35 Burst results for "Joe Palca"

"joe palca" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:45 min | Last month

"joe palca" Discussed on NPR News Now

"One sites. Run by the state this is. Npr new zealand. Prime minister justin to our dern is vowing to strengthen the country's anti-terrorism laws after a known isis supporters stabbed seven people in a supermarket yesterday the attacker had been under surveillance. Three people are in critical condition in texas county. Judge is temporarily barring the state's largest anti-abortion rights group from suing planned parenthood. A texas right to life website had invited people to anonymously leave information about anyone. They say aiding or abetting an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy after the state's new abortion ban took effect this week. Nasa scientists are waiting for more images to confirm that says. Perseverance rover successfully court. It's i rock on mars. Npr's joe palca reports. The rock cores are due to be returned to earth on a future mission. Although perseverance is a pretty sophisticated robotic geologist scientists would like to be able to confirm the rovers analyses with instruments only available on earth especially if the analyses hint that there was once microbial life on mars. The rover drilled the rock sample on september first but mission managers wanted to be sure. The sample made it into the collection tube. Initial pictures were inconclusive. So another set is being taken. Perseverance will ultimately leave the collection tubes on the martian surface for a subsequent mission to return them to earth. Perhaps in a decade or so joe palca. Npr news this is npr support..

Prime minister justin dern texas county joe palca new zealand Nasa Npr texas rovers Npr news npr
AstraZeneca may have "included outdated information" in COVID-19 vaccine trial report

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

AstraZeneca may have "included outdated information" in COVID-19 vaccine trial report

"There have been questions about data from astrazeneca's covid nineteen vaccine a federal group called the data safety monitoring board or dsm dmv is tracking the companies us. Covid vaccine study astrazeneca said. Yesterday its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective against cova disease. Npr's joe palca says that triggered fresh questions about the vaccines effectiveness. The trouble is that the dsa mvp said. Whoa hold on a second. That's not what we saw. And they put out a statement or at least the national institute of allergy and infectious disease. Put out a statement quoting the as saying we express concern that astrazeneca may have included outdated information from that trial which may have provided an incomplete view of the efficacy data. Astrazeneca says it will provide fresh data to the dsm. Be within forty eight

Astrazeneca Data Safety Monitoring Board Dsm Dmv Joe Palca National Institute Of Allergy NPR
Johnson & Johnson's one-shot COVID vaccine approved by FDA

NPR News Now

01:12 min | 8 months ago

Johnson & Johnson's one-shot COVID vaccine approved by FDA

"Has granted emergency use authorization to a third vaccine in the united states toward against covid nineteen. It's johnson's and johnson's one shot vaccine and npr still powell reports at fda approval means it can be distributed to the public he. Fda decision comes after an advisory committee made up of independent. Experts voted unanimously. In favor of the move. The regulatory agency had said a vaccine would have to show at least fifty percent efficacy with an acceptable safety record to receive an emergency use authorization. The johnson and johnson vaccine did that with sixty six percent efficacy preventing moderate to severe cova dullness and eighty five percent for more serious disease. A large study did not reveal any major safety issues. A key advantage of the johnson and johnson vaccine is that it only requires a single shot. Making it easier to distribute joe palca. Npr news now that the fda has approved the johnson and johnson shot it will be distributed alongside the two dose shots from pfizer madonna. The jj vaccine expected to begin rolling out early this week. The company says it plans to provide up to twenty million doses by the end of march. Please

Johnson FDA NPR Powell United States Joe Palca Npr News Pfizer Madonna
J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

Up First

03:45 min | 8 months ago

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

"The fda is getting ready to authorize a third covid vaccine emergency use in this country. This one this vaccine is from pharmaceutical giant. Johnson and johnson. And if it's authorized it would join vaccines from pfizer and madera in the us vaccination campaign. But here's the thing those other. Vaccines require two doses. This vaccine from johnson and johnson needs only one single dose to be effective. Npr science correspondent. Joe palca is here to tell us how effective good morning joe morning. well one dose. that's exciting. How good is this new vaccine. Oh it's good. It was sixty six percent effect of overall in preventing moderate to severe disease and eighty five percent protective against more severe diseases. Now for people with good memories. They'll say wait. A minute i heard that madonna and pfizer wasn't that closer to ninety five percent effective and the answer is yes they were higher but those vaccines were tested before. Some of the new variants began circulating and prevent any five percent of severe critical. Disease is really good since the goal of the vaccines is to keep people out of the hospital and keep them from dying and the other thing about this vaccine is mentioned in the intro is that it's one dose which makes the logistics of getting it to people a lot easier to remember to come back so public. Health officials are looking forward to being able to distribute the j. vaccine. This is how anthony fauci chief medical adviser to the president. Put it on. Nbc's today show to have them come in and be in the mix with the other. Two is is nothing but good news. Nothing but good news. Foul cheat now. The process usually is before a vaccine gets authorized in advisory board has to approve it right. Well yes well. Though he has to is probably an exaggeration. It doesn't absolutely has to. The fda can approve things on its own lookout but like the other two vaccines. The the fda wanted to be extremely transparent. There were some questions about whether they were rushing the vaccine to the market before they knew it was safe and they want to assure the public that this was being looked at carefully so that committee has been around for a while. it's known in the trade as burg. Pack the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee i love that name ver- pack made of scientists and doctors with a variety of specialization relating vaccines before the meeting. Fda provides the committee with its analysis and they also make that analysis of the public So i asked. Bruce gallon president of global immunization at sabin vaccine institute. What he made of the analysis of the johnson and johnson vaccine. I didn't see anything in it. That i would think is going to be a show stopper for packed. Wanna recommend that. Fda act on so gallon is predicting the ver- pack will give the vaccine a thumbs up. How many doses. Johnson and johnson have ready to ship out. Well not as many as people had hoped a year ago when started trying to make these vaccines they all said. All we're gonna do this at risk manufacturing which means we're going to start making vaccine before they even knew it was going to be authorized even if it worked. And then they'd throw away if it didn't work and the government gave the money to do this but even with that company's still don't have the kind of inventory. The country needs in the case of johnson. Johnson they have about four million doses ready to go out the door and expect to have twenty million by the end of march and one hundred million by the end of june and remember. This is a one dose vaccine so one hundred million doses is one hundred million people vaccinated which is very big. Deal leslie and briefly. What is the timeline here. When the fda issued the emergency use authorization it could be any minute. I mean they knew it right after the meeting. They could do it tomorrow. That could do it in a few days. It'll be soon. I think if the committee gives a thumbs

Johnson Joe Palca FDA Pfizer Madera Anthony Fauci NPR Bruce Gallon Madonna Sabin Vaccine Institute JOE NBC Advisory Committee United States
Moderna's coronavirus vaccine faces U.S. FDA expert panel review

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine faces U.S. FDA expert panel review

"Vaccine for the corona virus could soon be available for emergency use in the us. Npr's joe palca reports panel of independent. Experts are meeting today to advise the food and drug administration on whether to authorize the shots. The vaccine is made by the biotech company moderna and is very similar to the one. Fda granted emergency use authorization to last week. Madeira enrolled some thirty thousand volunteers. In a study to judge the safety and efficacy of the vaccine the company reports the vaccine was more than ninety four percent effective in preventing covid nineteen while many volunteers suffered unpleasant side effects. After getting the vaccine including sore arms headaches and fever for the most part these went away in one or two days. Fda scientists have done their own evaluation of maderna's vaccine. The advisory panel provides an extra level of scrutiny to make sure regulators. Didn't miss anything important.

Joe Palca FDA Moderna NPR Madeira United States Maderna Headaches Fever
FDA releases details on Pfizer vaccine's effectiveness

NPR News Now

00:44 sec | 11 months ago

FDA releases details on Pfizer vaccine's effectiveness

"Npr news. I'm korva coleman. The food and drug administration has released its analysis of the covid nineteen vaccine produced by pfizer and its partner biontech. Npr's joe palca reports. This information was reviewed by a group of independent experts. That advise the fda. You know it's interesting because so far what we've seen from the company has been press releases one or two pages Saying how effective it is and ninety five percent. Effective is is what they've been saying and this these documents all back that up completely. Npr's joe palca reporting. The advisory committee will recommend whether the fda should approve the use of the covid vaccine on an emergency basis pfizer to start distributing the vaccine in the us this month.

Joe Palca Korva Coleman Biontech FDA NPR Pfizer United States
Mars Is The Place To Go This Summer

Short Wave

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Mars Is The Place To Go This Summer

"Okay Joe Palca. We are talking missions to Mars. Let's start with the United Arab Emirates which launched its probe two weeks ago. As you said, this is the country's first mission to Mars Yup and the probe is called hope and it will arrive in twenty twenty, one and twenty twenty one is a big year for the U. E. as I'm sure you know Emily Kwong I do not Joe Palca, but you're going to tell me why, yes, I am a because it's the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the UAE which was established in nineteen seventy one. So the morality leadership was eager to do something. Something to celebrate and a mission to Mars seemed like a great idea, Joe, that is a pretty splashy birthday present. Yes. That's what I was hoping for my fiftieth birthday, but I didn't get it. But seriously, that's just one of the reasons that they were going to Mars, it's partly to celebrate, but I talked Sarah Murray the deputy project manager and science lead for the emerets Mars mission. The purpose was not only to get to Mars by twenty twenty one and have vowed scientific. Data coming out of the mission that is unique nature and no other mission has captured before. But more importantly, it was about developing the capabilities and capacity of engineers in the country. Interesting. Yeah. Sarah says that the country's leaders wanted the you A. to develop a more of a knowledge-based economy and building a Mars probe provided a focus for expanding the country's technological capabilities. Okay. So Sarah mentioned the unique nature of this mission. Joe Tell me about the probe and what it is designed to do. It's about the size of a small car in weighs about a ton and a half, and it has these solar panels that look like wings essentially an and when they're spread out, it's about twenty four feet wide and when it goes to, Mars it will go into a really unusual elliptical orbit that will take essentially over every point on Mars. Once a week, it's providing us with full understanding of the changes, the weather of, Mars. Throughout an entire Martian day and throughout all the seasons of Morris throughout an entire Martian year, which lasts roughly two earth years. Wow. So they're really trying to get a comprehensive picture of the Martian atmosphere right and it's not just over time. Here's David Brain. He's part of a team of scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder collaborating on the emerets Mars mission. The three instruments that are on the space craft will help us measure the atmosphere of Mars from the surface, all the way to space. which has really been done before with other missions and that's very cool. All right. Joe, I know that China's mission to Mars has been a bit shrouded in secrecy. Here's what we know that it's name is teen win one which means questions to heaven. But one of the most notable things about it is that it includes an orbiter, a lander Andrew Rover. So a spacecraft that orbits the planet can land on it and move across the surface. Right? Well, it's really it's got three parts. It's all pushed together for the trip there, but then they separate. The orbiter of course stays in orbit and does remote sensing of the planet, and also will serve as a radio relay station for the mission on the surface, and then they'll these two things together, Land Rover, and then the rover will drive down a ramp and explore around the landing site. So it's an interesting mission, and I think it's a little hard to say China is not obviously in the same category as. As NASA terms of look what we did look over here, look do this we you know there there are a little more circumspect about how they do their missions. But the scientists I've talked to say this is a very serious interesting probe and it puts China in a really interesting position because only one country has successfully landed and roved round on Mars. Can you guess which country that is Russia? Now it's a It's the U S. of course, Russia did actually land a probe. It's a question of whether to call it a success or not because it only sends signals back for a few seconds. So technical success, I guess but not a very interesting mission.

Joe Palca Sarah Murray Mars China David Brain United Arab Emirates Land Rover Twenty Twenty Russia Emily Kwong Andrew Rover Nasa Project Manager University Of Colorado Boulder
NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

NPR News Now

01:13 min | 1 year ago

NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

"Nastase Juno spacecraft is heading for its twenty eighth close encounter with the planet Jupiter later this month. As NPR's Joe PALCA reports, the probe continues to explore new feature is on the giant Gas Planet Juno arrived at Jupiter four years ago, it went into an elongated orbit, plunging fairly close to the planet's cloud tops for a few hours before swinging far out into space for weeks. Keeping the close encounters short is essential because of the harsh radiation environment close to the planet. Recently has been exploring an enormous storm that just appeared on Jupiter. An amateur astronomer here on earth was the first to spot the storm. The probe has also been making in-depth studies of the famous red spot, and even bigger storm Juneau's main mission is to map Jupiter's gravity field something that will take another year to complete Joe Palca and news. The private satellite launch firm rocket lab is trying to figure out what went wrong with the mission. Yesterday it's rocket successfully lifted off from New Zealand but was unable to reach orbit and lost its payload of seven small satellites rocket had planned to make monthly launches for the rest of the year, and into two thousand, twenty one

Joe Palca Rocket Lab Juno NPR New Zealand
"joe palca" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on Short Wave

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think <hes> vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and <hes> just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in <hes>, and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick <hes>. That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and <hes>. You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other <hes>. This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, <hes> and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of <hes> delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had <hes> parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that <hes> the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying anything

Joe Palca NPR Sean Kirk Food and Drug Administration Emily Kwong Matty Baltimore
A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

Short Wave

10:33 min | 1 year ago

A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying

Joe Palca Polio Vaccine NPR Food And Drug Administration Sean Kirk Baltimore Jonas Salk Rachel Martin Seth Berkley Fauci Anthony Dr Lewis Fellow University Of Pittsburgh Medic CEO Garvey
FDA ends emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

FDA ends emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine

"Food and drug. Administration has formally sending special status for the use of to anti-malarial drugs in the treatment of covid nineteen. They've been promoted by president trump and the first week, so the outbreak. NPR's Joe Palca reports the FDA granted these drugs so-called emergency use authorization in March emergency use authorization makes it easier for doctors to use a drug in A. A manner not specifically approved by the FDA Hydroxy Clarkson and Clark when we're initially designed as anti-malarial drugs and later shown to be useful in treating certain auto immune disorders. At first some researchers thought they might be useful in treating cove. Nineteen of you championed by president trump who says he took the drug to prevent the disease, but carefully controlled studies failed to show a clear benefit for either drug, and now the FDA has rescinded. Rescinded the emergency use authorization of scientific investigations of the drugs. Potential benefits continue

FDA Donald Trump President Trump Joe Palca Hydroxy Clarkson NPR Clark
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 1 year ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

Peer-reviewed data shows remdesivir for COVID-19 improves time to recovery

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Peer-reviewed data shows remdesivir for COVID-19 improves time to recovery

"Of peer reviewed paper confirms earlier findings that the drug room desk severe can help patients hospitalized with covert nineteen recover NPR's Joe Palca reports them disappear is an antiviral drug made by Gilead sciences in February a multicenter trial began comparing ram disappear with a placebo in covert nineteen patients who required hospitalization slightly more than a thousand patients were enrolled in the trial late last month an interim analysis showed the drug was helping those on rent disappear had shorter hospital stays than those on placebo eleven days versus fifteen days the results prompted the food and drug administration to grant emergency use authorization for Rambus severe making it easier for doctors to prescribe it to patients a paper in the New England journal of medicine confirms the earlier results

Joe Palca Gilead Sciences Rambus New England Journal Of Medicin
"joe palca" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Promise to observe physical distancing and other safety precautions attorney Robert Tyler says he expects as many as three thousand churches across the state to resume in person services earlier this week governor Gavin Newsom said churches are weeks not months away from re opening along with hair salons dine in restaurants and sporting events nearly all California churches have complied with coronavirus restrictions most of them holding online services Duane brown NPR news Los Angeles the urging campaign to end the corona virus pandemic is playing out in the trenches of vaccine research and development around the world in the U. S. where the death toll is nearing one hundred thousand the federal government is investing more than a billion dollars in the drug company AstraZeneca if all goes as planned NPR's Joe Palca says the company could start coming out with three hundred million doses of the vaccine in the U. S. as early as this fall AstraZeneca is making a vaccine developed by scientists at the university of Oxford in England last month researchers began testing a vaccine in a thousand healthy volunteers to see if a it was safe and be was capable of eliciting the kind of immune response that would be needed to prevent people from getting sick for now however no one can say whether the vaccine will actually prevent disease nevertheless the drug company says it's gearing up to be able to make a billion doses of the vaccine and expects to be able to begin deliveries in September Joe Palca NPR news at the close on Wall Street the Dow was down one hundred one points this is NPR news a musical based on a television series about a musical coming to Broadway is coming to Broadway when Broadway re opens of course confused Jeff London explains space ran for two seasons on NBC and looked at a group of theater folk putting on a new musical about Marilyn Monroe he developed a devoted cult following but didn't catch on.

attorney Robert Tyler Gavin Newsom Los Angeles AstraZeneca NPR Joe Palca England Jeff London NBC Marilyn Monroe California Duane university of Oxford
U.S. orders 300 million doses of potential COVID-19 vaccine from British drug company

All of It

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. orders 300 million doses of potential COVID-19 vaccine from British drug company

"The federal government is providing more than a billion dollars to the drug company AstraZeneca to both develop and manufacture of coronavirus vaccine NPR's Joe Palca tells us the deal could provide three hundred million doses of the vaccine to the United States with shipments starting by October AstraZeneca is making a vaccine developed by scientists at the university of Oxford in England last month researchers began testing a vaccine in a thousand healthy volunteers to see if a it was safe and be was capable of eliciting the kind of immune response that would be needed to prevent people from getting sick for now however no one can say whether the vaccine will actually prevent disease nevertheless the drug company says it's gearing up to be able to make a billion doses of the vaccine and expects to be able to begin deliveries in

Federal Government Astrazeneca Joe Palca United States England University Of Oxford
Trump says he takes hydroxychloroquine to prevent coronavirus infection even though it’s an unproven treatment

Morning Edition

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Trump says he takes hydroxychloroquine to prevent coronavirus infection even though it’s an unproven treatment

"The president says he is trying to protect himself against corona virus by taking an unproven drug right in now familiar name hydroxy chloride Quinn Hydroxycut Jenkins hydroxy drawer corner when right now yeah several weeks ago study objectives because I think it's kind of a lot of good stories and if it's not good I'll tell you right they are not going to get hurt but for two months the president has been promoting this drug which is approved to fight malaria he's even said what do you have to lose now researchers say there are side effects so essentially you might have something to lose NPR's Joe Palca is here to bring us up to date on the science either Joe morning Steve I guess we should remember this is an antimalarial drug it's been around for that purpose but with the side effects what does the research say about this drug and covert nineteen well the of the results so far have been mixed there were some very preliminary studies saying that it might have a benefit that got that got some people including the president very excited and they were suggesting yes we should give it to patients who are very sick but the bulk of the research studies the carefully done clinical studies don't show a clear benefit and do show some risks so it hasn't been widely accepted for that purpose there are still studies underway in laboratories the reason people are interested in this drug is in laboratory studies it has been shown to block the in the ability of the virus to infect cells and replicate itself so there is a theoretical reason to think it works and in terms of prevention studies at the moment there too going on but they're they're not the results are in from those yet so you can't say for sure whether it's effective at preventing infection or not I want to be as clear as I can about the side effects it's not that if you take this drug you're gonna automatically die I mean you you know you may be fine but studies show that there's an increased percentage of risk of well what exactly what are the what are the dangers well there are hard ill there are heart conditions and can be caused or exacerbated there some some negative relationship that the two diabetes but but people as you say people have taken this people take it now when they're going into malaria endemic regions and they want to prevent malaria but right now the data in terms of preventing infection with corona virus is more or less like my cousin's sister's friend's sister knew someone who knew someone who took hydroxy Clark when every day of our life and live to be a hundred so I'll do it is usually not considered scientific evidence and that is effectively what the president said I've heard good stories so I'm taking it he also says though he got a sign off from his physician Sean Conley what does the doctor say well the doctor said and this is the quote from the White House and after numerous discussions he and I had regarding the evidence for and against the use of hydroxy Clark when we concluded the potential benefit from treatment outweighed the relative risks now the question in my mind is that I mean that doesn't tell us what evidence he was weighing the risks are clear the benefits are uncertain it's a little hard to know how you weigh those so what we know is the president really like this and talk with his doctor a lot about it and eventually was able to get we think a prescription for it or do we not even know that exactly right I presume you know we the president says he's taking it the doctor says he talked about it with the president so that's what we know okay gio thanks for the update really

President Trump Jenkins
Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine shows it can produce an immune response

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine shows it can produce an immune response

"A vaccine manufacturers reporting permanent rather preliminary data suggesting its covert nineteen vaccine is safe and as NPR's Joe Palca reports there are also indications it may be effective in preventing disease early results only involved a few dozen participants but the company materna of Cambridge Massachusetts says they are promising none of the subjects experienced a serious side effect from the injection all subjects showed evidence that the vaccine had prompted their immune systems to make antibodies to the virus and that antibody response persisted for more than a month the company says the level of the response was comparable to what scene in the plasma of patients who had successfully fought off a corona virus infection a study to see if the vaccine can actually prevent covert nineteen is expected to start this summer Joe Palca

NPR Joe Palca Cambridge Massachusetts
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Team grabs a tough and then gets last minute instructions you're going to wind surf club today it looks like the northwest Corvallis it started raining so teams hurried off to their van he also has the teams will be out again this weekend and then one more weekend to complete the effort because of a shortage of tests the centers for disease control and prevention has recommended that priority for testing go to people who are sick and might be infected with the virus but that misses people who may be infected and spreading the virus but have no symptoms trace tests people whether they're sick or not Corvallis is a city of nearly sixty thousand people D. L. says they don't need to test everyone to get a representative sample the original proposal was nine sixty eight weekend for four weekends but they've scaled that back a bit they now have preliminary results from the first weekend they were out April twenty fifth and twenty sixth we had two hundred and thirty seven households and we tested four hundred and fifty five people and how common was infection the estimate is approximately two per thousand people so point two percent D. L. says that might not sound like much but remember that was just a snapshot it doesn't tell you how many people have been infected since the start of the outbreak and it's also possible there are hot spots the team missed still the L. says it's worrying to win a thousand is a sufficient level of prevalence that if we were to reopen too quickly we would risk entering another epidemic exponential growth as DLC has expanded testing efforts like his project will be important to help officials know when it's safe to re open the community and to catch flare ups should they occur Joe Palca NPR news.

Corvallis D. L. representative Joe Palca
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"In that area too it's six twenty KCRW this is the national conversation with All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro you've asked us a lot of questions about a vaccine for over nineteen and while an actual product may still be many months away we are learning more about the research and development process NPR science correspondent Joe Palca is back with us again to answer your questions Joe good to have you here that's great to be here are you there are a lot of different scenarios for developing a vaccine for the coronavirus let's start with a question from Carol in Cleveland what is the likelihood of being able to develop a vaccine for coalbed nineteen what factors might inhibit successful vaccine development and how long will it take their job I think a lot of people been talking about this is a question of when there's a vaccine but should we be talking about is if there is a vaccine well are you my crystal ball is still a little cloudy okay things haven't quite come into clear focus yet it's hard to say is what I'm getting at here developing a vaccine well I I've talked you know there's there's something like a hundred different teams working on it I've talked to quite a few they they they don't feel like they're wasting their time so let's cross our fingers and hope that they're on to something hundred team seems like there must be a lot of duplicated efforts I mean they're not all coordinating right well you know we're at a very early stage I think there are there are a lot of ways to tackle this problem a lot of people who think they have the right idea and so it's not really so much overlap there is some I'm sure but yes the the main thing won't be to that date the thing you don't want to do is make a hundred vaccines and then decide you have to narrow it down at some point but she is Carol asked about what could inhibit a successful vaccine well that's the real question there's not that much experience with this virus we've only known about it you know the benefit of the doubt since December so that's not very long and how long will it take well it depends if you're an optimist or pessimist you know that vaccines can take a decade or more okay well this question gets right out that it comes from Frank in Colorado I keep hearing that there will be a corona virus vaccine for twelve to eighteen months but scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine for HIV for thirty or forty years with no success how can we be so confident that there will be a vaccine for this star S. within a year and a half Joe where does that confidence come from well I think part of it is that this virus is not as devious if I can describe that human term to a virus as the aids virus it eat it the aids virus does things the immune system which are very very subtle and complex and difficult to combat this is much more of a standard virus that has a standard way of entering cells and scientists think they can block that with one to object it sounds like you're saying it's it's well it's more like a familiar object yes we've seen viruses like this before and we know how to build a vaccine against viruses like this but as I said it if this is new so the things that worked before may not work this time well that's a little bit reassuring let's go to the customers comes from Andrea in Seattle and I think a lot of listeners hear this question of hers it was reported that there is no evidence of a person infected with covert nineteen develops immunity to reinfection if this is the case is it even possible to develop a vaccine that can provide immunity to cope at nineteen thank you so many questions about whether survivors have immunity or not Joe what can you tell us and and how that ties into vaccine research well I know even in my own families still have questions about that the answer is there is there is evidence that there is protection it's not very substantial yet buddy again as I keep saying there's not that much experience with people being infected getting better and then being re exposed at the same time most people most immunologist to study this most virologist who study is they think that there will be some sort of protective immunity and it is likely that that someone who's been affected at least for some period of time will not be infected won't be it won't be able to be infected again is that for sure true well I guess we'll see but that's that's a common belief from what we know so far yeah I just underscores how new this is and how quickly we're learning about and I'm thinking this program has been on the air for close to two months and in the early days you were on this program answering questions that maybe today we know the answer to that we didn't in those first weeks of of answering listener questions yeah it's it is thus but it's also even some of the questions that we thought we had the answers to we might not I mean the the question of at this question of protective immunity are you are you protected once you become infected that's going to be an important one to nail down and I think it's still up in the air so all right well Susan in Arkansas wrote in to ask if the death a major illness from this virus is from the pneumonia that goes with it are people who received an ammonia vaccine doing better than those that didn't what about that other vaccine well that vaccine is an important vaccine but it's against a bacterial pneumonia which is a different kind of problem altogether from the viral pneumonia that covert nineteen is associated with so it is unlikely I don't think anybody's really thought that it's important to look at it because it will be a little bit like you know asking if if you know you're listening to jazz music does that protect you from listening to classical music I mean they're just I know this may be a tortured analogy that's all right run with it okay let's move on to our next listener question this one is about let's assume that a vaccine is invented how's it going to be distributed well let's listen to the question this is comes from someone hi my name is and I'm calling from the Chicago area so my question is not yet but when there is a safe sexting available who will get it everyone only those at high risk or anyone who wants it and can take for it thank you this is a crucial question Joe what what do you know well the answer is going to depend on a lot of different factors yes when the vaccine first becomes available supplies will be limited it will be a societal question that people are going to have to wrestle with I mean maybe you want to give it first to first responders maybe you want to give it first to the people who keep society going police and fire maybe it's store clerks maybe it's farmers maybe it's people that like that or maybe you want to give it to people who are at highest risk writers a lot of questions and some of them depend dancers depend on how bad the epidemic is when the virus comes when the vaccine becomes available and you know we're talking about research to develop a vaccine we haven't talked about production I mean creating enough of it on scale is a huge task well yeah I mean there's no vaccine now and we're gonna need seven billion doses I mean Sheesh there's a there's a production question for you for sure all right NPR science correspondent Joe Palca thank you for answering all these questions for us tonight you're welcome and I'm sorry we didn't get to Ramdev severe I have a good story about that but we'll talk about that some of there are many nights ahead in many questions to be answered I can promise you'll get around us if you're before two o'clock all right I'll come back and tell you everything I know it will fill up hours looking forward to it well tomorrow if your gig worker maybe for a ride share service our grocery delivery and you have a question or story.

KCRW Joe Palca ari Shapiro NPR
"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tonight a European space probe will fly past the earth on its way to mercury the planet closest to the sun that mission will paying around the inner solar system before getting to its destination here's NPR's Joe Palca normally when a mission milestone like a flyby occurs scientists gather at mission control to monitor the spacecraft's progress not this time we would all be at home really are does this from our living rooms kitchens have a Reno urine Herbert with the institute of planetary science in Berlin is one of the scientists on the practical level mission the problem just in twenty eighteen its goal is to find out what mercury is made of which will help scientists revise their ideas of how the solar system formed when it flies by earth's gravity will slow the probe down so it can head inward toward mercury but Herbert says earth's gravity alone won't do the trick so in October we do a flyby of Venus that again was slow us down a bit and that's just the start then there would be another fly by of the notes in any part of the foreign yeah and then we have six flavors of mercury every time slowing down a little bit in the end we're basically at the orbital speed of Margaret that can go into orbit around mercury that's in twenty twenty five in addition to the data and records at mercury that the Colombo will take some measurements during each fly by as it approaches earth for example Betty Colombo will measure the thermal infrared radiation from the moon something mission scientists say has never been done before from space Herbert says it will be the first time one of the missions scientific instruments has been put to use making scientific measurements hopefully by even early afternoon on Friday refer first idea on my house looks like like a lot of us Herbert and his colleagues have found the stay at home orders to prevent the spread of covert nineteen a bit well tedious we also are very happy to have a positive distraction something everybody could use about now Joe Palca NPR news this is NPR news thank you reading news in a minute with Brian but first Joe McConnell with some traffic.

NPR Joe Palca Berlin Herbert Margaret Colombo Betty Colombo Brian Joe McConnell institute of planetary science
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Tonight a European space probe will fly past the earth on its way to mercury the planet closest to the sun that mission will paying around the inner solar system before getting to its destination here's NPR's Joe Palca normally when a mission milestone like a flyby occurs scientists gather at mission control to monitor the spacecraft's progress not this time we would all be have told me or does this from our living rooms kitchens so whatever we are your Herbert with the institute of planetary science in Berlin is one of the scientists on the bat B. Colombo mission the problem just in twenty eighteen its goal is to find out what mercury is made of which will help scientists revise their ideas of how the solar system formed when it flies by earth's gravity will slow the probe down so it can head inward toward mercury but Herbert says earth's gravity alone won't do the trick so in October we do a flyby of Younis that a gun reached Lois down a bit and that's just the start then there would be another fly by Venus in April of two forms yeah and then we have six flavors of mercury every time slowing down a little bit in the end we're basically at the orbital speed of Margaret that can go into orbit around mercury that's in twenty twenty five in addition to the data and records at mercury that B. Colombo will take some measurements during each fly by as it approaches earth for example Betty Colombo will measure the thermal infrared radiation from the moon something mission scientists say has never been done before from space Herbert says it will be the first time one of the missions scientific instruments has been put to use making scientific measurements hopefully by even early afternoon on Friday refer first idea on how the data looks like like a lot of us Herbert and his colleagues have found the stay at home orders to prevent the spread of covert nineteen a bit well tedious we also it's all very happy to have a positive distraction something everybody could use about now Joe Palca NPR news.

NPR Joe Palca Herbert Berlin Younis Lois Margaret B. Colombo Betty Colombo institute of planetary science Colombo
"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We all want to stop the spread of coronavirus the most important thing is to keep health workers safe that means giving them the protective gear they need including something called a respirator which protects someone from breathing in viral particles and pure science correspondent Joe Palca traveled to the three M. mask manufacturers in Minnesota at three AM they've been thinking about how to respond to the corona virus outbreak for awhile in mid January we started to notice some strange disease patterns coming out of China making a call is an occupational safety and health leader at three AM we realize that this could be something that we might need to help respond to three and makes all kinds of protective equipment including water called N. ninety five respirators the kind of mass health care workers are encouraged to wear three M. already makes millions of these but more are needed we are ramping up production and all of our manufacturing facilities for respirators all over the world the call and I met at three Ms global respiratory fit laboratory this laboratory is where we take respirators that we've designed and we test them on a variety of people who got a variety of different faces to be protective eye mask has to keep tiny particles floating in the air from entering your nose or mouth surgical masks can only block large droplets N. ninety five respirators on the other hand have layers of specialized filter material that will keep out virtually any small particle but no matter how sophisticated the respirator his you have to wear it correctly and if somebody doesn't put it on properly or doesn't shave their face before putting it on they might have some leakage around the edge and that could lead viral particles seep in right now the centers for disease control and prevention says only health care workers and people caring for covert nineteen patients need to use N. ninety five respirators so most people won't need to bother with them still I wanted to know the proper way to wear one and the caller was happy to show me you want to make sure that it's covering your nose and mouth and touching your face all the way around she places the Cup shaped respirator over her face I've now got it over my nose and mouth there are two straps attached to the respirator so many use both straps she pulls the bottom strap up and over her head resting it on the back of her head any other strap is gonna sit on the crown of my head the next thing you do is form the nose clip this is a metal band at the top of the mask and you need to take two fingers and press down on that metal nose clip starting on your nose all the way across your cheeks the last thing is to check for leaks McCullough holds her hands over the mask and breathe in and out if it's got leaks usually you can feel it in your eyes rushing in your eyes are under your chin now I've worn these respirators I was told to wear them when I went to Hong Kong in two thousand three to cover the sars outbreak I found wearing them distinctly unpleasant they are hot and breathing was difficult I asked Michael about that so am I just a worse or is this a pain in the neck to where both okay McCall says yes they are a bit of a pain to wear but people get acclimated to them just like people get acclimated to wearing a bike helmet when they buy and if the alternative is disease most people actually treating infectious patients have a strong incentive to keep them on Joe Palca NPR

Joe Palca
Respirators Key To Coronavirus Battle... If Healthcare Workers Can Get Them

NPR Special Coverage

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Respirators Key To Coronavirus Battle... If Healthcare Workers Can Get Them

"We all want to stop the spread of coronavirus the most important thing is to keep health workers safe that means giving them the protective gear they need including something called a respirator which protects someone from breathing in viral particles and pure science correspondent Joe Palca traveled to the three M. mask manufacturers in Minnesota at three AM they've been thinking about how to respond to the corona virus outbreak for awhile in mid January we started to notice some strange disease patterns coming out of China making a call is an occupational safety and health leader at three AM we realize that this could be something that we might need to help respond to three and makes all kinds of protective equipment including water called N. ninety five respirators the kind of mass health care workers are encouraged to wear three M. already makes millions of these but more are needed we are ramping up production and all of our manufacturing facilities for respirators all over the world the call and I met at three Ms global respiratory fit laboratory this laboratory is where we take respirators that we've designed and we test them on a variety of people who got a variety of different faces to be protective eye mask has to keep tiny particles floating in the air from entering your nose or mouth surgical masks can only block large droplets N. ninety five respirators on the other hand have layers of specialized filter material that will keep out virtually any small particle but no matter how sophisticated the respirator his you have to wear it correctly and if somebody doesn't put it on properly or doesn't shave their face before putting it on they might have some leakage around the edge and that could lead viral particles seep in right now the centers for disease control and prevention says only health care workers and people caring for covert nineteen patients need to use N. ninety five respirators so most people won't need to bother with them still I wanted to know the proper way to wear one and the caller was happy to show me you want to make sure that it's covering your nose and mouth and touching your face all the way around she places the Cup shaped respirator over her face I've now got it over my nose and mouth there are two straps attached to the respirator so many use both straps she pulls the bottom strap up and over her head resting it on the back of her head any other strap is gonna sit on the crown of my head the next thing you do is form the nose clip this is a metal band at the top of the mask and you need to take two fingers and press down on that metal nose clip starting on your nose all the way across your cheeks the last thing is to check for leaks McCullough holds her hands over the mask and breathe in and out if it's got leaks usually you can feel it in your eyes rushing in your eyes are under your chin now I've worn these respirators I was told to wear them when I went to Hong Kong in two thousand three to cover the sars outbreak I found wearing them distinctly unpleasant they are hot and breathing was difficult I asked Michael about that so am I just a worse or is this a pain in the neck to where both okay McCall says yes they are a bit of a pain to wear but people get acclimated to them just like people get acclimated to wearing a bike helmet when they buy and if the alternative is disease most people actually treating infectious patients have a strong incentive to keep them on Joe Palca NPR

"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Been diagnosed with the illness covert nineteen NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been following the story and he is with us now Joe thanks so much for joining us so you're welcome so it seems like the big development today is out of Italy what can you tell us about the situation there well that's correct the virus has been spreading around the world and of course that started in China and and as still causing lots of problems there although things seem to be getting better and in South Korea there's all sorts of problems but the numbers in Italy are quite stunning today the case report was a sixty four hundred but that's up thirteen hundred cases from yesterday so the government has decided to take some pretty drastic steps they're going to try to stop all travel in and out of the area that most of the cases are which is the north of the country and from tomorrow Alitalia the carrier for Italy is going to suspend all flights in and out of Milan they think sixteen million people might be affected by this travel restrictions and a what about in the affected region there what what steps are authorities taking their how are people reacting to all this well I mean I think one of the things that we're learning from this is that this kind of explosive increase in cases is going to put a huge strain on existing resources the emergency rooms and intensive care units are in the area appeared to be overwhelmed by this great influx of new patients and what about the situation aboard that cruise ship that was stuck off the coast of California because twenty one people on board had tested positive for coronavirus yes well the U. S. department of health and Human Services announced this morning that the cruise ship would be allowed to dock in some place in San Francisco Bay apparently that's in Oakland in a non passenger port and then the cow your residence on board will be taken to military bases in California and the residents of other states will be going to bases in Georgia and Texas and in both cases they'll be in all cases they'll be undergoing testing and quarantine an interesting gonna speaking of cruise ships federal health official Anthony found she had some very specific advice for people in poor health especially the elderly and poor health about what to avoid crowds getting on a plane on a long plane trip and a bubble don't get on a cruise ship that was about you speaking with Chris Wallace on fox news Sunday so could you just take a step back from it and give us the state of play in the U. S. I mean do we know where the outbreak is headed well yes and no there have been difficulties predicting exactly where things are going because the testing that would be needed to tell us exactly where things are going hasn't been available so far but that logjam seems to be breaking federal health officials were great pains to say that there do appear to be enough tests coming online in the coming few days to be able to get a better picture of what the situation in this country looks like and it's not gonna look pretty right to begin with because of the extended number of tests are going to reveal a lot more cases now how bad it's going to be is something I think everybody's a little bit you know crossing their fingers and and waiting to see but in the meantime it's very important that people do carry out all the procedures that you need to do to prevent the spread and and of course they'll be hoping that drastic measures will be needed in this country that is NPR science correspondent Joe Palca Jo thank you so much you're most welcome here in Washington state testing hospital workers for corona virus has become a top priority that's because these workers will be essential if the virus continues to spread throughout the state and one hospital in Seattle has even set up a drive thru clinic for health care workers who have symptoms NPR's Jon Hamilton has this report the clinic operates out of a parking garage at the UW Medical Center in northwest Seattle when workers drive in they're greeted by Jan Nakahara she's a nurse with the university of Washington's healthcare system called U. W. medicine have you pull up and don't get out of your car fire at all times in each of their coca her says at the moment the drive thru clinic is limited to health care workers in the university system and they need to have a fever dry cough or other symptoms of covert nineteen the disease caused by coronavirus if they had symptoms they would go and fill out a survey online and then if the screeners thought it sounded like it was a possibility of being coronavirus and they're given an appointment today the next up with the testing clinic is in front of three quite medical tents a nurse named Jeff gates approaches each car in full protective gear including a clear plastic face mask hello my name is Jeff and employee health nurse here hi we're gonna be doing a swap for the gates prepares to take to swaps one from each nostril I have a lean your head back with a little ball about to move on sign up for a comfortable that one down collects the samples and seals them in plastic tubes will be processed by a lab a few miles away so we're gonna be tested for flu avian R. S..

Joe Palca NPR
"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ninety five respirators so most people won't need to bother with them still I wanted to know the proper way to wear one and McCall I was happy to show me you want to make sure that it's covering your nose and mouth and touching your face all the way around she places the Cup shaped respirator over her face I've now got it over my nose and mouth there are two straps attached to the respirator so many use both straps she pulls the bottom strap up and over her head resting on the back of her head any other strap is gonna sit on the crown of my head the next thing you do is form the nose clip this is a metal band at the top of the mask and you need to take two fingers and press down on that metal nose clip starting on your nose all the way across your cheeks the last thing is to check for leaks McCullough holds her hands over the mask and breeds in and out if it's got leaks usually you can feel it up in your eyes rushing in your eyes are under your chin now I've worn these respirators I was told to wear them when I went to Hong Kong in two thousand three to cover the sars outbreak I found wearing them distinctly unpleasant they are hot and breathing was difficult I asked Michael about that so am I just a worse or is this a pain in the neck to where both okay McCullough says yes they are a bit of a pain to wear but people get acclimated to them just like people get acclimated to wearing a bike helmet when they buy and if the alternative is disease most people actually treating infectious patients have a strong incentive to keep them on Joe Palca NPR news.

McCullough Hong Kong sars Michael Joe Palca
Darpa Cranks Up Antibody Research to Stall Coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Darpa Cranks Up Antibody Research to Stall Coronavirus

"There among the more than five thousand new coronavirus cases reported in just the past twenty four hours labs all over the world are racing to design diagnostic tests vaccines new therapies all to deal with the virus and here's Joe Palca is here to talk about a promising pilot program happening here in the U. S. hi Joe hi there what is it worth the effort who's behind it well it's an effort called the pandemic prevention platform or P. three and it's funded by the defense advanced research agency differences Vance research projects agency which does some really cool cutting edge stuff in science for the defense department and everybody else happens it's a four year program it started two years ago and their ideas to be able to respond rapidly to an emerging threat whether it's covered nineteen or something else any Jenkins runs the program for DARPA we envision the P. three five form actually functioning as a fire break in the instance that there's a pandemic outbreak what does she mean by far right well it's something that will at least temporarily protect someone from contracting the virus before a vaccine is ready it might be a stop gap therapy even and the department is interested because what if they have to deploy troops into an area where there is a pandemic going on and they want their trips to get their six without being hurt hi and if even if there were a vaccine you get a vaccine it takes a couple weeks to develop immunity so they want something to work right away but this is temporary would only last for about six months so I know it's complicated but can you explain how this temporary solution the P. five three platform works has two basic parts the first is to identify antibodies so those are the things that ARE immune system used to fight disease they're going to try and get antibodies from people who've been infected with covert nineteen and recovered okay so they you can fish those out of people's plasma their blood and then they're going to that usually that that takes some time but they're trying to shorten that pre to three weeks and then they're trying to develop a rug that can be used based on these antibodies not typically when you make a drug like that you become in these big bioreactors but they're going to try something different they're going to try and just take the genetic material that codes for these antibodies off and put that into people and that the people's own cells make the antibody so the people become the bio reactors but how long does all that take as any of us can make a difference for people who are suffering from the qualifiers well I put the question to DARPA's Amy Jenkins this technology could be used in this current corona virus I will carry out that that this is still a very early technology it has yes ban in human clinical studies but it has not been in thousands of patients it's been and tens of patients so again what does that mean about the time line well it means she thinks that there might be something ready in as soon as ninety days but we'll see two scientists really think that this can work so well the ones I talked to seem to think there's reason to believe that market Killian is a professor of cell biology at Albert Einstein college of medicine obviously is something very much and development but I think the strategy and the basic idea is sound so I I mean the ideas yet it's experimental it's cutting edge it's new but there's something it's something I'm I was actually when I came across this I was pretty surprised that it even existed but apparently it does and they're confident who knows okay well worth watching and here's Joe Palca thank you we appreciate it

Mouse babies born from cells that were transformed into eggs using a 'chemical cocktail'

Marketplace

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Mouse babies born from cells that were transformed into eggs using a 'chemical cocktail'

"Scientists in China are reporting a way to turn nine the eggs cells in mice into egg cells capable of producing mouse pops Joe Palca has the story granulosa cells are special cells that surround immature egg cells in the ovaries by treating those granulosa cells with a chemical cocktail researchers at Nang K. university in Tianjin were able to coax them into behaving just like normal mouse eggs these new cells could be fertilized and planted in surrogate hosts and produce fertile mouse pops the researchers say humans also have granulosa cells and that the approach used in mice could someday be used in human fertility treatments the research appears in the journal cell reports Joe Palca

China Joe Palca Nang K. University Tianjin
A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

All Things Considered

02:15 min | 2 years ago

A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

"There is a mole on Mars that's making NASA engineers tear their hair out NPR's Joe Palca explains why no they haven't discovered a small insectivorous mammal on Mars the mall we're talking about is a scientific instrument carried on NASA's insight probe that landed on Mars a year ago the malls designed to measure heat flow coming out of the interior of Mars Troy Hudson is insights instrument system engineer the mall has a pointy tip and an internal hammer that works like a kind of pile driver to pound them all into the ground the frustrations began last February when the mall started downward it was supposed to go down sixteen feet instead it got stuck after fourteen inches Hudson says he and his team decided the problem was related to bouncing just like a gun recoils when you fire at the mall recoiled ever so slightly every time the hammer tried to drive it into the ground so instead of going down it bounced in place engineers thought they might be able to prevent the bouncing if they use the scoop on insights robotic arm to press against the mall as it hammered they tried that in October and it worked for the first time in eight months we have definite forward progress that was about six weeks ago but Hudson New a problem was coming eventually the top of the mall would be flush with the Martian surface and there would be nothing for this group to press against so they came up with a new plan we moved to this group over to a different position nearby and pushed hard on the soil hoping that that would transfer force to the mall through the soil rather than directly in late October they sent instructions for insights camera to record what happened Hudson says he was horrified when he saw the pictures I was very distraught the mall had backed almost half way out of the hole Hudson is pretty sure he knows what happened without the arm pressing the moles to artid bouncing again and when it does that loose soil in front of the mall can infiltrate in front of the tip filling up the space that occurs whenever it bounces and the just bounce bounce bounce bounce and more material fills in and it ends up backing out of the ground Hudson says they're confident they can use the scoop press technique to get them all back down to where

NPR Joe Palca Nasa Troy Hudson Engineer Fourteen Inches Eight Months Sixteen Feet Six Weeks
"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Grant foundation working to harness the power of research to make a difference in the lives of children teens and young adults for more than eighty years learn more at W. T. grant FDN daughter work it's morning edition from NPR news good morning I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm David green it is not easy to treat viral infections but scientists in Massachusetts I think they may have found a new way to stop viruses from making people sick by using what amounts to a pair of molecular scissors and her science correspondent Joe Palca explains what a virus infects a cell in our bodies it hijacks the cells molecular machinery to make copies of itself those new viruses can go on to spread the infection through your body we need to be able to cut the virus at a fast enough rate to slow down replication or to stop replication from happening Cameron mere bold as a postdoc at the broad institute in Cambridge near gold works with so called RNA viruses viruses that package their genetic information in our NA a chemical cousin of DNA to cut the viral RNA he uses a molecular tool called crisper in this case crisper cast thirteen that can target a specific region of RNA cast thirteen when it finds its target it can become very active and start to cut other are in is finding the right target is key there's a lot of our days inside cells that are necessary for the cell to survive so it's important to find an are in a target that's unique to the virus you're trying to control me of old says Arnie viruses are particularly difficult to control because they're a bit like shape shifters they tend to change their genetic sequences when you try to pin them down we really want to understand what the virus is doing in response to cast thirteen treatment vaults colleague Kathryn freed she says what the virus does and response to treatment should be informative that could potentially teach us about what parts of the virus are particularly important for its function and that in turn will show the best places to target the virus in order to disable it so far free G. and Miraval say they've only show their anti viral treatment works and sells but the parties so Betty head of the lab they work in is bullish about using the crisper cast thirteen system to treat viral infections in people there's still wanted to want to work out but we feel pretty confident that this will work as a therapy if it can be delivered in the right way by delivering she means getting the crisper cast thirteen tool into the right cells inside an infected patient now crisper cast thirteen specifically targets are in a so it will only be useful for illnesses caused by RNA viruses like flu and Zeca but Janice Chen says researchers are now finding a variety of Christopher's with different properties chan is chief research officer at mammoth biosciences a company that hopes to capitalize on crisper technology having a broader Kristin full box is really important to figure out what is the specific need for any given application progress in building that tool box has proceeded quite quickly after all it's only been six years since scientists first became aware of how powerful a tool crisper could be Joe Palca NPR news a water bottling company wants to sell Florida's most endangered resources water.

eighty years six years
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Many medical tests require blood drawn with a needle but as NPR Joe Palca reports some engineers in California have turned to another bodily fluid for doing these tests sweat there are a lot of reasons to use sweat in medical tests one is that it can be axes very conveniently and non invasively a different body sites Molly got Bahria is an engineer at the university of California Berkeley she says it used to be that testing sweat meant collecting a sample and sending it to a laboratory she says new technology has changed that we can do all of those measurements of molecules ions at the point of secretion as she and her colleagues report in the journal science advances they've developed a flexible patch they can attach to someone's skin Bahria says the sweat enters a microscopic well embedded in the patch and in that well is where we have our sensors for composition analysis the analysis is sent electronically to recording device the patch can measure the Salton sweat but bar yes says it can also measure things like glucose although it's not clear whether sweat glucose is as informative as blood glucose the Berkeley team is just one of several working on sweat patches John Rogers is at Northwestern University we do things without electronics Rogers says the patch he's developing with the sports string company Gatorade uses chemical sensors to measure the sweat for electrolytes we have a specific chemistry that changes from a light into a dark red being on the salt concentration of the sweat Rogers says if measuring glucose in sweat doesn't turn out to be all that medically useful he expects measuring other things will be heavy metals things like mercury or cadmium that workers might be exposed to on the job you can detect those in sweat so you can measure lead exposure directly you know other kinds of heavy metals they show up immediately in sweat and there could be other medically relevant compounds measurable and sweat Berkeley's Molly Kumbharia says the patches could open a new era in medical testing what challenge needs to be overcome is really understanding where sweat testing is meaningful certainly those of us who don't like needles are eager for sweat testing to prove useful.

Joe Palca California Bahria engineer John Rogers Northwestern University Gatorade Berkeley Molly Kumbharia NPR university of California Berke
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Many medical tests require blood drawn with a needle but as NPR Joe Palca reports some engineers in California have turned to another bodily fluid for doing these tests sweat there are a lot of reasons to use sweat in medical tests one is that it can be axes very conveniently and non invasively a different body sites Molly got Bahria is an engineer at the university of California Berkeley she says it used to be that testing sweat meant collecting a sample and sending it to a laboratory she says new technology has changed that we can do all of those measurements of molecules ions at the point of secretion as she and her colleagues report in the journal science advances they've developed a flexible patch they can attach to someone's skin Mario says the sweat enters a microscopic well embedded in the patch and in that well is where we have our sensors for composition analysis the analysis is sent electronically to recording device the patch can measure the Salton sweat but bar yes says it can also measure things like glucose although it's not clear whether sweat glucose is as informative as blood glucose the Berkeley team is just one of several working on sweat patches John Rogers is at Northwestern University we do things without electronics Rogers says the patch he's developing with the sports string company Gatorade uses chemical sensors to measure the sweat for electrolytes we have a specific chemistry that changes from a light into a dark red being on the salt concentration of the sweat Rogers says if measuring glucose in sweat doesn't turn out to be all that medically useful he expects measuring other things will be heavy metals things like mercury or cadmium that workers might be exposed to on the job you can detect those in sweat so you can measure lead exposure directly you know other kinds of heavy metals they show up immediately in sweat and there could be other medically relevant compounds measurable and sweat Berkeley's Molly Kumbharia says the patches could open a new era in medical testing what challenge needs to be overcome is really understanding where sweat testing is meaningful certainly those of us who don't like needles are eager for sweat.

Joe Palca California Bahria engineer Mario John Rogers Northwestern University Gatorade Berkeley Molly Kumbharia NPR university of California Berke
"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was shot now she's being charged with manslaughter in the death of the fetus she was caring and impairs Joe Palca gets an up close view of today's total eclipse it is Tuesday July second Alex Morgan celebrates her thirtieth birthday while winning her way through the World Cup on team USA his next live from NPR news in Washington on trial Snyder customs and border protection has launched an investigation into a Facebook group for current and former border patrol agents impairs finesse aroma reports the closed group contained derogatory polls targeting migrants and lawmakers the group called itself I am ten fifteen a reference to the border patrol code for aliens and custody and over three years it's acquired nearly nine thousand five hundred members it was uncovered by pro publica a nonprofit news organization some posts mocked migrant deaths specifically that of a sixteen year old water Mollen migrant who died in may while in custody at the border patrol station other posts joked about throwing burritos that lawmakers the border patrol chief called the posts completely inappropriate and said any employees who violated the agency's standards of conduct will be held accountable the NASA Romo NPR news ProPublica report was published as congresswoman across your core tens and other members of the congressional Hispanic caucus toured the border facilities were observers said they found migrant children living in desperate conditions Texas congressman walking Castro chair Secaucus we saw that the system is still broken at.

Joe Palca Alex Morgan USA Washington congressman NPR Snyder Facebook border patrol NASA ProPublica Texas Castro sixteen year three years
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Health Joe Palca NPR news immigration is shaping up to be yet again one of the main themes of the twenty twenty election president trump signed an executive order last year to end his own zero tolerance policy that allowed children in migrant families to be separated from their parents at the border but families are still being separated under some circumstances and finally about is is an attorney with the Texas civil rights project he joins me now from McAllen Texas welcome to the program thank you you've been at the front line of representing families have been separated at the border explain what that means give us an example of what you do so every day of the week we interview separated adults most of them happened to be parents but others are siblings cousins aunts uncles we interview them early in the morning right before their criminal prosecution hearings under the zero tolerance policy and before the hearing begins we going to court and asking the crowd of of adult who among them has been separated from an under age relative and on any given day three to five of them raise their hand and then we talk to them to try to identify why they were separated and then help them find their children be reunited and when it happens to be a lawful separation that is in violation of the executive order then we take action and sometimes legal action to get those families reunited we've had to go to court in a few instances but in most of the cases we interact with any family members in the U. S. so that that child can be released to that relative and then be reunited with the adults they were separate from the administration as you mentioned has supposedly stop the policy family separation this is a wise it's still happening the parent tells abrasions which are the ones that were supposed to have ended last summer are still happening in three scenarios first is the parent has any criminal history for example last week I interviewed a father from Guatemala who had been in the United States years ago and he once got a citation a traffic ticket in Colorado for driving with an expired driver's license and for that now he was separated from his son and the government takes the position that bad criminal history prevents him from getting his child back secondly we also see separations when the government alleges gang affiliation or criminal activity and those cases are extremely frustrating and difficult to fight against because the government won't provide any evidence in the third instance is land the government alleges that the father is not really the father and what's really frustrating about that in addition to the separation itself with which you know it's frustrating enough is that it's so easy for the border patrol agent processing the family to say you know what I don't believe that to your daughter and take them away separate them and then to get them back together it's a nightmare Congress has passed a bill last week that will give billions in emergency aid for migrant children and president trump is expected to sign it do you think that that will help the situation where you are maybe it will be a temporary assistance it it'll make things a little better for a few months but if the policies don't change in six months the H. S. and P. B. P. are going to be asking for additional funds and in fact this almost seems like the agencies are being rewarded for the way they have been treating children and and migrants by giving them additional funding so I think I was disappointed in that or at least in the fact that additional funding is coming to those agencies without any changes to their policies and practices as a condition of receiving the additional funding because that's the core of the problem the trump administration and their supporters I would say the people crossing the border are doing something illegal they are coming into the United States those that come into United States illegally and not waiting at a port of entry to ask for asylum and you know the United States can have this many people coming in without a formal process what would be your response to that that argument Lou Lou has been raised throughout history every time there has been an influx of immigrants we can take that many Irish immigrants we can take that many Italian immigrants we can't take that many Jews and every single time the United States of America has seen the light turned around and become one of the only places in the world that that is a beacon of hope for people seeking refuge and protection so I'm still hopeful that will make a turn and we will continue to be that but that argument you know I I just it's it's not something that is policy making issue because it's been Hey before I'm unfortunately always with see no full break and racist undertones if you can only vote is is an attorney with the Texas.

Joe Palca six months
"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on KCRW

"Addition from NPR news, I'm Scott Simon when NPR science correspondent, Joe palca came to a city at a story about EDM. We thought we can get down with that. Joe said the story is not about electric dance music favored by J Liederman, who writes our theme music. But instead, the electric DiPoto moment of the neutron, we said, what is that Joe said he'd explained when Indiana University physicist Chen, you Lou is asked why she's interested in the electric DiPoto moment of the neutron. She's ready with an answer. I'm trying to understand. Why weakest in fact, she's trying to understand? Why everything exists you me stars, galaxies corned beef sandwiches? Everything theory say the explanation may be hidden in the electric DiPoto moment of the neutron. It's not a moment as in a moment in time. It refers to the neutron being slightly more football shaped than perfectly, spherical you see at the instant the universe came into existence. Billions of years ago. Energy turned into matter. Now matter comes into types matter. And anti-matter. And when the particle of antimatter meets a particle of matter, they annihilate each other. And all that's left is light. So somehow somewhere, there had to be a slight imbalance, a bit more matter than antimatter to make all the stuff in the universe theories, predict the signal that explains that imbalance would be found if the neutron had a measurable electric DiPoto moment. But so far, no one has been able to measure one Chen, you Lou says that maybe because it's small and hard to measure neutrons to do make them precisely we need to be able to slow them. Come find them in space and watch them for their alone time. So basically, you're trying to get the neutron to sit still while you study it exactly new is working on one way to slow down neutrons at Oak Ridge, national lab, and Tennessee, they're working on another. Name. Target is down there. We're at something called the spoliation neutron source at Oak Ridge. It's a cavernous room that throbs with energy Vince, Ciancio low is a physicist here. He says, when you shoot a beam of protons at a target made a mercury. You get a spray of neutrons that can be diverted into multiple beam lines. Thirteen and the dental.

Lou Joe palca physicist NPR Oak Ridge Chen Scott Simon J Liederman Vince Indiana University Tennessee
"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"joe palca" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news and the New York conversation. Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm Wayne ground. Although President Trump says he's not happy with the compromise Bill to fund border security and prevent another government shutdown. He ended today he's not prepared to veto the measure, which would pay for only about a quarter of the border wall. Trump originally demanded we're going to take a look at it when it comes. I don't want to see a shutdown shutdown would be a terrible thing. I think a point was made with the last shutdown people realized how bad the border is how unsafe the border is. And I think a lot of good points were made. But I don't want to see another one. There's no reason for it. Disputes over the wall led to a thirty five day partial government shutdown and a continued drop in the president's public approval rating, some Republicans have discouraged Trump from invoking. His emergency powers for fear of setting up a showdown in federal court. Congress faces a Friday night deadline to get the funding approved to avoid another shutdown after years of being Nasr's robotic on. Void Mars opportunity is done. Nasa made a final call to the veteran Mars Rover. But no answer computers. Joe palca says space agency is now formally ending the mission last June a giant dust storm swept over opportunity, essentially blotting out the sun, and preventing the Rover's solar panels from generating power mission managers had hoped. The Rover would wake up when the storm abated it didn't they sent? Hundreds of commands hoping that one of them would spark the Rover to life. They didn't. So now more than fifteen years after a successful landing. Nasa is calling it quits not bad for a mission. That was originally scheduled to last ninety days opportunity has returned a trove of valuable data about Mars. It's one of the missions. That's helped show that water was once more plentiful on. What is now extremely dry planet. Joe palca NPR news stocks finished modestly higher on Wall Street, led by shares of banks tech and energy companies. The Dow up more than one hundred points about half a percent. This is NPR. You're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. NYPD officials are giving more details about the incident in which a plainclothes detective Brian. Brian Simonson was shot by friendly fire last night. Investigators say seven officers fired forty two bullets during an attempted robbery at a mobile phone store in Richmond hill queens chief of department. Terrence monahan. Says the detective spent his nineteen year career at the one hundred second precinct, and it's hitting his fellow officers hard human, and you motions that they're feeling right now losing a great friend. It's hardened. They're hurting. There's a lot of hardcore non in one or two NYPD says the detective was outside the store while other officers were inside as the alleged perpetrator ran out the officers opened fire hitting Simonsen as well. As sergeant Matthew Gorman who is in stable condition. The MTA has released more details on what will happen during the L train tunnel repair. WNYC Stephen Nessin reports around eight pm on weeknights. L train riders will start to see service impacted by ten pm El trains will only come every twenty minutes until five AM when the evening work is expected to conclude on weekends. It'll be the same twenty minutes to cross the river. But the agency says it will boost L train service from Canarsie to Lorimer street on the weekends with trains coming every ten minutes, the J M G. And seven trains will have more service. The MTA plans to hold a series of meetings to discuss the new plans. It's still expects to start construction at the end of April. It doesn't know the full cost, but expects it'll be cheaper than the old plan. And it thinks construction will take about fifteen to twenty months in Albany. Lawmakers are holding hearings on sexual harassment in the workplace for the first time in decades. Legislators and advocates say the process is an important step to strengthen protections for employees, including those in government state. Senator James Scopus represents parts of the central Hudson valley and says too, many state employees. Have shared experiences of being harassed at work, and many many more have no doubt not shared their story out of fear of losing their job fear further safety or fear from being thrown into an unwelcome uncomfortable and very public spotlight. New York state passed anti harassment measures last year, but advocates criticized the process for not. Including public hearings tonight, partly cloudy, low around twenty eight degrees, currently thirty eight degrees..

President Trump Joe palca NPR MTA NYPD Nasa New York Bill Brian Simonson harassment Culver City California president Congress Albany Senator James Scopus Terrence monahan Jamie Floyd