvel stuff than dc no we don't know i guess disney more okay sure he well see the thing is is like he doesn't normally do stuff like this it was kind of odd and i actually didn't really love his version of superman so i didn't buy it for that reason i mean i love him as an artist i just didn't really love the his portrayal of it so i wasn't a infatuated so yeah anyway there's a million variants of this so have fun with that so yeah got it got to catch them all yes yes it is so here's here's an interesting bit of trivia for superman he was originally a bad guy he jerry yeah thank you thank you hang on he was originally a bad guy guy like minds canadian no we'll talk about that in the next episode stand on guard i promise so but no jerry siegel and joe shuster who were the two nerdy creators of him they when they were in high school they wrote a story about a superman who was a villain with special powers mental powers and basically it was an absolute power corrupts absolutely kind of thing and then they ended up changing him but here is it was superman has quite the history of changes but what do i want to go where do i wanna go here there's lots of lots of trivia about supervisor ret cons lots of red cons lots of trivia one of the one of the things that people say no this wasn't it but then when they looked at like closer things after jerry siegel passed away it looks like superman was like a stand in for his dad kind of because his dad passed away just a couple of weeks before the original draft for superman came out the original bullet.

disney jerry siegel joe shuster supervisor
"joe shuster" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Elizabeth gilbert where she argues that genius is really not rare that many of us have at least traces of it inside ourselves it's a great motivational talk and check out dan gilbert speaking and how people can be genuinely happy even if they do not get what they want in life it's worthwhile listening for anyone even people who love their jobs next job i'm steven griberg and wbz news time is 12 25 the search is on him cleveland for a new location to put a statue of superman officials originally planned to put the man of steel near the rock and roll hall of fame but that site is no longer available city officials and sculptor david deming are meeting to talk about a new spot demings four thousand pounds ten foot long statue includes a tribute to superman creators joe jerry siegel and joe shuster the two are from cleveland and created the legendary comicbook character back in the 1930s wbz news time is twelve twenty six right now we have fifty one degrees in boston under mostly cloudy skies some rain coming in later this afternoon in it will be cloudy and damp tonight and tomorrow with rain much of the time which could occasionally be heavy the overnight low forty the high tomorrow forty three wbz news time coming up on twelve twenty seven israel taking aim at iranian targets in syria details ahead at 1230 would wbz's mike macklin here's your forecast it's going to be cold surprise surprise surprise were pretty sure of this because for two million winter's in a row around here it's bankole except during the ice age when it was thinking cold where right window our triple pain window is the solution to cold remember what mom said hey it's cold at.

Elizabeth gilbert cleveland boston israel mike macklin dan gilbert steven griberg superman david deming joe jerry siegel joe shuster syria four thousand pounds fifty one degrees ten foot
"joe shuster" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"joe shuster" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Different people on different say was a superhero can verse story and really why thought so zuse with them or odin the these are the all powerful gods right in in the four mythology and and oregon say the nordmann's cugat algae i i agree here eight poseidon opec okay the modernday acclimating series while you shouted perry it is the god of war he's the modern day holck i just would like you to was there any gather whispered st louis the god of us perry man when he's a little okay so yes i agree with you ancient times there were superheroes so it didn't start with with batman and superman exactly so that's my point let's take a look at a little bit here as to since the agent days the question is we've now progress we've gone to a we are at this point comic books started in the thirties with the superman 1930 aid jerry siegel and joe shuster batman in the '60s well i mean before that way for that but in the thirties as well but in the '60s they developed these these shows on television bright and let just think about the show's because the next section i'm going to have to have your a little quiz of four you on the music of superheroes ogre tv show yes lord okay kerr yeah we've got we did an app gives you that we will do that in a few minutes few short minutes but first i want us evaluate this we have comic books now did your parents or grandparents ever talk about your dad talk about reading the first comic books in now he told me and put down like me reading comic russell who was beat an event is trying to put myself in their 30s and 40s who was reading superman and batman back then you know when they first started out to really make this work it had to be just the kids right he was straight alcudia noah dahlem ever reading any of these now rewrite in.

batman jerry siegel joe shuster russell oregon perry kerr