20 Episode results for "Joe Murphy"

Doctors already struggling to cope with coronavirus tsunami as government introduces fines for distancing rule-breakers.

The Leader

16:43 min | 6 months ago

Doctors already struggling to cope with coronavirus tsunami as government introduces fines for distancing rule-breakers.

"Weekday at four PM. Join the leader for the latest on the Corona Virus Crisis With News Analysis and commentary from one of the country's most trusted newsrooms. Subscribe to make sure you don't miss episode now from the Evening Standard in London. This is the leader. Hi David Moslem the front line against Luna viruses faltering. Can It hold? I've spoken to a senior consultant to one of London's major teaching hospitals and not put too fine two points on their. It's absolute terror. What is about to they feel about? Evening Standard's Jonathan Prince. Been talking to the overwhelmed. London doctors battling the disease being described as soon Nami also on the one hand. They are in both Johnson's words putting their arm around strivers and on the other hand. There's the long arm of the law going to whack people who illicitly hold social gatherings with these fines. Coletta Gladys Joe Murphy talks to the leader. Podcast we exclusively reveal the fines. The Governor Wendell impose on those who preach lockdown laws and. I just spent fifteen minutes on my iphone just pressing delete delete delete and. I looked down at my diary and all that was left with a recurring birthdays. My friends over the next fifty years Waldron pianist and composer Stephen Hall on the devastation. Being wreaked on the classical and all twelve won't help. Is there for the self employed taken from the evening? Standard's editorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper or had to stand a dot code UK slash comet in a moment inside the hospitals fighting can own a virus. There's a warning hospitals in London. Being Dale used by a continuous anomaly of Corona virus patients and critical care beds a close to running out the evening standard reports. Health Chiefs. Believe up to half of the capital's NHS workforce is off sick or in self-isolation the UK's being encouraged to show support for our health workers and editorial column his right behind them. What would you be doing on a normal Thursday evening at eight PM heading out to see a film meeting friends for drink while that life is on hold for now but there is something else you can do tonight and that show your support for NHS staff and cares at the frontline in the fight against corona virus clap for Caras is a campaign asking people to show their appreciation eight? Pm Tonight from the Sotho Garden Balcony Street or anywhere. We think it's a great idea. And how many of us take part in Spain and Italy where lockdown has been going on for longer people have been applauding from apartment balconies windows. We can do the same in London. It's not just a way of saying thank you. For to linking people to Evening Standard's dolphin prints being speaking to doctors on the front line joins me over skype and Jonathan. What have they been telling you? Well I spoke to senior consultant to one of London's major teaching hospitals in days and not supposed to find points on there is absolutely Tara at what is about to fail is about to hit the very worried about the lack of testing in particular which means affectively sufficing blind and the level of equipment. That's available to them. They're also very worried about this guy. I spoke to compare his situation to the And if you saw a novel but the brave Russian workers who were sent in to try and fix the reactor with our inquiry sort of rudimentary safety equipment. That start sort of how they feel. What can on the front line and of course when expecting that situation to get west this weekend. Don't we yes? I mean my understanding is they're expecting A peak probably in the next week or an initial peak and possibly a another wave coming within a week or two after that into the middle of April and despite all the going into providing beds and respirators and old equipment I need. They still worried that they're not going to have they been able to give you any indication. About how many people? They're seeing no in specific numbers but they you know they all talk about waves and soon. Aw means people and floods people coming in uncertainty on unprecedented levels is something that they they go into work everyday very fearful of that futures and the house potentially their livelihood and their families and they're very worried going to Among aren't GonNa make it. This must be exhausting for people. Yeah get impression that people are incredibly shots. It physically and emotionally and mentally as a huge challenge for them Just the constant pressure of what the having to do with. It never goes away. The they're finding it hard to let go when they got home. My one of my contact city cried when he put his child's bed last night because he's worried about whether he's GonNa be there as a as a breadwinner in the in in the coming months and people around the UK being asked to show the support for the NHS. Not something that the evening standard is backing to the doctors to the nurses to the workers. Feel that support from the country. I I think they're beginning to I think Initially they felt that they were there working in a separate universe and I didn't really I didn't really people outlet really understand what was going on inside hospitals. I think the message is starting to guess out. Now and I think they fill the beginnings of the public's behind them in the public supporting them in the NHL volunteer scheme has been incredibly Matin incredible response from the four hundred thousand sign ups already in the first few days but they appreciate that puts a end of the Diet and unless Serra quits Another analogy that they talked to me. Is that if we sent the army into battle without the rice commitments. That'd be a national outcry. And it's similar situation for from doctors next. There's no one-size-fits-all solution for the mall. If you did try that you'd be wasting tens of billions of taxpayers money political editor. Joe Murphy on plans to help the self-employed. And how much will breaking lockdown laws? Cost you if you've ever been to Leicester Square even if you've only seen it on TV you'll know how downright weird this sounds this last square this morning there was barely anyone there a tall clearly. Self-isolation is being taken seriously by some but we've also reports of people apparently breaking the rules. And you may have heard this policemen telling people off on. Shepherd's Bush green which was the rounds this week. I'm down in bite. Can you please just leave? Well now? Those that don't just leave could face a fine political editor. Joe Murphy Has Story. He joins me on the phone. Joe I also want to speak to you about the government's package for the self-employed the strivers as the chancellor calls him. But let's start with these new finds. What's IT GONNA cost? There's a nice symmetry of this isn't there's On the one hand they are in Boris. Johnson's words putting their arm around strivers and on the other hand there's the long arm of the law going to whack people who illicitly hold social gatherings with these fines and we can reveal because it's our story on the front page today that they're going to be set a sixty pounds which is more than previously reported for the first time offense but if you do it again then you could be getting double that as a fixed penalty notice just like illegal parking if you pay within fourteen days. It'll be chopped in half so there's a potential revenue stream there for the government although hopefully not a big one for the government is also making announcements about habits to help the self-employed today. Joe What sort of things can people expect David? The is going to launch what he calls a big rescue plan really complicated because this is a complicated question but the simple thing for people who need the money is a dedicated website where you can register from tonight and that will mean eventually some cash support will come to you when we talk about eventually. How long could that be because a lot of people are running money right now? Exactly right David and you remember for the regular cash support Pete for people who of lust lost their jobs because of Kern virus. That's not going to be rolling out help until end of April which is quite a while from now will this is more complicated. And you're talking about a longer timescale than that nailing that down to a firm deadline just yet but you could be looking into may before people actually get cash. The self-employed whiled is extremely complicated. Because you've got people kind of filing their invoices and and working from offices. There are people like taxi drivers for example. Who Don't have passengers anymore. Exactly right that. It's so complicated Taxi drivers they've lost all of their passing trade at the moment but of course they might be employed on. Boris Johnson said yesterday Breslin time ferrying nurses to hospitals. That don't have to go on the underground so they might lose a lot of their income but not all of it and they require different levels of help potentially to somebody who's been working on a domestic building side that's closed whose income stokes and whose people he worked for last week may not pay him because they've come bust in this crisis or have cash flow problems of their own then you've got the other level of complexities that some people are actually better off because of this crisis not many but you might have a self employed ebay trader who suddenly got an amazing new audience of people who housebound and going online shopping and last the you've got another. Catholic yourself employ people who might declare income of twenty thousand pounds. He's actually not what they're living on. They've got a wealth or they've got a full time job and this is just there part time earnings from writing books or after dinner speaking for some people so all those different people require completely different levels of support. And there's no one-size-fits-all solution for the mole. If you did try that you'd be wasting tens of billions of taxpayers money on people. Who are the didn't need the help or who deserve the help? So targeting is a big problem. And that's why it's taken so long and you can read more from Joe Murphy at Standard Doco. Uk now so we just have a little moment of Zen. That's pianist and composer Stephen half performing to spring a season. He was looking forward to until could own a virus came. He's one of the millions of self-employed who have seen. South `isolation calls their work to dry up. The performing arts have been very badly hit. The classical wild has all but come to a halt with musicians. Seeing theaters and hall shot all over. The world as Stephen Joins me by skype now. And how badly has all of this affected you? The constellation of concerts. I actually had a very very busy spring and I was going back to America for a month. And you know I just spent fifteen minutes on my iphone just pressing delete delete delete and I looked down at my diary and all that was left a with a recurring birthdays of my over the next fifty years. We just don't know of course when this is going to to right itself and you know really nobody this these days. Un's royalties from recordings. Those days are simply gone. I mean the goodyear for somebody who's selling a lot of CDs is probably a few thousand. I mean I think people would be very surprised. They look at the pop world and and they think that millions is pouring. In absolutely isn't the case I couldn't survive a month on my roaches. So I think for all of us you know I too have simply nothing coming in so you know. I've got something in the bank at the moment. But as the months go by trickles away and when there are no credits and debits Very few people in the world On slightly concerned about that. So what are people doing then to try and pull themselves because it must be quite scary right now? Well a lot of people of course giving a free content you know. Putting up microphones and cameras in living rooms and playing concerts. And it's wonderful. You know if you have that equipment and that knowhow and that kind of confidence to do that and that's a support certainly in in a moral way It's not a supporting the financial way. Of course because you know I imagine if one of those people you know in in very grave difficulty started charging probably people would go somewhere else is a little bit like recordings. You know if you can find or or newspapers if you can find a free one It's difficult to make someone pay for something that they can find free somewhere else. Oh that's the other side of the Internet isn't it you know it's open everything up but who supports it all? How does it pay for itself? I think at some point in the future and this is true for journalism as well it has to be some way very easy way of just paying a penny for an article or so that it's just. I think it's not so much people don't want to pay something that somebody's worked very hard to produce. It's just the ease of getting to it you know. I feel someone's giving the recital in their living room I don't want to pay fifty pounds but on the other hand. I think it's it's nice to be able to contribute something towards it. We'll know that if something's had effort made into making that it shouldn't just be for nothing forever so I think that will that will change. The town's lesbian making announcements about help for the self-employed and he's spoken to the evening standard. What are the sorts of things that you need? It's an impossible situation isn't it because almost everyone needs something you know. No one is is coming out of this unscathed except a few mega billion businessman. But you know for most of us to ninety whatever percent of us. There's GonNa be problems and I wouldn't like to have to be the one saying well. You deserve this and you deserve that. I I mean it seems to me and it may lead us to some sort of You know where everyone is given a certain amount of money every month regardless as a safety net as a sort of basis from which we can all work because I think the idea that you wake up in the morning and you can't afford the bill that stopped through the door or you just you know you haven't got enough to eat. We can't live like that and I think this time is going to make that very much more acute than before. Selena's subscribe through your podcast provider. Give us a rating. We're back tomorrow at four PM.

London UK Joe Murphy Boris Johnson NHS David Moslem Jonathan Prince senior consultant London self employed skype Gladys Joe Murphy political editor Joe What Sotho Garden Nami Selena NHL Health Chiefs Dale
UK lockdown: is a second Covid lockdown coming? And why adoptions went up during the pandemic

The Leader

14:25 min | Last week

UK lockdown: is a second Covid lockdown coming? And why adoptions went up during the pandemic

"Hello it's David here and thank you for listening to the leader. We're bringing you news analysis interviews and commentary every day at four PM subscribe to make sure you don't miss out and give us a rating on your podcast provided to now from the evening standard in. London. This is the leader. Hi. I'm David Malls. Lender is a second lockdown imminent. We're hearing two meetings this week on. Wednesday. Night the chief scientist and chief medical officer were advising. We need the firebreak and on Thursday the chancellor had a meeting at number ten. Where he said to present to the Prime Minister with some extremely worrying forecasts, a political editor Joe Murphy and what's happening in Downing Street has the Health Secretary appears not to real one out and I guess a lot of people have been thinking about adoption for some time. But with the opportunity probably led to people say, let's make some of those really big life decisions and let's do it now salons from the courtroom adoption charity did lockdown inspire more people to take children into their homes. Taken from the Evening Standard editorial column. This is the leader of the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper head to stand Dokodo UK. Slash comet in a moment has could only virus cases rise again is a second lockdown coming. The next lockdown is the last line of defense is the thing that we can do to keep people safe if that's if that's needed. From I like the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock was doing television and radio interviews. This one on BBC breakfast stressing the government wants to avoid a national lockdown but not ruling it out while the calling two weeks. Circuit breaker is on the table which could see a temporary ban on friends socializing and shorter hours or closures of public restaurants. Editorial column is concerned how an economy already hammered by the virus would handle further restrictions. The facts that such strict measures even being contemplated makes it imperative that the whole government is prepared particularly Chancellor Richie Sirnak he is already under pressure to replace his successful furloughs game with targeted measures to help those industries which are still struggling to survive the chancellor's record gives this newspaper optimism that he can do so but the same can't be said of our view of the prime minister's performance. Boris Johnson has been absent from battle too often repeatedly leaving it to ministers to answer the difficult questions. It's time Mr. Johnson communicates leadership even if behind the saints he is operating effectively, we certainly don't feel it. All political editor Joe Mafia's here Joe is a second lockdown realistic possibility. It is a realistic possibility, but let's not get ahead of ourselves and I certainly would want to scare thinking wrongly that we're going to have another blanket national lockdown as we had from March twenty second through June July. I'm pretty certain. That's not going to happen at the moment. The numbers don't remotely justify but. There are big increases going on of the number of cases per one hundred, thousand people. And, the are rate is probably a little over one in many places. And that means that there are going to be some restrictions I think. In London before long that kind of national blanket lockdown where people have to stay at home nobody's talking about that as a possibility at the moment. What instead, and this is a real change is we're looking at social lockdowns and I think these are going to be coming to London during October and what would that look like while the scientific research over the summer? Research that I'm sure was aided by the eat out to help how campaign which got everybody out socializing and having a good time in August. But what the shown is that the vast majority of infections that people get is not from strangers on the tube or from people passing you in corridors win the park the vast majority of transmissions actually take place from friend to friend and within families when people are socializing and in their own homes. So the restrictions are we're looking at targeting that sort of activity. So you've seen some of this being brought in in the north. The northwest today has had curfews where they close. Entertainment venues from. Ten o'clock. where they bar people from socializing between different households or with friends. And these are actually quite severe restrictions on individual freedoms and the ability to have fun. But by doing so they hope to. Maintain the prize of schools being open. So children get an education. And workplaces being open for as many people as possible so that people can make a living and keep the economy going is that what this circuit breaker that someone's doesn't mean talking about about? Yeah. The circuit breaker is an interesting idea is bit like when Boris Johnson the other day use that very old fashioned raise a stitch in time saves nine. A two week firebreak if you like to try and slow the surge on and at the end of it hopefully, we'll just go along at a more moderate pace of infections rather than letting it get out of control, and that's important because if you look over the channel, you see hospitals filling up in Madrid UC, very high infection rates in France now and. The House actually said today I'm fear more people may die as a heavy heavy walling if we did have further restrictions though if there are shorter hours for Pablo closures on restaurants. Cambrian afford it. But the really interesting question and we're hearing of two meetings this week that we're absolutely critical on Wednesday night Chris Witty and Patrick Violence, chief scientist, and chief medical officer. Were advising we need the firebreak we the circuit breaker that that attempt to slow things down. On Thursday the chancellor had a meeting at number ten where he said to presented the prime. Minister, with some extremely worrying forecasts what would happen to the economy if we go into any form of severe or extended lockdown. So, this is where you come onto the prime minister's. Stitch in time will save that heavy lockdown that blanket lockdown from happening, and hopefully being the the end of all this will be able to bounce the books again one day. Next absolutely. Delighted. We've now got a study group of people come in straight who could in principle be looking a big match for the charge in the New Year salons on why more people are asking about adoption and what that says about how the country is handling this pandemic. At the height of lockdown Julie, not spring when social contact was forbidden when some of us didn't see another soul food weeks even months something extraordinary seems to have happened. The courtroom adoption charity says it seen a rise in the number of people asking to take in children and make them part of their family? It's not just a little bump. It's up twenty four percent on the year before could it be lockdown itself as behind it while the charities sue lounges with me and so you've been dealing with what is really quite a significant rise And inquiries. What do you think is inspiring. So many people to consider adoption. I. Think it's the people had more time to think particularly early days in wonderful spring we had when people were hiring I. Think it's time for people to really think about what matters to them in life what were the main goes they wanting to save mind what was really important and space is how? The fact that people thought will actually find life something that we really value. And I guess a lot of people been thinking about adoption for some time. But with the opportunity I guess Obama bedroom care home just for those early months lockdown. Publicly led to people saying, well, let's make some those really big life decisions and let's do it. Now, we you expecting this because the time when this rise is coming up right in the middle of lockdown we're being told to stay away from each other and yet hero people who want to reach out during that time I. Think it probably Moses. Surprise. Actually, you never quite know what's GonNa encourage somebody to make that. Cool. You don't know what's going on in their minds. But I guess we'd come to reflect on it now and we think about what the whole experience was first individually we know that we were thinking about those important things in life what actually mattered, but the numbers have been much greater than we had anticipated and it wasn't that we were to click promoting adoption for foaming we were we were going about managing all businesses so we could deliver adoption in a new way because we have to learn how to do everything online in. A week or two before we were office based work. And then you know we you know we knew it was coming way you pick up your laptops in your friends and he say a guy. Next week, we're going to be completely virtual, but what about the children the you'll working with this must be. I would expect or at least would hope of really good thing for them because I bet a lot of them were wondering. If we're in a time of isolation to be looking for a new family absolutely absolutely, and we've been very pleased that the children whose arrangements we weren't able to follow through the point of you know point initial put block down all of that has been worth three now. So lots of families have been made during this period of children of contempt with adoptive families, which we really pleased about. But there are lots of children waiting around two hundred children in London alone the looking for adoptive families and. Thoughts Y and we businesses normal. You know we wanted to keep everything happening am because the chuck didn't WanNa. Miss any opportunity for. Is Looking for family to be adopted by Mrs. Al Zozo. What's happened and so delighted we've now go. Study Group of people in. Straight. Hype. In the next couple of months will be talking to look and be matched with a child I mean that's how quick convey. Usually, the assessment process if it runs through and there's no gaps, is about six months said potentially anyone coming food now could in principle Be Looking at much the out in the new year. So That's what motivates us what we're doing and the national campaign. This has come out this week as Vamos giving out supposed to messages. About saying to people, this is the time to come forward and think about don't show. So for those people who all thinking about adoption and coming forward, what kind of advice can you give to them? What's the fuss step I'm say first thing is becoming. Understand more options about this is a huge commitment you're making. This is a lifelong commitment. which was hugely rewarding. But you do need to do your research. So take time read the information out. And then just take that bold confidence. is to give us a call and say we're interested in adopting and then people can take basic information and then no meet. The first thing that happens is you you? Go to one information events and then we take your own from there. Is it worthwhile? Absolutely no question about. Having a family is absolutely worthwhile. Having a family through adoption is absolutely worth will be able to change a child's life. Through adoption is absolutely worthwhile, it's translational absolute transformational and I guess that might be one of the things is public pumped it. So many people's waking inquiries the when things will blink everyone. People probably in it took for this is a transformational potential for me. I'm going to do this do this now. So absolutely worth well, and if it's ever been thinking about it. This is a good time. Really is a good time to my inquiry. And that's Alita. You can keep up with all the latest developments with Evening Standard's live blog which you'll find it standard. Dokodo. UK and we also have morning briefings available at seventy and three your smart speaker just ask for the news from the evening. Standard, this podcast is back on Monday at four PM.

chancellor London Prime Minister Evening Standard Boris Johnson Secretary political editor David Malls scientist Evening Standard medical officer Mr. Johnson BBC Joe Murphy Dokodo UK France UK Obama
The Labour party languish in the General Election polls  does Jeremy Corbyn have what it takes to beat Boris Johnson?

The Leader

16:47 min | 11 months ago

The Labour party languish in the General Election polls does Jeremy Corbyn have what it takes to beat Boris Johnson?

"From the Evening Standard in London this is the leader there is no brexit on October thirty first and the only people taking to the streets are kids looking at the results of an evening standard poll nobody cared interestingly chop he's doing of handling brexit political Addis Joe Murphy on the savage showing a huge I am prince and pictures of various historical figures on the wall the incredible in a moment the first major poll election campaign shows a huge lead for the Conservatives if the European Union as planned at eleven o one just before the witching hour on October thirty the pull apparently any consequence here's an editorial column we aren't it was running smoothly rather than preparing to become the world's longest lorry park shows it has a seventeen point lead over labour with the prime minister's personal political editor Joe Murphy has been going through the figures from our poll in the Evening Standard's Westminster a lot of that mountain is overcoming the impression among the public that journey Coleman comes to breaks it which is going to be a big part of this campaign and pretty well half visit well this was in his Bazzi Riley is the kickoff to the campaign the the irony of this was in a hole where he was given the full presidential Eric honest now compare that with Boris Johnson and at least a big contrast with Labor supporters and you've got eighty four percent saying he's doing a good that's despite the fact that we're supposed to leave the EU today we're finding incredibly frustrated but then again for delay interestingly there's no real sign of which is an increase from a month ago when it was thirty eight and you've got eighty four Tali blame the prime minister more likely to blame parliament the speaker again says down to MP's in parliament is there any way for the Liberal Democrats huge problems of its own today because they are clearly split over whether to feel the Liberal Democrats that poll rating has gone down. I'd say that the really think real thing to watch out for is in places like London especially lipped M's they will make a heck of a difference in a lot of contests around the country a Putney where just ingredients retiring will the Lib dem effect hand the seat to Labour on the basis of this poll if it can if the vote got a long conservative lead on nation first of all the electric of flying off in all sorts of directions it's full and apart so they could be some huge surprises you might find that often leave areas that labor used to used to take for granted and you might find the toys this is my next unless you an extraordinarily collection of his own art now the owners of that building wanted clear it out on a very quiet day my first ever editor ones handed me a tape but how

Liberal Democrats Joe Murphy prime minister Boris Johnson London European Union Bazzi Riley political editor Tali MP Coleman Westminster Eric Putney editor eighty four percent
YouTube isnt fun for parents trying to shield their kids from scary stuff

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:01 min | 1 year ago

YouTube isnt fun for parents trying to shield their kids from scary stuff

"From American public media this is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in from Ali would the kids youtube is fun except when it's not especially for parents trying to shield their young ones is from the scary stuff advertising purposes there is a lot of appropriate content on youtube four kids and there's a whole lot that really absolutely is not appropriate the existing brands as opposed to only alternatives. Joe Murphy is editor in Chief of common sense media she says it used to be that up until the age of and now for some related links Youtube one hundred seventy million dollars settlement slash for anyone but kids are Wiley and they will find ways to watch Jill Murphy is editor in chief of common sense media she says I think one aspect of it is isn't algorithm really the best way for us to generate recommendations content to a young impressionable audience can you and I feel like a hypocrite because I have the same battles in my house every day my kids are always asking to watch there are alternatives for you too we have an entire list eight kids were pretty shielded because they need their parents to type in searches now with voice control the age range is shifting younger would expect and it becomes quite a rabbit hole I think it's like there's no FCC equivalent for Youtube right for a long time now a lot of major alienated off of these platforms they wanna be in where it's cool to be and so I think that is why the conversation needs to continue to to be around the players in this space have just kind of held their hands up with Lake will just a platform we just provide a space for others to provide content creamed breakfasts not everyone's of the mindset and then there's the recent one hundred seventy million dollar settlement youtube made for tracking and targeting kids for a whole lot of families are struggling with this easily youtube has become the number one pain point among parents kind of the eight to twelve th space it's not just they're not even like mentally and emotionally and cognitively ready to make those decisions to turn something off to walk away to not be now that's true ish but then there are other offshoots of Youtube where you could pay and create a subscription and they returned to do originals themselves Dr Site the challenges because phones are cool and Youtube is cool and Netflix is cool and kids do not want to be skewed by the messages it feels like unfair fight so what is the parents supposed to do then I know what is supposed to do I am a platform it's not just the way that it plays content but it's actually become tempted plays this idea that there's lots of cool stuff on there your kids gravitate towards that we all love it. I mean there's tons of course often turn to handle youtube in your family it's not an easy conversation you kind of have to feel the personnel because like co sleeping in is only not we could do a little bit better than that and so- feeding algorithm on auto play it just feels unfair really I mean it it puts them in a place I'm a parent and my discussions with other parents supposed to be doing a lot of that. The company had promised to disabled comments on videos featuring minors after it was widely learned that predators were using comments sections to be Jed Kim and that's marketplace tech this is a PM this marketplace podcast retirement Ryan's family says they abide by all laws and regulations you can read about it on our website at marketplace tech dot org nine men's it'll do a better job of policing content aimed at kids rights they company promises it'll disabled comments and personalized ads on all videos aimed at key kids see net says the company will also use machine learning to make sure video feed stay appropriate the thing is the article points out youtube was already that you can find on Youtube but what get served up in the algorithm what get served up through related videos is not necessarily what your rickie even if it's kids making the content buzzfeed says Super Popular Youtube Channel Ryan's for review maybe in hot water for the way it features more than thirty billion total US and lots of endorsement deals but a complaint filed with the Federal Trade Commission says the channel weaves sponsored product into stuff what began as a toy in boxing channel for now seven year old Ryan has grown into a veritable empire with more than twenty one million subscribers super creepy but see nuts found youtube is still struggling to lockdown commenting on videos featuring minors advertising to kids is it's product tours. NPS surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people in our comm- customer unity got forty five percent loyal users with Intercom in just twelve months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do that's inter- not by entercom intercom what's more of the. Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner of a website and packed it with conversational is into videos and doesn't properly label them as advertisements the consumer watchdog that made the complaint says preschoolers can't recognize this kind of product placement as an.

youtube Jed Kim editor in Chief Ryan Joe Murphy NPS Jill Murphy FCC Ali boxing US Federal Trade Commission Wiley Netflix one hundred seventy million do one hundred seventy million do forty five percent twelve months seven year
Rory Stewarts mayoral bid, PLUS did Boris Johnson write a pitch for Hollywood?

The Leader

12:34 min | 1 year ago

Rory Stewarts mayoral bid, PLUS did Boris Johnson write a pitch for Hollywood?

"From the Evening Standard in London this is the leader Hi. I'm David Malls Land Rory Stewart for London mayor. He's written in the evening standard to announce. He'll run as an independent in the next election. He says he'll sought the city out there from his believes that wait is through this our political editor. Joe Murphy says it's come as a bombshell in Westminster later what the President Zip coast looking at this is a balancing act almost on the one side. He's trying to send the sport to new regions but also to its powerhouses. It's traditional basis so with that in mind. London John is always going to be in the reckoning the conversation around the world championships after success by Katrina Johnson Thompson and Dena Smith why London should host the twenty twenty seven world automatics championships also we begin with a sickening montage of atrocities beheadings of innocent people in Orange jumpsuits. Was this Boris Johnson's Hollywood bit did the script he allegedly wrote with a role Scarlett Johansson. Emily Sheffield seen the pitch and takes us through it. The taken from the Evening Standard's editorial talk. This is the leader you'll find it on page fourteen in today's paper Bogota Standard Dokodo. UK would slash comet in a moment Maury Stewart's independent Pitt for London. The contest has to be mad of London just got a lot more interesting in an open letter to Londoners published by the standard today former Tory m P brewery stuart says he's GonNa run as an independent and here's what the standard things. This may be a new label for Mr Stewart but it fits better with his past while he has served in a conservative cabinet Mr Stewart Chew. It never seemed very comfortable knowing the party line. The ex-soldier stresses his track record and not just identifying the problem but solving it if he can clean thirty thousand truckloads of rubbish from the streets of Kabul he believes he can keep little off the pavements in Kennington and Kenzo rise of course he's not the first is to make all these observations about what's right and what's wrong in our city or claim. He's the one to fix it. We will need to hear much more in the coming months about why his answers dances are any better than the ones we've heard before it won't be easy for Mr Stewart to win but it's certainly not impossible you can read royalties to its letter in today's paper and its on line up political editor. Joe Murphy sort this morning in our Westminster Office Joe. How's the announcement gone down with the Tories and labour like a bombshell. Tori High Command. Are just open mouth of this. This really does change things. It changed things in in several ways one. It makes the marrow contest more unpredictable to it means that the chances of the official conservative candidate. Shawn Bayley really really reduced the bookmakers are already relegated him to ten to one outside a slot uninstalled rory stewart as the second favourite silicon in the race as he spoke when he was running for the leadership of the Conservative Party so much about his constituency in penrith is is it a surprise as appears to be for the parties. He's now going to run for mayor of London. Is there a strategy here. It's always awkward if you have been a politician in representing two different parts of the country and in the past politicians who've changed location have come under fire from from old or new constituents students but on the other hand done this in a fairly clean way announcing his resignation from his old constituency and his own party this morning and and subsequently announcing in the Evening Standard in this amazing thousand word letter that he is going to be running in a different part of the country. There's quite commuting the in the gap between those two events and during that gap tim found the former leader of the Liberal Democrats tweeted a torrent of of praise for saying what a fine independent thinker he was one of the few who really gets it and Harriet Harman former deputy leader of Labour Labor tweeted best of luck in the future to Rory Stewart and of course then a couple of hours later. We learned this bombshell that he's actually going to be running against their candidates in the medal race. How does he do though he's written in this latter today by his priorities things on affordable housing polluted air on safe streets. How is he going to convince. It's London that he has answers to all of these problems. He's got to do it first of all by using the maths of the of the Meryl contest that means job number one is overtake. Shawn Bayley now Sean Bailey is second-placed in the opinion polls and of course all the contests tests so far from there have been a runoff between Labor or stroke can livingstone and Tori with smaller parties being squeezed in the first round and then their support coming into the interplay in the second round but the maths mean that if he overtakes Shawn Bayley then he's the man who then in second preferences will attract the crossover votes and he's the person you can put the squeeze on the official. Tory candidate according to to the Stewart supporters. They've done some private polling on this and it finds it said ECON is well out in front don't but that Bailey steal it jointly in second place now that's before. Stewart has even announced his candidature next. I love running in the UK and I'm really happy that I'm getting UK later into season Denache Smith speaking about let her love of running in Britain her gold medal and Doha and Katrina Johnson thompsons help London's chances of hosting the Wild Athletics Championship in twenty twenty eighty seven the president of athletics governing body wants a world championships to return to London as early as twenty twenty seven so does this ended good. Lord coast backing comes in the wake of the wonderful gold medal successes of the British female stars Katarina Johnson Thompson Antena Ashes Smith in the current well championships in Doha which have provided a thrilling reminder of the joy and excitement that this country's fleets as well as their international rivals can provide I to the public this city has recently hosted both the twenty twelve Olympics and the two thousand seventeen athletics world championships both was stunning successes and Lord Comex clear that the capital as one of athletics red hot territories should be able to enjoy favor again. We agree. Let's bring the twenty twenty to seven world championships to London the Standards Mama Johnny's been watching the events in Doha he says loco will need to show more than UK success this year to bring the event went to London in the future. What the president said Co is looking at is it's a balancing act almost on the one side he's trying to send the sport to new regions hence it it being in Qatar in Doha at the moment but also going back to its powered houses. It's traditional braces so next time round in America which is a big hub for athletics so with that in mind. London is always going to be in the reckoning the conversation around the world championships what it did two years ago is host. It proved a very successfully selling nearly three quarter million tickets fifty thousand people to mow sessions in contrast to here in Doha where we've seen quite empty stands and here's the new blockbuster mission to Syria glorious wish fulfillment dream movie a mixture of Golan Globus and readers of the lost Ark.. That's an extract from a pitch. It's claim aimed that Boris Johnson wrote for a Hollywood movie with a puffer Scarlett Johansson or maybe Angelina Jolie the evening standard columnist and the founder of this much. I Know News News. Emily Sheffield is read the whole thing and she's with me now emily. We have to take the Downing Street hasn't confirmed that Boris Johnson has written this pitch. I suppose the screenplay that you've seen some of the very similar writing style to him though isn't it. I obviously did corroborate that. This wasn't a song kind of spoof and because it is really quite funny so it almost reads like spoof because it's called things in it. like helicopters going Dougie dugout. Duggal Walk Walk Walk and a word some point where he he goes splatter when one of the main characters dies and then spiff located but yeah so he he he is meant to have pitched this in and August twenty fifteen because he ties it to the awful full of Almeira the the time and I genuinely believe that he the whole world at that point was watching in in in horror and I I haven't the is meant to be a full film script. I have to say with absolute openness. I have not seen this but this pitch did amuse me in its awfulness awfulness iceberg. I just I was struck by well. They won editor at the standard who I saw hit said. Oh Oh I definitely could see this film. I mean I would see you say oh for this. I I saw a little bit of ambition there particularly in the people he thought so could play these characters scholar hands come on Scarlett Johansson but that's every that's every middle aged. Man's dream isn't a straight man stream. Is that Scarlett Johansson plays your place your lead and I quite like the description of his lead male character you know very the whole thing is like raise the lost Ark as he says but the fact that he mamaji August whereas it's not just Marmaduke this is when I read it when I first got it. I I mean I was laughing not lead to Mama Ju combined. RNC person comes up with that. I googled it and Mamad. Martin C button did in fact exist in seventeen thousand one well there. You go say they do if poorest on this. We we know one thing. He does know his history. So is this based on a real person. I don't know there's very little to go on Marmaduke. Take Montmorency Burton yeah. I think it was just a name. I suspect actually came straight out of Boris his head. How serious do you think he was about this. A ooh knows I think most writers I lived in Los Angeles for a while and it was like every day. Someone would send me another script. I think most nice writers and Boris started out as journalists. Most journalists think they've got a book or a film in them and I suspect this was the moment he thought he had a film in Him. Could it be embarrassed. Johnson screenwriter instead of prime minister was that much of a passion eh now I think he was fully engaged on becoming prime minister at that stage. This was is only three years ago four years ago sorry so he was mad and he had just become MP. That's the leader taken from the Evening Standard's editorial. Call them where delivering analysis and opinion every day at four you can also keep up to date through Billiton's on your smart speaker. There's any one of those at seven every morning. Just ask for the news from the Evening Standard and we're back tomorrow.

London Evening Standard Boris Johnson Maury Stewart Scarlett Johansson rory stewart Doha Joe Murphy Westminster Shawn Bayley political editor Emily Sheffield UK Mr Stewart Chew Tori official Katrina Johnson Thompson Stewart president President Zip coast
The Queens Speech analysed, plus is obscene Cats the movie REALLY that bad? And a special Christmas message from pianist Stephen Hough

The Leader

17:00 min | 10 months ago

The Queens Speech analysed, plus is obscene Cats the movie REALLY that bad? And a special Christmas message from pianist Stephen Hough

"Subscribe to the leader through your podcast. Provide remix shoe. You don't miss out on any of our episodes released four o'clock every day from the evening standard in London. This this is the leader breath. Hi I'm David Moslem. The Queen has delivered her speech. Can Boris Johnson deliver the revolution. He's promising the language used by voiced Johnson over and over again is the word radical. He says this is the most radical queen's speech in a generation that's quite a big claim our political editor Joe Murphy on and the challenges facing the government even with the big majority also. DFL Bossi's are really quite concerned about the impact of this on the bottom line. If you're people use chips listened buses they simply get less cautious. Simplest Thought City Hall editor. Ross lied along. Why fewer people using public transport in London and come on the critics have their claws out for CADs? The Standards David Sexton gives his verdict on the most talked about movie this Christmas. It's just so embarrassing. You feel transfixed with horror all the time as well as being boring and having no story and we also have Christmas Miss Message from the renowned pianist Stephen taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the the newspaper or head to stand the DOT code. UK slash comment in a moment. The Queen has spoken. The Real Revolution will come quietly my lords and members of the House of Commons. My government's priority is to deliver the United Kingdom's uh-huh departure from the European Union. On the thirty first of January. The Queen's speech went more or less S. as expected with Brexit at the top of the government's priorities but the was one intriguing bit of legislation that perhaps appropriately seemed to sneak in unnoticed. Measures will be developed. The tackle hostile activity conducted by foreign states a landmark and Mark Hall of Security Laws to crack down on spies saboteurs. Hackers was revealed for the first time agents of foreign states who abuse social media media to disrupt elections could be jailed. They will be no Russian revolution in this country. Pinar Hetero column believe the government itself has quietly plotting its own and what the Queen did not say may be more important than what she did. There is one genuinely revolutionary piece of legislation in the Queen's speech the EU withdrawal bill. It's been argued over for so long that we forget how far reaching it is. But the Queen's speech is largely silence on what replaces it. That's the crucial detail. That will come later on days like this. It's worth remembering that radical governments do not detain the Queen for long. They're reshaping of the state is achieved by relentless executive focus and meaty budgets. Major public public service reforms are achieved through a very small number of landmark bills like the most successful revolutions. Little is announced in advance. And it's only when it's over that people realize how much has changed a political editor. Joe Murphy is in our Westminster Office. Joe The seem to be an awful awful lot unsaid in this speech but the government's preparing huge changes for the United Kingdom. It is on the language used by Boris Johnson. Over and over again is the word radical. He says this is the most radical queen's speech in a generation. That's quite a big claim when you think back to some of the things that coalition did or if going further back when you think of the nine hundred ninety seven gentler by Tony Blair witch did indeed James Britton pretty radically in its own way But certainly with leaving the EU top dead center of the speech and the first words to Queens said this counters a major change. That's coming away. No very many any big surprises in the queen's speech the rarely all but this was really interesting about this overhaul of the official secrets in these kind of new laws to stop spies and Russian interference appearances in our election. Why that such power will? This is a priority. This is a reminder actually of of of of how the bright young political things aren't as she driving everything everything in the agenda this crackdown foreign intelligence operatives who are here as agents of influence and other people who law currently has been it cracks in that they can slip away and this is something the intelligence communities and security experts have been diligent in quietly working on for quite some time. They're looking at faults in the official secrets acts which go back over a century the trees and act which goes back to thirteen fifty one I think. And they're saying these is need updating for the real world or new laws creating to fill those gaps such as. It's perfectly okay to work for say the Russian North Korean governments as long as you not go actually bugging all stealing documents but you can sit on the Internet creating as much havoc as you want by spreading conspiracy theories race or using intemperate language to try and foster divisions in our society all making claims to undermine elections. There's actually not a law law that is adequate to putting those people out of business of the moment and this is GonNa Change that and of course the Queen Speech is the the first opportunity for all all of our new and the old ones to all hang out in a room together. What's the atmosphere like that? After you know an election is pretty momentus election will of course we've waited two years Queen speech and now we've had to within a space of two months and so a lot of the bills. Were quite familiar from the last green speech in October but at the same time the reception is a hundred percent. Different venue heloc. A hung. Parliament deadlocked no certainty. That anything that was announced announced would actually get onto the statue books. Now you have a giant majority and a totally different mood and of course. It's great colorful occasion on a couple of takeaways politically from that in the procession from the Commons to the House of Lords. You saw Jeremy Corbyn walking alongside the Prime Minister As tradition dictates but he stared dead ahead a very sour have to say expression on his face looking most grumpy and the prime minister was looking from side to side and occasionally casting quizzical looks. Amused quizzical looks as the leader of the opposition But was studiously ignored then behind them. Emily thornberry got into a barging match with the Scottish National Group. Leader in Blackford tried to in her view push in front of her in the procession session so she asserted her place bodily and of course the person that all gone to see the Queen Herself at the age of ninety three was I think it it has been said showing her age. She read the speech in a very clear voice indeed but sniffed a few times suffering from a cold and she had almost misstep on the stairs. It's up to the throne and it's reminder that she will not be doing these occasions forever and we have to enjoy her as long as we have next. You may not have noticed but fewer people using London's public transport inside the city center. call us up or the mayoral election. Next year. We look at what could be a major issue. If you squeezed onto a tube train on November twenty-ninth you're not alone more than five million. Journeys were made on that day. The busiest in the system's history but data from transport for London shows growth on the underground is actually tailing off. There's a similar story bosses. Meanwhile Karl use outside. The city center is rising city hall editor Ross. Lost Lytle is at City Hall where he should be really but he joins me now. Ross was behind this. Drop the reasons for this. Are Twofold really. The first is as the state of the economy. A transport for London says that they have been fewer people coming into London for that is for business for work a Domestic tourists or international tourists and the attribute that to the sort of the flight laney economy over the past five to ten years. That's it's been quite graduate. The other factor is the change in the way people work that sit with technological advances related to broadband and Suwon means. It is much easy to work from home so people may not have a conventional ninety eight to five. PM Job Anymore. So rule all that together and essentially those is fewer people getting tubes and buses. This must be hitting to your bank account. They don't WanNa get about revenues A. T. F. L. Bossi's are really quite concerned about the impact of this on the bottom line. The have already lost around seven hundred million pounds a year in government subsidy to run the chips and buses that that was withdraw in the last couple of years and means basically t.f L. Must break-even on a rolling basis. If you're people US troops and Bossi's he's they simply get less cautious as simple as dealing. This is going to be a big part of the mayor election next year. One of the key lanes of battle is likely to be what drives call his war on the motorist. He does plan she'd be reelected to expand the ultra emissions Zo oh and to the boundaries of the North and South Circular Roads by October twenty twenty one presently you laze knowing is just in the area of central London congestion charge zone but if this zone is expanded people who have older vehicles more polluting vehicles will have to spend twelve points fifty two right the calls. No this shows essentially that people are much more dependent in the suburbs on cars to get around the simplest seem connectivity as there's no in between chips and buses and trains it's in the suburbs so these are the typical Tory heartlands as well city can may struggle to win votes to rely on Labour heartland of inner London. If he wants to get back into City Hall Cat Got Your Tongue filmed in Hertfordshire with largely British cast and inspired by a collection of Poland's by t s Eliot who gave up his American passport to become a British subject cats. The movie based on a British musical has already proven its value to the UK film industry. But what about his box office. Critics have not been kind our own. Dave sexton says it's nearly as obscene as the human centipede but he did give it two stars and is with me now to explain why David the must be something edible by this then it has good actors in it who are absolutely traduced and lost basically. I thought it would be unkind to give it none. But I see that in the Telegraph Tim. Robey has actually given it. No stars whatsoever and in the Guardian Peter. Bradshaw has given it one so I feel I was over-generous. Now it's a tough the thing to turn into both a musical which is always extremely successful and movie because it's not really a plotline to Elliott's cats as the never never under the never was a plotline their collection of verses each one presenting a character So you Lloyd Webber and Trevor Nunn MM invented this idea that one of the cats would ascend to heaven which like a kind of proto talent contest so they presented themselves and there was a winner at the end And that's all there is in the film and it simply doesn't sustain a ninety minute film a tool. There is no story no story what server the critics have been very colorful in the criticism is R- appoint when you see a movie like this and you go. I'm going to write the definitive line. Oh that's absolutely what film critics do. They're very competitive. Little Bunch and they knew this was going to be a disaster and so they were honing themselves. Ready for it before it happened. And and they'll be all looking at each other's reviews and such thinking news sunk in the shop as cruel obviously back racism or not that means lots of people are talking about it. I'd imagine a lot of people are going to go in. See it even if it's just to see it really as bad as people say. Is there a possibility for this to be one of those cult. Elton movies that that somehow becomes a success later on. I can't really speak for musical fans I find the inexplicable to begin with I think you know you enjoy musicals by abandoning your critical faculties so maybe musical fans will get something out of this. But I don't really think it's going to work as a kind of camp cult classic doc because it's just so embarrassing you feel transfixed with horror all the time as well as being boring and having no story Here's one more thing. Since it's nearly Christmas. The pianist and composer Stephen Half off. That's him playing list has released a memoir rough ideas in which he talks about his life as an international performer and reveals his thoughts on subjects. When the people he's met to the existence of God he's taken a moment to write for the standard asking? Can we believe in Christmas. And not believe in Christ and the man who describes himself as a Christian with failing batteries has recorded an extract for the leader which we've put to his own composition hallowed performed by the sixteen in a Christmas has an evergreen perennial appeal because it can reset had the human machine. We spent all year winding ourselves up into coils of tension. Fear or tying ourselves into knots of rancor and I'm Bishen and then Christmas gives us the opportunity to wipe the board clean something subconscious about the appeal of Christmas. Not as soon as the way we hear. Music composer performer. Former can not every not unbolted the score every harmonic change into the deepest musical logical forest. But I'll reaction to hearing the vibrations in the air air or seeing the baby in the crib awakened something in us which is beyond analysis. A sense of being heard as we listen a sense of wonder a sense the possibility of good in the world some people stumbling for words to describe its source have called it gone maybe Christ never existed but Christmas does it contains a profound wisdom you for living a better life it may only be a symbol a story but it's our story if we wanted to be and it's gentle juxtaposition of simplicity and service with a healthy celebration of material goods can be our best hope that the story which is hours we'll have a happy ending and you can read all of Stephen House Christmas message in the newspaper or online at Standard Dakota case last comment you can go and see him to the Wig Oh hall next month that Selena don't forget we have our audio news bulletins ready for you at seven. AM every morning. Just ask your smart speaker for the news from the Evening Standard. The podcast will back tomorrow.

London Evening Standard Boris Johnson European Union United Kingdom T. F. L. Bossi political editor David Sexton Ross Joe Murphy City Hall editor London Thought City Hall David Moslem House of Commons DFL Stephen
General Election 2019: Boris bids to calm Conservative nerves after election launch day gaffes

The Leader

12:55 min | 11 months ago

General Election 2019: Boris bids to calm Conservative nerves after election launch day gaffes

"From the Evening Standard in London. This is hi. I'm David Malls. The election campaigns have barely started and already the Tories are in trouble. Normally these things are gift-wrapped like sort of box of chocolates. Today share college from doll also assure us the Christmas stores coming out in the summer and people get angry about that comes marks and Spencer struggling before we've even got to Christmas. This is not just a crisis M. S. S. profits plunge again taken from the Evening Standard aditorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper had two standard Doco in case slash comet. In a moment we speak to all political editor. Joe Murphy about the troubles Satori. HQ This was the PM leaving Downing Street to meet the Queen rejecting thing photographers requests. For nearly ten minutes later he was at Buckingham Palace to mark the dissolution dissolution of parliament and after a chat with the queen it was back to Downing Street to tell the country the election has begun. Come with us. A government believes Britain should stand tool in the world. Okay with Jeremy Corbyn in the Labor Party who cited with Putin when Russia or oh did poisonings on the streets of Salisbury but as editorial column explains it's a bad start for Boris Johnson. On paper this election the Conservatives should walk. They chose the timing and the terms. So why the nerves in Tory circles i. They've lost the opening salvos of the campaign. It's hard to think of a worse. Start to a campaign from government expecting to be reelected we've had Jacob Rees Mall claim claim on. ABC has more common sense in the grenfell victims of our the rest room for whatever the fire brigade said we leave burning building. It just seems common sense thing to do. Meanwhile they have been two resignations including the secretary and the candidate in the gower says those on benefit street nick putting down of course rows about candidates in stupid remarks from over promoted cabinet ministers are Pau for the course in any election. Shen it's the missteps from Tory. HQ that are more. Alarming conflicting adopted video of Labour's kissed. Armor would be amateurish enough. What they he wanted to give you a good deal? They know that you're going to actively campaign against or not compounded by the mistake of getting into a twitter war with Piers Morgan about route it and then allowing the party chairman to be so more on this morning's media round that he abandoned his final interview with Sky News only to find that the redoubtable doubtable Kay Burley conducted the interview with an empty chair. ooh Fumigate Begin to tell you how cross I am you watching cable at breakfast and then teach. It was supposed to be filled filled. I should say by the chairman of the Conservative Party. Where is he? He's probably fifteen feet away from where I'm standing his simple fact about this selection. If Boris Johnson loses any seats overall he will cease to be prime minister. If Jeremy Corbyn loses seats he could still easily end up. Open Downing Street only guides Joe Mafias in the Westminster offers. I Joe editorials offering some advice to Boris Johnson. Today but I suspect he's probably had some strong words for conservative eight q itself after launch. Like this I can never remember election launch like it normally. These things are gift wrapped like sort of box of chocolates. The Prime Minister Clears so is his diary. Nothing happens until the big moment when he or she walks out and make the announcement and travels to the Queen and a dignified procession to the campaign trailer. Afterwards today share college from dawn we we. You'll see this story in the later. Addition Kay burleigh marched into another broadcaster studio to demand to James Cleverly while you on my program because she thought he was avoiding her. It's been quite a day. We were only talking not that long ago on this podcast joe about the size of the conservatively lead to pull thing. We had seventeen points between the Conservatives and labour. They really are at risk of throwing this away only. We'll of course seventeen. Point late was a bit of a poisoned chalice. The toys because there's only one way to go when you stop the campaign with a humongous big lead light. That what you want to do is stop doc with a modest leads and build during the campaign So that was a sold for them. Aren't the election that I keep thinking about is is Edward Heath in one thousand nine hundred seventy four when he went to the country saying Hoogovens The parallel of course is Johnson said today wanted election a half to have one because parliament won't let me get my brexit deal through and he said I'm chewing my tie in frustration. Well the problem with that strategy is you have to keep the focus on one question the dividing line you choose the dividing line. That he chose was is it me or the trade unions who run the economy of the country. The dividing line that Boris wants us to focus on is is it. Is it the people's referendum or parliament. Who should decide on the brexit question Russian? Well there's a the the the thing that should be haunting. Boris is heath went out to the country but over the course of a six-week campaign. People stop talking about should we should we. Should we back Mr Heath against the unions and they started talking about Mr Wilson's campaign based on pay based on working conditions based on ordinary kitchen table issues. Now the question is can Boris. Keep the focus on his brexit question and as our leader said on his question of whether he will. Mr Corbin is the right person to run the economy. Or are they going to veer off into all the sidetracked with launch day. Goes out of the window. What chance is there of keeping on track for five more weeks? Do you think the novice age today. I'm certain some of them are nervous however they are confident that they have A prime minister. Who when you ask who do? You won't be prime minister. Boris Johnson or Jimmie Coleman. The most voters will come to the same and so which is they won't burruss rather than the other man But they're not they're not Little confident that they'll always get that message over Couple of good news. These things for them they've We've got a poll. Today sauce. Mori poll shows it. Saturday Javid easily out schools. John McDonnell when you are people who'd you won't be chancellor the Exchequer and run the economy and set your taxes and there's been trouble for other parties Michalik severe sleighs done investigation. Detained to fake news in some of the leaflets being put out by Liberal Democrats around the around the capital and we've also got news that they're eighty thousand thousand. More people joined electoral register overnight after we did a front page yesterday saying come on sign up to vote. Don't miss out next. There's lots to do and the priority is to get a clothing business back into growth. It's been the three years since eminence. Boss Steve said he wanted to turn around their clothing business. It hasn't happened. Fashion sales have plunged something. Time is running out for the CEO. does an old theory the fortunes of those two bastions of Middle England marks and Spencer. And the Tory party. Closely tied when Margaret Thatcher was riding high so was her favourite store which opened specially to clue delegates after the Brighton. Bomb and which famously provided the iron lady with her underwear in the nineteen nineties with both on the new management the retailer wilted in the face of new high-street challenges and so too did the Tories a decade later to enjoy the Renaissance Nemo just as the Tories launch their election campaign pain him and ask results. Show their profits plunging by seventeen percent up business news editor Alex Lawson's. Alex seems to be in trouble an awful lot. What's happened to enable ashore as the Christmas stores coming out in the summer and people get angry about that comes marks and Spencer's struggling before we even got to Christmas today? They've seen profits. Crash reported that to the city. They're also cutting the dividend which weren't please investors a short stories? The clothing isn't doing very well but the food part of the businesses. What's going wrong with the clothing side Well there's a lot of different factors here some of them to do an SS own goals and something to do with the wider highstreet. First of all on the High Street we know that said sort of budget chains like a primate have been doing well as have the likes of a a sauce and Boohoo online. So squeezing the traditional names on the highstreet ones that we've all grown up with Marks and spencers next and of course we've seen be. HSEN houses appraiser struggle in terms of mass themselves. This is a business which can sometimes seem like a bit of a bureaucracy is one of the biggest names in incb business but with that comes thousands of staff and the inability to move at pace which they online combat. Since they have haven't been able to do serious the trouble firmness well it does seem like they're in a perennial state of crisis. They've had Steve Rowe. the boss has been in place since twenty sixteen gene. He was an MS life. Reworked from the shop floor earned the position But then archie. Norman has come in the chairman. Now he is best known for attorney around. Asda quite famously. In the late ninety s seen as a bit of a pugnacious figure in the city doesn't suffer fools. We saw earlier this year. Joe McDonald a fashion boss. Left shortly after jeans Gates This is an issue where Holly Willoughby who is one of the people who promotes promoted. Denim range them. People couldn't didn't get because the buys brought enough stocks are clearly when you when issues like that issues of availability. Some bolts retailing are being seen by the customer. That's never a good sign. It should be the sort of thing that would ask what you've been around forever. Should it got right by now. You would have thought and also. Is that question of what g go to. Ms Four four people associated with basics. You know punt SOx is the biggest seller in UK for example but beyond that. I think there's an acknowledgement there from the company. Anthony that they need to be a bit more fashionable more modern. They've said they've relaunched. They're arranged for example but will that be enough from the city perspective. There is a suggestion that they could split split out the fashion and food businesses. So you've got one the food business. which is doing a joint venture with Accardo later this year which could accelerate that growth and then the fashion and business which you then potentially are able to close them stores move online and make that more profitable that might be the way to go forward and that's leader keep up with all the election developments and everything else? That's what's going on with the

Boris Johnson prime minister Spencer Jeremy Corbyn chairman Buckingham Palace London Joe Murphy Steve Rowe. Edward Heath David Malls Tory party political editor Conservative Party Joe Mafias Jacob Rees Mall twitter
No end in sight for coronavirus lockdown - plus isolation lessons from solitary confinement with Dr. Rangan Chatterjee.

The Leader

17:09 min | 6 months ago

No end in sight for coronavirus lockdown - plus isolation lessons from solitary confinement with Dr. Rangan Chatterjee.

"Thanks for listening to the leader. Kuna virus daily over the last few weeks. We've been concentrating on covering the covert nineteen pandemic bringing you news interviews analysis and special features. We'd love it if you could share the show with anyone you think might benefit from it and get in touch. He's the HASHTAG leader podcast now from the Evening Standard in London this is the leader could Luna virus daily. Hi I'm David Malls Lynn. There is no end in sight. The lockdown the message is getting louder and clearer that the lockdown will not end this week. In fact it will go on for some time. Let Gladys Joe Murphy on why authorities want to keep it going for longer also keep it simple. Do Five minutes each day on your minds. So that's your mental health. Five minutes each day on your body's that's your physical health and five minutes a day on your heart. That's about human connection. That's what many missing at the moment. Since it is going to go on longer. We talked to wrong and Chatterjee from the field. Better live more. Podcast on how to get through self-isolation taken from the Evening Standard's editorial call him. This is the leader Kuna virus daily for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper or head to standard Dokodo UK slash comet in a moment. Joe Murphy on the lockdown ambulances without sirens have begun being the first patients to the NHL Nightingale Hospital in London. It's begun operating at a crucial time with one intensive care doctor telling the evening standard. The work at his East London. Hospital is brutal and relentless. It's a situation reflected in countries all over the world. Covert nineteen is not going away and our editorial column says efforts must be redoubled at an international level. Where in a crisis that is hitting every country and every human being on the planet so surely we should respond to it together. But we're not it's as if we're part of a series of giant experiments rather than a joint battle. Will THE GERMAN MODEL OF TESTING? Turn out to be right is South Korea best using smartphones. Has China really got on top of it? What is president? Trump's plan our vaccine expert sharing what they know. A joint letter led by Gordon Brown and signed by many former leaders and experts including Tony Blair and John. Major came out this week and deserves more attention than it's getting. It calls for global health measures including billions for joint effort to find vaccines and shed stepping up of production of protective gear rather than a race to buy it. It also backs a massive economic response to support the developing world and stop liquidity crisis becoming solvency crisis in which businesses and banks go bust. If we don't do these things will come out of lockdown only to find the world's lost the fight but how long will that lockdown last for at least in the UK? Probably quite a while. I'm joined by the evening. Standard's political editor. Joe Mafi. Joe I want to tell you about the lockdown land but just as we start speaking there there's an update coming through on Boris Johnson. Houghton news straight from Downing Street Is that the prime minister. Is I quote responding to treatment close quotes which has to be good sign bearing in mind that There is not much else coming apart from that he is clinically stable and a health. Mr Day said that he was comfortable and in good spirits building up to an optimistic picture. There was a report overnight. His temperature come down a bit But that's not being either confirmed or denied by number ten unlimited goes to a fairly thin gruel of information about the PM's condition so that's hopeful news about Boris Johnson. But for the rest of the country does not much optimism. Going around right now we were. Some people were speculating. That the lockdown might end as early as next week. But it doesn't look like that's the case really is it? I think the the message is getting louder and clearer. The lockdown will not end this week in fact it will go on for some time. Now you've had today a battery of experts and political figures trying to make that clear Wall obviously holding to the nicer. Take a decision won't be made until next week But Edward Argyle. The health minister said now is not the time to let up. We'll be waiting for more evidence of a sustained downward number of cases or deaths the World Health Organization's men David MMA borrow said. We need to not relax it until we've got alternatives and in place You've had Sadique Kahn. Saying we are nowhere near lifting the lockdown. You add up all that along with several doctors who have spoken out on behalf. The rule colleges. And I think you've got an absolutely emphatic answer. Which is don't get your hopes up just because it's a sunny weekend coming. Yeah because we have the bank holiday weekend coming but it does seem as if there is genuinely no idea really when the lockdown might end. There's literally no idea at the moment because we're waiting see sustained data about how the virus behaves but we can sort of make some guesses based on the way the ministers have said they'll make the decision first of all they're said we need to see a downturn in the crisis will not specified whether that's fewer cases or fewer deaths and. They've said we'll need to see spare capacity in hospitals at the moment spec past exists but when this peak comes and CDC cancer today the peak in London looks like arriving seven or ten days time. That's when we might be finding capacity outstripped. That's when if there's going to be a huge crisis we'll be feeling it And you have to actually work through that peak and have prestige and before anyone can consider easing lockdowns so the hospitals are clearly bother under strain. Now we have reports and evening standard today about doctors telling us that the facing brutal in some hospitals but also there are issues over care. Homes as well on the join. You've brought this up with The chief medical officer Chris Witty while raise last night's press conference the virtual press conference done by video with Chris Witty because we're hearing reports from care homes around the country that they are not getting proper. P P getting flimsy masks Rollin. Good respirator standard masks. Then not being given testing and doctors and nurses are going into them. They're skyping so when an infection breaks out it seems in lot of cases you've got staff with no proper medical training and in many cases people on the minimum wage or just above it Having to cope with this quite dangerous and quite worrying situation we have a story in today's paper that is a must read. It's about often green home in Stettin. He which has about fifty residents and there are infections. There and seven residents have died with suspected corona virus And that really does spell out the tear buying situation if the government is basically got a policy that it will kettle homes whether infections Chris Witty's reply to me was not very encouraging in the sense that he said he's always said this is going to be one of the toughest problems to solve and that we should expect a rising number of deaths in care homes so over the next week or so really. It's not looking like a very good paycheck from the United Kingdom metabolism. There's lots of science victimize them the case numbers look as though they're reaching a plateau in the next week or two Plateau may be too high for comfort if it keeps within the competence of those highly stressed overworked and hfs workforce's and within the number of ventilators. Then we could get off as likely as it's possible to get off given the unfolding scale of the tragedy. Next old they were all experiencing the same thing. At the moment and says this global condemn ick. We're all experiencing in completely different ways. Doctor Rhonda Chatterjee gives his tips on getting through an extended self-isolation so it looks like we're going to be locked down for a while. Well done to all of us getting this far. But what's next? You may recognize Dr Chatterjee from the BBC Breakfast Sofa or his hit. Podcast feel better live more. And he's with me now over zoom wrong. How are you getting through this? I came three ups and downs. Think like like everyone. I think some days when you start well and the sun shining in the morning you think. Hey you know what? Let's pretty goods and other days. You feel things are getting on top of the other thing. I would have been a few years ago from us but I think it's the way I look at life now and the way I try to apply some principles in my daddy life. I think they're really really helping me now. Well there's definitely eight years ago. I guess I've done a lot of personal development work over the last two years and the understood myself and how I get fulfillment in my life and I think in the past. It used to be a lot from external validation. You know you do things that would make other people happy. And I've really flipped over the last years and really understood about comes gem along the way that I used to feel as a child and what I thought I had to do as older realize. Actually that it's important idea things that make me have paid for in this situation if I apply those same principles. I'm figuring out. Well what can I control I put a post on instagram literally. About two hours ago which people already responding save which basically control what you can control the sandwich out now at the moment econ control. You can't control what the government policy is. How many beds are intensive care? What can you control what you can control your attitude? You can control what you watch the news once an hour or just once a day you can control the phone a friend or your parents. Each day I've spoken see prisoners. John mcevoy was one of the most notorious criminals in this country at twenty four. He's locked up next to the seven seven bombers in the highest security prison and he was in solitary confinement almost five yes not allowed outside his cell for twenty three hours. In every twenty four rounds many fuss feeding that wherein confinements right and John said what I needed to see was a needed routine. I realize that routine was king for me every morning I would get out exactly the same time and then I would to a prison circuit workout. So then he goes. No I used to drink see March taking drugs but I realized that when I move my body each day I felt better about myself. My mood was felt more in control tes. And then you can you can look at Nelson Mandela. When he was in prison for what twenty seven years? I think it was right. He would have to go in work in the quarry now. They did a lot of manual labor in the prison. He'd have to go and do a Lotta that work but when he got back into his cell then if he did it every day or it was four days a week he would run for forty five minutes on the spots or they were all experiencing the same thing at the moment. It says global all experiencing in completely different ways. Yeah I wonder though if people are putting pressure on themselves to achieve something during this lockdown period you know I can write that book on. Al always meant to Ryo oil. Do something amazing when actually all you have to do is just kind of get through and do the little thing. Keep it simple. Do Five minutes each day on your minds. Mental Health Five minutes. Each day on your body starts your physical health and five a day on your heart. Which is human connection? I'll give you an example. The mental health days so the feminists on your minds could be a breathing exercise. It could be journaling simply writing down. Your worries in your anxieties is so powerful. You take out of your head and put it down onto paper but it could be five minutes of nature. We know nature lows. Australia was in Helsinki revolt mental health. If you're lucky enough to have a garden and you have a morning cup of tea. One sit outside in the garden and have cup of tea while listen to the birds. Move your body each day right. You don't have to go and run a two hour fifteen k. Like you see you buddy posted on instagram. Hey I'm out once I made. It counts today at the fifteen k right fine. If you buddy can do that but the say. Just make sure you've moved. I'm skipping on my Paseo. Why so easy. It makes me feel ready goods. The other thing says we think about dancing. Dancing is incredible crank of the currently Red Hot Chili peppers books slouching back on and I'm thinking I'm just rocking out soon at home and I feel like a million dollars off to us because you can't feel anxious and you can't even cry and feel sad when you're dancing stone upbeat chain right. So that's a lot of people especially people with kids or families final pieces to at least five minutes. Stay on your hearts and you know David. That's about human connection. That's what many missing the moment because we can't see parents. We can't see our friends. We see a wet colleagues right which is so important for our well-being so make sure you using technology like zoom core like we're doing now few and acts of kindness each day right. Kindness is incredible. Kindness isn't just good. For the other person who receives the kindness connoisseurs actually probably more beneficial for the person who actually does acts of kindness in St last night. One of the elderly woman who live here She has Alzheimer's and she disappeared from my house and the entire street was looking for our windows. Couldn't leave the houses all looking eventually. She she came back of her own accord. It's quite an incredible thing how we can become closer even while. We're being south isolated isn't it? Yeah I think you've had a now the head of David a Lotta saw experiencing things like that. Where we're we're getting shopping for elderly neighbors and then you think. Hold on a minute. What happened in society? Where when now lording ourselves for doing the basics of looking after people around us? You know what happened? Where did we go off track? I live nearby my mum's outlook after MOM's sunshine on at the moments hugging her something. We took for granted and now I'm like Oh my God have not touched the full weeks even five minutes away from me and I think the incredible gratitude that many of us and now feeling about the small things I really hope that stays with us and I would really encourage people this wanding every morning. I'm writing down a few things. I'm grateful full because I don't want to forget this one. This is all over. I don't forget I'm going to remember how I felt. So if I decide not going off track and getting too busy forgetting this stuff it will be nice reminder. It's actually bring me back. And that's the leader KUNA virus daily. You can keep up with all the latest couvert nineteen developments with the evening standard live blog. But you'll find it standard Toco UK and we also have morning briefings available at seven. Am through your smart speaker. Just ask for the news from the Evening Standard. This podcast is tomato at four PM.

Evening Standard Rhonda Chatterjee Chris Witty Gladys Joe Murphy Kuna London instagram Boris Johnson David David Malls Lynn World Health Organization John mcevoy China UK Stettin Joe Mafi CDC Tony Blair us
Coronavirus: China policy leaves hundreds of brits stuck in Wuhan, splitting families apart

The Leader

16:07 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus: China policy leaves hundreds of brits stuck in Wuhan, splitting families apart

"Thank you for listening to the leader. Please do subscribe through your podcast provider and tell your friends about us to now from the evening standard in London. This is the leader. Hi I'm David Moslem trapped in the virus epicenter the British citizens. China won't let leave some families some couples facing some very difficult decisions. Some have young children and it looks like only one parent may be able to return back to Britain our deputy political editor Nicholas sessile on the extraordinary ordinary diplomatic wrangle over repatriation flight also shortage. It seems to be a combination of issues not everything is produced in the UK so many any large Pharmaceutical companies will have manufacturing plants all over the World Evening Standard Health editor. Ross lytle talks to Tanya snugs about his exclusive report got into a shortage of hormone replacement therapy drugs and listen. Andy Confirms in the interview that she asked to sit and was told. No let a gladys Joe Murphy spoken spoken to Labor leadership candidate Lisa Nandy in high demand for a secret anti Semitism report to be released taken from the evening standard at Oriel. Call Him. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper ahead to stand the Dakota UK slash comet in a moment. Why has has China been stopping a UK flight from landing in Wuhan? The last B. A flight out of China landed at Heathrow last night bringing home some very relieved passengers. Five hundred to come back early. Worry was that if I became meal buses of whether you get an ambulance so I don't know search for that. He didn't know what this was the flight. Walking down the street no but in Wuhan estimated two hundred. UK citizens are still. There stopped from leaving by Chinese authorities. The British government sent a plane to get them. Beijing won't give it permission to land because they don't one known British people getting on it which could mean splitting families up our deputy Pity political editor. Nicholas Cecil covering the story. And he's in Westminster Office Nicholas. What's going on here well? They're being to general issues here. One is his general permit such consent to land at an airport that now seems to be resolved and a flight is due to to leave a Heading for Britain at five. Am tomorrow morning. The second issue is with a family's will be an out on board they include non British British nationals. So so far the Chinese Chinese authorities have been saying that non British nationals and Jewel UK k. e. Chinese nationals. On not going to be allowed on the plane precip grammatical have now for several days being to persuade them to change their mind on that but until lunch time today is not clear what the situation is and the foreign secretary. Dominic Robb Spook Cabana discussions with China. Earlier we've been working tirelessly honestly front office working with the health. Been Working flat out twenty four seven to try and make sure that we can identify British nationals. Nationals in Wuhan get them to a muster point and then get a flight to flight in and out this dependence on the decisions taken by the Chinese government. I spoke spoke to the Chinese Foreign Minister on Monday. But we can guarantee and reassure people that are out there families. That are here that we're doing everything we can around the clock tonight that happen so it could be that this plane lands but only the father or the mother will be allowed onto the flight. Yes certainly some families. Some couples are facing some very difficult decisions. Some have young children and it looks like only one parent may be able to return back to Britain leaving the the other parent in city. which really at this stage isn't it? Very much goes city. What happens when those who you do get on the flight get home? Nick will the current plan and I must say that plans have been changing as a day's going along by the current the plan is for them to fly to our boys Norton in Oxfordshire then they will be taken by bus to a and and it just facility in the northwest there they will be kept in quarantine for fourteen days to try and stop this virus our spreading and get into Britain. They'll be kept under close medical watch And the problem might be that. What if some of them turn out to be carrying the infection then they could put it to other people At its facility and concerns about that are rising because it does seemed that this virus is spreading faster than people had initially thought. Yes certainly it's the that is I think what is causing some and degree of alarm among health cheese and ministers people have been comparing it to the SARS outbreak in two thousand and two and two thousand and three and it spitting far faster than that certainly Peter ensure he received professor of experimental medicine at Imperial College. London now describes it as a very worrying situation saying it looks like as far as has spread very fast. Yeah it's obvious that people in the UK concerned about this virus. We know that Packs of surgical facemasks sailing out on the boots website earlier. Demand for that sort of thing is rising how all other countries responding to things all the as afraid as the UK is certainly some countries who've already stopped issuing some visas to Chinese nostrils. Russia has done that. The Czech Republic has done that and one area of really great concern. Is that if if if this infection reach is less developed parts of the world where they've got poor health care and particularly if you've got highly populated lated areas the concern. There is that the virus could spread even quicker and be even bigger impact the next some make men back into stock at the end of APIARY. Some march summer even predicted to be able to stock until the very end of the year ear health editor. Ross lytle on the H. O.. T. shortage that's leaving some woman waiting months for treatment the evening standard revealed shortage of hormone replacement therapy drugs as leaving. Some women going through menopause waiting months for treatment and despite the health Saturday pledging edging to intervene some drugs will be out of stock until later. This year. Editorial column says that's unacceptable. This is a problem that has blighted lives for for too long and must now be urgently addressed by the government. The unavailability of such drugs is having an unacceptable impact on women who need them to overcome the effects of the menopause. It's obvious this is not a niche issue. Every woman will face this challenge and it's wrong that the drugs. They need to help them often hard to obtain. Mr Hancock said this week that the shortages were the result of problems at factories overseas which produced them and said he recognized the importance of the issue. That's good but he must do much more to ensure the problem is rapidly. Resolved women across Britain deserve. have nothing less. The story was broken by a health editor. Ross lytle who spoke to Tanya snug from the Evening Standard's audio news team Rossi even talking to some women affected by light the shortages. Just tell us what they told you and what you found or the story broke around six months or so ago when it came to national attention that there were shortages Jeez over a number of different each RT products. And by chance we were actually looking into this a week or so ago when we got in touch to see they were still having problems despite government pledges back in October to train. Stop the problem happening. And the other day. Art Health questions the host of Commons Manila Wilson. Who is the new view? MP for Twickenham stood up and asked my Ankle Hill secretary what he was doing because she had been contacted by heart. Constituents saying it was still a problem and basically today stories. The result of both a ruin research on conceals that she Raised with my ankle. And what particular because it's different types of h autism. What particular type hype is is being affected? What is there a shortage of his a combination of everything as far as we understand and what the Bushmen society phone was that some Patchy said available summer north art some make men back into stock at the end of February some March summer even predicted to be able to stock until the very end of the year shortage seems to be a combination Benicia of issues? Not Everything is produced in the UK so many large pharmaceutical companies will have manufacturing plants all over the world there can be production difficulties. Ot's most typically because of shortage of Bro. Ingredients seems to be one issue here with some of the glue that is used in the patchy to fix the patch to your arm arm on the scale of the seriousness. Well is not quite the same as running of insulin which would mean that some of these labours potentially at risk. But it's certainly something that I'm glad they didn't suffer from I mean. How detrimental is it for these women not to have these drugs because it's not as easy as just single? Just get a different drug right. I mean it's it's not that simple surely is Simple it'll one those practical problem that these drugs are prescription drugs. The second problem is that the GP may not know much either. Debate the menopause or about the alternative of drugs so some women we spoke to say they were having to do their own research. Defendant what may suit them based the third factor is that the side effects from these drugs are different different according to the dossier within them according to the tape of drugs obviously. We were taught that they're actually thirty. Four symptoms of menopause c-can imagine how varied beacon of suffering that women will experience. It's not like going into boots and asking for. I will profane because new defenders Rhino is just not that simple the active ingredient. He didn't these drugs is different. Hancock said and what is he doing about it. Will he recognized. It was an issue so he gave a sympathetic response without giving a detailed tailed response to be fair to the Department of Health last October. The did impose assertive trade embargo on each not drugs produced in the. Up to prevent Direc- sport so that at least the stocks that we have in the country shouldn't leave the country trying to prevent the overall number on the shelf not declining. Some some politicians have been asking written questions of the Department of Health on this on the scale of this and just this week the Department of Health actually admitted it has no idea how many women are unable debu to receive the form of each not wish such that. We don't really know how much of a problem this is. And you can hear more from our audio news team with our Moaning Billiton and Santa smarts because at seven. AM every weekday. Just ask for the news from the Evening Standard now Labor leadership contender. Lisa Nandy challenging. The party's he's high command to publish a secret report on antisemitism she spoke exclusively to our political editor. Joe Murphy. Who's with me now? From Westminster Joe is at least ninety making a risky move and putting something so controversial within Labor at the heart of her leadership election campaign. It's what she says is about a huge question of trust in the party not just from the Jewish community which has been so appalled by what appears to be a rise of of anti-semitism not held in check by Labor Party but also a question of trust within the Labour Party itself. Now essentially what she's saying is something quite heavyweight. She's saying the party. I need to be assured is saying the same thing to one authority as it saying to us. No Labor has sent a submission totally earthy confidential up till now we've not seen it to the equality and human rights commission about what happened to do with antisemitism and how those allegations negations were handled and so far this has been seen by the former shadow cabinet by the leader and by the deputy leader. Maybe a handful of officials now now yesterday. All the candidates for Labor leadership were called in and giving a briefing on the work done to tackle anti Semitism and Lisa. Nandy uh-huh confirms in the view that she asked to see it and was told no and Jenny. Formula General Secretary said we're taking legal advice. You can't see it But no reason was given for that refusal so Lisa said that if she is later she will publish it because it's so important to restore trust in the party is quite a big thing to raise is quite a big commitment to make but this has been a hugely damaging issue especially in London where there are lots of key seats still being fought over over the next few years when you interviewed. Did she strike you as someone who is expecting getting to be the next Labour leader because he has been a bit of an outside role of there is some momentum minor campaign I think she is one of the most interesting people in the contest enticed by a long way Now she says annoy in this contest to broaden the conversation. I'm in it to win it And I'm sure she's having a good goal though she's he's the placed and she is substantially behind in the polls on the front runners but she made a very interesting pitch. Interestingly interestingly we met at the Lyric Theatre Hammersmith which wasn't an accident that was sending a little message there. This is not just a northerner who's obsessed with buses houses and the plight of rundown small towns but somebody with experience cities because little known she used to be a hammersmith counselor in fact she was the housing spokesman. That's been on the council. And she used to be a housing officer in Waltham stow so she does quite a bit about the sort of problems faced by young families twenty and a housing ladder trying to find places. This is to rent in London. I have to say I found her very thoughtful in that. She answered the questions. All the questions we throw her. She's also very funny and very human and so she certainly ferry brave. Is that going to be enough to win the competition. She's definitely balls. It's not gonNA be enough to win it on its own You never know she might get some momentum now but what she has done. She's staked out a place in the political debate in this country as a gutsy brave principled and I think a lot of people will say. Yeah we'd like to have more of these than the next few years. Whatever the result of the leadership ship campaign itself and that's the lead-up you can subscribe to this podcast through your provider? And please do share those with anyone you think might like take the evening. Standard's news commentary and analysis delivered to them at four. PM Every day. Join US again tomorrow on Breaks Day.

UK Britain London Lisa Nandy China Ross lytle political editor editor menopause Wuhan Nicholas Cecil secretary Department of Health Mr Hancock Tanya snugs gladys Joe Murphy Dakota UK Standard Health David Moslem Andy
Boris Johnson Exclusive: PM is laser focused ahead of General Election 2019

The Leader

13:07 min | 10 months ago

Boris Johnson Exclusive: PM is laser focused ahead of General Election 2019

"Thanks for listening to the leader and remember you can subscribe through your favorite podcast provider to make sure you get it every day at four pm now from the Evening Standard in London. This is the leader. Hi David Moslem. Boris Johnson has spoken exclusively to the Evening Standard's political editor. Joe Murphy how is the PM handling the pressure Rasha of this extraordinary election. He is what you'd say focused in fats are up say that he was the most disciplined. I've seen him for quite a few years. We'll speak to joe about that and Mister Johnson's plans for the first one hundred days. Also a huge property funds band withdrawals and blamed brags it it and the blame for this is the government's Indian because you've seen one year of pro social artistic France. It's not just London facing a rail strike. Paris Harris is all but paralyzed by one. That's also affect in the youtube. Stop we speak to prison affected taken from the Evening Standard Editor. You call them. This is the leader. The whole thing become the newspaper. Oh had to stand the code of UK slash comet in the moment Jomaa Film. Why Boris Johnson says? There are seven seven days to save Britain seven days until election time with polls showing an average of ten point lead for the Conservatives. Seems like a good idea to sit down with Boris Johnson and listened to the as planned are political editor. Joe Murphy's done just that and we'll hear from him in a moment I here's what our editorial call makes the current and possibly continuing. PM has to say sometimes elections can be hype too far but not sworn in a week. Britain's future will be decided will brexit happen will large parts of our industry nationalized. We'll spending saw and dead get out of control. Will the Union of the United Kingdom survive for many voters this has been a warring an unhappy election contest so we welcome Boris. Johnson's Sen's positive words in his interview with the Evening Standard Today. He's ending the campaign by trying to appeal to wavering voters by promising a conservative manifesto. Esto which were it not for. BREXIT would see his party rooted firmly in the mainstream of politics. He says he does not want the next parliament to be dominated donated by Brexit. That is wishful thinking. Next week the country gets to decide whether a leader who helped divide the nation can bring it back together. Gather Joe's in our Westminster Office. You met with Boris Johnson. It's been very much boola Costa campaign. How did he seem well? He is what what you'd say focused in fact say that. He was the most disciplined. I've seen him for quite a few years. Now by that I mean he he was sticking rigidly on message. He wasn't getting thrown by trick questions. He wasn't being looked down the primrose path of of of of sort of stray topics even when they were sort of in favor. Jeremy Corbyn pretending to watch the queen's speech a main course hours they wouldn't get he wouldn't get drawn any other things he was sticking to his core message and that is assigned. I recognized from when he was standing there and he would pull out a big big binder of questions and answers quite openly an quite without shame because he is a man when he really really want Something he lays down to focus and that's where he was it wasn't shambling Boris. It was focused. Boris and the polls US suggesting jesting I think the most recent ones on average is showing a ten point lead for the Conservatives. Did he strike you as a man who thinks he has this in the bag. He struck me as somebody not who wasn't going to take any chances he wasn't gonNa take his foot off the pedal and he wasn't gonNA take his hands from round the neck of his opponent who he thinks he's got on the ropes. I would say Burr who is terrified that in the last moments of the round. His opponent could wriggle away and breath again So he was relentlessly attacking Jeremy Corbyn. I mean he spoke about some of his own big projects his big picture but tom-tom again he came back to saying but look all of this. All these big plans are have. My big vision is at risk because I get an overall majority the Commons the Palman went. Let me beat Prime Minister Anymore. They'll find a sort of alliance they'll put. Johnny got me Calvin in at number ten and that is the big dilemma for conservatives. Isn't it because they could get the most seats but if they can't get at this planet action through parliament it's often north isn't it. That is exactly what the prime minister would tell you given half a chance. He keeps coming back you too. We've got a parliament the hub. Let me make any moves. Give me a majority and we'll see something different completely new story an there's an interesting thinking. Hey you've got to go back if you think about it to two thousand and one before you can have a situation where there was a prime minister who was potentially actually going to serve a full parliament with an oval. Majority your your member. The in two thousand and five Blair was at the end of his years and he was forced out after two years. Yes in twenty ten David Cameron had to form a coalition in two thousand fifteen he had a majority a good majority. But unfortunately the referendum random Brought all that to a close and then in two thousand seventeen theresa may got a hung parliament again and it was all an utter disaster. So you've got eighteen years that this country has had False starts and Johnson's appeal. He's what he feels Dell's. He's main appeal especially to London. Where people are divided on breaks is the promise that well government the actually can make? Decisions and held accountable is got to be an improvement movement on a series of governments that have got flat tires and broken down engines from time to time obviously is still a very are Banjo. But you've covered a couple couple of elections in your time. How does this one compare in terms of the stakes have been raised and the extraordinary way in which these these campaigns have been run I think in terms of the stakes? I mean the difference between the parties is really very very wide much wider than I can remember NBA since the eighties William Hague who I interviewed earlier on this week made a very interesting point. He said well if you think about the toy. Tax Ex- policy now is quite similar to the tax policy. That Tony Blair had in two thousand and one But in other respects the parties have pushed really wide apart. So you have. The brexit is the issue that is the immediate dividing line but behind that. You've got to spending differences that are enormous am borrowing that is unrecognizable by bypass terms terms. I think what you've got for the first time since nineteen eighty is a real sense that the country will go in different directions. Depending on who wins there was a time uh of triangulation and third ways middle ways and Husky hugging when it felt like the two benches. We're Amir sort of you know a hat Ed breadth between them But now no. It's very different next. Ask a huge property. Funds as blocked savers from withdrawing that cash should the city regulator have stepped in soon the city regulators facing a storm of criticism criticism for failing to beef up. Its rules have to MSG. One of the country's biggest property funds said it was temporarily suspending dealing in shares. The group Will Jones buildings like the Riverside Retail Park Chelmsford has blocked savers from withdrawing their cash after it could not sell buildings fast enough to meet redemption requests. Auditorium Column says the Excuse Given Brexit is a flimsy investors in two and a half billion pounds property fund are horrified or fight to find that the cash has been frozen. MSG CONSUL ASSETS QUICKLY ENOUGH AND BLAMES BREXIT for slowing down the market. It's about excuse. Three years in Brexit hardly surprise investors have been let down by the fund but it should never have been allowed to make the impossible promise of good returns and easy access to cash in the first place our financial markets are supposed to be regulated anger at. MSG should also be directed at the financial to conduct authority for not stepping in now in London seven day. RMT Union real strike and four underground services being kicked by delays con. Stop the city from moving over the channel in Paris though something very different happening the city's been brought to a halt by a massive strike over pensions more than eighty percent of train. Drivers are on strike just about every regional trains being cancelled and all but five metro lines have been shut down. It's also hitting the Eurostar with around half of their trains counseled Antoinette an is in Paris and joins me now this is happening after so much disruption in the city caused by those yellow vests protesters on people getting a bit fed up of not being able to go about their lives. US More than half of people are actually supporting yellow vests and that affected by Dan. Because it's just about not going to shows lizzy or a very tristen commercial place in the city people that I'm more affected by the yellow. This I've seen other owner of these places in this very Terrific in commercial neighborhoods in Paris so tourists. And maybe let's say those those exploiting these these places in Paris so really I think that Generally like the generally fringe people. They are more supportive. Supportive of the yellow viscous they see. They are seeing seeing. They're protesting for important things for them for every everybody for the society. Actually so I think there are more supportive. Actually who's getting the blame for all this well. I would say that the blame for this is the government's Indian because you've seen in one year of pro. Social protests in France is the first time we have sold over protests. And it's not not on the list. It's in so many parts out of the hospital in the be crazies. All the public servants are being squeezed in and specifically the poorest people in society the one that I know not working with low wages. Who are the one that will be affected by this reform against against which is the the the protest today? Both the unemployment insurance ender retirement system in France are being really Eddie attacked by the government and people they see that it's about their their life so I think the movement of today's very much General one in the the union what we call the couvert dilute and I think many people see people are courageous to go in the street because police is very very strong these days as the police the police repression is very hard and government. Machado would before so people that are going to the streets. They are really ah fearing funding sales and needs. I'd say it's the first time for a long time that in France you you've got fair to protests but I think it's very supported supported by the society as a whole and that's the leader we publish at four. PM Every day so please do subscribe to make sure you get. It's nice and early and also try out bulletins on on smart because there's a new one of those every morning at seven. Am We'll see you tomorrow yeah.

Mister Johnson Joe Murphy Brexit London Jeremy Corbyn prime minister United Kingdom Paris political editor Tony Blair Evening Standard Editor Boris France youtube Paris Harris France David Moslem Britain NBA
Hush Little Baby

The Truth

27:08 min | 1 year ago

Hush Little Baby

"The episode of the truth contains strong language dear diary. Last time I wrote dear diary was back in high school. The baby the first thing that surprised me after she was born miss her face. It's been so much time looking at sonograms nanograms but this is the first time I saw her features. It felt like the first secret she'd ever kept from me perfect. Oh my God she's beautiful you guys. She was just like you must be over in so so they're over the moon for you to over the Mo- everyone's so happy for me and I know I should be too. I mean I have a baby now. Guess that makes me Mommy. I'm talking to you. You're just checking your vitals. Okay Oh look at her. She's gorgeous thank you. She looked like you or your husband well. Everyone says she looks more like me such little sweetheart. I'm bet you just can't imagine life without her. Of course of course not I'm. Hey <hes> ask you a question is it. Is it normal to feel a little distant from the baby. Do you want me to move her closer. Oh no no I it's fine. It's fine. You don't want her closer. No I guess they just <hes> is. I've been feeling a little not myself baby blues. Everyone feels that you'll be fine but I just feel really off like I know I should be happy but for some reason I I'm not a it's the normal for me to feel a little bad. Are you sleeping. I mean I guess I'm not sleeping well. What's your mood? You'd scale of one to ten. What does that if any changes I mean I just had a baby? So what about your thoughts. What about are you planning to hurt her? What yes or no I have to ask these questions? If you're planning to hurt her. We need to take action to protect her well. No I know I don't want hurt me baby. Have you ever been physically buying. That's not what does your husband ever been by went with you Eric. No never you know forget. I said anything I just wasn't feeling like myself and I wanted to know if it was because Oh my God what was that we all know having a baby as an easy and sleepless nights. It's got a sudden drain on all of your time and energy and that feeling that you have no idea what you're doing today in the truth a story about what happens when you're bundle of joy feels more like a bundle of terror before we get started. I have a favorite ask. The truth is conducting our annual audience survey and really value your feedback. It'll just take a few minutes and we love to share about yourself and share some of the things you I love about. The show please visit survey nerds dot com slash truth to take the survey today that survey nerds dot com slash truth. Thank you so much now back to hush little baby. Maybe what did you do to her. I didn't do anything. Why does she sound like it's not normal of course it's normal? Why is she doing it? You were talking about distant. You feel you think there's going to be no consequences what we are husband. Insane steph making me a monster. She's right but I didn't mean to say you're a month's different not knowing how to feed me feed her just feed her. I tried but she just wasn't latching may hey. I don't know how I don't know how to do. Just here's what happened. Nothing everything is trying to feed her. She's okay. She's she yeah. She's fine. She's Ok look she's latched. That's amazing. Wow Yeah just really hurts. Do you want me to go get the lactation. No I am just outside. I know what I'm doing sure you hear her cry. My hearing's not that bad. Let's take a little walk them holy <hes> we'll be right back. Why can't he hear her like I can? I don't know you don't even seem that bonded. I have to tell you no. I can hear her pennies that you can ruin her for him to keep this to yourself. She's obviously daddy's what you daddy's got you but I'll be between five minutes in three hours from now. What were you talking about nothing Pistons? She's a little angel right. Don't worry I'm Tony One and you've been sleeping well. Yes how about your mood scale of one to ten ten YEP. I feeling great eating great doing great so yup. I am all set right. Just remember to keep track of your baby's eating and sleeping scheduled for the pediatrician appointment okay. We'll write it all down. How are you feeling about going home excited yeah? I'm really good wonderful well. We're wishing all the best congratulations mom and dad welcome home sweetie. You've never been here before. This is your house and this is the lives already so comfortable with this. What do you think you're missing? I'm go pump okay. What is everything okay? Check it out. She loves this light. She's really staring at it. Hope Fluorescent Light Bulb doesn't burn up my retinas on what if that's bad for her eyes light that's the only thing they can see doesn't seem like she's listening. Maybe I should tell him directly. No no no no just Eric. Can we just could you please just not do that. Just just in case just find okay. We'll turn the light off. Okay late us at the air out of the room diaper delivered. I didn't know you had keys. Eric gave me your spare yesterday. Hi Sweetie Oh gimmie. I love you. Welcome home money yeah. It's good to be back. Thank you so much for the diapers. Could you over by the changing table title Eric The changing tables not done yet. It's it's a lot of the way there really isn't though partly we're working on honey when you were a baby. We just stuck you on a mat and called the today. You'll get it taken taken care of before Friday. My Friday will didn't Eric mention anything. We didn't have a chance to mention what nothing bad. Don't sound so alarmed. I was just planning a little celebration for you next week for the baby and you I mean so people can meet the baby and see you all those people watching see what I am. I think it's a nice idea will get to introduce her to all our friends. They'll get to meet the best baby on the planet she so well if she. She were a boy you'd be having a Bris after days not necessarily of course you would. We never talked about having a right because we were having a girl that if she weren't a girl and we did have a breast. Are you talking about. I'm I'm saying it would be nice to introduce to our friends all do all the planning. All you have to do is show up and that was easy enough since it'll be at your house but I don't want to host a party. You're not hosting. I'll be hosting back at the hospital I met this is lovely couple with their own catering business. Who are these people Gillis and we'll do it in two weeks instead of this week okay that way everyone will be happy but I- why don't we talk about this later WanNa go for a little walk just the three of us the WHO watched the baby? I meant the three of us you me and the baby. Oh yeah yeah that sounds good and this is the play ground. You're going to have a lot of fun here right honey. He's waiting for you excited Yup. That's right. It'll be it'll be great can't wait for you to run around play. Do the TIC TAC toe thing over this imagine the like one can run in a way for a new. Let's keep working. Yes sure she's so cute. Thanks how old is she five days five day you must be so in I love of course you know it's the most love the most but you can feel absolutely right here. My are- screaming at me go baby. Carla have a baby right now. Don't yeah because will because you know you have to wait until you're ready or you won't you won't be good at it so drafted tear you have been <unk> should be right now. She's fussing. Stop It. I'm sorry not you the baby. We have to keep moving her a great day you too. What was that about? They need to know it's a responsibility just being nice. He freaked them out. I'm sorry for embarrassing you you. No one tells you how it is. When you're that age they need to know so they can prepare like how we read those books and took that class? I'm just trying to give them good advice like a good parent. Just showing cracks keep this up and he's going to terrible you really are at this since she's hungry. I sit down and feeder apart now yeah I I. I need to write down the feeding schedule. We don't have to do apart. I just wanted to you want to read it down. You a joy to be around sixty five A._M.. Woke up and drink two ounces napped at eight A._M.. Woke up at eight. Oh five back to sleep by eight twenty five or changed at ten snapped again at eleven. We'll go up at one who are back to bed at to change diaper high to Change Dyke Era Gadget. There's changed got to be careful when she fusses better if I just do you not trust me honey. It's been two weeks. She makes the slightest in Iraq it out of bed before I can even get my head off the pillow. You're particularly events runs next week anyway so I should just get used to doing this. You should get some rest before the party tomorrow or what I won't be presentable. No that's not. I'm trying to help them worried about you. You're not acting like yourself. I wonder what's changed. I want to change okay okay but you've been isolating yourself completely cutting me off okay. Do you want to take over breastfeeding. That's not trying to fix everything is what I'm supposed to do. I'm supposed to go in there and feed her and you know what tomorrow you'll get tired of the party. You're so excited to hi so congratulations Eric you win. You have to have a party. I just thought it would be nice to see her friends. She's hungry just need to be wrong now just company. I don't need company. The Monitor and here all go back to bed. You can eat and I'm GONNA get some recipe for this stupid party. You'd think risk is going there and fine if you feel this way about spending time with me imagine what your friends with them see. What you're you think you can fool everyone? It's only a matter of time before they see the truth. You can't Eric Forever. I am just trying to make sure he can love you. Leave me alone. Eric loves me. I'm I'm not gonNA like you make him miserable on. Maybe he just loves me. He loves both of us. Everything's different. It's not that different you seriously believe that just look at yourself. I'm not a monster. You're a monster or maybe the real monster is a woman who can't back up. Maybe you are the reason you don't want to have the party. Maybe the nasty little thing you want to hide is it made everything I diane comes from storm so if you think I'm a monster that you wear Albouy this Interros Hush. Little baby will return in a moment but I do you experience stress. Do you have any anxiety or chronic pain or do you have trouble sleeping at night at least once a week. We are not alone many of us. Do I have insomnia. I sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night. I can't get back to sleep and I was desperate effort to find anything that can help and then I discovered feels feels is a premium C._B._d.. Delivered directly to your doorstep it naturally helps reduce stress anxiety pain and sleeplessness. I started taking a little bit right before I went to bed and it helps. Let me sleep you just place a few drops of feels under your tongue and feel the difference within minutes. It's incredibly easy to take and if you're new to C._B._D.. Feels offers a free C._D.. Hotline and text message support to help guide your personal experience. It feels works naturally to help you feel better. There's no high hangover or addiction. Join the feels community to get feels delivered to your door every month. You'll save money on every order and you can pause or cancel at any time feels has me feeling my best every day and it can help you to become a member today by going to feel dot com slash truth and you'll get fifty percent off your first order with free shipping. That's F. E.. A. L. S. dot com slash truth to become a member and get fifty percent automatically taken off your first order with free shipping feels dot com slash truth now back to hush little baby were there. She is feeling let me tell you I started making them amosis and if he asked me they're tasting purdie good cheers. I don't want to have the party but people are coming in a few hours. We have to cancel it. Okay okay. Let's talk about this wanted to talk yesterday and then you fall asleep. I'm sorry you told me to go to sleep. I don't want to do it. We don't have to Lina. Let's just send out an email. We can risk listen. I know you get anxious but this is a wonderful thing you ever been. Everyone keeps telling me how wonderful it is constantly all the time but you know what it's not. I don't be dramatic. She says Christ mom you're one talk. I was a mistake and you weren't a mistake. You are surprised right and I'm sure that's how you felt when you realized you were pregnant did you did you have a party right then and there or did you wait two whole week. He stopped talking about this in front of Eric. It's fine. I am so hello sorry for having literally anything to say about myself at all sure you were surprised but you know what I stepped up to the challenge on my own. Do you have any idea what I sacrificed. When you were born do you get? A whole lot of sleep so now I'm just talking about the I'm done. I'm done doing nice things for you. Cancel the party. I don't even know who you invite her Dr. You've been drinking. mimosas are fucking excellent drive you home. Let's take a couple of hours and regroup the group. You need to talk when I get back car. Seats home it okay. You're okay. Why are we doing? We're going for a drive where South asking me Shit. I don't know I don't know so that was pretty interesting before. Not GonNa talk about it. Why because it's Gonna I'm just GONNA? I'm GONNA we drive. I WanNa know where you are. I mean really the one in where I am. You'll be with me. You know she's right. Your mom didn't have a support network when she had you you have it easy and look. I'm fine right. Are we getting out because I want to go for a walk in the park. I want to go for a walk in a park like how things used to be so. Why don't we go to the park near home because it doesn't feel like how things used to be these people can tell you're a baby aiding freak just disc two minutes okay just for two minutes? I'M GONNA pretend I'm a good mom. No please please just wait till we're in the car. I don't want to be a monster now. Restrooms ahead finish shut up. You're it's going to raise them with me. If I lose my call all these people are going to see what you were really not going to Davis genetic or not hear this. I'm sorry do you mind if I sit over here. who of course cool okay Ma'am yes to public space? She's got to eat right. We all got to eat but you could do that at home and just trying to be a good mom Jesus no reason to get angry. I'm just saying their kids in this park kids in this park. But what do you think she's feeding the Dildo. It's not appropriate my son's playing over there right now and he doesn't have a problem problem. So what is your problem. I'm just trying to let kids a fucking baby. Jack Ass all right. This doesn't concern you on talking to her. Jesus Christ what happened. Don't let him make you feel bad monster. Everyone's a monster. Are you okay yeah. She's not hurry you. Are you okay. No no not really I wanted this for so long. Just snuffing is gone like it's supposed to know I mean I. I thought that I was going to be a good mom. I just I don't feel that way. I feel really really. We really sat all the time and really alone. You're not alone. It can be monsters. What's her name Olivia? That's funny. That's my name no way really Oh. That's so I mean it's a beautiful man. Obviously I'm partial to what's going on. I'm sorry I've got to go we should they sure you're not going anywhere and I wanna be a bother your mob bothering me sure just stay. Stay here fedral little monster. Thank you ars. I'm Joanna by the way nice to meet you to run and that's and that's my son Ernie. He's got a haircut Scott that he is. It loves them to hear more original stories like this go to the truth podcast dot com you can also follow us on twitter and Instagram or handle is the truth fiction hush. Little baby was written by Marina tempelsman and produced by Jonathan Kevin Mitchell was performed by an car Erica Schroeder David Ebert Katie Hartman Lewis Cornfeld Leslie miso Erika Hernandez Area Gatlin Boris Kaikan and Talia metal special thanks to magnet theater the offer classes and shows on Improv sketch storytelling New York City find out more at magnet theater dot com. The truth is a part of Radio Topi from P._X.. Work curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcasts. You can learn more about all. The radio shows at Radio Tovia Dot F._M.. Our associate producer is Emily Mironov. Our intern is caroline felt. I'm Jonathan Mitchell and you have been here the truth thanks to progressive for their support. Recently progressive asked me to reflect on memorable moments wentz in transition to a fully-fledged adult so until three years ago I lived in a one bedroom apartment in New York with my wife Jen and now I live in a one bedroom apartment in New York with my wife Jen and our three year old daughter tackling that's three people sleeping in one bedroom and the thing is it's a great location and my wife has litter for twenty three years so the rent is affordable and it's the kind of place we would dream of living if we didn't already but toys are encroaching on the living room and our daughter has outgrown. Her CRIP is at times. I think it's time to move well. It's either spend two hours commuting to have one more room or to suck it up and have one bedroom with three people will know there's another option where what if we gave Sadie our room. Where would we be? We will be in the living room. I guess we could do that. Joe Murphy Bet a Murphy bed is basically basically a bed that becomes a wall during the day as a hindrance at the bottom and it folds vertically so you have living space in the day in bed by night so the question is do we move and have a yard and maybe even space for an office in a studio or do we stay in Manhattan closer to work and all the things in the city. We love obviously we're going with the new bed. So what do you think about getting your own room. Good what's going to be in it. They be a baby. That's my baby's. Just your babies <hes>. What about your kitchen now? What about all your toys? No what about your big ten taps. No I'm fine. We'll see how this goes. Whatever your Dream Home looks like you can get quality coverage at a great rate with progressive insurance in fact with Progressives homequote explorer you can compare rates online from other companies and choose the covers that works for you?

Eric The sonograms nanograms New York City Iraq Radio Tovia Dot Pistons Interros Jonathan Kevin Mitchell Lina Tony One twitter Gillis Carla Scott Sadie Joanna Jen Joe Murphy intern producer
Back to work Britain: inside Boris Johnsons plans. Plus how schools are preparing for the end of lockdown

The Leader

14:13 min | 5 months ago

Back to work Britain: inside Boris Johnsons plans. Plus how schools are preparing for the end of lockdown

"Thanks for listening to the leader. Kuna virus daily. If you're looking for more podcast June. This pandemic have listened to the evening. Standard's Webby nominated woman tech charge. It's all about women leading the way in science technology engineering and Maths on Star Wars Day. Have a listen to Shami Chan. She did the visual effects for the Mandal Odeon TV cities and the Force Awakens just such for women take charge and your podcast provider now from the evening standard in London. This is the leader KUNA virus daily. Hi I'm David. Malls is the lockdown close to being lifted. Thank you for all you've been doing to stop the spread of credit ivars. Thanks to all of you. I believe we are making progress and passing through the peak. Boris Johnson is expected to speak on Sunday about how the U K plans to ease restrictions our political editor. Joe Murphy tells US Watson Store and I'm guessing that the government has in mind I talk about having truly reach. Notice had teach filling him on how some schools are getting ready to welcome pupils back. Take it from the evening. Standard's editorial call them. This is the leader. Kuna virus daily for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper ahead to stand a dot code. Uk slash comment in a moment the UK lockdown lifting strategy. This week the Isle of White becomes the first place to test at the UK. Government'S COULDA VIRUS OB-. It'll tell people if they've come close to someone infected by couvert nineteen so they can then self isolate while they see if they develop symptoms. It's a major part of the. Uk's lockdown lifting strategy but our editorial column says its first test will be to see if people actually use it in normal times a government APP which monitored where you go on your phone would be the last thing people wanted to install but these aren't normal times if the government can reassure people about privacy. I'm the system works then. It will still only function if enough people use the APP. Research is Oxford estimate that fifty six percent of the population download and run it. The outbreak will be halted. The Datsun ambitious target Singapore which developed an early found that lots of people didn't use it. Australia's up covert safe is now a week-old and four point. Five million people have installed it a lot but still under a quarter of the population. Australia's PM is telling people that using the applegate. Pops open sooner. Boris Johnson rang him for tips last night. Expect similar big sell here too. So there's a lot of f surrounding the APP but we are expecting bonus Johnson to announce on Sunday how the UK will begin to ease lockdown restrictions. Evening Standard's political editor. Joe Murphy is with me now over the phone and Joe what we think. He's going to say well. What we're not expecting to hear is him to say lockdown is being eased from such and such a date. So let's get back to work Nicholas Sturgeon as usual has blend the gaff today by saying that she expects another three weeks of lockdown at least and we're making real and significant progress and that is definitely the case the numbers still being infected by the virus on the all important our number remained too high rate not to make any meaningful change without risking the virus quickly out of control again so all things considered and well let me stress. Decisions are yet to be formally taken is very likely that on thirsty. I will be asking you to stick with lockdown for a bit longer. So what are we going to get from? The prime minister. Probably on Sunday is a plan. This is something that I think. A lot of us have been hoping to see. This is the route map back to work and hopefully in time back to the cinema and the per- but that's not for a long time but getting they call me moving again with some changes to some of the rules. Some safety measures a lot of safety measures and a sort of plan to for a staged firing the engines one by one so that they can over a period of many weeks let some people free and see what the impact is on the all the reproduction rate number and if things are going okay let some other people free to work. And then if that's working then maybe a bit of socializing after hours will be allowed. Parts of these plans acquired interesting to me. There's been a suggestion that they might relax to me to report rule. The two meter rule is being at the core of social distancing from the very start of this There's always been a little bit of flexibility implied in it. The tumor rule is you must stay two meters apart from other people wherever possible and that wherever possible has always been kind of observed but not really disgust. And certainly if you've been out and about if you beat the shops you'll know occasions when it's unavoidable to pass people in the shopping oil that you pass close than two meters. But what's changing is. They are preparing to be more explicit about the exceptions. The have to be made if people are going to get back to work in the Warren's that are some offices and even the bigger officers if they're going to observe strict social distancing you won't get very many people into them and the the exception really boils down to this David which is a if it's a brief encounter within two meters. It's not like to be very dangerous. If it's in a very tight place then you are going to have to use. Pep or shields and have that all prepared ready for people. I can imagine this quiet type places in Westminster though Joey the key while I ventured back to the House of Commons last week David interview here starmer and it was very interesting that they've got a lot of things setup for example on the lift up to my office. There's a sign saying no more than one person in the lift anytime now. That's okay for me. I I work on the third floor. I can shit up the stairs But if you're on floor twenty of canary warf and you're in a lift. That normally has twenty people squished. In how do you cope with that and get people to their officers in short order? The other thing that we had at the House of Commons was one way system. So there were sort of those those those nice ropes that you see in cinemas of an of a certain vintage have been placed long corridor so that there was a one way system on either side of the rope and that kind of thing. We're GONNA see everywhere. One Way. Systems especially if corridors can be one way then there's much less risk of people passing each other routes made in sticky tape glue to the carpets everywhere. You're going to see a lot of that. As for lifts yes restrictions may be on. This is from talking to people. How would you do with the left design for fifteen or twenty people? You'll remember some tube. Stations rely on these two Well the answer. Is You reduce the number of people using them very very severely unless you can somehow put screens in or have everybody used p hope that breath for for bullets. Look sure if that's going to work and there are other kind of really fine. Details emerging from the strategy. One alarms me because I'm the worst John. Listen the while Joe and I never have a pen on me. I'm always borrowing. I would steal all yours if we were in the same office. But you're at Westminster Kensington Office but I've got a pen and now we're not going to be allowed to Blue People's pens. You'RE GONNA have to get one of these pens. Hangs around your neck David so you can't lose it and to be honest that might be a blessing for everybody else in the office next to walk down the street on your home across the other side of the street. Social distancing in schools is not really cheap. Second thing to meet. If the offices are opening up what about the schools we speak to head teacher. Charles Filling about preparations in some classrooms. The sound of a school bell still get she. Doesn't ed setting up straight now. Of course the bells ringing tall have been banging for lonely through. Empty corridors for weeks name. Some of you may have been taking over as teachers and I hope that's been doing well but if the offices are ruining up what about the classrooms. There's been no official word from the government but it still plans to be drawn up to let some pupils back in from next month so the real schoolteachers might not have long to get things up and running and I'm joined by one name. Giles Bellingham is a head teacher at Francis Holland School in Regent's Park and Charles. The must be a massive amount of work involved in doing this. There is a cleaning. How we're going to keep each room clean before all the next Come in where we have antibacterial. Weixin the groom's that it can wipe the tables down hand washing children arriving at different times and stuff being allowed to. If Times that we probably won't have registration. Teachers can come in just for the lessons when aged come in. So they're not on the chew is time thing. It must be difficult when you don't have an exact date to work towards. I'm guessing that the government has in mind the first day back off a lot of talk about having notice of coming figuring that would make sense anyway. So that is what I have been planning to was my team and I will wait until on a Sunday to see what actually comes. How many people do you have your skin and rarely coming in from We have five hundred dupuis. They come in from his broad sweep across north northwest and west London coming mainly on the chew some of them lived snuffs walk and and and I think one of the things that people might be concerned about. The parents perhaps is getting them. Say School whether Password might be more parents dropping off. Are you expecting all those pupils was supposed to come back to actually come back? And Jesus some maybe held back for a couple of extra days yet. I do wonder whether some of the parents will be concerned about their children coming straight back into school having stages such tight communities for six seven eight nine weeks whatever mind be than to suddenly gone to a massive commutes the game. That has been quieted job of Donald. Making us wary of going out. Walk down the street down your across the other side of the street social distance schools is not really achievable settling on since being to meet. Paul. That's not how schools work. And what can you say to your to your own teachers to yourself. Actually about returning other. Is there any trepidation? Oh I think some more teachers than usual mind cycling. I think someone might walk in able to Another was saying we'll try to allow them come at different times so they can avoid the busiest time tubes and when they finish teaching the Go Straight home rather than waiting until the rush hour in the evening. Also thinking about how we can spread out stuff for. The teachers have gone about eighty centimeters. Rinse and then there's another teacher and another teacher so we need to make sure that we offer them somewhere else where they can go work if they don't want to be achieved by John and this has been such an extraordinary time particularly the ads for those parents who've had to take on the role of teacher as well. I expect there'll be some glad to send the children back to classic. I think that's definitely will the children every enjoying having interactivity and so we've been able to do a live video lessons livestream lessons. I think that's going to real benefit Not every not every school to manage it. But that's what I think has been a turn around point when initiative we would just setting at does not as motivating on a stimulating easy children to lose sense of what time of day to get off. Once I get going so we started assembly. In the morning we have lessons to data's lingerie as activities activities suggested doing lumps off things in backyard and and until the end of the day. And Are you worried? Some children may have lost their place. So you're people's have lost their luster place at in teaching. There's going to be a lot of what to catch up with. The coatings working jolly lots of mutual. That's not the case is going to be a set amount of catching up in leveling out yet. But I think teachers are inspirational off. And they were trying really hard to heat up with things. They're diligent as professionals bring on indeed and that's the leader Luna virus daily. You can keep up with all. The latest cove nineteen developments with the evening. Standard's live blog. Which you'll find it Standard Dakota UK and we also have morning briefings available at seven am three. You're smart speaker just after the news from the Evening Standard. This podcast is back tomorrow at four PM.

Joe Murphy Uk David Boris Johnson London political editor Australia KUNA Shami Chan Mandal Odeon TV Blue People House of Commons Charles Filling US Watson Store Standard Dakota UK Isle of White Nicholas Sturgeon prime minister canary warf Francis Holland School
Bixby from a Developer Perspective with Murphy, Kibbe and Haas - Voicebot Podcast Ep 70

The Voicebot Podcast

58:47 min | 2 years ago

Bixby from a Developer Perspective with Murphy, Kibbe and Haas - Voicebot Podcast Ep 70

"This is episode number seventy of the voice podcast, today's guests. Joe Murphy, Roger Kibi and Pete Haas. We talk about Samsung Bixby, and what it means for developers. Okay. So I wanna take a moment to thank our sponsor this week whittling. Go they have new product out called cast lingo so cast like short for podcast, and you can check it out at WW dot cast, lingo dot com. Okay. So let me tell you what it is. If you're an author a podcast or a coach teacher, an expert in something where you have an audience, it'd be interested in what you had to say could really benefit from that thing cast lingo is the easiest way to publish a micro cast on Amazon Alexa, and what micro cast will think of Twitter is a micro blog. It's a short form of podcast. And it's really simple to do you fill out a form online at castle and go dot com in three to five days. You'll have a published. Amazon. Alexa, skill you can name it. What you want? And then you in the interim download mobile app in it. You just press record. And you have seventy seven seconds to leave some sort of message a joke, an inspirational quote, some type of information you wanna convey you. Just submit it, and that becomes live in your Alexa, skill instantly. So I checked it out. So you can check it out yourself voice Bhatt says, so it's called voice bought says, you can say Alexa, talked voice about says. And then you hear some sort of comment from voice by something. We're working on our first couple are going to be about data and the industry not surprising to many of you. So I definitely think you should go. Check this out. It's a really interesting innovation. And I think this is the type of thing that we look at with voice. And we say, hey, how is different what can be different about? How we work with these things. Kathleen goes a good example of that. So check it out at WWW dot, Kathleen, go dot com. WWW dot Kathleen, go dot com and many thanks to whitland go for sponsoring independent media voice about podcast now to the show. Welcome back voiced by listeners. I know that many of you loved my interview last week with Adam char about the Bixby launch. It was an exclusive. He went deep on the background with Siri, and with vivid to Bixby and actually revealed something most people didn't know that this whole journey of his started twenty five years ago. So if you didn't listen to the interview, I definitely recommend it because it's it's important around the Bixby story, but you know, what it's important about the evolution of voices systems. And so for me, it was a rare treat to get so much time with him right after they'd launched this product on the floor of the Samsung developer conference in San Francisco while I was there. I also got the chance to speak with a number of developers who've already worked on the Bixby platform and some of those voters have also worked on Alexa, and Google assistant. So they're able to provide contrast as well as some insight around Bixby itself, which was really unique opportunity this early in the development process, and I think something that a lot of people wanna know. Okay. So Bixby is different. It's interesting. How's it different? Because most people already have a frame of reference. So that's what we saw it to do. So our three guests are all working around Bixby, one of them, even the eventual winner of the ten thousand dollar prize for the Bixby capsule challenge that was Roger kitty. But I I we're gonna have Joe Murphy. He's the founder and CEO vocalized dot AI. They conduct performance testing of voice, assistance, and smart speakers. You've probably seen some of his data and the voice about that. A articles were shows what's better Amazon echo, Google assistant in terms of general performance characteristics. How they understand accented speech. So he gives his perspective on what's coming out. From Samsung from a performance standpoint around Bixby, Roger Kibi is founder of voice craft and Pete Haas is founder of conversation curve. Both our developers that were finalists in the Bixby capsule competition, they also have extensive experience building for Amazon election, Google assistant. They offer their perspectives and developing for Bixby and how differs from those other platforms. So before we get to our inter. Views. I want to thank further chief who gave us a five star review on apple podcasts further chief said, quote, my favorite recent interviews are Emerson Sklar Jeff Adams, past present and future voice assistance for this newbie. It's fascinating to hear how much history there is with voice technology, and yet how credibly early we are in this movement to smart voice assistance. I think that actually echoes exactly what dot keet Laos, Adam chyers colleague at vivid. Embiid Spey it Samsung it is early. But there is a lot of history. So that's what we're trying to do. We're trying to tell you the history of voice assistance, voice technology, and what's going on today and eventually where that evolves. So thank you very much further chief for the five star review. If you are a listener, please take a moment to share your thoughts about voice about podcast and the apple podcasts or tune store in the Amazon, Alexis skill store or your favorite podcast app. It helps other listeners discover the show, and if you do so you just might get a shout out the voice about podcast. So thanks a lot further. I'd now do interviews. You will I hear Joe Murphy for vocalized day. I then followed by Roger Kibi who is the winner of the Samsung developer challenge, which we didn't know at the time when I interviewed him happen the next day, but congrats to Roger for that. And then filed by Pete Haas. Who was also a finalist and has really interesting things around product search and basically a store that he set up on. I'm Bixby creating new capsule. So enjoy the interviews and let me know thought. Okay voice about listeners. I'm here today with Joe Murphy, founder CEO vocalized at a and we are at the Samsung developer conference two thousand eighteen San Francisco at the Mosconi center, and we had an interesting morning today in which oh, yeah. Really was. Thank you for the interview. And we attended the keynote session, and let's just get the elephant out of the room. Okay. There was a foldable phone. I know amazing has nothing to do with voice. But while it was impressive. And now we can jump back to sixty. Well, so yes, there was a photo phone and we saw an action if you it downstairs yet. No, I haven't okay, I've got to go. I've got to go check that out. I don't know if they have it down tires out it because it was in that guy's pocket, and I don't think it's leaving his body. He took off. So that that was one of the things that I I pointed out to people on Twitter because I was just like an aunt hopeful phone, and I've been talking about Bixby and all these other things, and I'm like, oh Bixby big launch pretty significant stuff. But all the headlines are going to be about the phone. Yeah. But it is notable. They opened the keynote with Bixby an AI and they're glad you said, yes. And kind of contrast that I think to earlier in the year at the apple developer conference. How voice was such a miniscule part of the show and here Bixby invoice really is layered on top of almost everything they're doing except the foldable phone. Yeah. The foot will foam was sort of like that one more thing the end which used to be a big thing at apple developer conferences, now is like dark mode is one more thing. I mean, it's sort of leaves you wanting more. So did you go to the apple developer WDC this year? I was there earlier this year, and I was kind of disappointed on the lack of Siri horsepower. At the presentation. It was really just shortcuts. Yeah. And that really didn't have a voice component. And we've seen it. I mean, it's not that impressive in. Traditionally I always so originally I came from the mobile phone world. So traditionally Samsung apple are the two competitors that you see going to head with the iphone versus the galaxy. Now, I see starting today shift where who is Samsung's main competitor might not be apple in the future because as they're going more and more towards the expe- smart things, and what really hit me was the multi modal nature of Bixby. It's more than Alexa. It's more than Siri, and it's heading more towards Google assistant territory. Right. And I thought that could make who do you think the number one competitor is now Gogel, but their number one partner for mobile. Who was on the stage. Yeah. Google is up there with only third party on the stage. I believe right. Absolutely for the keynote. So did someone you think sort of think through this strategically and say, you know, we have to reaffirm part of the Android community. So we need to have a what what was he up there? Three minutes. Yeah. Three minute interlude by someone from Google. Do you think that was really the motivation behind that? I hate to think what people's motivations are. But it would seem like they needed to give them a nod and some assurances that we're in this together. But I think at one of the sessions after that, which was solely focused on Bixby. Right. One of the questions from the audience is what motivates me to use Bixby versus Google assistant when they're both on my phone, right? And I didn't really feel like there was a good answer. It was not clear to me why somebody would be motivated to use Google assistant. Versus Bixby especially because they came out with one of their core principles was one assistant. That's right. And they kept reiterating that and I wanted to raise my hand and say, well, there's about a couple hundred million people out there that have already chosen their one assistant. So how do you win them over and kind of what came out of that was Samsung, and I wrote down the number was shipping. Five hundred million devices a year, death, right? So they do have access to this hardware ecosystem. That's right that their competitors. Don't have and I could see that as the way for the Bixby layered across the TV. The refrigerator the mobile phone. So they have every touch point they need, including the smart speaker now at the galaxy home that that could be their way in the house, but other than that, it's it's an uphill battle for though. I think with with Samsung, it's always you have to look at a couple of different ways. One. There's always Korea. And so having a full suite and Korea and dominating the use cases and experiences. There is a part of Sam strategy always global company, but Crean company as well. And obviously even bigger in Korea than than they are here in the US. The I think it's really interesting that you bring this up about who they're competing against and what the rationale is. Now what kit Laos did say a couple of times that. You know, it's early he seen this before he's been through a couple of these rodeos, and that people haven't really selected. He an example is he said there were seventeen browsers when Google or seventeen when Google first launched right? And so there's not even that many voice assistance out there. So he didn't say that. But that's that's it was the location. So you know, if it's better it'll win. Yeah. If it's better it'll win, but you do have that embedded base. It's I agree. One hundred percent it's early but it's not that early. And some people have already made their decisions. This is the kind of conversational assistant that I'm using on a day-to-day basis. So you'd better give me a compelling reason. If you're gonna ask me to switch. That's right. And I actually believe that the the one assistant would probably work against them. But I don't believe it'll be one assistant, and they kind of hammered that point one assistant a couple of times and the other. Question came to my mind with Amazon, Alexa, and Microsoft in court Tana, and the assistance talking to each other and wanted to hear kind of labs impressions on how they think that's going to work because it goes counter to the one assistant unless it's done invisible to the user in the background. But I don't know if those kind of partnerships would be realistic. Yeah. I mean, I had interview with childcare from Samson vid labs magician the magician. Yes, he did. Magic trick onstage with Bixby is really interesting actually did to the breakout. Sessions one as well. This is fun. You know, they really believe that they will be the one assistant that they can win that. And it wouldn't surprise me at all. They can't be for some people. Samsung has a lot of assets. Google also has a lot of assets that are also very valuable and Amazon certain countries ecosystems has a lot of assets as well. And so, you know, my expectation is that this is what they've rolled out today is significant. And that frankly, if they did open it up to Bixby being a service to Google assistant as well. So that there is interoperability it could actually be a wonderful top. I don't know the Google would necessarily wanna do that. But they might do it to sort of maintain position with good partner on the Android side. And I could see then people would have access to Bixby even if it wasn't their primary assistant, right? And I think that could be really helpful because of the number of domains you have to cover and how you do that. It's going to be difficult for everybody to do at themselves. It's definitely going to be interesting. I think the galaxy home coming to the US will be another touch point that will help set the tone for how he's going to do within the market. I have high hopes and high expectations because Samsung always makes beautiful hardware. Right. And the more hardware they make and the more touch points. They have around there around your home. The more likelihood that you're going to interact. With Bixby, and because Bixby is now open and they announced a whole suite of tools today for developers to develop their capsules they call it. Right. It's great to see the energy and the investment that's hands lungs putting into it. And getting back to the point you mentioned earlier in the early days of search engines, there were probably a dozen or so and now there's one or two main ones that everybody has one. There's. I could see a similar thing. So I can get back to that point and say Samsung's making the right moves earlier would have been better. Right. But what they're doing and with their hardware ecosystem and with smart things. And even the plays in automotive with Harmon, they're setting the table to succeed. It's just now they have to give users and consumers a reason to really make the jump. That's right. That's right. And so what about the the the launch demonstrations today? Stuck with you the most probably the the tools that they're now making vailable? So I was really impressed with the openness and the approach taking with. I think it's Bixby developers dot com. You can log on and start developing. Now what they're claiming the quote, that's resonated. With me was that third party developers are now treated as first class citizens. Right. And I think developers will really gravitate towards that. Now. I haven't spent enough time on the tools to say. Is that actually accurate or not? But if it is accurate, I think it will attract developers, and that's something obviously they need to do right now. How many skills does Alexa, have forty thousand fifty thousand seven hundred thousand whatever the the forty five in the US. Yeah. Slow sixty. But I think getting people to now right skills for or capsules not skills for Bixby is the next challenge that they have. It's probably the biggest challenge that they have the tools look attractive investments there. We'll just see time. We'll tell I think for developers a lot of a lot of home. Listen to this podcast are going to be sitting there thinking, okay, I'm not making money on two platforms. Do I really want to not make money on three? Now. I think it's fair to say that they talk about this marketplace and to roll out early next year that's close as they would say to a date and marketplace will also include tools for monetization. They weren't clear. If when marketplace comes if monetizations day one or not it's not in the today. One thing they did say is they're very flexible on the business models on monetization. They didn't come out and commit to. Here's our cut. Here's your cut. I think they realized they need to be flexible, which was really good to hear. This was top people at the lab saying it. So it's good to hear that. They're thinking at the top bef- lexical monetization, and how they can make it work for big companies and small companies, and that was another point that DJ co actual. Closed with. Don't know the exact quote, but he he came out and said, whether you're big company or your small company Samsung is committed to work with you. And I think that's another thing that will resonate really well with a lot of the players in voice right now who are brand new startups getting into the space and Samsung is basically inviting them in with open arms, right? And this wasn't like some division executive saying we love developers. This is the president of the company. Yeah. Up saying that we're committed developers, and he in particular has really been out front. So he's taking the lead on rolling these things out in the February van last year's event who you can see that the commitment is at the top. And I should point out that just to elaborate for those who've didn't see the keynote that when they talk about this idea of developers being first class citizens with with their very explicitly saying as the other popular voice assistant platforms. The tools that the first parties have native, Alexa, native Google are different. From what the developers have the developers? Don't have access to all of the features. Correct. And so when the platforms decide to roll out their own first party capabilities, they often make the third party capabilities that are somewhere look wanting and its place, you know, Amtrak out there and said to me we use the exact same tools as the developers. There's no difference. I wanted to touch on one point that. I think they've labs brought up several times. And Adam brought it up was how do we take voice from being a handy thing to have to an essential thing to have. And I do see Bixby with their hardware ecosystem being able to bring that multi-modal Bixby voice and displays was it tap touch talk. Yes. That's right. So they do bring that across their hardware. So it'd be really interesting to see if they can bring this to it's now essential in my life versus a nice to have. I'm glad you brought it up. So they talk about multi-modal, which is true. But it's really the the interesting thing about Samsung, I think is multi surface and the surfaces being all the variety of devices having a common experience across those. It's not clear to me right now that that's necessary. So do I need to have personalization for my. Microwave, for example. Maybe I don't know. I'd have to I'd have to see it in practice to really know. Do. I need personalization on my thermostat. Maybe people are doing that today. Some people like it, some don't like the personalization watch. We see backlash of that. We certainly see like personalization around travel, those types of things that makes a lot of sense because the Shembe taste. So we'll see you know, that personalization. But this whole idea of multi surface in a way that it's going to take a little bit longer for Amazon and Google to get to in part because the they're doing so little personalization today, and as part because of the way that the hooks that they have into those other surfaces very light and on top of multi surface, which I love that term, by the way. That's what I was thinking. But I just wasn't coming up. But on top of multi surface. They also introduced the one you. I right. Oh, right. And it's nice to see this new clean. You I across those surfaces. And now, I'm really getting into a place where I'm interacting with devices very intuitively because I know how to use my phone, and now a similar you is appearing on my TV and starts giving me that feel of in the system, and it's very easy to move from one surface to that's right. And and it is worth pointing out that among those five hundred million. Devices. They roll out every year, they are number one in smart TV's shark. In fact, I think they're like number one by a wide margin. Last time, I looked at it. Pretty sure like the next three don't even add up to them or something. So so definitely a big thing. Why don't you tell the voice by listeners who you are? And what you do just a brief overview. Sure great. My name is Joe Murphy, the CEO and founder of vocalized AI. We are a research company working on benchmarking services. We developed software tools for benchmarking ASR performance. We're looking at really getting the industry together to start discussing how these devices work, not only for the big players in the industry, but for the third party partners and quantifying how well these devices work benchmarking, performance one device versus another and informing consumers. This always listening device you're bringing into your home. There's a few things you should. About it. Some of those things are how it handles accented speech. How it handles waking up accidentally what happens to your formation. How it handles different types of talkers such as youth versus elderly. These are all things that we've been working to develop a suite of tools. So you can run the device through the test. We and then get a feel for how it performs compared to other devices out there, and there's a couple at least a couple articles maybe three or four that we've collaborated on you've written. Some I've written some of those about some of the data that comes out of your testing, which I think anybody in the industry should look at that. And what I really like about what you're doing is you're creating this database that we're gonna see change over time from. Yeah. Absolutely one of the things that drives me nuts in Silicon Valley is ABI tending these meetings and somebody will get up on stage and say the problem of speech recognition has been solved. It's a solved problem. And then in my lab, I see if I use accented speech or youth speech or elderly speech or lower volume or entered his background noise. The real world environment of how these devices is being used has not been solved. So one thing I would like to drive home people, please stop saying that speech recognition solved problem real world, speech recognition, how people interact with devices is not solved problem is. So well said in fact, I just did a national survey of US adults. The number one thing that people said is keeping them from using voice assistance, more is it doesn't understand them well enough, and they said if understood me better, quote, unquote, they would use their voices more. Absolutely. And I think that's probably a good way to wrap. This would be perfect. And you know, what we'll see? I mean Bixby the one thing that really didn't get confirmation of. But it is a new Bixby. So this is. Not the Bixby that rolled out in 2017 seventeen. Correct. But it's not clear to me when the new Bixby actually hits the phones and those types of things so those are some of the things we'll be looking at. But just for the listeners if they want to follow vocalized, I follow you and social or something. WWW dot localized. Oughta is a is the website and were on linked in. We also have a YouTube channel perfect. Okay. Great. Thank you very much. All right. Cheers. Thank you. Okay. So we're on site here at Samsung developer conference in San Francisco. The big news was well foldable foam. But we'll put that aside. The big news was Bixby as we know is Bixby to Dotto a don't ever used that term. I had the opportunity to sit down with a couple of developers who've already worked on the platform with some of the early they've done some demonstrations and of the call sort of the beta release, and my first guest is Roger Kibi. Roger, why don't you tell the voice about audience your name? What you do? Just give them a little bit of your background. Sure. Roger cabbie and about twenty years of technology. Experience a lot of that working for big companies and helping drive their technology strategy for the past year and a half. I've been pretty deep. Immersed in the voice ecosystem originally building out a company to help small medium businesses established voice presence. Now, I've I've cut a pivoted over to provide voice consulting services for companies to. How do I stash voice presence? What's that gonna mean from a business and technology perspective? Okay. Great. And you have been doing that largely on Amazon and Google you didn't start I'm Bixby, but you were enticed at Bixby. So let's start with this idea of what stood out to you today. In terms of the announcements, the keynotes that you participated in particularly given the fact that you've seen a lot of this already because you've been working with. You know, it's hard to because if you've already seen it, right? Some of that stuff was was not new news, right? And things. I think one one fact really stood out to me Samsung ships five hundred million devices a year right now, all of those are going to be Bixby abled. But some large portion of them are going to be which means that all of a sudden Samsung could release an enormous amount of BIC speed enabled products in a short period of time. And then that added with already been pretty excited and interested in how Bixby and really underlying technology their take on on how to think about and build voice, applications or voice capsules the Samsung term that quivalent of skill or or at action how tell me about their philosophy the protest, they take. And how it's different. I I would say there's a very kind of NL you kind of a. AI focus there, which at first when you go in there and having developed several Alexa, skills and a couple of things Google actions. And it's a different take different way of looking at things, and and I had kind of rearrange shift, my brain, so to speak to understand how that would that would work. But there's some pretty interesting things, for instance, when you trait do training, right, which you do all those this. You can see there's almost this. There's an explanation when you run, and you can see how the NFL you is actually processing the data has analogy us today for the old database people explain plant, but it's an explain plan for NFL you and I've never seen that before. And it's actually pretty interesting and informative to have that there because then you can understand if it didn't understand me or didn't respond the way I wanted to I can see underlying mechanics and how the engine understood that the phrase there. I think I think that's really fascinating. So they expose how the assistant is interpreting what you're saying they do in a much deeper and richer way than anything I've seen on the Alexa. So for troubleshooting. This has to be very useful. It is it is it's it's really nice. And do you aside from that? Like what you can see do you really feel the Bixby handles intense differently than Alexa, Google assistant. I'm going to say. Pro not really and things like that. I mean, the kind of the way it handles things in the way, you set things up the way, you do the training to me is really reminiscent of Google's action flow, actually. Okay. And they are and that reminds me somewhat of it. And so that isn't unique. It's this exposure of of when you go, and okay, I train it. And then I can see this kind of example model I could actually write a little app speak to it. And then I can see how it interpreted that. That's that's the unique part. It's not so much the training part. The development is it's a little bit of different paradigms. Whereas I'd say to my mind, Amazon is mostly co driven Google is there's a lo- more configuration driven. Right. You write the code. But but dialogue flow is there's a lot of configuration here. Samsung is more on the configuration side of matter of fact, some in some ways even more than dialogue flow. Although the tool at this point, probably isn't. Has has all the bells and whistles that dialogue flow. Doesn't look it doesn't have a look and feel like a dialogue flow configuration. No different. It doesn't. Because a lot of that configuration is in these text files. Right. So for instance, with dialogue flow, you're doing a lot of configuration. It's a it's a UI base configuration pulled down a lot of settings. Very you're doing something similar with a with a capsule, but you're actually just Iraq. She writing in their their these dot B X files, which the configuration files there. So they're they're you I requires you to kind of understand their configuration file format and how to do that. And that's definitely there's nothing wrong with that. But at I it's a challenge to kind of understand how that works and how to make that all fit together. Okay. So why did you decide to take the plunge into Bixby because you're making so much money in your monetization for your skills? Oh, yeah. If yeah. Exactly, my monetization. On my Alexa, skills is just amazing. Same challenges. Everyone house. You know? I think it's. I looked at it. I'd I'd read about and seen some videos online about the underlying technology and does really interesting approach not got me excited. And then when I thought about this Samsung, the reach kind of quantify those numbers that I heard today like, you know, this could be pretty interesting platform. Let me go try some things. Let me write the, you know, the the Hello world apt that everyone writes, initially and looked at it. And then there was the developer contest to go. And you know, sure there's a little bit of financial ward. But everybody likes early did lexicon. Finalist and I'm fine. Thank you. Thank you. And you know, we're all going to. How you're buying dinner tonight. Exactly. We're all going to the final presentation is tomorrow. So yeah, it was a little bit. Try something new and because I got some hints and ideas that they might be doing things a little bit differently. Go try it, and certainly the resources and the size of Samsung means they could they could put a pretty big dent in the market if they have the willpower energy to do that. Okay. So tell me what your capsule does. So my capsule fairly simple. It's called what been and the whole idea is we've all gone to dispose something there's a recycle bin a compost bin trash bin. And you're like, well, what do I put wear a so I'm not the only one exactly half the time. We we put the wrong things in the trash bin or and and too much in the trash bin the wrong things, recycle and combos. And I was like, you know, that data's available about where I should put things although a little bit messy side to get that data together. So it's relatively simple. You simply ask can I compost? This can I recycle. This can. I trash this. What been this go into? There's about a thousand different items that understand. Okay. So that's yeah. And understands and only you tricks around the you have to build all the intents, and yeah, yeah, it's a little bit. Like I said, though, if I were to build this as Alexa skill to compare. It would be writing a lot more code because a lot of is configuration driven. Okay. So a lot of the with Alexa, the intense, and I'm writing coat a lot of that is I had to configure these configuration files understands these things that actual amount of code is. I dunno fifty percent of what I might have had right with Alexa, which is so much of it is done by Bixby itself. Does. Yeah. Bixby does a fair amount of itself. Yeah. It's like having a giant library. Yeah. Yeah. You could say that. It's like having stack overflow right there. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. So the other thing I wouldn't mention which I really didn't get exercise. It looks pretty interesting about the platform is this idea of learning and what they mean by that is really personalization. And it's smartly understanding if I asked this if I keep on answering the same question the same way and number of days or -cations arou- stop asking that because I'm on soom. Right. So this is the personalization personalization feature. Did you turn that on? I didn't. Because for what I needed it just wasn't needed. And I'll be honest, their documentation isn't a notice where fully needs to be to fully leverage these nor the amount of sample code. So nothing I'm saying that they don't know. But that's pretty it's contextual e aware time during the week. I asked different questions during the weekends the morning ASA different one than at night that looks really interesting to me I could do that with with both Amazon and Google, but I'd have to write a bunch of code to do it having the framework do that. Looks really intriguing to me definitely want to understand that better. But I do think with conversational interfaces the smarter. They are and the more. They understand me. And who I am. But the better they can be doesn't worse than asking the same question. Every time I invoke rice skill action capsule. So that looks super promising, but I really didn't exercise it fair enough. So you're mentioning to me that you got to meet a lot of the core Bixby platform developers. I did now were they were they were they give labs or were. They samsung. Well, you know, you gotta ask how long they've worked for worked in this. Right. So yes. So one thing that Samsung is a lot of their well, all of these conferences law. There implies are here. But a law the core Bixby people I met one guy who'd been there for five from labs, and he is writing a lot of underlying code, and he was just super excited to. Actually, see people get it out there. Get it out there. The end, you know, the end developers so to speak use it, and we had a long really interesting conversation, and he's super energetic and excited because like any developer you love to see people using your product you love to hear what they like. And don't like, and and lots of energy there's a product manager I talked to a project manager. And so a lot of the Samsung employs were quite interested in us as kind of earliest earlier earlier among the earliest developers. What we thought of the platform? What worked what didn't work? So they're pretty open right now about oh, you need to talk to this person. They'd love to hear about that. Right. So it's indicative almost and you're like one of fifty. Yeah. I mean, I think someone throughout the number seventy today, but we're not talking about fouls, and we're not talking about one hundred. We're talking about something lesson that in fact, I think just a few weeks ago, they were they were like. Forty and they were they wanted to get more people in, and you know, frankly, I don't know that they really advertise. Very heavily. Yeah. They're trying to figure I mean to my mind developer vandalism. One of the kind of livered I things of any platform right there. You know, you can definitely tell there's been a lot of underlying engineering effort. But as far as the next step, which is right in a lot of great documentation. A lot of great sample code developer evangelists, whether it be events like this contest or media beat up and that they're still developing the front end of that Prosser front end of that process. They still have a lot of work to do. Which makes it more challenging some ways to build. There's not a lot of people to answer the questions. Right. And Aaron is not a lot of sample code there. Also makes it I'd say more fun in some ways. Right. It's a wild wild weapons. Yeah. Sounds like what you're saying. Is that you really do need to take the time to learn it. And so there is a learning curve associated. Whereas, but once you understand it. There's a lot of things that make it go really fast. So if you make the investment, there's an accelerated on the back end, I think that's fair. I think that's fair. I think it's I think the investment I wouldn't underestimate if you're coming from. Let's say Alexa, background that the amount of kind of relearning and rethinking you to do because it's quite a different platform and the way it handles and thinks of the one thing that you're like, oh, that's totally different. I've got the really reorient. It's gotta be the it's all the configuration files and understanding. It's a metal language that really is there, and it's like, wow, this is like a simplified programming language to to learn. Well, it's funny because was dock said it in the this afternoon session. Maybe I don't think you were there. But he said or maybe it was Adam they said, oh, you know, objective c. Right. They were talking about the app store needed objective c in order for to do a lot of things you want to do with apps, and they weren't really saying that they had built something, but they're sort of intimating. There was kind of like that for for voice voice assistance. I think there's been a lot. I think this kind of meta language they've written to configure. It is got some thinking around how to think about not only voice. But hey, I is there. It's definitely you can see that. There is a a methodology in a way of thinking behind it. I don't know if I can put my exact finger in what describe it that. Well, but there's definitely a philosophical belief that this is how you should do things that pervades that product. So when will the voice spot podcast listeners people to try what been so my understanding is in early twenty nineteen that's the best date. I would be one of the first hundred whatever. So right now, they're trying to sign up. To build their capsules rights. We have Aisher wrote a couple of them and trying to get you know, when they released their their capsule store, whatever their place market. Okay. Thank you. I'll be an early early developing early. It's just pretty exciting. Right. You know, one of the challenges in the Google and Amazon ecosystem is pretty. Yeah. And you know, I mean early mover advantage, right? And get get some traction air. We'll say that's another attractive thing about the platform. Is is hey, you know, we all discover Bility's easy when you're among fifty or one hundred when you're among forty thousand is a lot harder charred. And so how can listeners check out. What you've done on. Alexa. Follow follow you on social. Yes. The best way would be on Twitter. So at Roger Kibi R G E R K I B B perfect. Thank you so much. Roger, I appreciate your perspective. Thanks a lot. Brett, my pleasure. Okay. Back at the Samsung developer conference, and I got the opportunity to sit down with another developer Pete Haas who has worked with Bixby Bixby Dotto. That is so well, why don't you just tell the listeners your name? What you do what your background is. So my name is Pete Haas. And I've been developing for voice since two thousand five which is nice thirteen years worked in an IB, our company, of course, it was the only option for voice really just follow that journey and probably wants to re came out. It was a really big deal to have that experience. Right. Did that blow your mind? It really did. Because I. It was just something. We never experienced before this open ended thing where it was just kind of democratized to an iphone, right? You are doing all these rules basis. Domes Harz terrible. Harz terrible build something that would do that will cost you a million dollars. If you build something quivalent to what the airline systems were doing at the time, right? So fast forward. I was on a quest define. Well, how can I find a speech recognition that would be as good as let's say Google voice? And then Google released an API. Oh, great. I have transcription at a level. That's pretty close. Right. But I was missing the one piece which was the piece right? So even though I could get the transcription, I know ano- you head. No. So I went to the signal conference in two thousand sixteen and they introduced a million API's that we're doing the same thing. Many of them got bought since. And that was the key. Right. So ever since that I've been really on that path and twenty seventeen I opened my own voice agency. It's just voice wanna do a mobile app or website. You can call somebody else for that fair notice dissenter DNA, and I've just been kind of following that path and that led me to the Bixby developer conference here Samsung developer conference, and okay. So we'll we've talked about this with with other gas. You went to the keynote this morning. What jumped out at you? Like Roger said, I mean five hundred million devices a year, right? And their plans to roll it out. I think they said by twenty twenty right? Every. Yeah. This year. I mean, that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. Quite a footprint. I mean, that's nothing. Like any other companies really have? We'll tell you. This is an aside. I saw the they've got these different TV's. They call it the wall, and there's the other one that's like the frame. Yeah. The frame disappears. It's like, it's if people haven't seen it, I recommend you check it out because it's basically just Ashida glass that becomes a television. But when you turn it off, it's like transparent, you could see the wall behind it or you can float. Now, they've got things where you can float pictures on it and stuff like that. That is so amazing. And I'm sitting there thinking, okay. So this is visual most people listen to this podcast about voice. And that's what I'm focused on mostly. But we start thinking about multi-modal, which are think about the screens around us. And sometimes we ask for voice, but we might get a visual complement to that. And they've got some devices that are going to be perfect for that. Where you could just put them in many places around the home where you wouldn't normally have a television. Yeah. But most of the time it's. Art. But just that one time that you need it when you say something to shows up there. Yeah. Yeah. It's amazing. And then all the other appliances. I mean think about refrigerators or talking to your coffee maker for that matter. I mean, it's gonna be interesting how they roll this out. And all the additional use cases that are going to take place that don't really exist now and the screen component that I think that is really key. It's kind of baked I think the screen component is pretty important. Okay. So let's talk about your perspective. I'm bixby. So when did you first start using a couple months ago September? Okay, I found out from user group and entered the competition and opened up the ID and said what is this? It it looked as Alexa, Google action. It looked nothing like that. Okay. So. Yeah. So you got the ID. So explain to listeners what's in the ID. Well, it's pretty full featured. But I mean, you really have to kind of build everything there's not really you. I where you're dragging out boxes to say. This is my intent and do. No. So you basically have to Drake com concepts. Right. So you write these concepts. What the concept it's a noun. So if you have a product a product is a noun and an action is right. So you take actions on that, and you basically defined that layout. But as I code goes, you're not really writing code, which is fhu to me. It's a winter. So let's talk about this. So this is the I don't remember because like dynamic language programming. Then Emma, Jenn. It's cogeneration. It literally builds it for you. And when it shows it to you, would you can actually see it after builds it. It's actually a flow chart, it looks like a flow chart, and it's it's easy to Rico behind it. Yeah. You can see what's going on. But I guess their argument is that it's Gaels because one of the problems is you can build for somebody say thousand things in time. They say thousand one things your. Not ready for that. Right. And Bixby kind of builds that in and to me, it's not even a voice, it's really an AI platform. You know, it's really baked in where you think of it this way if as a skill developer a lot of the intelligence is on let's say Amazon side. Well, they're doing all the processing. And then they're giving you a request. So you have to fulfill that order, right? There's no intelligence on on your end unless you build it. Right. It's really just programmatic response. Right. Right. And so. Bixby's kind of bring you in a warm hug, it just kind of brings you into this AI platform, and once you get over a fairly steep learning curve because it's a different paradigm. But once you get it. It's kind of exciting to see the use cases, you can really create. So what is your capsule? See? So you from is is the big people say Alexa, gives you a string. What does Bixby give you? What do you mean? By string give you a string requests saying this is this is the this is the request that we want you to fulfill. Oh. I don't know. I mean, it's. I mean, you're basically building this capsule that will fulfil these intense, but you're not even really calling him intense. And you're just taking actions upon them. It's not clear exactly how that's gonna look in production. I guess you call it. So when they release it. I guess I think we'll know a little more how that's gonna look right? But right now, what's interesting is you don't even really have the name them occasion. So you can just make requests for dinner. Raise reservations at five o'clock week from next Tuesday, and that's perfectly valid thing to ask. And if you're able to fill fill it, and it's part of your soul. The other thing is they'll do this thing where. Every assistant is unique to you. So you're going to have your own set of capsules that are unique for bread, and I'm gonna have some they're unique for me. And so when I request something for reservation, look at your. Restaurant that I may be enabled this capsule. Do you didn't enable it did you lay to enable it to like select or does it does the system just select select based on your past behavior. I think the way it's going to work is if there's something not enabled yet. They'll have maybe the top capsules can fulfil that request. And somehow you'll be a blend able it and put it into your kind of personal. Yes. Set of. Okay, personals. All right. So you built a capsule your part of the contest, right and a finalist. Congratulations. So what was it? What did you build? So it's called beautiful, and it's a fictitious beauty supply chain, very similar like Alta. Imagine a brick and mortar stores across the United States with thousands of products. And each of these stores has a beauty salon in the back. We can book. Can appointment for hairdresser. What? So I really wanted to demonstrate the search and discovery features of Bixby so simply asking something like fine hair conditioner. Well, there's thousands of probably hair conditioners. So what will happen is the first time you go through the experience, it will try to collect some certain traits for you like straight here. Do you have wavy here? Trying to fight for all these kind of traits that are specific to you. And then it will give you recommendations based off of that the next time you go in and ask for hair conditioner or some product. It will use that previous exchange. You had to give you a better. And so you've enabled that feature where it learns it remembers who you are, and and that's all done without account linking and all these other things. Right. It just automatically knows who you are as user. Yeah. Right. All right. It'll be interesting to see how they do that when the Samsung galaxy home shows up the smart speaker, which is a multi user device. It's one thing to do it on the note nine, which is a single user device. Yeah. And they made a point to say there is certain experiences are personal to you. And there's things that are kind of shared across a family. A house got it. All right. So this is like a demonstration type of thing. You didn't you don't own. Yes. Beautiful. So you created a number of products in you've been able to demonstrate how it works. If you were to try to do something comparable. Google or Amazon. How would you do it? Would it be different? Yeah. Well, yeah. I mean, you wouldn't have some of the features or at least I'd have to build some of them on on my side. Like the personalization features that are kind of baked into the Lincoln. Yeah. And then the screen is just native to it. So you, you know, that's the thing. There's a special component on the phone where you just press the button and say your rents, and, you know, get the screen response where you can start the conversation with the voice, but then finish it through taps typing. So what something that you really like about Bixby that you think is missing from the elected skills kit or actions on Google. I mean, certainly some of the preference learning where they're building that in. That's great. I love that. You don't have to do the named indication that is just that to me so much friction that to me that's not natural language if you have to speak in that way. Right. So it's not like the operator model. The others work off where you say I wanna speak to. Yelp to get restaurant information. Right. You just ask for the restaurant information. And it may give you yelp. But make you something else. Right. And you struggle if you don't have a brand name like yell. You have some small skill at your developer trying to bring up it's really hard for them to remember your skill name. That's that's right. So you've built a number of Alexa, skills. We were talking about one earlier. Why don't you tell the listeners? What that was. Okay. It's called team time. And what it does is it. If you're a team snap user, which I have two boys and they're in soccer in many sports. And they're constantly asking me, dad. What jersey I'm wearing today. My red or my blue what time is practice. Where's it look all these things? So so all that information. Unlike the team snap website or mobile app. So they could look it up. They could look it up, but they don't because their kids. They don't earn. My wife doesn't even really download apps. So she's constantly asking me because I'm the only one teams so. Now, you know. Okay. Just yes, collects problem. This is a real world problem must be solved. How did you solve it? I just linked it up to team snap has an API, and you can just link into it. And honestly yesterday, I was packing to go out to San Francisco. And I heard my wife using it and she came up steers. I said did you use the app? She goes. Yeah. You want to know what time practice was? That's perfect. Did you get alerts on your phone like someone's using the though I kinda hear the yeah? Yeah. There's a little beep at the that's good. So we're talking about this a little bit earlier that there's a lot of people use this team snap. Apper software, but you still have this discovery and promotion issue. So you know, how how you tried to address that? And do you do you see something breaking through to help make it easier for people to discover and start using the skills? I mean, what I've found is if you are big brand you certainly can shine through the skill store. Or if you know, you're one of the select few that they pick as one other feature skills, do very well, or if you were super early, that's that's worked out great. But then there's this other group of the wrestling ninety nine percent that it's hard to break through the noise run. There's forty thousand skills, and in there, how do you think that will be different with XP? It's hard to say exactly I mean, one of my strategies is because I'm so early. I'm really considering really going all in on Bixby or going a little harder on it. Because you know, you just be kind of the first guy to buy, you know, Malibu beach property, you know, fifty years ago, you know, it's kind of a land grab so strategically. I'm thinking that way that that's maybe place. So they'll have the S nine or ten now for the the flagship phone. I mean, they've got the no nine, and I don't remember how the galaxy S nine is coming up. Right. So so they'll have galaxy S nine coming up March April. I think that's usually when they launch. And so I'm guessing that's when marketplace will come out as well. They seem about right heels. Right. Yeah. So you could be one of one hundred capsules and people have they had there's going be a way to like browse. I don't even know if. There is you just have to act as Bixby right now. Right. I don't know if there is a way to browse and cancer, something's a cancer others. Yeah. But that would be certainly an opportunity particularly for something that's going to be high volume. Yeah. Like Ambien annoy skills. Something like that. You know, certain people have done very well with it is a thing. Yeah. It's very popular. I've noticed that. They do get a lot of reviews to like unlike most things, so so you're thinking about maybe going all in anything else that you say, hey, if you are a Google or Alexa developer. Here's one thing. That would be helpful for you to know when you start out. I'm Bixby super steep learning curve. Maybe it's not so much that it's just it's just a different paradigm. So you really got over that. I it's a different way. It's a different approach in some ways. I think it might be better. Because again, it's more scalable in the responses that you could handle over time. Right. That's great. Okay. So how can listeners learn more about you? And what you're doing? Look me up. Pete hoste. Oh, look at my agency conversation curve dot com, and on Twitter, and all the usual places. That sounds great. Thank you very much for spending some time with us today. Thank you voice about listeners for once again listening all the way to the end, I'm Brechin seller. Your host each week. You can find me on the Twitter at Brechin Sela, our guest this week. I really wanna give them a shout out. And thank them for taking time. Joe Murphy, Roger Kibi, Pete Haas, really great that they can share that type of perspective. So that you voiced by listeners can not only learn a little bit more about Bixby, but you can understand how it's different than the other players in the market how that might evolve over time, and how the bigs befuddling -ality may influence what you start see steam coming up on Alexa, and Google assistant. So watch out for that. I also want to recommend you head over to voice about that for slash research voiced by die Ford slice research for those of you the missed it. We have a new report out called the voice assistant consumer adoption report. We did this with research partners, postering and rain. It is the first research that actually looks at voice assistant us across surfaces. So we did a big report earlier in the year around adoption of voice assistance on smart speakers. And I think that is become sort of the touchstone that a lot of people look at how are people looking at like thirty pages twenty twenty charts. And how people are using smart speakers. Well, we looked at doing the same thing today. We've got twenty seven charts. It's thirty pages of analysis in we'd go really deep into voice assistant use smartphones. And surprise surprise. It's different than how people use them. And smart speakers. So is developer is an industry founder is a marketer. You're looking at this. These are things you want to know. But we didn't just stop there. We we look deeply into this for voices systems on smartphones. We looked at it for smart speakers as well, which which many of you have seen, and then we also compared it to other. Surfaces like here. Ables smart TV's computers, and in the car, so go check that out voice about that Ford slash research. And you can download that report. I think you really going to like it. And that's what we do voice about our research. We what we really focus on is answering the questions that were interested in and the things that we think you're also going to be interested in, but nobody else's looking at it. So because we're so focused on the voice industry, invoice assistance. We can go deep. So definitely check that out. Thanks again to my guest this week. I look forward to having you back next week with another amazing guest.

Bixby Samsung Alexa developer Google Bixby Bixby Amazon Samsung Bixby founder and CEO United States Amazon Twitter Roger Kibi Bixby Bixby Dotto Roger apple Joe Murphy AI Siri
A-Level exams: Can Gavin Williamson's job survive this? And how Al Murray's saving comedy

The Leader

15:30 min | Last month

A-Level exams: Can Gavin Williamson's job survive this? And how Al Murray's saving comedy

"Thanks for listening to the leader. If this fast time, we hear every day at four pm with news analysis commentary and interviews. Please subscribe and share the show using the Hashtag lead the podcast. Now from the Evening Standard in London this is the leader. Hi I'm David Monson can the education secretary hold onto his job? He will be set today at least But long-term has to be said that to the education that future looks extremely our political editor Joe Murphy on the future of Gavin Williamson. Fiasco and not the start of this crisis to myself. I'm not emotionally reliant approval of strangest to get through the day but God you. I'll Marie on saving comedy after the First Major Gig in front of an audience in London venue. Taken from the Evening Standard's editorial call him. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper had to stand a doco UK slash comment in a moment after the exams disaster. How does Gavin Williamson out of this? When two ministers break ranks and criticized the government's handling of something you know things have gone badly wrong paymaster-general petty mode and ministry of defence is Johnny Mercer both wrote about their concerns over a level and G CSC results on social media. Followed a swell of Tony backbenchers demanding a Utah on how the exams passed but editorial Collins says a lot of damage has already been done. It's a hideous mess and although there was never going to be perfect solution, the government urgently needs to get a grip. The aim should be to at least ensure that the overall balance of this year's grades matches those of previous years but even if adjusting results ends up with more favourable grading than in the past, being kind to students in these difficult times seems a lesser problem than inflicting further damage on their lives. If universities find themselves swamped with too many qualified applicants as a result than the cap on admissions should be lifted to this country will eventually rely on today's young students and their futures must be protected. Up Political Editor Joe Murphy is with me now joe given all the anger from a large section of the public and the criticism from within his own party. Kanye. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson's job survive this within the last couple of hours. David. Number Ten has said the govern Williamson has the full confidence of the Prime Minister and I think that indicates that he will not be set today at least but term it has to be said the Education Secretary Future looks extremely bleak and if you talk to conservative MP's as been during this morning there really unimpressed by the way. This has been handled and I think that if he stays in post in the next reshuffle, there would be something rebellion and I think that this has gone so badly so far that it's probably accelerated the timing of the next reshuffle as world we know that there are changes on the way about how exams the exams going to be handled, and yet you know that island came out pretty quickly to say that they were GonNa move things we already knew what was happening in Scotland y has it taken so long for things to change in England that's extremely good question favorite and. The only answer we were getting from number ten today when we asked that question and. Wasn't it to that had been warned by some academics these consequences that poor children would be losing out in disadvantaged areas. That they've been warned of that and we get the same answer, which is, well, we're working hard to ensure the fairest possible system. If you look at those words of between the lines implicit in that is an admission that we don't currently have a fair enough system, and you may well ask, well, shouldn't action have been taken before the exam results came out rather than after the exam results to ensure. The system was as the prime minister it would be robust. Now regardless of the changes that do come in, there are still going to be people who have Saturday levels who may not get those university places on there. There's GonNa be a lot of anger probably for quite some time among a lot of young people be anger will be is intense the moment as we've seen in demonstrations in London the weekend. That's why I suspect the government strongly tempted to carry out the big U-TURN accenting teacher assessments of people's grades. This is something that. A minority of MP's. Torian piece that is apparently calling full overtly but the majority are saying that if robust appeal system come be done within a matter of hours or or day to most then teacher assessments has to be the way forward by default and I think the MP's a coaling for that know that there is no appeal system that could be instantly made to work. And therefore by calling for this two pronged thing, they really putting the emphasis on the latter. And letting the government see the writing on the wall. Next before this, the main topic of conversation I think you could say it was brexit. On, which people were not Gone through in different ways, let's put it that way. whereas. This is an actual universal experience. How Murray are we ready to laugh at Coluna virus yet and can comedy itself survive to tell the jokes? We often hear about comedians making a comeback, but this time it's comedy itself as having to find its audience again last night to the ground and clap of I'll money and jade adams compared the first big indoor live comedy Gig in front of an audience since lockdown began in our review. The Evening Standard said it was magical Mary's with me. Now, how was it walking out on that stage and seeing that audience again after so long? It was just it was just fantastic. I'll admit that yesterday afternoon I had done a Gig a compact. So they weren't the first humans I've been in front of being in a beautiful theaters. With punters, it was super special. You know and it's my environment. It's the place I'm used to being. So it was really lovely. How was it down now? What kind of restrictions did you have to put in place? Did they affect things at all? No they didn't seem to I mean normally room that size would have thousand people in it I mean for the last time I played it. There were a thousand people in that and they were crammed in and around in bonds busy and Elissa thing and So. Didn't have that Buzzer that vibe but that was easily made up for by the simple that it was happening. and. One of the things this definitely, the case for the audience is who are coming out comes to mind when they really want to be there. They really all that 'cause they're into comedy and they live comedy to to work out and to come through this thing. So literally, what they lack numbers they make up for with how much they're into it. You know and that is also. That's great. That's great thing to be given. It wasn't the normal London. had. A great line of you're selfish because. Sandy. Was Nathan Kagins Great. was. It easy to get performance to come in and do this all the concerns among comics actually Bogan back on stage I think it's fair to say there's a unanimous feeling that will really want to get back on stage. Not who about it comedians are an interesting breed we all different people and whenever you read that so sad clown depressed thing you think how for God's sakes it's a cliche. We all role very different types of people but we'll have the one thing income, which is we love being on stage and we're all missing it, and at the start of this crisis I said to myself, you know I'm not I'm not emotionally reliance on the approval of strangest to. To get through the day you know, don't be ridiculous you. You're you're a grown man you bigger than that. But having done a little bit having done sort of a handful of gigs in the last two weeks God look the approval of strange. And You know I'm a show that's why I'm in show business I'm a show of long before I'm the sad the sad lonely clan during the hardest job in the world you know I mean. So I think it's fair to say everyone was shop. He was very emotional last night and I mean everyone was really I mean shop he was talking about how she's only really perform into her dog during lockdown. Is it possible to come up with new material while. In the house, is there anything that can come out of all the comedic opportunities from lockdown? Well, it has been difficult to find to to actually find a stimulus I mean the first three months where every day was identical to every other day and I'm not used to being a home. This is the longest I've ever been in a home in my life. Right if I'm on tour I'm here two days a week one day a week. So that in itself has been, it's been difficult but like like revelatory or like extraordinary. But I'm does she lack of stimulus of interaction with the rest of the world I think has made writing difficult I think clearly some people have finding the. Finding this plenty of juice in lockdown lemon. But. Yes I'm meant to be writing a book and I found it very, very difficult in a way that I wouldn't have done if I was just going about my normal life where lots of stimulus lots of different people, it's different places rather than this room old day everyday our audiences ready to laugh a virus yet. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. The thing always to bear in mind is people very often process difficult situations by laughing or laughing around them all off to the side of them what we're not saying that they're laughing at the people who've suffered from this, but the circumstance of a lot of it. And People's reactions to it a great fodder actually for comics because after all. Really. Interesting thing about this is an event is we have all gone through this as a country whatever we think of it. We have all on through it. Before this the main topic of conversation I think you could say was brexit. On which people were not? that. In different ways, let's put it that way. whereas. This is an actual universal experience and I think the comparisons to the second will been facile and trite and generally unhelpful a-. Actually I've plenty the myself but but isn't like doing jokes about TV program that some people have seen in somebody eleven saying or Scooby Doo, some people don't remember. Says happened to everybody. There's a deep universality about. Northern used to talk about that I said when you right when you wrote comedy after the war, you're actually dealing with a completely communal experience that everyone everyone had experienced as a as always with comedy. There's always a serious point to something that you have raising money for venues for comedians comics. How much trouble is the comedy industry because we had this massive bailout for the government, you don't get any of it. Is remarkable because the thing it's the enemy of thing. Where does it where does? It. Does it survival of the fittest Darwinist bit is social gathering? Is People all in a room? I mean I. filmed something earlier today is being treated for thinking and and a fringe theatre, which is a hot black room with benches where you'll crammed in next to each other and your share everyone's sharing the same at and sharing the performance at little and it's not like not even like an airplane with the as being filtered and processed and cleaned you all crammed in together. That's the problem. That's absolute weakness to proper existential threat right now and I think as we go forward, you might end up seeing some keys where people sign a disclaimer you might say Moscow gigs. I went into the other night and they took our temperature on the way and you might seal laugh start to happen. I. Think you're going to see kind of like covid clubs and all this thing eventually if it can't be figured out how you get thousand people into a theater with the mosque on or whatever because the venue like where we were. The. Clapham, grand. They live on fumes anyway arts, venues all live on fumes they all live their margins are all very late in the into percentage and so if you if you reduce the if you reduced what they can take that Deng for an. Old stages like me because when it comes back, probably come and see me one of the interesting things that's happened in since I started out as a comedian. The Edinburgh Fringe Twenty thirty years ago. It's a small thing and now it's gigantic right but it's the people coming three. It's the people who would have had a good Edinburgh this summer right now. Who maybe never will and that's quite worrying but that's kind of the issue. Isn't it? I mean? If you do you feel that you've call momentum to get things going now that you've done this one you've shown it can be done. You've shown others that can be done or is that it that it? I think I, think the real test is going to be the case nationally, the real test is going to be. In the autumn into the winter. When 'cause you know lots of people who've been involving stuff that's outdoors and keeping it going that way it's is when we can't be outdoors any more. And I think that's GonNa. That's GONNA test social distancing com outdoors near actually what people are gonNA put up with anymore how they're going to tolerate you deal with it. So I think what we were trying to show last night. Is that it's the this industry people love people, Love County. They may not like comedians. They love comedy. And we were trying to show that we we're all you know we it wasn't. We didn't win on a starving comic with his begging bowl we sat trying to protect. And infrastructure, and I think that we all rely on but also the audiences will rely on who knows I mean I hope I think maybe maybe streaming mortar come from streaming than watching gigs on twitter and facebook and things like that. But by God that doesn't compare to having people in front of you and the actual live. The moment you I could stand up so about a mile. and. The moment if it's coming down to thing resume isn't quite the same moment. I'm that's the leader. You can read our review of that. GIG. The newspaper or online at Standard Kota. UK This podcast is back tomorrow had four PM.

government Gavin Williamson Evening Standard London Joe Murphy David Monson UK secretary political editor Prime Minister MP Johnny Mercer Love County Tony Kanye Scotland Collins Utah jade adams
Could coronavirus really be over by Christmas? And how did the Queen knight Colonel Sir Tom Moore while socially distancing?

The Leader

13:49 min | 2 months ago

Could coronavirus really be over by Christmas? And how did the Queen knight Colonel Sir Tom Moore while socially distancing?

"Hello, it's David here. The leader brings you news, analysis and commentary every day at four PM. Subscribe to make sure you don't miss out. If you're enjoying the show, please give us a rating on your podcast provider now from the evening standard in London. This is the leader. Hi. I'm David Mawson bought on says it could all be more or less over by Christmas. Maybe it is my strong and sincere hope that we will be able to review the outstanding restrictions and allow a more significant return to normality from November at the earliest possibly in time for Christmas. He's outlined how the lockdown restrictions being lifted further, but our political editor Murphy says the laws are coming down harder and well. The queen used a sort that belong to have fond King George, and that was used for the normal for the numeral ceremony, so I take. I assume that is sold length the Evening Standard Lizzy Edmonds on the difficulties of a socially distance knighthood for Karnal, Sir Tamou. Taken from the evening. Standard editorial call. This is the leader of the whole thing. Because the newspaper had to stand the Dakota slash comment in a moment, the new lockdown restrictions explained. When it's only July and the sun is shining. Most people will think it's too early to consider Christmas. But when you're planning a country's path through winter during a Karuna virus, pandemic symbolic deadline is looming quickly. Will we be able to have Christmas dinner with our families? The prime minister was asked today. It's not a very important time of year for for families. It's also a very important time of year for. The UK economy, and and for many many millions of people say it's very important that we we hope for the best but plan for the worst, and and clearly the steps that were taking. September October November they're all conditional on our continued ability to defeat the virus. That's a lot of caveat Sunday one the only ones during Polish appealing at Downing Street earlier in laying out the further lifting of covid nineteen restrictions, the PM says everyone can use public transport should consider alternatives. Employers can ask people to go back to the office, but they should also think about whether it's still safer for staff to stay home. Events will start again. You'll be able to go to the theater indoors, but local authorities are getting powers to clues and ministers can introduce stay at home. Orders are editorial column says it's still not clear if the country is opening up or shutting down. Of course as the nation eases out of lockdown, the rules will need to change. It makes sense to open up the country as much as possible while cracking down on the kind of behavior, most likely to spread the virus. That makes it all the more vital that the government learns to communicate its own rules more effectively. A poll reveals today that thirty four percent of Londoners say clearer government messaging about safety would make a big difference. This is an unknown and terrifying you virus. It is not enough to trust that workers and employers will use their common sense. Frightened people need guidance without it. An emergency quickly becomes a crisis. Obligatory to Joe Murphy is with me. Joe The prime minister seems to be trying to walk a tight rope between opening and closing down Kenny keep his balance. It really is a high wire act and when Patrick valance. Said yesterday! There's no reason to scrap the work from home guidelines. You'd really think. Can The promise to really make it to the other side? Today I thought he gave one of his more assured performances. There was a lot in the statement in his press conference a very draconian. In case of local outbreaks. But they were the sort of ballast holding the tight rope down for. Some quite courageous shall we say unlocking measures to come some unexpected ones theater live theater to return from August. With social distancing stadium events, some sporting events, we spectators, this is an an and social distancing guidelines relaxed to something near what he called normality from November. Yeah, I thought that was interesting. It was kind of an optimistic thing. He was talking about, wasn't he? Hopes to have the country back to normality around. November maybe even in time for Christmas and that would be I. Guess a big morale for the UK. There's also a great deal in this scenario for his critics. Some of whom are saying this is reckless they of course in the luxurious position that If it does go wrong, they can go out and say shouldn't have done this. And if it goes well well, we'll all the forgotten There is a lot of on his shoulders. and the price of normality by Christmas I've gotta say. I'll believe it when I see it behind the scenes on talking to some missing government officials who are actually saying covid nineteen might be around for a considerably long time to come certainly is a background disease in this country on the comes and goes. A bit like malaria in lots of parts of the world something that you coexist with and learn to manage and. In that context, a lot of what the prime minister was saying about going back to work is all about we have to take some of that risk on our shoulders. That game at two normal would involve with a virus. That's not necessarily going to be magic to way by vaccine. He saying go back to work partly because. It's not going to end with. We don't just get to borrow some money to get through a short term crisis, and then the the Visha Tacoma comes back, and we go back to normal could be possible that we are going to be having some disruption to our lives throughout twenty twenty one I'm maybe twenty twenty two, and who knows in the background lower level, perhaps even longer than that something else that has emerged last day, or two is a controversy over how the COVID nineteen death figures of being calculated hancocks open inquiry into this. This is one of the most extraordinary things I can remember. As a surprise out of the blue. It turns out that public health England who are a public body who've come under a lot of flack during this epidemic for some strange sort of way of following rules, but they have been counting any death where somebody in the past tested positive for covid nineteen as a ovid nineteen death. Now this means quite literally that if you had covert nineteen in February and were tested as such David, and then you were knocked down by knee, driving a number nineteen bus in July, you would go down on the public health England as a covid nineteen death, because all they're doing is cross, checking the death records with the test records and saying a Ha. Now! There's two problems to this one, is you? Didn't know about it more extraordinarily. Still. Members of the cabinet didn't know that was how they were counting deaths. And this came to light because people started saying. Why is it that the hospital death rates are coming down? But the community death rates seem to be staying high at because people who had covid nineteen back in March April during the first wave, a dying of natural causes some of them may well have been accelerated into their graves by the disease. But not in common language, necessarily the cause of death. And there's another way this matters. This is because of international comparisons believe it's an old and we didn't know this either. Until today, Scotland have a cutoff of twenty eight days. If a test was the twenty eight days, they don't record it as a covert death necessarily. And that would get away from the idea of being run over by bus five months later. And we don't yet know what other countries do but I'm going to make a bet. They probably don't do it the way P.. H. E. of been doing it. Next, hey, very much captured. The hearts of the nation and is is number of in strengthen encouraging today, though that he felt very humbled, lizzy edmonds on a unique knighthood for a unique Ma'am Connell Sir Tamou. Canosa Soto mood as one of the heroes of the KUNA virus crisis, approaching his one hundredth birthday, he decided to raise money for the NHS by walking one hundred laps around his guarded. He wanted one thousand pounds. He got thirty three million now. He's also got a knighthood following an unusual ceremony at Windsor Castle. The Evening Standard Liz Edmonds is here and Lizzy. Getting made a is always a little bit special where they've had to lay on some special measures for Tomo, they have so yes, I think leadoff spoke at the end of April when he was given the owner McConnell so his birthday, and then shortly after a couple of weeks afterwards in, May. Boris Johnson none none other than announced that he would be knighted a which is pretty. In itself at to have the prime minister, announcing that say that's that's one thing that's been especially exception, captain, Tom I'm all other role. investitures had been put back to the end of the year because of the pandemic, but again not for Captain Tom Day rather than Buckingham Palace. He's going to Windsor to meet the Queen plus. No everyone who's is don't sleep, but by the Queen's The top it's royal as it were at his ceremony especially as well because of the pandemic save social distancing measures were put in place. I assume that that. Adequate distance saying Sapan sanitizing state would have been a very special ceremony, but one that am reflects already operating will Obviously, we haven't been able to see it, but I wonder how they did. The sold on the shoulder thing I wonder how long that Sodas Lissi for. The crane used a sword that belong to have found Ray King George, and that was used for the normal for the new Wu ceremony night. I assume that is sold length. I haven't been told otherwise. I think the actual passing of the of the insignificant That actual mental is it well I? Think is something that ambition policy being looking into how they would do that. Make sure it was sanitary. Statement they released a few hours ago. Senate suggested something like that site. They've definitely put a lot of. Thought into it for sure. I mean they've really laid out the red carpet force tomor now, but it's very deserving, isn't it? I mean the country really did unite behind him and his campaign for the best and Lee did. He was I. Suppose to raise about wanted to raise a thousand pounds, and he raised to show to thirty three million. You'd probably much captured the hearts of the nation and. Back in in March and April when he was doing, did locate. The debts of looked down for the the in in a lot of people were. Saying funny very difficult finding life very confusing in was a very bleak time for those people. Hey with this one hundred zero will veteran and doing what he could to support upgrade nhs since everyone just got behind him and. I think he is is nimble. In strengthen encouraging, he said today, though that he felt very humbled that this was happening to him, and it must have been a real whirlwind. Few months for him as well, but yeah I mean to guy from living at home in Bedfordshire own. Just thinking while I might as well try and raise money for Manchester being nicest by none other than the Queen herself in a special ceremony puts on just the that was announced by by the prime minister must be surreal And that's the leader. You can keep up with all the latest breaking news on the Evening Standard's website at standard to current UK. This podcast is back on Monday at four PM. If you subscribe, you will miss it.

prime minister UK David Mawson Lizzy Edmonds Joe Murphy NHS London King George political editor malaria Sir Tamou Karnal Windsor Castle Tacoma Dakota Boris Johnson Patrick valance
Local Lockdowns: How would London deal with a second wave of coronavirus? Plus, concern at Brexit chief's National Security appointment

The Leader

12:00 min | 3 months ago

Local Lockdowns: How would London deal with a second wave of coronavirus? Plus, concern at Brexit chief's National Security appointment

"Palo it's Bonnie back with you again this week. While David's away, the later podcast brings news interviews and analysis from the Evening Standard's newsroom every day at four PM. If you're a new listener, thanks for joining. If you like it hit subscribe, and if you have a moment, give us a rating to from the evening standard in London. Is the leader. Hi I'm Bonnie Christian Howard London deal with another flare up of Corona rhinovirus. This has been a disaster right? Let's not mince our words. This has been an absolute nightmare for the country in the country's going through a profound shock as global coronavirus deaths past the grim milestone of half a million Prime Minister Boris Johnson says a quart whack-a-mole approach who help deal with local flare ups in the UK. But what would this mean for the capital and Lord West? Who Was Security Minister under Gordon Brown and we're. We're one of the chiefs of staff he was he was a sealed, and he said well. If I was putting together a list of people to be interviewed with that Job David Frost wouldn't have been very high on the list semi said will has been forced out from his role as civil service head and national security adviser, but the Evening Standard's joy. Murphy says Downing Street's decision to hand the key role in protecting national security to the prime minister's chief Brexit negotiator has some former top mandarins worried? Taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column. This is the Lleida for the whole thing. The newspaper OR HEAD TO STANDARD DOT COM dot UK slash comment in a moment. How would London deal with a second spike of covid nineteen? Home. The crucial thing is is to make sure that we're ready to crack down on on local flare ups, and that's why we've called whack-a-mole strategy. Prime Minister Boris Johnson told Times radio. The country is ready for local flare ups. Coronavirus, insisting the UK can bounce Ford as he pushes for the economy to reopen. The city of Leicester could be the first to experience this new strategy as a further eight hundred and sixty six record. Record Cases Maine's. It potentially faces two more weeks of lockdown, but what would happen if there was another spike in the capital, Alex Thomas from the Institute of Government joins me now. Alex if London says a surge of COVID, nineteen cases will be looking at a city, wide or borough by borough shutdown could mean a sort of blanket return to the sort of lot that we were all experiencing at the end of March. March and April, if it was really serious, but I think more likely is the government will decide to apply more partial lockdown and focus on a requiring certain businesses, not to not to open a certain events not to happen so almost a sort of partial rollback of some of the changes that we've seen in the last few weeks and we're expecting to see to see next week so I think it's more likely to. To be a partial thing that are kind of complete returned to lockdown, but obviously that depends on the seriousness of the disease progression in the situation. Can the government actually do it? Logistically legally how lockdowns work, the government and the local authorities are going to need to have to manage this. Because the moment you get into a borough by borough or more kind of partial lockdowns, it gets incredibly complicated, I, think there are. Three things really the government needs to make sure it's got in place in order to to manage all these things. The first is that it's got the right kind of legal powers there at the moment, and we're not sure yet. That's the legal powers exist for either the national government or Local authorities or the man in order to enforce some of these. Were in order to to have the power to bring these lockdowns in the other thing that they need is the data the information, so they need to be able to assess where the diseases and what's going on and use that state decisions then the third thing I think this is the really really really difficult thing is they need the enforcement powers and tools in order to make that happen? It's just not going to be plausible to have the police and other authorities enforcing loads of incredibly. Complicated and specific rules. It's going to have to be. Pragmatic and practical, and it's going to have to have the consent of the people who are being asked to. Ask to restrict restrict themselves one of the one of the things. That's really unclear. All of this is whether ministers should be taking that decision whether it should be local leaders. We've heard. The last few days, the the mayor of Leicester and also to con in in London are complaining that they're not being. Let into these conversations. Enough and actually they're the civic leaders who've been elected by. By their people, and they would say they should. They should be the people who are who have the power to take these decisions. And at the start the government was quite good at communicating what a lockdown men and everyone knew what they had to do an, but now the boundaries around this same a little bit more vague, and we say that with people flouting the rules more and more. If there's another lockdown, would this just add to the confusion especially if it was by far so what the government's slightly to say wants people to take personal responsibility and understand the risk. I think they're gonNA. Try as far as possible to. Avoid these very very specific very prescriptive rules and to try, and people are to use commonsense particularly when you get to. A local areas or borough by borough. Restrictions. But they are going to need to do is to inform people and say actually the risk is particularly high in your area, and therefore unfortunately, we're going to have to ask you stay at home. We're not going to allow the pubs to open in. In your area and the other thing of course about London is everybody moves around all the time as we all know that the borough restrictions are. Important administrative reasons, but they don't affect people's everyday lives. As they as they go about their work and and social lives so. It's going to be a real challenge to anything like a kind of. Bora or sort of sub reasonable approach. Next this looks like not diversity, a tightening of control by the circle around the prime minister, a pay 'em is facing a storm for the resignation of the country's top civil servant. The country's top civil servant and most powerful official in government Sir Marcus said will was forced out of Boise's roles at the weekend. The UK's chief Brexit negotiator David. Frost will step in as National Security Adviser, a decision that worries some top former mandarins while his spot at the heart of number ten remains open. Our editorial column says so mark may be gone, but we still need. I'll civil service. So Mark said will has always known. He might have to take a bullet in the service of his country as an intelligence officer, and then our ambassador in Kabul. He has put his life on. The line is also survived civil war Westminster, until now Downing Street's charge said with a straight face is that government is run by amateurs, their critique of the civil service set out a well-crafted speech by Michael go at the weekend is that it lacks professionalism? Asking those in charge constant question could things be done? Better is right, but there are two flaws in the critique. The first is that it is dismissive of the talent and commitment of those who work hard in our civil service. The second problem is the lack of self awareness. It's no good berating white tool for its lack of radicalism to read Mr Gobs. Whole speech carefully you can see that his real critique is of political leadership in Britain rather than a civil service that is on focused on serious and won't throw the dice. The Evening Standard's Joe Murphy joins me now joy. What's been the reaction to Mister Frost? Stepping into the role of National Security Advisor Will Bonnie the reaction from. The people who are experts in this field has not been very positive. Gus O'Donnell the former cabinet secretary, who is one of the most long serving and revered holds that position. Has Questioned it and also Lord Ricketts who has been a really big. She's fallen off face in his time, but also he held the post of national security adviser, he said. This looks like not diversity, but a tightening of control by the circle around the prime minister and this morning I spoke to Lord West. Who Was Security Minister under Gordon Brown and we're one of the chiefs of Staff. He was the see Lord. And he said well. You know putting together a list of people to be interviewed with that job, Dude. I wouldn't be in very high on the list. What Boris Johnson said about why the decision was made. We're talking to number ten. We've got this morning and de-stressing will actually. A, not everybody WHO's held the NSA post has been a former spook or army person. Quite a few of them have had diplomatic experience is it's a jobless only existed for ten years, so it's not. It's not set in stone as it were. And the do point out that David Frost has had twenty five years experience as a diplomat including a pretty junior. Let's face it ambassador to Denmark. Before he went to I the private sector, he was incidentally lobbyist for the Scotch Whisky Association of one point. And then returned the Foreign Office as an advisor to Boris Johnson and subsequently authenticated negotiator for Brexit, so they're saying he's he's well qualified in its were in his way, and finally. What's next for Sir? Mark will only what's next for most said we'll, we'll be seeing the House of Lords, and then he's going to look after Britain's interests with the G. Seven summit next year, which is quite important one. Who Comes after him as an interesting question, what they've said is, it will be present or a former permanent secretary of Whitehall. So that rules out? James Dyson, being drafted Dana or another captain of industry. And there's a I I have two or three names in the frame, but none of them incidentally are household names. And, that's the Lleida you can read more on those stories in the latest edition of the Evening Standard or at standard dot co dot. UK and we also have morning briefings available at seven. Am through your smart speaker. Just ask for the news from the Evening Standard. This podcast is back tomorrow at four PM. Subscribe to make sure you don't miss out.

Evening Standard Prime Minister Boris Johnson London UK prime minister National Security Adviser David Frost Mister Frost Bonnie Christian Howard London Leicester Gordon Brown Lord West Joe Murphy Mark Britain advisor Alex Thomas Palo Corona rhinovirus Institute of Government
Coronavirus: worst case scenario revealed in UK 'battle plan'; why Apples paying out $500m (in total) to some iPhone users; and is Pretty Woman: The Musical any good?

The Leader

16:23 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus: worst case scenario revealed in UK 'battle plan'; why Apples paying out $500m (in total) to some iPhone users; and is Pretty Woman: The Musical any good?

"Thank you for listening to the leader. We Bring News analysis commentary and interviews from the Evening Standard's newsroom. Every day at four pm you can subscribe to your podcast provider to make sure you don't miss an episode now from the Evening Standard in London. This is the leader. Hi I'm David Moslem the. Uk's battle plan against Karuna virus has been revealed. The potential is there for this to be something that our country has to get through. But I've got absolutely no doubt that we have the resources you got. Beat the Health Service We've got the expertise to do. Will it work the evening? Standard political editor. Joe Murphy seen the strategy and talks to the leader podcast also. The older lithium batteries were delivering power evenly throughout the devices. So this is why some people are experiencing that phone. We're just shut down up when it was about forty percent apples to pay up to five hundred million dollars after admitting it intentionally slowed older. Iphones technology journalist. Amelia heathland explains why and it is after all a musical about prostitution which is not really well not a common subject for that kind of out for pretty women strutting onto the London stage and the Evening Standard's critic Nick Carter's has given it four stars taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper or had to stand the DOCO. Uk slash comment in a moment how the UK will battle KUNA virus today. We've published the Corona Virus Action Plan setting out all four parts of the UK will take own necessary and reasonable steps to prepare full and tackle. This outbreak in. The plan has four strands faced with the biggest public health emergency for the generation. The Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the nation to present himself as a leader with a plan. I fully understand public concern. A your concern about the global spread of the virus. And he's highly likely that we will see a growing number of UK cases before he spoke. A twenty eight page document was released John List detailing the four state strategy containment delay. The search mitigation by have Modi told that with the Scientific advice that we have with the levels of preparedness that we have with often tastic and HFS our ability to test and to survey the spread of disease. This country is going to get through. Navarre's new DOT ORG and get through it in in good shape. It's a battle plan to tackle could own virus not just on the threats against health but also those against the economy public services and society the Evening Standard at tutorial call them says it paints a grim picture of what could be the government's battle-plan reports in a severe outbreak. One and five employees may be off work at any time pressure on public services would be extreme. The police would focus their efforts on serious crime and public disorder. Major public events would be suspended. The London marathon might not take place. Footfall chiefs are preparing plans to play matches. An empty grounds health. Experts suggest that in the worst case scenario between sixty to eighty percent of the population could become infected at some point in the course of the outbreak. Some other countries have unfortunately reached that point already. Here we are still getting ready. Public servants deserve all our support as they do that. A political editor Joe Murphy was one of the journalists invited by down the street to get a look at the plum job this document reveals a worse case scenario that would hit the UK heart. What they call the reasonable worst case scenario. So he's not. Even the worst case is pretty severe. I mean we are looking they say potentially at a one in five off work situation that six billion people not turning up for work on any given day at the peak which they think will be During the early part of this summer doesn't mean they're all L. Of course some of those will be off as a precaution And some of them will be off because they're because they're looking after people but that's going to be a big blow to the economy without a doubt and it's going to cause a lot of disruption in lots of parts of our lives wall kind of measures is the government licking at implementing them. You're looking at a huge array of measures across public policy all sorts of government departments and led most of all by people doing doing their duty as the health sector keeps putting it which is principally at the stage. Just washing your hands. Things would then ratchet up into more serious measures. If the disease gets worse and no secret here it will get worse. I think what came over the briefings that I went to today at the launch of this battle plan was a resignation that this will actually be an epidemic some point over the course of this year and the real challenge is to make sure when it happens. We're ready and the happens at the right moment. Do you think the government feels confident that it is ready the UK is ready as they keep saying all the messaging. Yes I do seem ready. I mean as we who follow sort of London government. No there are all sorts of plans tucked away on shelves ready to dusted down for dealing with such issues as Excessive deaths so for example. You know we've seen the plans for London to deal with a huge number of extra bodies which in crawls some very grim reading in some very ghoulish detail which we weren't going into the moment And this sort of thing is where the civil services well prepared. What's what the preparation that we're seeing at. The moment is actually preparing the country mentally for the disruption that we're gonNA see for the tragedies that we are probably going to see if this gets very bad and that's a sort of PR exercise combined with with with mental preparation and Building National Resolve. Do they have an idea of when the peak might come they do? And what's more? They have an idea of when they wanted to come. And they'll do their utmost to make sure that happens so the ideal time is for the peak to happen in the summer around June. And that's when they'll make sure it happens so currently we're in a container phase which is probably. I would say having listened some of the advice probably going to last another couple of weeks loest. And then we'll be into a delay phase where they'll be taking measures to delay the onset of until after the current cold weather with this extra burden on the NHS so that things start to build up no earlier than May June into a ready high levels and then they don't want it to be delayed too much because the risk then is that it goes on into the autumn or even worse that you suppress the virus so much that you get a second outbreak that could pop up in the winter's come and better to delay until summer and then bite the bullet summit and get it over with. Let it happen. Manage it mitigated directly sources than to the people who most need it who the vulnerable and the elderly for the rest of us to Groti F- and get on with things. Next Apple is second biggest smartphone maker in the world after Samsung. Lots of people that have those devices and people are very unhappy about the fact that that device may become obsolete in two years. I really heath mun or why apple's paying out up to five hundred million dollars in total some food news. It was one of those very few tech rumors that in the end turned out to have some truth to it. Apple was intentionally slowing down older. Iphones the company admitted. They said it was to help. Make the product last as long as possible. The inevitable lawsuit was filed in California and now three years after the company. I said sorry. It settled the case and is preparing to out five. Hundred million dollars though. It's not admitting any wrongdoing the evening standard technology journalist Amelia Heath. Men's here to explain it all Amelia. What's actually happened? This story goes way back to two thousand seventeen when apple admitted that had been pushing out software updates which slowed down. Older phones. Said that reasoning for is that the older lithium batteries were delivering power in evenly throughout the devices. So this is why some people were experiencing that phone. We're JUS- shutdown up when it was about forty percent and that those automatic shutdowns can affect the sockets inside the phone so it was pushing updates to people with the iphone six the six ask the SEC. And then the fence avenues. While which would kinda stop these automatic shutdowns and preserve the inner workings of the device but people were very unhappy about it because they saying apple bricky mile phone so it stops working and then I have to fork out for a new one thousand pound phone and there was a court case was new in the states. Yeah so on. Friday apple offered a settlement to people who had these devices by saying that they would offer out five hundred million dollars which works out to about three hundred nine hundred million pounds to people that have been affected by this. They said they haven't admitted any wrongdoing. And so people who have who are named as claimants in the suit got about three thousand dollars if it is approved. And then if you had this phone and you had specific updates which included the. Iowa's ten point two one or the IRS Lebron Around December twenty fifth trend. Seventeen which is which is around the time the lawsuit was filed than that means that you could potentially claim some money back from Apple. How much money could Kluber? So if you're if you're not a claim and and you can put a claim afterwards you'll get maybe around twenty five dollars but I'm this is. Us people this is for UK listeners. Unfortunately but the idea is that of a lot of people claim that twenty five dollars book. I write down but if you have one of those phones anyway. Apple was running scheme so it was cheaper to replace a battery in your phone as a result of this kind of updates and things. So you're not going to be able to buy a new iphone with with The money that you might be able to claim from apple but I think what it shows is if they've got up to five hundred million dollars available and claimants can expect somewhere around twenty five million. That's a lot of people who've been affected by this. Well I guess that's the thing that apple is you know the second biggest smartphone maker in the world after Samsung. Lots of people that have those devices and you know they are expensive in the most recent hyphen could cost you. Nearly fifteen hundred pounds and people are very unhappy about the fact that that device may become obsolete in two years minimum and you can read more of that story on the Evening Standard website at Standard Dot Coda UK. It's the latest movie to become a west end musical. Pretty woman fresh out of Broadway and now at London's Piccadilly Theatre but is it to use a line from the movie better than pirates of penzance. Well it's divided the critics but the evening standard's net cutters has given four stars. And he's with me now. Negatives movie came out to in nineteen ninety. Is this just a big Fast or is it something new? Anybody anticipated the pretty warm. Would be a success of musical about prostitution. Which is not really. Well it's not a common subject for that kind of art form but I was really pleasantly surprised by it. By how sort of Bouncy and exuberant it was how the The main character Vivian. The pretty woman of the title is given much more agency And I think it works. I think he's a what a delight. Is it one of those ones? Just sweep you off if he let it and just washes right over here. Yeah I think they've They very cleverly sort of updated the tone of it. It's sort of. They've done it as sort of a dream of the of what the nine thousand nine hundred might have been like in L. A. including a soundtrack by Bryan Adams which is not the most experimental thrilling thing you'll ever hear but it does catch you up and he does know how to write a good choose when I was a kid. Nicknames IS ENTIRELY TRUE. I wrote a review of pre women for my school magazine. My headmaster went ballistic that fourteen year. Old Boy I'd seen a fifteen movie about prostitution. Have they changed tall to adapt things to the the metoo movement and and how society today not over much? Although I think as we said it's it's made clear that this is not some fantasy the the idea of a woman working. The streets is not some sort of jokey fantasy And it's made fairly clear that the character played by Donnie. Mike who's played by Richard Gere in the film is an emotionally. Strange manner somewhat emotionally neutered. Man Who just devotes himself to work doesn't really understand. Emotion doesn't really know how to relate to women and she sort of teaches them how to relate women. She teaches in the value of things rather than the price of things. How do the cast step into Wad January iconic roles? This is the role that created a movie career for Julia. Roberts is defining really for for Richard Gere. How do you step into those shoes? Well I think very cleverly again the The producers don't really try and Replace Richard Gere they solve. Let Danny may just stand around. Amy Atkinson do her stuff because she is rather wonderful. You sort of think of Julia Roberts of the first ten minutes and then you forget partly because Atkinson is dressed exactly like Roberts in the film all the outfits that you remember from the postal from excerpts from it all here and president correct but she really has made the role very much her own. She's very She's a golden extraordinary singing voice. She's very funny very attractive in her. Exuberance you really root for right from the start. And when she's upset you you really feel for her so in the trailer. So new spoilers. The some of those key moments in the movie. That bit. Where Julia Roberts goes together is a necklace out of the box. And Richard Dick Class lines and closed off recreated and the the snooty assistance who won't let her shop or also president correct. And that Salida you can subscribe through your podcast. Provide and get in touch with the HASHTAG deleted. Podcast we're back to at four PM.

Evening Standard Uk Apple London prostitution Richard Gere Julia Roberts apple political editor Joe Murphy Samsung Health Service David Moslem John List Standard Dot Coda UK Boris Johnson
How could a police officer be shot inside his own station? And, a Tory rebellion threatens Boris Johnson

The Leader

14:40 min | 3 d ago

How could a police officer be shot inside his own station? And, a Tory rebellion threatens Boris Johnson

"Hulo it's David here. Thank you for listening to the leader. We Bring News. Analysis and commentary everyday at four PM. So subscribe to make sure you don't miss out and please do share like and tell us what you think of us get in touch with the HASHTAG leader podcast on social media. Now, from the Evening Standard in London, this is the leader. Hi I'm David Mosley how was a suspect able to shoot and kill a police officer inside their own station? This is a sad day for our country is once again we see the tragic killing of a police officer in the line of duty is they're trying to protect us and keep us safe Home Secretary Pretty Battelle says she's meeting with the met commissioner while an inquiry. Is Launched. The Evening Standard John done tells us what's happening and this is a rebellion with quite a few Kohl's is being mixed in with it and they feel sore that these things are happening all the time and I want to have their say political editor Joe. Mafi. As Boris, Johnson faces a Tory revolt over lockdown measures and the poll showing the public question his leadership. Take Evening Standard's editorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper head to Standard Okuda UK slash comment in a moment. How did a suspect get a gun into a police station and kill an officer? Uniformed. Officers Lei. Floral tributes outside the doors of Croydon police station where in the early hours one of their own was shot dead by a suspect. Mrs Speaker with your permission on a point of order, I wanted to bring the house's attention to the fact that a police officer was Saturday shot and killed overnight in Croydon in the House of Commons polic- Minister Kit malthouse vowed to find out how someone was able to get a gun into a police station. We ask all peace officers to do an extraordinary job. The fact that one of them has fallen. In the line of performing that duty is a tragedy for the entire nation. I know the entire house will offer their condolences to his family and friends and colleagues. May he rest in peace and may justice follow this heinous crime? The prime. Minister has paid tribute to the huge debt. The country owes to those who risk their lives to keep US SAFE MED commissioner. Cressida Dick said the death sends shockwaves reverberating throughout the force. The matters of finally. Policing is a family. In London and across the United Kingdom. And today we police. Are All morning a great loss. ADITORIAL column says police appear to be facing ever increasing dangerous. It is not yet clear. Exactly. Our sergeant came to be killed in a police station. sought. Show vents are thankfully where. Even. So police in London have reason to feel less safe in their duties. Attacks on police rose sharply during the coronavirus lockdown the forces own figures showed there was some two thousand and twenty seven assaults on offices between May and July. Thirty eight percent increase compared with the same period last year. Our brave officers do not deserve this treatment. The public rely on the police to keep them safe and them a corresponding duty. We should not forget that every day they put themselves on the line for us. Evening Standard's John duns covering the story John the Matt says that no police firearms discharged. So how did someone apparently manage to get a weapon into a police station and an officer? It's baffling and it is what the Independent Police Complaints Commission on Murder Squad detectives will be looking into it how this young suspect could walk into the police station apparently be searched and far. On not being found about his curse foreign policy than used to shoot the custody sought in such tragic circumstances obviously, the these questions will be raised and will be formed a major plank of the investigation that must be concerning for other police officers. Though John, they must be asking their own questions about their own safety I. Think don't have to be a branch look this custody suites. Where weddings to happen is not not just a handful of offices at Croydon. Departments based there as well. So they would have been a lot of officers own site albeit nearly hours of the morning. So yes. Safety procedures will have to be reviewed an in if I were a police officer Roy family with police officer at that station or any other station. Now are be asking the question. Is there rigorous enough searching these security when felons or suspects abroad in the station investigations? Obviously underway, there's a Lotta things still emerge in but what facts do we know right now and good twenty-three old man was arrested taken into the custody suite this custody suite was. Built in two thousand twelve trumpeted a highly secure state of the art custody suite. He was taking in the he he was being processed. We understand he he had been served in in as the desk sergeant processed him. I filled in the paper work took his details He was able to produce a weapon and shoot. We understand multiple times and before turning the gun on himself. Leaving him in critical condition leaving the dodging tragically battling for life paramedics and I'm colleagues tried to save him but he died in hospital is the Prime Minister? Hers Pay Tribute as Says Pretty Patel the Home Secretary and Cressida Dick the MEK mission of. This sort of thing is a big shock to the country isn't it? We don't expect police officers to be killed inside their own police stations. Absolutely. True. It's truly shocking. Police personnel obviously nine for not carrying guns and weapons themselves, and this is a very, very unusual event for a place to be shot on the street would be highly unusual. That's be shot within the confines of a police facility, a custody suite where people are going in who are known to be potentially dangerous in some cases It's totally shocking is it's something we do don't expect in Britain. If we read about this in America or another country even then it would be shocking. But in Britain I think is especially stock and should serve as a warning the. Police put themselves on the line every day they do come under a lot of criticism boxing. This brings into sharp focus the dangers there in. Next. Public of always had very mixed views about Boris Johnson they've always seen the here's somebody in relation to Brexit who gets things done but they've never been under any illusion that he's necessarily the best master of detail. Joe Murphy has brought US Johnson faces trouble from within his party and public should the prime minister be concerned? What's new in podcasting? Here's what we love courtesy of a cast recommends. On scale of one to ten with one being completely straight. And Ten being completely gay what number are you? You Know I. Don't think that you should rank how they are I. Guess. That's just a little of a red. Flag for me. Come on come out. A weekly podcast where RIA? Till, they're real coming out stories. You can find come on come out on your favorite podcast. Check out now go listen. Cash. Who? Could Bonus Johnson's premiership really be in trouble in all these seems likely with an eighty seat majority but strain. Within his party he's being accused of ruling by fear toward his lockdown measures some Tory. MP's concern regulations like the ten pm curfew on pubs being imposed without parliament getting liquor them meanwhile and Evening Standard Ipsos Mori poll suggests the public is asking questions just thirty two percent thing Boris Johnson's good in a crisis, but they do seem to like the licorice she soon he's at fifty four percent uploaded Gladys Joe Mafia with me. Now Joe, let's start with this apparent Tory rebellion over lockdown. What's going on there? ACTUALLY THIS IS A. Rebellion with quite a few courses being mixed in with it. So you have a number of parliamentarians. Including Harriet Harman the former Labor deputy leader in lead the house. Who simply a demanding that parliament have more say when measures to crack down on Corona Virus Vale. So the prime minister announces a curfew and it comes into force two days later without a proper vote of the house without MP's having a chance to amend it. and. They feel soul that these things are happening all the time and they want to have their say on the have their vote and make changes where necessary. There's another strand this rebellion too, which is particularly on the Tory side on the right wing of the Tory party who feel that too many matches, the squeeze individual freedom, and for some of them, the economy more than freedom that matters. Are being rushed out through parliament and not enough is being done to consider whether that's the right political balance about keeping the country going for livelihoods or keeping health service going for lives. So. Is this because these? MP's believes the prime minister is wrong in his decisions or is this Making a point of principle that should be discussed whether they would agree with all. I think the latter day with a gop quite certain that when the prime minister's measures are put to a vote, they will fly through with a huge majority least because kissed Alma said on Tuesday that the Labor Party supported them in principle. So they may pick out bits here and there whether Paul Pal's changes. But the vast majority have cross party backing and sail through the House with a big majority even the eight t the prime minister had other general election. But it is interesting that members of Boris Johnson's own party should be coming out and publicly saying this against their leader and the prime minister, and at the same time, the evening standard has done a poll showing that the public is perhaps starting to doubt Boris Johnson's leadership capabilities. I think the public of always had very mixed views about Boris Johnson. They've always seen the he is somebody in relation to Brexit who gets things done but they've never been under any illusion that he's necessarily the best master of detail and as you say. As things have gone on during corona virus, the problems with Boris Johnson's handling of detail have. Taken on a bigger perspective in the minds of MP's including Taurean MP's some of whom for different reasons think he's gone too far or not far enough and some of whom just want a bit more consistency and good judgement brought to the government's policies. And according to the F. Sauce Mori poll that we've done people are starting to cat richie sooner can as deputy be quite impressed with how he's handling things to be fair. If you're a chancellor, you all going to be quite popular giving out lots of money. That is very true and of course, somebody some Chelsea the is going to have to try bounce a books at some point in the future. But right now richie sooner considering the economic optimism scale is really really negative. He's doing very well he's got the best ratings of any chancellor since nineteen, seventy, eight and if you cast you mind but you might remember that Denis Healey was the very popular chancellor in those days. he's also got a huge rating among Labour voters Labor supporters fifty, nine percent of them think richie sooner is doing a good job which is quite amazing under the circumstances especially but here's the thing David that I think will be weighing on quite a few minds, which is Saas Maury. Who out of these three guys Johnson soon, neck starmer do you think have these? Well, they call leader image attributes. Are they good in a crisis do they have sound judgment of a more honest than most people? To they have more substance and style. And all of these we found that. Richie soon, not only beats Boris Johnson. But he also beats kissed armor who is, of course, the man the Tories have to take on at the twenty twenty, four general election now that I think we'll be a discussion point this weekend. And that's the leader you can keep up with all the latest developments with the Evening Standard Life blog, which you'll find it standard doco UK. This podcast is back on Monday at four PM.

Boris Johnson officer Prime Minister Joe Murphy Independent Police Complaints Croydon John duns David Mosley Cressida Dick London commissioner Secretary London Minister Kit malthouse Richie Evening Standard Life Brexit Standard Okuda UK Evening Standard Ipsos Mori
UK government wants sweeping new powers to fight Covid-19. Should it get them?

The Leader

17:10 min | 6 months ago

UK government wants sweeping new powers to fight Covid-19. Should it get them?

"Hello it's David here so over the next few weeks we're going to be making this podcast from our houses today in my kitchen it would be lovely to hear from you in the outside world and we promised to reply. Get in touch with the HASHTAG. Alita podcast particularly if anyone knows how to work a pastor maker really appreciate that and subscribed to through your favorite podcast providers so you don't miss our news analysis and advice net from the evening standard in London. This is the leader. Hi. I'm David Malls. Linda New Lukasz test could own virus with results in ten minutes is on its way. Believe it or not. It looks like a pregnancy testing kit. The have in the bathroom the differences instead of wing on it. You take a pet put a drop of blood on it and it gives you the result with strike appearing in a window which sounds miraculous our political at Joe Murphy. On the bit of Kit that will help. The government hit its target of twenty five thousand tests every day. Also I was able to load up with two packs of nine roles each and I walked out like King of quite guilty though the evening. Standard's investigations editor David. Ku in Luke's into stockpiling are we risking a health? Just going to the shops and heads a huge downer. I'M NOT GONNA NOT GONNA shy away from it. I like to to go outside during walks running and I went to. Lands is being quarantined in Italy for two weeks. He tells us why the UK should expect taken from the evening. Standard's editorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper or had to stand the CODA UK slash comment in a moment the quick Guna virus test and the massive target could help the government. Hit renew come to Prime Minister's questions at an unusually spas prime minister's questions and sat a little further apart on the green benches of the House of Commons and bought a stone. Som was allowed to speak without the normal boos and jeers the PM might expect. I want to thank the right honorable gentleman for the way in which the opposition has been approaching this issue. Generally and for the corporation that has taken place between our from benches in this in this matter because it is a a as he rightly says. This is a national emergency. And we're asking the public to do things to take actions. In a way that is really unprecedented for a government in peacetime and perhaps even unprecedented in the last century. The government needs to keep this atmosphere of cooperation. Because it's trying to get through an emergency powers bill to take on. Kaduna virus is massive in. Its Scoop as editorial column explains a Corona Virus. Bill is being rushed through parliament. It's a shocking sweeping and essential law. They'll be shortcut ways to register. Healthcare workers o'clock on suing for clinical negligence and volunteer service. It will become easier to detain people under mental health powers to close applet schools and events to stop public gatherings and closed down transport elections will be canceled at any other time a decision to close all the schools in the country would in itself be stunning news. Now it's just one of the things that government has got to do. This is not government by decree. We have a strong democracy with institutions like parliament the courts and an independent media all of which will be watching but it will still feel very different to anything we've known in our lives political editor. Joe Mafias in our Westminster offers. Joe Does a lot of people to take in here and it's hit the first hitch today because some labor. Mp's are balking at the fact that these emergency powers are scheduled to last up to two years now. The government's all was promised there be a sunset clause which a lot of people took to mean. Yeah come the autumn. After the first crisis is through will renew the powers will drop them for. They will actually to keep them going for considerably longer. And that's a problem. Why does the government want or is it looking for two years for these powers? Wealthy Fares the government. They've always said that they would use powers appropriately unsparingly and have a sunset clause But they won't powers that will last for the duration of the crisis for as long as they needed and that is going to be eighteen months or so before we had vaccine and the vaccine is at the moment the known endpoint to this crisis But what I'm talking when I'm talking to government sources. They're telling me that. Well you might actually find that. Some of these powers will be of short duration consum- of longer duration and that there will be a responsible balanced set. According to need elsewhere the have been issues about testing and people wanting to be tested. Haven't been tested. The government said a a new talk for that. Now has what what's going on without you. This is a big ramping up of the testing regime. So a week ago you had four or five thousand tests a day being done by the NHL in public health England then. They roped in more hospital testing equipment to increase that from yesterday to seven and a half thousand a day which is where we are. Now they're going to raise it first of all to ten thousand a day roping in private sector equipment and within four weeks. They're aiming at a target of twenty five thousand tests a day which is high by any standard and the government reckons. They'll be ahead of any country and there's a new test being rolled out as well which will help them do that. I think this is very exciting news because it has the to be a test that really could be useful to as you me as well as to the health professionals this test which will test not for whether the viruses in bloodstream now which incidentally is being done a huge complexity but this test will look at whether your blood contains. Antibodies and the. Antibodies are little balls of protein that your body constructs and they're each one is designed to attach virus and destroy it. They if they're it means two things one is you've had covert nineteen already. Maybe you fell ill with it. Maybe you're one of those lucky few who don't get symptoms but you've had already and now you are immune to getting it again. If you've got the antibodies you could return to work without worrying about being infectious to others all getting infected yourself. And the first wave of these tests and there are thousands of them have been produced by laboratories in the private sector and they're almost ready to be rolled out. The first ones will get jess because he wanted to use them to identify an army of people who can into care homes and hospitals and look after elderly vulnerable people. Who really you called afford somebody. Who's carrying the bug to see them? But there will be some untold probably available to the private sector so you might have to pay and have a test done now to get the current tests which test nasal swabs undergo very very complicated procedures to to sort of create a form of DNA That costs Lee three fifty quid in the private sector and very few people having them done this new test. Believe it or not. It looks like a pregnancy testing kit. The having the bathroom the differences instead of wing it you take a pet and put a drop of blood on it. And it gives you the result with a strike appearing in a window which sounds miraculous and the manufacturing cost could be very low although if they are on the market to you and I I expect the cost will be a great deal higher. Next at TESCO. They were queuing at four thirty. Am for the opening at five. Am and those Lou. Rawls were gone by seven. Am probably before investigations editor. David Cohen's being looking at shop supplies. Where can you find toilet paper in London? Tesco and Brent Cross was packed at high five the sporting the shelves at just being stalked in somewhere empty within stockpiling is continuing and causing serious problems on investigations editor. David Cohen's being out in London. Any joins me now. David What have you seen? I went on a hunt lack most other frustrated customers and I started that A TESCO superstore one of them in north London not far from where I live in crouch end. I then went onto Costco in. Wembley the wholesaler. And then I came back and tried several convenience stores nearby which was better David interesting. The the new role was untidy. Sold out within fifteen minutes at Costco. People had been queuing from eight in the morning. The START AT TEN AT TESCO. They were queuing at four thirty. Am for the opening at five. Am and those Lou. Rawls were gone by seven am probably before there was no advice as to win. They would be restocked. People were told. Come tomorrow and Q at four thirty next door. I went into the local halen center which is a health food store and they said they had none and then the other cashier said Oh. Hang on. We've just had a delivery and I was able to load up with two packs of nine roles each and I walked out like King Quad guilty though with people looking at me and one of the one woman who lives on my road suit to me as I walked up quite quite laden with a twinkle in a I what I know where to come if I run out. You'RE GONNA have a lot of people knocking on your door. But it's interesting because you do sort of calculations when you buy you start to think well I could definitely take you know more than one pack but that seems wrong because then I'm reducing other people's ability to buy however win. Would I be able to get again? And then the next that came into my head maybe I should take another pet for my daughter and husband. Maybe they'll run out. Lots of rather complex thoughts come into you head weighing that up with with with not wanting to ever via panic buyer or a hold do things that are contrary to the common good you nevertheless doing things that are on the border of all that and there are well. We've seen a lot of panic. Buying now at the stores you went to whether any signs or any around to try and discourage people from panic buying or going a little bit too far in their pursuit for toilet room so the the big story was have introduced rationing You can only get set number of packs of water of of the role of tens at Costco. I bought a ten kilogram bag of rice. You're only allowed one. So that's all good and yet there is absolutely no notices or signposting or messaging about social distancing. This I think is unsafe. Both for the customers. But especially for the frontline workers the tellers. Who are taking currency as well as card and many of these customers will have the corona virus. In fact I spoke to one whose daughter was put into intensive care last night because she got very very high fever. They suspected corona virus. She told me this about ten minutes into the conversation. I watched in some horror as she handed her trolley to somebody else who put their hands where who hands had been. She had no mosque. She had no gloves and she was mixing very closely with other shoppers. And this woman was a staff nurse Ellen local private hospital and if she was behaving this way I thought well we we really need some leadership from our politicians and from our industry bosses as to what Social distancing means in detail in the public place. You can read more from David in the Evening Standard newspaper or online at Standard Okuda. Uk everything. The U K C with Kaduna Virus Restrictions. Italy has been through before and more quarantine. Laws went into effect in the north of the country. Nearly two weeks ago auto landover cheer is one of millions affected and he joins me now also. When are you in the moment? And then My family's summer house on the lake majority when the news broke about a possible quarantine of Lumber D. which is we're Milana which is where I'm from me and my father. My mother we were all gathered across Sicily and we made our way here to lake to find the day after that. This province was to be quarantined as well. Two days later the whole wasn't locked down. How long have you been the full just over twelve days now? How is that being? I'm lucky enough to have a garden and to enjoy outdoors. It's all just because it feels like I mean it goes town restaurants bars everything that's absolutely not necessary is closed and even going to do. Groceries is A bit overwhelming. Because we're counted at the entrance. There's a bouncer of source with the mask. How are you getting through a day? What do you do? I find that Routine is key so I start my morning with Breakfast with my family then I get on to learn some stuff. I'm into coding now but it could literally be whatever and the afternoon. Of course. We have lunch together. Bits OF SIESTA AFTERWARDS. And right before dinner. We're getting in the habit of having these Videoconference operatives the beer. He would have before dinner in Italy. There is this Ritual that's all. Italy seems to be going along with now at six. Pm each nights. There's a sort of plush mall fires up there speakers or goes on the balcony with a musical instruments or just by themselves and they start singing. It starts with a national anthem. Then it becomes something else maybe a popular song maybe anguish song. Patch realistic Dialectal Shan is that that you kind of reaching out beyond your own confines and it's still in a way meeting up with people absolutely vital. I'd say there is a way to get fruit as if we sort of firing find our our communal spirits again and these sash mobs. This singing does create the sense of community. We probably won't be able to see anyone apart from from our families until April the third but there is a very good chance that that's that line will be extended. It's not working out okay. Though being back with the parents we are getting in the habit of respecting each other's spaces a lot. I expect this to be some sort of stress tests for a family. How do you feel about the way it responded to the crisis you feel safe? I feel safer than we would have been if none of this had happened. Of course being in quarantine being lockdown is. It's a huge downer. I'M NOT GONNA NOT GONNA shy away from its. I'm quite an outdoorsy kids. I like to go outside during walk doing walks running and I can't however the fact that the curves are somehow flattening and the fact that say the health situation in number is now reaching the point where it's getting overloaded so these measures are starting to have noticeable impact on the amounts of patients that go in intensive care. Which is the key here right. And that's the subscribe to your podcast provider. Give us a rating we're back tomorrow at four PM.

government David editor Italy Costco London UK TESCO David Cohen Rawls David Malls Lou Joe Murphy Linda New Lukasz Kaduna Alita Ku Prime Minister Evening Standard
Dave Isbitski Amazon Chief Evangelist for Alexa Talks Voice Adoption - Voicebot Podcast Ep 95

The Voicebot Podcast

59:01 min | 1 year ago

Dave Isbitski Amazon Chief Evangelist for Alexa Talks Voice Adoption - Voicebot Podcast Ep 95

"This is episode number ninety five of the voice podcast. I guess today is Dave is Bisky chief evangelist for Amazon, Alexa. Hello voice nation. This is Brett can sell your host each week for the voice podcast where we have ended up conversations each week with people that are making waves in the voice industry. This week's guests surely meets that standard. I know many of you caught my closing keynote at Alexa, live last week for those of you that didn't it was an online developer conference hosted by Amazon, check out the show notes, and you can see where you can view that online. In case you missed it all of the sessions were recorded. So you should be able to watch any of them the want, including my closing Keno and the opening keynote, and that's where we wanna head now by chance while is at Amazon's day one building recording for the session in Seattle. I ran into the opening keynote presenter, Dave is Bisky, David. I have many times discussed having him on the podcast. But it never quite worked out until today. In case, you don't know, Dave. He's been the chief. Alexa, evanger. Since February twenty fifteen that's four years. But in smart speaker years, it's an eternity. I think everybody will agree to that. David started out hosting office hours. Alexa, slack. He did. The Alexa podcast. He's was going to meet up and more recently been seen. Speaking conferences around the world often. The keynote speaker hundreds thousands of people in the room, and he's usually talking about the merits of voice and the unique attributes of Alexa. I wanted to get his perspective on the journey thus far where we're headed what brands media and government other players should be doing, and this isn't days first rodeo when it comes to tech evangelism prior to Amazon. He was tech Vangelis that Microsoft for six years, which was preceded by more than a decade technology roles and fortune five hundred world, J, J and technology services. He brought a lot of experience with him to Amazon, and he's widely credited with laying a strong foundation for the Lexa developer program. So this is. A great opportunity to get a firsthand perspective from him, and how things have evolved in the voice industry at large. And specifically lex over the last couple of years. So I'm excited to bring that to you today before we get started. I wanted to quick listener shout haven't done one of those in a few weeks vocalized, which I assume Joe Murphy for those of you in the in the know in the industry. Well, vocalized posted a five star review in apple podcasts. Saying quote, I don't do a lot of podcasts. But when I do it's voice about seriously, though. This does help me survive my bay area commute. And I always learn something new about the voice I revolution. Exclamation point. And quote, Thanks Joe. And the team vocalized day, I for submitting the review, it definitely helps them podcast discovery. But also helps build community across the nation. So we pre that I've another shout out this week that goes to Ben Fisher, Ben was my gas an episode. Eighty three and he is CEO of magic and company. If you want to learn more about how brands like show body, imperial media companies Gimblett and Warner Brothers entertainers healthcare providers, how they're all using voice. You can catch a lot of interesting insights episode eighty three. And if you're looking to watching Alexa, skill Google action or want to integrate a voice experience into a device or a social media program. You should check out magic and company dot com. Magic and company dot com. That's magic like magician. So magic and company dot com. Magic and co if you wanna use this shorthand for it they design and implement conversational experiences. That includes a couple of webby award nominees for twenty nineteen. So they've got some experience there that's been recognized by third parties, the magic oh team can take you from idea to production voice experience. And they have technology enables voice experiences to be deployed across multiple platforms simultaneously. So I encourage you to. Check out magic and company dot com. They're building brand experiences. One conversation that a time. I appreciate bed in the team. For sponsoring voice about podcasts for the last several weeks. It's really appreciated and many people ask me what they can do to support the work voice pot. Sponsoring the podcast is one way. But you can also sign up for our weekly voice insider newsletter. That's just eight dollars per month in provides all sorts of insights data that never get published. Elsewhere. If you want to check that out just good avoi- spot dot Ford slash insider voice day. I Ford slice insider or you can do something totally free doesn't cost you anything. You can submit a review to apple or Google podcasts or one of our Alexis skills or Google actions like vocalized dot did. And we just did the shout out. If you do that will try to shout out to try to do that every couple episodes to shout out to a listener. But that's something that really does help out as well. So think about that. If if you like the show go to apple podcast. It's or Google podcast or Sicher wherever you listen and drop us a review, preferably five star. But, you know, be honest and write a little screed in there about what you think about it. It all helps thank you into Ben Fisher. Joe Murphy and all of you listening each week now for another deep dive into the voice revolution. My interview with David Bisky onsite at Amazon HQ. So I'm here at Amazon's day one in Seattle, and I ran into David's Bisky. He is the chief evangelist of election echo. I know a lot of people out, there know, Dave or have you met him in person or seen him speak because he speaks it a lot of conferences. But he's been the chief evangelist for how long Dave gosh. Five years. Five years. Got it. It is two thousand nineteen. So you we were just can't spend. Okay. So what we should use. Dave, please introduce yourself state your name what you do and give people a sense of what you're all is in the Alexi ecosystem. Yeah. Yes. Sure. So I am part of the Alexa team at being at Amazon since twenty thirteen. I've been in tech for really long time. I'm just gosh. I think of myself as just a tech evangelist somebody who's always chasing the shiny thing. I was like that since I was a little boy get excited about latest tech. And then go tell everybody about it as it when you're a little boy. Oh my goodness. I gotta show you I gotta show you my studio with all my Commodore sixty four one twenty eight Amigas all my consoles that I have basically rebuilt my bedroom between sixth grade and tenth grade in my house in my studio basement, right? And it just fell in love with tech. Just the accessibility of it. Just the it was the one thing that came pretty easy to me like even reading the Commodore Vic twenty book I posted this on Twitter. I still have the original piece of basic that I I typed, in course, I had a typo too. It was my aunt who she had worked at J. She was a ministry of assistant, and she was in the family. She was the computer person. I mean, this is back early eighties. Right. And I was like I can't I don't know. What's wrong? What's wrong? And she's like you missed a space. Wow. Like, it's the finally of rate very one zero. It's computers. And so man. Chaste tech my whole life. Whether I was cognizant of or not been super super fortunate work with these amazing companies started doing Vange when it was called evangelism. Whatever that means to me. It's always meant just helping people being sincere being giving without expectations. How as I've always looked at the evangelist role. So when I was at a cost she was Microsoft in two thousand six two thousand seven it was just free training. Wait, what's dot net and here? Hi can show you how to do it. Now. What normally you'd go and pay hundred dollars an hour for whatever console. I'm going to do it for you for free. I love this stuff. I've been told my excitements contagious. So then people would get excited, but that kind of thing, then why do why do big companies have people like you? This is what I've always felt because you don't need a lot of us is that and you saw this firsthand. You're you're part of this is like with the Alexa community in the early days is. That stuff would have happened naturally. But somebody like me can have it happened in three months. What might take three years to three months, right? It's a person that instead of dealing with a company, you're dealing with a conduit somebody that can get your message across to the right people somebody that can connect people both inside and outside the organization somebody that can take a step back and say, whoa. I know we just had one hundred API releases. This is what this actually means. You know, this is what we're trying to do. And just kind of bring it all together and paint a picture of it and point people in the right direction. And I came across initially through the Alexa, slack group. Yeah. And I mean, it was held office hours. Yeah. Right. That was crazy. That was there was some people that I was on thought I was crazy for that. But I was like on this is I mean, if you go back it was and it was super early days. Right. And I remember like I would hear. Recurring themes, whether I was out and back, then I mean, we didn't have the amazing teams that we have now who go around and actually do have events. Right. Ten thousand people. I started way with so many smarter people here than may, you know, if that's an as if I'm that smart. But there is just incredible people doing credible things back then it was me. So it was like, well, what do I do? And I'm like, Well, I I need to get this thing out in front of other developers and see if they're rocking. It the way. I am. What's working? What's not? Right. And so there's early days, man. What I would hear the same. Like we have nowhere to complain about this. And you know, like, how do I talk down was on? How do I tell them? And I'm like, you know, what let's just all get on a webcam together. And I remember telling people this is going to be like an ask me anything. They're like, I'm like, I'll talk about whatev. And you remember those early cost there were in this is where I was like, okay, I've been in a lot of technology waves. But when I host something like this and people come in who are just fans of echo like you would see that member. Be like I love using this. How do I get echo to connect to whatever life? And so it was this weird. Awesome. Mix that I have not seen since the internet, and you and I were talking about early our inner early internet days and build websites. And I remember in those days, you had people that just love the possibility of the web, and there were people that wanted to make stuff, right? Like, the whole webmaster. And that's how I was like there's a cool mix here, man. There's people running their own businesses Thursday. Entire industries. Like, I knew nothing about smart home that there were people that have been creating smart home setups in buildings corporations and homes, and you know, back in twenty fourteen it was I o t remember that that was the hashtag. And I remember sitting it was a Keno panel it bluetooth world twenty fourteen and everything was I o t and a lot of the themes people are like, hey, you know, we need more consumer top shin. It was like, yeah. But we don't have that one unified interface. And I'm like Hello. Right. Right. You know, you felt like an iron. It was literally a shift. You saw in the audience like I'd be I always try and lean back a little bit and let the panel. So that I can understand where the other panelists are coming from and before jump in. I have a tendency to get so excited passionate. I wanna talk and control the conversation. Pretty quiet kind of said, my spiel, and then people were standing out in the audience, and they were pushing the other panelists does anyone on this penalty? Probably remember I've run into people like we want to hear from. Dave. We wanna hear about this echo thing. And I was like well, imagine fourteen. Yes. Twenty fourteen pre-release. No. Yeah. I September is that when it came out. So what we did? If you remember we did preorder in in twenty fourteen that you could sign up prime members. And so now a lot of people had the actual devices. Yeah. And it came with a remote and stuff back then too. And it was just the one device. And so that was a big thing too. Is I used to haunt that thing around with me because I mean, you you probably felt this way to try and explain somebody ambient computing is like trying to tell them why a phone that you touch made out of glass is better than your physical. Keyboard on your flip phone now. Right. It was something you had experience. And then you're like, wow. This makes sense. So what does this actually mean? Here's a super interesting thing. And I hear this from the community back then. What would happen as people would get so excited? I spent most of my time bringing them down to reality. You remember those days? It would be like all right. This is great. So I want to have this conversation with Alexa about everything. Right. And you're like, no, no, no, actually, it's super early. This is what we can do. We want to hear about your feedback and figure this all out. You know, what's interesting nowadays. Which really I love this. And I continue to see this. And you probably see this too is when I start to have these these discussions, and it could be with brands it could be with startups. It's a reoccurring theme. There's two plants. So it's Dave what do I do? Now. What do I do in the next thirty days? And where do you see this headed in five years? How can I plan five years out? I've never had that. I don't know about you. I didn't get that in mobile. Everyone was like. I it do this again. What are you kidding me? It took a few years before mobile. I became a thing. Right. And people thinking they need to organize our business around it that. Yes, for sure no business said, thank you tech company. I can go. Learn new things and build new things and hire more people to do the same thing have a conversation with my customer because that's that's what it was all about. I think the first time. I actually saw the device somebody had one. It was not me. But it might it was either late fourteen or early fifteen. Yeah. And I was like I'm not even sure that I got I was like okay seeing. It's usually sixteen. I saw it again. I was like, oh, so something happening here. Yeah. Yeah. Sixteen then we have the dot by then I think we had early sixteen. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And so for me it was. Like at the beginning. It was Dave. What do you think about this like super interesting early days for me was who's developed and just talked with with Pete on his voice podcast for the voice summit about this. He asked me a question who's developer for this. And I was like I thought a lot about that in twenty fourteen in early days because that was with the marketing there was no marketing managers for lack. So right. So it was like, that's what marketing was asking was. Well, if we're going to we're going to do something who's the developer for this? And I would say everyone. And they go what is it mobile? Is it web is? And I would say it's everyone and you're starting to see that with blueprints. You're starting to see that with the ability to tell Alexa, things she can remember. But I truly feel it's like YouTube in content creation. Right. It's that the tech has gotten out of the way and the conversation is truly the medium. And I feel like voice as we move more and more in the future, you're gonna see that more and more. So people I think we're gonna see we're going to be surprised that people who've never written code that weren't part of mobile weren't part of web are now having conversation in create creating experiences San inclusiveness. That's got me. So early days like that. I was like, okay. Let me do. Let's talk about that. So you start out. You're doing ask ask me anything office hours in. The general channel and Alexa, slack. It was probably the most common thing that I would see the most common comment was office hours are tomorrow, right? Yeah. I don't know office hours. Tomorrow ask that question the answer. Let me know what he says. So that was definitely real. Thanks. He did that. What else did you do hack nuts? Yes. So oh, well, I mean, this is just a little bit of inside baseball. But every companies like this and so early days not a big team. There's no budget there. So I'm like, hey, I've been doing community building platform building for fifteen years before Amazon, and you have to get out there. You got to find people who just as passionate about you and enable them, and so like I need to take this thing on the road. And so I knew a lot of people AWS known a lot of people for AWS for wildness. Okay. You know, like do you have some free space? And there was just perfect timing. They're like we've got these things called Papa loss. And we've got one happening in San Francisco. We've got one in London we've got one in Berlin. And so I just jumped into the pop up loss, and it was great because they're like, hey, you know, what we've got customers asking about Alexa echo. And we've got no one to talk about it. You know, this is. So it's so new so I'm like, oh, come out. I'll train your people. So that there are always, you know, how like the lofts have sick almost like the genius bar. You know, it's like that kind of ask. So did that create it early content for that? And then I would go this is where Joe JR. Clinton came Dave low like all like, Eric like, all these super awesome, incredibly smart people. They're part of the community came out of that. It was just incredible like timing of everything and the community of all that Kolesnik. So I went around and that was worldwide doing all those things took all those questions. And then what I did was internally. I knew I needed to get this feedback to the team. So everything was small enough that I could meet with every developer back, then I can meet with every manager that's creating code, and I can meet with the leaders, but I'm like, man. This stuff's all my head. And we want the history of this, right because communities have a living breathing history. And the thing that's always made me sad is over time as community leaders move on. There's like a piece of that soul that disappears right? And I'm not talking about like me leaving Amazon. I'm talking about key code selective collect over. Yeah. Yeah. So what I did was I created a Wicky? And it was everything I thought that was great everything that we weren't doing. It was like here's because joked quit with write me emails of stuff. And I'd be like Pupo, boom. And I'm like, yes. In this thing, then it did. Then I would organize them. I'm like, these are the things that need to happen. Now of like, you see the user voice. And then as engineers could come into Amazon on T Alexa team as part of their on boarding. They could see that. So that that was like my gift to the commute. Unity is that I want you to know that every time somebody gets hired at Alexa. The history of what we've discussed it. Correct. Yeah. So I did that. And then. Paul cut singer who I knew from my app store days. Really great guy. He was like I'm going to build a Thon team. So I'm like, here's all the stuff go out and rock that what I'm seeing. Now is I'm getting hit with all of these brands in digital marketers. That are saying is this the flashing sign on the internet. Right. Like, what does this mean? And it's very interesting because if you know anything about that market once a specific brand within that vertical. Does something that's when the phone rings. Right. So early days it started out in finance, you know, with Capital One scale. And then it was you know, what does this all mean? And then talking to analysts and things like that. And so I was like, I'm I'm all about I think deep down inside. I'm all about trying to trying to do as little work as possible when it comes to repeat myself. I hate listening to myself over and over again. So I'm like is the next year for me a phone call for an hour every. The day with some sea level exact about what this means for their brand or do. I just go to them, and Alexa, and was on this incredible company where if you've got an idea, and you've got a plan around it you can just run with. And so that's kind of been eighteen twenty four months has been this brand digital marketers. What does this all mean was that mean from the consumer side like because it's interesting because it's not so much developer stuff as it is what is the impact on this for your customer, and that relationship that you have. Okay. So let me let me let me ask you a couple of questions here because I think we should talk about sort of the history. So if you think back, so it's twenty nineteen. Now you start on this team in two thousand fourteen right? Or is it twenty thirteen. I started on twenty thirteen Alexa, as me Alexa, skills. Marketing works started in twenty fourteen late twenty fourteen okay? Late twenty fourteen. So how do you break it up? Like, what were the epochs of Alexis because there was the early days there was there was the pre ask. Oh, man. The super early days. And I know some of your listeners will remember this. We didn't have Lambda right? So that was a nine. No. The team wanted to do that. You know, it's like as you're building things it just takes time. I mean, you're creating stuff from nothing NATO best been incredible partner. So I remember when we got Lambda it was like, I could demo this thing without creating a beanstalk in lamb to come in. I wanna say twenty twenty fifteen so it was so here it is. So. June July twenty fifteen and you may remember this. It's in my Twitter feed. I had like my first Alexa presentation ever, which was at GD see in February of twenty fifteen and it was this is echo. Right. And it was it's going to evolve over time and at the end so excited about this. Because I got to announce we're going to have sign ups. We wanna know what you think, and it was the echo episode K, and you can still see pictures of of all that. And it was like we wanna hear from all of you. Because we you know, we had great ideas for this. But we wanted to hear what two hours thing we wanted to hear from the tinkers and the inventors, and so then it was June July twenty fifteen we have this ask and we have ATS, right? So we have Alexa skills, and we have the voice service and the Alexa fun at the same time. Or was it all the same time? Yeah. We all three which I thought was great because what would happen is. I had. OEM? Calling me up. I had startups looking for funding end developers. So it was just super interesting exciting time. So that was twenty fifteen then the tools at that time. A lot of the you remember these days, you know, the community was very clear about what they wanted built a lot of that was around built in types because there was so much having to do stuff on your own when we launched it was Amazon literal. Daytime. And number. I think there was like six of them. There was not a lot. And then we nonce that built in library at reinvent. And so you could you could see the way I this is how I explained right? This is how I look at my job. Like, what is this all me? So how I would explain it. And you could see some of my talks at the time is Alexa, voice Nabl all the things. Meaning as a content creator gang because I'm looking at this as anybody can have a conversation in anybody can use voice if I'm gonna create content. I should not know how to programmatic change a word. That's phonetically in some thing that a computer understands right Alexis, you do that. And so over time is that evolved, and then launching internationally was huge to be able to have the different models. And then we had a built in type, suddenly we had this European city because European city I knew this if when when you fly nobody's ever flying to when you land in the Berlin airport you like I'm not in the airport because it's not Berlin doesn't sound like it is in US. It's different. Right. Lo and behold, we're. Not all the same across the world. And so it was that. And then the tooling was another. There's two I would say depends on the type of developer. You are. If you are the type of developer where you're kind of working outside of the Amazon ecosystem your architect it out. And you'll see this with the the Capital One talk. I did it reinvent one year. You'll see how they've extrapolated what Amazon is doing and what Alexis doing and they have their own way of generating all of that. So they have their own tools and processes, what do you want at the end? You just want an easy way to publish an easy way to up dates in easy way to understand the analytics of what your customers are using. Right. And so if you're doing that you need bulk uploads, you need reporting you need those type of things. So in that hit in the web portal. There was a lot of excitement. And then if you are a coders coder, you're not opening any gooey tool you're sitting there and terminal you're curling. I mean, I remember at the first on people were curling and just EV. Everything was written from terminal, and so when we did the snappy interface right skills management API of which the new Porto was built upon it showed that you could actually interface. It wasn't a black box anymore. Right. So people were super excited about that that they could actually start to publish do skills and do all of those type of things. Okay. So let's talk about it. So like sixteen pretty significant. I mean, audio player came out remember that that was huge when we had smell August of that was fifty Hatwell for don't don't forget we had ninety seconds SNL tag first before we had the long form audio streaming. And so immediately when we announced that I remember, I was showing people how to it was I was doing office so showing them how I would record myself live while I was talking then play it back with SNL, tag and people like, okay, I want to create a music player. Of course. So you could see the ideas. But that was the general theme Behan just like a question. Why ninety seconds ninety seconds is gone. Six hundred and forty K. Right. It's like well. It's it's at the time. I think I'd have to ask the team. But I think it had something to do with s Mel itself with audio tags and stuff. Yeah. Yeah. It was never. Yes. So sixteen like a lot of things change because you went internationals you said that was September. I think you started shipping to Germany. I'd have to verify all these days, but they sound about right? The official launch date and Europe was February of seventeen but you you did the pre orders before I remember writing about that. So. So this is this is a different Alexa. This is where you're saying. Okay. This is really expanding. And it's starting to be a lot of people saying, oh, this isn't a novelty anymore, right? Because you also had a really big sales year that year your primary rival came out and November of that year. And there was all this attention going on and seventeen was just a year that ton of activity. Yeah. So here's something super interesting. As somebody. Who's again, I've always gotten to work with these really awesome companies so to get to travel the world, right? And I love traveling. I'm just wired that way, even when I was doing the hack Athans this how I met Sam mention in a pub with Dave low, and and this is before we had launched in the UK. And so it's all these people who are already working with Amazon because they're part of AWS groups doing things and everybody has an echo, and it's like. And it's like, what are you guys all do in with echoes out here, and they're like, I just wanna play with it. And what was super interesting is. They liked the US English voice. And I'm like was it the accent? Like, you know, it's just four now. It's just not as formal. And that's when I went. Wow, this is really clicking in my mind. This is the first tech wave ribs about human beings. You think of anthromorph isn't right? Like, the the the ability take an inanimate object and give it human qualities, right? Well, that's never happened before. There's never been. And you can correct me if I'm wrong as long as I've been around with tech. There's never been a tech wave. That's happened that you don't need the latest device. You don't need the latest update or patch. An every app that you use. You don't need the latest version. And so that clicked in my head is like, so what has to happen? Here is nail so culture and for somebody who's coming from the app store where when we would go ahead and launch in another country. It's string replacement right in mobile that doesn't work in. And so the the best headline I saw when we launched in the UK was it said, Alexis, very, very British. Meaning it got the nuance. It got references. Bob's. You're right. Is is a is a whole reference through monarchy right of royalty favoritism and nepotism. And and things like that. That's what really clicked then was that. I felt like like what would get me really excited as I get an Email or a message on Lincoln where I saw connection. So I saw somebody in another country in the language that I don't even speak that felt like they were heard by another technology, and when I would tell to customers, and you could correct me if you don't feel this way. The idea that you don't have to remember what you said since day one since twenty fourteen I think is what's really struck a chord with people is that the intention of what was understood. So if I think back of after those launches in what excited me is as Alexa, grew understand, more and more people and more and more people consistently, right? They understand generically how the communication works. Right. But it's not like, they remember everything. I did. Right. And I think that's one of the big gaps that everybody's working towards like this idea of context maintenance over a period of time that it knows you not just how you say things. But it knows things you've told it in the past. And it maintains that a slot. So the persistent slot. Maybe not even that you'd ever say it again, like why would it have to know why would have to tell my birthday twice? Yeah. And we have we. Have lots of API updates at help with that. But this is how I like to tell people like it. And we've known each other now for five years if I came up to you, and I say, hi, I'm David Bisky this offensive there's history but for decades, man, that's what we've done with tech, and we forced that upon people. So the real power here. And what's different is? There is actually a human being expectation now that I've had conversation, and I haven't had a conversation might have been at work. It might have been in some form of capacity. But usually it's on my own terms in a comfortable space my own way for information. I want is very human driven. It's human venture, man. And so that creates an expectation of don't be a stranger. We've never had that before. What do you mean? Don't be a stranger. What I mean by that is that if Alexa asks. You for something. She's already told you or it doesn't remember? Well, you're not Alexa. You're an impostor got it. Right. I that's what I growing up in jersey. That's what we would say don't be stranger. I don't feel like there's a lot of persistence. Well, that depends on whether you're talking about in normal conversations with Alexa. You're talking about specific skills. Are you is your terms of persistence? My overall engagement with Alexa across everything right because I think that level. So let's say that's like the metal ores. I've been playing this game for three years, and it's the same questions. Well, so so there's there's a there's pieces there, which are third party skills. Right. And how they've built in this idea that they're going to persist data persist that relationship. And remember things you don't have to say them over and over again. And then there's this other thing around Alexa, generally, right? So all the first party stuff. And so I think there's a lot of third party skills. Actually, do persist the air actions, or at least components data points from the interactions. And so they have that. And that that's really good for personalization. But at first party level that doesn't really happen. You know, I guess it would depend on what you're interacting with give me give me a specific example like for me. I can say things today that I couldn't do this before where I could say Alexa. Is it going to rain today? And she'll tell me, and then I say how about tomorrow couldn't do that before there's a concession. Understanding session context actually south two years ago. I could say something like, which I've just actually did this. So I know it could say Alexa, reorder vitamin d it's been ninety days. Right. So there's an understanding of that is actually transaction that happened there times going into your order history. Yeah. Alexa, play my top hits. It's not necessarily a an Alexa thing that's going into Amazon dot com. It's point from your profile, but I think for human beings, no difference. It's however interaction I've had across anything. And I think that's the ultimate goal is. That's what I hear from customers is brands is. The shouldn't be separation. It's just a conversation about the things that I care about. And so needs to be as seamless as possible. I think I just wanted like clarify the difference in terms of you know, that being a stranger in those types of things, I think it's everyone's working towards us. And nobody does don't get me wrong. That stuff does as we all want to be like if I if if there's three different ride share solutions on the platform, right? I only use one it should never ask. I should never have to invoke it. I should be able to say give me a give me a car or I need to go to the airport. Well, automatically know Brett choice, though, there are other people that should say if I've never invoked one before I want the one that's the highest rated. That's there might be another one. That says I want this specific brand because that's the one I use right? So it's it's customer choice and then working backward. But yes, remembering what this are. And I don't think any of them are there. Yeah. I think that's what we want as human beings with super powerful as human beings is to say what was the song? I was listening like I do this all the time for photos, and this doesn't exist. Right. And this is. Dave thoughts. But I think as this stuff goes forward, what's incredibly powerful as a human being the way in which we think maybe there was a maybe I was feeling sad. Last April on a certain date. And I could say what music did I play because whatever music I played picked me up. Right. That's think of human beings. That's where I think this stuff can really help over time. It could be something like you played this. Oh, and by the way, there's a new release right, right? But it's it's a continuation kind of brings all of that together. Right. So I think everybody recognizes that that's a logical extension. We're not there today. And that we have session bass context maintenance. It could be an awesome skill. Does that you could do it in a skill absolute do it in SCO takes them take some thought to do it. Well can do. Okay. So we get through two thousand seventeen and over the last year and a half or so it's been it seems like a different phase over the last year and a half. I don't know if you feel that. But it's like. A lot of people were getting started and twenty seventeen. There are a lot of people try trialing things and that over the last maybe it's eighteen months. Maybe over the last year people are saying, oh, I guess this should actually be strategic approach to what I you know. I should think about this holistically. I shouldn't just think about this is going to be part of my promotion for my q for q four sales project. So this is where I feel super fortunate with my job is my view of the field. I'm constantly have to turn off my brain. And try and reset it because giving example reinvent we had that booth at reinvent, right? And I walked up, and I was like I wanna do booth duty. And people are like why are you doing here? Like people are coming up trying to have selfish while I was in line, right? And I'm like, no for the next three hours. I'm here. I'm telling people I'm here. And I'm asking everyone in line when they got the first eco super interesting answers. This was reinvent November reinvent. Okay. Second question. What was the first skill you used and how did you find out about it? Also, super interesting. Come on market research. Yeah. Yeah. I you know, some of those were private answer. Some of them were really interesting. Some of them were finding out how to use the skill in which I won't say this store, but the store they were in. They were demo how to you skills, which I never thought of. Others where because or they were in. So they bought it at best buy or something like that. Was there and they say retail, and they showed them how to do and that was actually selling point for them. And so and other people had just gotten an echo twelve months ago. Others eighteen months ago. How many how many devices you have in your home? And so what's super interesting is you have these people who've been using these devices now for four or five years, and I'm constantly asking myself because I'm part of that too. What's my expectation today? Right right now, what's the expectation of a person that just bought a device? In twenty nineteen. I can guarantee you it's different than somebody who bought it in twenty fourteen laid up then there's what you're talking about. And so it's super interesting because there are people that approach their strategy as what I remember of the web, I need to do this now because all these other people in my space doing this, right? There are other people that say, I'm not gonna make that stake. There are other people that say. What I this is how I knew wanted to start this conversation, which I think it always opens it up super interesting as I say, especially if these this company doesn't have a brick and mortar store, right? What if I told you sound like morpheus from the matrix? Right. What if I told you you could talk to your customer every day in the moment where they are. What would they ask you for the first time almost nobody knows? They only know what they ask on the help desk line. Right. But you can do that you flash briefings. You could do a skill. There's nothing to say that you can't have like I was talking to a hospitality chain. And they knew what you would expect won't name the brand. But what you'd expect I want? I wanna put rooms. And I said, no I travel all over the world. I am a diamond. I won't I won't even use terms to say diamond gold star red blue, whatever because I don't want you to the chain. I want to have a conversation with you that I'm going to be in Munich next month. Just like, I I was at your concierge dick, and I want it to be local inside info that's only available to me. And I want it on the fly. When I need it without figuring it out in app that you just redesigned. And I wanted to actually suggest things over time because you know, what I like based on my travel preferences. Why are you doing that today? And in fact, you'll learn more about me as a customer, then you would any other type of type of interaction right about that? What people want to put a room, right? They're treating their product is if it's a commodity, right? It's just like I don't think about that. As a hotel. I wouldn't say commodity with. They're doing is. They're trying to get transactional because they're realizing there's two dollars transactional commodity. You're you're traveling. You must need a room. Let me sell you a room. They're not talking about all the other things when we travel, right? Yeah. There's very ability in hotels amenities you might wanna know location. What's next door? Every city. I go in for the first time, I go. What are you known for? I want to try that food. Right. Right. And that if you are in an area where I'm staying I stayed at this one place in Berlin. That was right across the street from this amazing barbecue place who knew there was amazing barbecue and Berlin, I wouldn't have thought it right credible ashamed the pictures. But that is something that I think is important people. And as a brand that you know, once you start thinking about that. Then I start to ask other questions like. What do you sound like you spend all this money on a logo that? I'm never going to see unless it's that modality. What do you sound? Like do you want? Alexa to be your voice, or do you wanna create your own voice because we have this entire library voices that you can do on the fly now rolled out probably integration last year. Right. Yeah. A lot of choices professional narrated. Do you remember in the eighties? There was like avoid the noise and like Little Caesars Pete like, I still remember all of this. I don't feel like that's the case anymore. We don't have. They're very feeds feats, man. So you that stuff sticks. And I feel like invoice that could be incredible because band there are jingles my wife, and I we'll start singing jingles from eighties. Saturday morning cartoon guys must be so fun. Oh, yeah. We will say we're stupid dorks. But it's like we're the jingles like now's your opportunity to do that. And you could be serious brand. But man if. You nail that jingle. And you're quirky. And you make me laugh once there's no other tack that makes that available right? So that's kind of the opportunity there that I present. And so then what you're saying? When they when they talk about a plan is what I tell them is experiment because what you need to do when you know, you get you get conversations about new customer acquisition customer engagement customer retention, right? What does this all me? So what I say is how will you knew your customer because that's the conversation. It turns into well. This. Let's just say these three things we know everybody uses in our mobile app at least every forty eight hours. Right. Then the question I ask them is. How old are they like what do you mean? Well, you're saying your customers using obviously people who know how to use an iphone or an Android. What about the people that are on the other age of the spectrum? What are they doing? Are. They calling are they not using that at all how large of an audience is that for you. And so there's a reset on who's our customer for this. And then once you figure that out you can look at what are your customers actually doing today within mobile within web within brick and mortar when they walk up. Right. When I was a Bank teller growing up. I had people would just come in every week talk to me for half hour right that long-term relationship. So when you figure those things out, then that's when you can roll out those specific conversations because those people are going to want very different things. Okay. Star with the customer. You also mentioned this idea of thinking about what do you want that? Or what how could you address that first question? What's that first question? So I know my people I know I question or several first questions I could answer for them, right? Which may or may not be book a room. Right. And then like how do I sound right? So those are three discrete things. Yup. What else? The unexpected. I find that is super incredibly powerful for people is so like just like the right? This is an example. I was shown because I can pick myself is I have this dice roller, and my so here's the question as I go if if you could roll all these different cited dies, and you've never used it before what do you do? And if you've used it before what do you do, and you can extrapolate that into an actual brand or business, right? For me. What happens is it's like ninety something percent in the if you've never used it before you roll the die, and oh that was kind of fun. I heard the sound you do it again if you've already engaged with that. It becomes utilitarian you go in you, roll your done. Right. Right. So what does that mean for your brand as a service is there something that I'm gonna use every day? Is there something like tax time that I only do once a year, right? On my my mind this time of year. Is there something that I could be using more and more over time if it was faster because nothing beats speed, right? So if I create and I make it available through my Lexus skill, but it takes the same amount of time or people really gonna use that. Okay. So tell me some things you don't have to name a brand new name brand. It's really up to you. But tell me some things you think are the or the approach that a couple brands have done that have done it. Well depends on the categories. So discovery find is really interesting. So gosh, I should know this. I think it might have been Simon Schuster, Stephen King incredible, author they created and I talked about this digital book world, they created a skill that I discovered a book I had never read before. And what it was is like you and me having a conversation. If as if we were saying, hey, I had the favourite what was. Was your favorite Stephen capable of time. And I'd be like, well, I feel like a western I feel like whatever and it kind of led down this path to a book. Right. And then at the end, you can listen to the book or get a sampler, whatever so I- strap elated that at digital book world. And I said to all these publishers what happens at the end of every book of really good book for me sadness. You want more because those neural pathways are there like I can hear those characters in my head. And you ask any good authors. The same thing they're like, I'm having conversations. This is not a world. I created this exists. I'm simply viewing it. Right. And I said what's to stop you guys from working with an author to have those characters, and I can just have conversations about whatever every day. It's like holiday fright. And so when you ask me, what do I think is the it's this is David Pinon thing. Right. So it's like real conversation. Real discovery a cell Westworld did. Some of this where I could actually go ahead, and I could talk to the characters and move in with that that's very appealing to me. Right. Other things is when it's faster. So I'm the type of person where I'm all about if you make it faster for me to pull up in order. If you make it fast for for me to work with a I was quoted recently of talking about voices, the new HTML, and what I what I was saying by that is much in the way that HTML today is the conduit through all of the content media. We get right. Even think about like YouTube and stuff like that. Right. It's not the be all end all it's simply the conduit. That's what voice will be. And so I wanna get at that specific thing. Whether it's it's turning off, a smart device, or it's getting to a piece of knowledge, I wanna be able to do that with my voice, and that kind of stuff gets me. Excited when I see those things too. So I actually installed like the Alexa app on my laptop. I know if you you you might have seen that earlier because I found myself sometimes I don't have a device around. But I'm talking to my computer. Have you have you talking your computer more because not much sometimes the the Siri comes? All right. So there's a accidents. Yeah. 'cause you gotta MAC. Yeah. I it's funny. I went back to two windows after years. I helped launch windows, seven and windows. Eight one is. But what's super interesting to me is that my brain. And there's a there's a EPA genetics is is is the study of behavior. Modification how genes are expressed. Up in that. Now, I find this all the time when I want to do something, and I'm not thinking, so it's almost a subconscious level. I talk. And so I was doing that more and more to the point that when I right. It's all voice dictation now on my computer relate. So that I just read it article. I think it was I wanna say it was Wall Street Journal, the title was I spoke this article. Yeah. And he talks about his whole experience. Yeah. And it's I mean, somebody grew up in the eighties in the Commodore analyst like it's been around forever. But it's it's never been at that speed. I won't say his name. I was doing a keynote in in Denver. He was connected with the onion. And he wrote this really good book. And I was talking about it because he's like, you should write a book too. And I'm like, I really suck at writing. Like, I just love talking. He's like check this out and he had this app on his iphone? I wrote this entire book with this as just talking and again, my editor went back and kind of change the things around. But then that is what I mean by like forces in the new age to everything else is just getting out of the way. And now anybody can kind of express that content. So when I see those type of things that gets me excited to I actually, you know, if you use word, I use oh, three six five plugging this how they do all the voice dictation now, and and it works and then MAC, obviously, do yes, you're to absolutely. So I think what you're talking about those and expression that we see elsewhere that when people start to become accustomed to using voice in the home. But through their smart speaker, then it triggers this idea that I can use voice. And then when they're other places, they're like, oh, well, I don't have the smart or how would I do this? And so what we see some of the data is that people who own smart speakers, then start to use voice more on their mobile phone in particular. Yeah. 'cause that's device. That's okay. Well, let me just ask this. I think this can answer. My question do that. So I I like your example about from digital book world, I think that's that's pretty interesting. And this idea that you could continue the conversation, you could you know, people have done that they've created. What's it like represent people? That's a really cool idea. I was actually just talking to someone earlier. I said, you know, this is something this goes along the lines of things you could do invoice at. I'm not sure you could do in the previous platforms. Yeah. But you think about Tolkien wrote the hobbit, right? And so he wrote the hobbit but had this whole idea of this whole world Middle Earth history of it and formed over time. But let's say the hobbit was the tip of the iceberg, and he's in slowly over then the Lord of the rings revealed more and more, and then eventually wrote all these histories. Well, there's no reason you couldn't have three hundred fifty page book. That is the story. It's not use your own adventure. It is the story. But she was able to ask questions at any given time and say what was that blue car? You know, and they'll tell you about what's how long how old is that car or this character. Where does that character live or where did that care to grow up? You know, things that don't fit into the economy that you have to have in the story. Yeah. But would really make it a richer hinder NCIS Lewis Faye? Yes. It's a lot of interesting to see, you know, dawn shredder and everything else like between the and their views on good evil. And here's a super interesting thing that I've told people some people are running with this. And I'll throw it out to your audience sell. I'm a big gamer. I've always been a big gamer, right? Even since my my Commodore Amiga days when I sit at home, I'm going to sit in front, and I'm gonna rock XBox, PlayStation. Or I'm going to play my PC, which is actually connected to my big screen as well. With the lab. Keyboard. When I get in my car, and I was showing you my echo auto before. When I get in my car. I can't play games. But when I do my car, there's a very different context switch and I feel like like we have multiple modalities for creating these interactions with Alexa skills. You noser screen is not as touch as not there's modalities in the way that you're going to want to engage with voice, depending on where you are. So when I am in the car, and I have an hour. And I'm alone. Sometimes I can listen to his music if I have a bunch of threads running in my brains, most of the time, and this is where I listened to your podcast is when I'm traveling to and from that airport, right? But to pending on the drive if I'm going down to DC and backed maybe a little bit under six hours, there's depending on the content like if it's fictional content. And I need to like understand a lot. Sometimes I'll pause what the author is actually saying, so I can go through everything, but games in that sense. Huge. You remember playing the game going down the highway and being like is Redcar blue car. Green car. We used to punch bug. We used to do the license plate. Ah about that. As you have voice in the car. It's one you brings back all the educate and stuff. Yeah. To the can do and then to. There's it's it's where you are. It's that it's that modality that can be incredibly engaging like Lord of the rings like this. There was a Lord of the rings one. And right then and there I just played a game where I was fighting about rock site. Would you like to know more about our there's a whole book about it? It's called a was at the two towers where candle factually stands on the bridge forget, but it's a way to tie in and all those things through game. That would never happen me sitting at home in front of my big screen today. Exactly. So I think that's one of the things I think in we'll bring this to conclusion. But I think that we haven't yet seen the Uber. Right. So the Uber's something couldn't have existed before we had smartphones with persistent high speed connections. Right. So I don't know that we've seen that yet invoice. We've certainly seen things from previous eras that have become newly Stanford through voice. So for example, the household radio is now much more. Interactive much more interesting much more robust than it used to be. We've taken things from the phone like timers and alarms and put them there. We've made weather more accessible, but we haven't yet seen that thing which is couldn't have existed pre previous the voice world or have we? So I'll flip this around on you because this is the way my brain works. All of those things you described. Brought value to you. But it was the value. It wasn't necessarily the thing. I can remember time and you can too when there was no such thing as app stores abs- stores were built. So that developers can have an easy way to launch additional functionality on top of Noah's layer that was easily discoverable and could be monetised. Why does it need to exist? Today. It's the way that our brains are thinking about this stuff you start to look at mobile phone usage and things like that. Right. And so I think what you're asking. Because it's such a deeply personal question is how are you using today? And it might be how are you using Alexa today because I've been surprised like standing in line at reinvent bus. Stop conversations. They don't know whether it's a skill or not they'll be like will. I lex Alexa, when the Showtime is for whatever it's a show time scale to that person. That's changed things. And so that's very different than an APs store. It's always been about that value. So I think where. You'll see that as a is continue to give more and more value cross all sorts of different things and across all different age, spectrums is where we're going to see that stuff shine. So it's not an app in a sense. It's the utility in the value of the things. Okay. So Dave tell me tell the listeners how they can learn more about what you're doing. Keep track of everything the Dave dot com has my links to everything podcast all that. Perfect. Thank you L. You're welcome. Checkout on Alexa, live. Yeah. Thank you.

Alexa Dave low Amazon developer Alexa Berlin Twitter Microsoft YouTube David Bisky Brett apple US Alexis Alexa Google Seattle Ben Fisher Joe Murphy