17 Burst results for "Joe Mcnally"

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"At least two cameras, sometimes more, the holy Trinity of lenses, 14, 24, 24, 70, 70, 200. That covers a lot of the basis. And then there's other ones that would factor in as well. But small measure of small flash. And then I use pro photo for the bigger flash, if you will, you know, the B ten pluses are excellent units. And so, you know, if we go out into the road with four or 5 bags of stuff, pretty much feel we can get just about anything done. Yeah, yeah. And yeah, four or 5 bags of stuff for Jill mcnally, whittles down to one bag for Frederick van Jones. One bag with a couple of things in it that, you know, we make it work. You know, I guess the final kind of landing gear down question would be around the how this works in your world. And your world is different than most photographers I would argue that aren't operating at a high commercial level. But on a post production side of things, once a job is done, let's say it's one of your self assigned yet funded self assignment projects. Who's doing the post production on that? Is it Joe mcnally from shutter click all the way through to final delivery or do you have a team you hand it off to that kind of understands the kind of look that you want and are tuned in and they can pull that out? How does that work after the shutter click? Well, for many years, I had my crew chief Michael calley just left right before the pandemic. I fell in love, got engaged in the married downs, wonderful. He lives down in Virginia. And so then the pandemic hit, so I am in hired a new crew chief for a new first assistant. But Callie was very good. At retouching. And so I relied on him for that. But the beauty small silver lining. Let's call it that of the pandemic was time at home where I really learned a lot about capture one. And I feel very comfortable with that program. So now, like the book that you showed there, the real deal, I did a lot of the retouching on those pictures myself. Which is a new found for me because I had never really paid too much attention to retouching and Photoshop for me was always the deep end of the pool. If we are doing fashion where we need an elevated skill set, then yes, I farm that out professionally. And we use someone who really knows what they are doing and we can do skin work, which is absolutely beyond my skill set. Okay. Does that make sense? Capture one. And we use, I mean, we use solstice retouching. Just amazing, very talented, very talented. I know these folks, yeah. And great relationship. And yeah, really tuned in to we have a lot of discussion, but yeah, like, you know, that fine detail work on skin, fashion that that's an art form unto itself. And I don't approach. Yeah, you remember back in the day day, imagine doing skin work without capture wonder Photoshop. That I can't imagine how those magicians made that work happened back then because that was something else. Something else. So let's wrap up with what's next for John mcnally. What's the next trip? What's the next project? Where are you taking the Z 9 next on the planet? Well, I got a big job in March that were assembling right now and the bits and pieces are coming together. Production wise. And hopefully, you know, I have a zoom this week with an ad agency for a fairly sizable pharma shoot. TBD, we'll see what happens. But in terms of excursions and knowing where I'm going next, wine country. That's my neighborhood. Yeah, Napa. Yeah, going out to Napa and April May ish time. And I have two weeks out there. First week of those workshops are full, but the second week has a few openings. So come on out. We're going to do some lighting. We're going to do some landscape work. And we will have a wonderful time. Because I just came out of the out of the Amazon rainforest. I was in Ecuador for the last two weeks. And it was beautiful. It was wonderful, fantastic group of people, fantastic trip. But wine country will be, let's call it a little more accessible. If you were animals out there too, I'm thinking you're going. So a lot of great learning and we got that it's on our website listed on our website. Okay, excellent. All right, John mcnally, I'll leave it right there. Thank you for doing this. Thanks for coming on and congratulations on the real deal available at fine bookstores everywhere. Amazon included, I'm sure. Yeah, I can't wait for the next one. Is real deal two in progress already, or is that on the whiteboard? No. We're standing down on the right in front for a little bit. Yeah. I hear you. It takes a lot out of it. Up and running. And initial reports are people are enjoying it. So I'm happy for that. Okay. All right. Jim mcnally, thank you so much. Nikon ambassador, extraordinaire, the real deal this weekend photo. Thanks, sir. Thanks for coming on. Thank you, Frederick. Honored to be invited. This is twin. This episode was sponsored by MPB, the world's largest online platform for used photo and video kit. Visit MPB dot com..

holy Trinity of lenses Jill mcnally Frederick van Jones Michael calley Joe mcnally John mcnally Callie Napa Virginia Amazon Ecuador Jim mcnally Nikon Frederick MPB
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Photographic heart should be preserved at all costs. Your enthusiasm, your love for this. And you can't let maybe naysayers or lack of attendance kind of destroy that. You know, I also think about self projects and you may know Julianne cost from Adobe. Julie Julianne and I had a conversation a while back about the importance of self projects in the signing yourself self projects. Not only for portfolio building, but also as an exercise to get better as an artist. Do you subscribe to that as well? And do you are you giving yourself self projects from time to time? If so, what kind? Yes, I mean, what I'm thankfully, hopefully can do is I decide on a quote unquote a project. And I write proposals. And I try to monetize the idea and get some backing for it. So that I can more fully, because I think kind of ambitiously, I guess you could say, you know, when I'm thinking of dreaming up ideas and I can't self fund everything I do, occasionally I do. Occasionally, I'm just saying, heck with it, I'm going to go do this, whether anybody wants to pay me for it or not. And there are threads that you can establish that you can revisit over time. Or a really powerful thing is to do is to incorporate your interests into an ongoing funded project. I used to do that with geographic. I had a story for geographic ones on human performance. It was their millennial celebration of the human body that coincided with the Australia Olympics down in Sydney. And I photographed athletes and Olympians, et cetera. But I also was able to, because my editor gave me the leeway, I was able to incorporate other sort of whimsical ideas into the idea of performance. Dance, for instance, I feel is a very elevated state of human performance. So I did a dance photograph that was not assigned to me. But geographic funded it, and they loved it. And they published it. I did, I wanted to illustrate strength and bodybuilding. And I thought, well, coiled strength. How could I illustrate coiled strength? So I rented, you can do this in Los Angeles. I rented two 18 foot Burmese pythons. And I got the number three bodybuilder in the world at the time, Chris Cormier, to come into the studio. And we shot it in the studio with this giant snake wrapped around him. When she was sort of dubious about, but he did it. And geographic ran that as well. Total surprise, I didn't even tell my editor I was shooting. You know, so I think if that's maybe nirvana is if you can find a genre of work that brings you places that you're put potentially passionate about. Spend a couple of do a workshop or something. And then spend a couple extra days. And really direct yourself into something that you really want to do. There's all sorts of ways of doing it, but bottom line is yes. You have to feed your eye. And that requires sometimes you just stepping up and driving your own project and funding it yourself. I love that. I was trying to write that down before you finish feed your eye. I'm going to use that. You know, I'll wrap up with this. I know a lot of photographers, photographers, I think part of the DNA structure is talking about gear. And what are you shooting with? What lens did you use to shoot that with? What app did you use the process that where you posting it, all those sorts of things. I'm not so much curious about that. I'm more curious about your approach to going out on an assignment. And is it, you know, slot one, which is Joe has his current 22 loadout of gear, a bag, maybe a backup version, identical of that bag, but you have a bag of stuff that you take with you. And with that bag and what's in that bag, you can accomplish a Joe mcnally level of work, or is it more a team style where you know you're going out on a mission and you go into your sort of matrix room of weapons and you pick the right things for that particular assignment and when you come back, you put them back on the shelf and go, what does it look like in Joe mcnally world? Frederick, I think you and I are in the same boat. We've both seen way too many movies. Totally. You know, I get jobs that are big and small. All over the lot. You showed a few images of the Z 9 camera, the marketing campaign out on el mirage. And that's a big job. Lots of gear, lots of rental gear, winnebagoes, crew of maybe a dozen, or so talent, hair and makeup styling, you name it. That's out on that's at that level. But I don't work at that level all the time. You know, I did a thing for a camera store recently where I did a series of images and I called it a walk with one light. Because I wanted to drive home the point that you don't need a lot of gear. And so I just took a subject and interesting subject, and we walked around New York City with one light. And it was fun. So I think what you have to do is tailor your pack to the job at hand. My basics are always that I have at least two cameras, sometimes more, the holy Trinity of lenses, 14, 24, 24, 70, 70, 200. That covers a lot of the basis..

Julie Julianne Chris Cormier Julianne Adobe Joe mcnally Olympics Sydney nirvana Australia Los Angeles Joe el mirage Frederick New York City
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:27 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Career that has emotional resonance and a power to it. Shooting one picture nowadays that's good anybody can do it. Literally anybody can do it. The technology is right there. But shooting year after year in producing a sea worthy collection of pictures, editorially powerful, things that people notice, things that people pay attention to and telling good stories year after year after year is a long, tough slog. And you have to get ready for that. Yeah, yeah. You scare me, Joe. I'm going to put my camera down. What's this work stuff you're talking about? Nobody's still there with working. This is press the shutter and be done with it, right? Yeah. No, but it's joyous. It's joyous. Joyful versions of Sisyphus. We will never get The Rock to the top of the hill. But there's real joy in trying. Especially that one picture, you know, that you might, you might shoot thousands of frames over the course of two or three weeks or whatever. I'm just speculating. And you just get down on yourself, like none of this stuff is any good, but then you can turn a corner, literally. And there's good light and maybe there's some kids playing soccer or something in the street. And you just kind of put your camera to your eye, and it's absolutely magic. And you can grab those pictures almost like their talismans. They're like, you know, it's like, oh yeah, I can really do this. And that becomes the wind in your sails. For many moons thereafter. Yeah. You know, one thing that comes up a lot on this, we can photo is the idea or the question of specialization and should you specialize as a photographer? Should you pick a genre and stick to it or should you should light be your genre? In other words, yeah, I can light falls on the Olympics. I can be an Olympic photographer, light falls on dance. I could be a dance photographer, like falls on product that could be a product photographer. I understand F stop shutter speed and ISO and composition. Therefore, I can apply that to a variety of subjects. That's one mindset. The other mindset is, do one thing be known as being the best at that one thing, burn a hole in it, like a magnifying glass on a leaf, and you will be successful. Where do you fall on that? Should photographers specialize or should they generalize? Hard questions, Joe, hard questions. You didn't tell me about this going in here. And be like, pinned like a butterfly to the wall. Man, come on. I'm The Oprah of photography. Come on. And this sounds like a Dodge. It's not really everybody's path is unique. I'm a generalist. I remain resolutely a generalist because I really don't have any other choice at this point. So that is, you know, I do what I do. And I've always been interested in the kind of global offerings, you know? Like, oh yeah. I'll go to C, you know? And with a ship and that would be cool. And then I'll climb this building or then I'll shoot this portrait. And then I'll do some studio work. So I've been managed to put together this kind of patchwork quilt of a career. It's not been a steady, straight line at all. But nowadays are different. I used to advocate for young photographers, the very first thing you should do is go get a job on a newspaper. Become a staff photographer at a newspaper because you'll go through hell and you'll get thrown lots of jobs that stink and you'll have to innovate your way through. It really gets your grounding going. Your pins are under you. You know, as a newspaper shooter, it's a great learning tool. That's not available in the level that used to be. So now I think identifying a certain interest in going after that interest is perhaps more the way to go. Because if you jump into weddings, for instance. And say, well, I'll do a few weddings a year. You're up in the wedding market against people who are doing lots of weddings a year. Who are passionate about it and very, very good at it. So being a part time approach to something where someone else, your competition is driving that train like crazy, 7 days a week, you're probably not going to be successful. So I think you have to choose at this point in this marketplace. I think you have to choose a direction and really, really apply yourself to becoming as best as you can be in that particular genre. Yeah. Yeah, and that goes to the next thing would be the importance of social and letting that drive your work and drive things. In other words, we've had these commercials or these conversations on this, we can photo where some photographers will say, the work that they produce is directly related to the response that they get on Instagram or wherever they're posting. So you're kind of shooting for the thumbs up or shooting for the likes because if I feed the koi pond, this kind of bread and they go crazy, but not so much when I feed them this kind of bread, I'm gonna feed them more of that and that drives the work. Should that, I mean, it's valid, right? Because if you have a gallery show and no one shows up, then that's one thing, but if you do a gallery show of a different kind of work and everyone shows up, obviously you should do more of that kind of work. What do you think? As an artist, you know, taking all commercial and money out of it. But as an artist, how should photographers kind of guide themselves, should they be influenced by social and public opinion or should it be just be, you know what? This is my singular vision. I am an artist and I feel like I need to do a photo story on X and that's what I'm going to do. What do you think? I think your best pictures will result from you following your nose and your heart. Is that old damn torpedoes, full speed ahead kind of thing, you know? And I think if you craft your I mean, everybody plays the social game, I think it's a necessary thing. And you might be out there on social media as being a presence that is encouraging or offering up a variety of different work. And you have to accept the vagaries of that that some people will like it, and some people will not. I think the bottom line is do good work, present good work. If at the end of the day, you can feel good about what you achieved and what you posted and what you shot, then that's a good day. Jay maisel always used to tell me. He would do a corporate job for lots and lots of money. And then he would come back to the bank where he lived down on the bowery for many years, and he'd go up to his roof and just shoot sunsets just to feel clean. You know, so I think your..

Joe Olympics soccer Olympic Instagram Jay maisel
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

09:17 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Two or three weeks before I would get word from my editor that everything looked good or something like that. Now that instantaneous access to amazing technology, I think has bolstered the confidence of photographers everywhere. Yeah, do we not as photographers do we not know what we're missing? You mentioned with the D 8 50, right? That was it. You know, I remember back in the day, it was that after it was, oh, I have my first pro level camera was a Nikon F three. You remember those? With the screw on battery grit or the motor drive and all that on there. Yeah, so and I thought that camera was, how could it get better than this? It's amazing. Look at all this stuff that this camera can do. And now we have the Z 9. What's next? What are we missing? Seeing into the future or being able to capture dark matter. What are we missing in these cameras, you know? I mean, obviously focusing speeds can get better and all that. But are there any features that you just wish you had that aren't there in the Z 9? You know, I have to say to people might look at this with a scans or maybe you say, oh, you know, he's just blowing smoke. I'm not really. I'm a bit of a simpleton when it comes to cameras. There is a very famous British war photographer named Donald McCullough, a member of Magnum, and I've always admired his work. He said one of the best things ever about cameras. He said, I only use a camera like I use a toothbrush. It gets the job done. And now the Z 9 is a hell of a toothbrush. But every iteration of the technology I say to myself, how much better is this going to get? And sure, there's little refinements that you could maybe add to the present packages that we have, but I don't choose to dwell on that. There's a lot of. Crying and well not crying. What's the right word to say, just like debate and pixel peeping, complaining. You name it. And that's fine. You know, people get involved in the technology. And the shape of the pixel does not matter to me. The end results or the ultimate mission of photography is to tell a good story. And no matter how much technology we have, that's still a very hard mission. And that's what I choose to focus on. And so the Z 9 has a roster of things that I'm still just getting used to. That are enabling me to hopefully press forward and tell good stories. So I got no complaints. I really got no complaints. So the flip side of that is, since you have that Z 9, what are some of the favorite things or some of the more surprising things that are present in that body that you weren't expecting, the ergonomics is that the menu? The focusing, tracking, what are some things in there that Joe mcnally or someone operating at your level was surprised by? Sure. You mentioned ergonomics. I mean, I shot the Tokyo games. I shot them all on D 6, which is flagship DSLR. And I've always liked a robust camera in my hands, especially when I'm using long glass. The Z 6 is Z 7 series of cameras are wonderful cameras. Amazing technology in a small form factor. But you pop that onto the back of a 600. There's not a lot to hang on to. So I was really happy that the Z 9 is kind of this marriage really of DSLR flagship build with mirrorless technology. There's a lot to handle with this camera. It gives you leverage. It gives you feel very connected to it and the way it's designed. The other thing is I mean, apart from the autofocus, the autofocus is astonishing. The eye detect is remarkable. All those things that you've heard about on the airwaves about photography of late. But to me, a real revelation was never losing sight of my subject. The mechanical shutter is gone. And so no matter how you are exposing your banging along at 20 frames a second, which is another unheard of number, as far as I'm concerned. And you never use lose sight of your subject. It's amazing. And I find that to be valuable, not only out there in the field, but even in the studio because you're able to see those nuances, those split seconds in between the moments, you know? And your subjects are right there with you all the time. And I thought, that was the first time I had ever experienced that in all these years of shooting. And that was kind of seems like a small thing, but it's a revelation to me. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, there's so many little bits. I mentioned to you before we started recording. I recently picked up the Nikon Z 6 two, which I'm in that sort of honeymoon period with an understanding the camera, being kind of diving into it and understanding what its limitations are and capabilities. It's just a magical. The system is just magical when it comes to still photography. I can't say enough about it. And that 24 to 70 F two 8 is what I have mounted on it. So very excited about that. You know, when you dive in, or in other words, let me rephrase that. So if I'm an Emma photographer I'm coming to you. And I've read the book. I've been following Joe mcnally. I've been on the website Joe mcnally dot com. And I want to do work similar to what you're doing or operate at your level. And I'm new. I'm just getting into this. How would you instruct me? As a mentor, would you say go get X camera, take these courses at this website, go take a trip and do a workshop, what are the steps to go from? I'm really interested in photography. I want to get better in a Jill mcnally direction. How would I go about doing that? Except the fact, first of all, first off, that it's a long road. And patience is required. And then identify what really motivates you. Are you motivated by the human face? Are you motivated by sports? Are you motivated by documenting the joys of families and weddings? Where are your interests? The other thing that I have always advocated and has been powerful for me is to do a lot of reading and dive into the history of this field and look at a lot of pictures that have gone before. I have very large library of photo books at home. And I find them an ongoing source of inferred inspiration. And so I look at some of those truly amazing photographers and the work that they did in the years that I've gone by. And that has formed a base for me of kind of what motivates me visually. Where do I want to go in this realm? Because, you know, your by and large, talking about a freelance industry. So I always liken my Joe mcnally photography that this old jalopy, you know, it doesn't go very fast, but I can drive it wherever I want. That's a beautiful thing. And if I want to pursue dance photography, if I want to pursue special effects, if I want to pursue sports, I can collect myself and drive in that direction. So starting small, being patient. And the 10,000 hours rule is very, very real here. The more you do this, the better you will get. And education is not to be underestimated. There's educational alternatives all over the place, apart from going to a university or a long and expensive program. There are options for education. The kelby group, for instance, has lots of information there will present it. There are photographers who run consistent sort of lessons, you know, Dave black has his workshops at the ranch. He has an archive. David Harvey at strobes, if you're interested in flash, I think still has his archive of I think it's called boot camp, you know, flash boot camp. So the basics are important. I firmly believe that. The automated cameras will just run you into the ground. So you have to be careful of that because you take it out of the box and wow, I'm making pictures. I got this thing on P and I'm pointing at things and everything looks pretty good. Okay, let's calm down. You got to know basics. You got to have a firm foundation. If you want to take this and build it into a real satisfying.

Joe mcnally Donald McCullough Nikon Jill mcnally Tokyo Emma kelby group Dave black David Harvey
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:36 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"I mean a clip of that. You gotta guess. You know, I think that for me, you know, and you can extrapolate this in any way you want. When I first really seriously picked up a camera, I knew immediately. It felt comfortable in my hands, and I thought to myself, I don't know, without even really knowing the first thing about it, I thought to myself, I can do this. And I don't know how I felt that. But it was intuitive and it felt natural. The camera just felt natural in my hands. And there's also the other kind of underlying thing is that instantly or in my first classes, photographically, I realized, wow, this could keep me out of an office. Because I'm no good in her office. I'm just not an office person, you know? I drift. I'm like a balloon. My wife is constantly reeling me back in. And. Can you learn to be passionate about something? Yes, I think you can. I think it stems from life experience and its stems from many situations I've met with people who have taken workshops with me or something is that they've they want to turn on another side of their brain. And once that is turned on via the making of pictures, then they're full bore. They can't shut that back down. So yeah, I think once you're bitten by the bug, there's no turning back. And then once you're bitten by that bug, right? And then that's just the beginning, right? So how do you, how do you get to the point where you're creating the level of work, I mean, obviously you got to get your shutter finger kind of exercise and take lots of shots and understand what you're doing. But the concept of the photos, let's take a commercial out of it, right? So it's not a client that says, hey Joe, we need a shot of this car on the salt flats, doing this. That's out of it. If you're just Joe mcnally and you're on, you just want to go do some shots because you're feeling that burning desire. Where does that come from? Does Joe have a list of like, okay, when I have some time, I'm going to do this shot. And when I have more time, I'm going to do this shot. Or is it more serendipitous? You're watching a movie and you're like, hey, that would make a great shot. I'm going to execute that. Where do the ideas come from that aren't driven by commercial? Yeah, again, good line of inquiry, really, because everybody's process is different. Mine is not a particularly organized process at all. Now I don't have check marks and a book or anything like that. I ruminate. I imagine. The phrase, what if what if we put a camera on this? Or what if I was able to get over there or so you start with the imaginative process, the kind of wild ass thought, you know? And then say, wow, maybe I could make a picture of that. The frontispiece to the book, it's just a blank page with two settings on it. Two sentences on it. In bold type and it says, I imagine the life, and then I took pictures of it. So I have a pretty active imagination. I read a lot of comic books when I was a kid. I went to 5 different grammar schools, which is actually good preparation to become a photographer because you're always the new kid. And I read epics and adventures and fantasies and stories and comic books and I know that influenced my color palette. My camera point of view, you know, heroic poses and action and strong vivid color. You know, sometimes I wish I could quiet it down, but it just never happened. I just chew on ideas and sometimes things come from, as you say, you know, I mentioned comic books, but also movies. I remember I saw water for elephants when Reese Witherspoon laid down on an elephant in the movie, I believe it was. And I went to Lynn my amazingly patient studio manager who's been with me for 30 years and she's a marvelous producer. She's actually working on two large projects for us now, which will shoot in March. Assembling the bits and pieces. And I went to her and I said, I just made a screen grab of it, and I said, this feel. You see the feel, the light, and the next thing you know, we were in Florida, and thankfully we had a big budget job. And we built a circus tent and old time circus tent. Wow. And that's where that came from was a split second. And sometimes on location too, you can be walking with the usual scout, and something just glimmers in your eye. Like, oh, and you can't, you know, your head gets pulled for a second. And it's like, that's where we're starting right over there. Are you the photographer that always has a camera with you no matter what? You're out to dinner. There's a photographer camera sitting on the chair next to you. No, no. I take it with me frequently, but not all the time. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, you know, it's interesting. We talked a little bit about sort of in the early days of, I think we weren't recording. We were talking about the old SB 24 speed lights and I remember distinctly, I remember, I don't know if you remember this, but there was, I think it was a video or a photo series of you lighting a jet or something with a bunch of speed lights. And yeah, it was a video because I remember that was the first time I heard you use the term voice activated light stand. So bringing it to 2022, where we are now. That was back in the teens, right? We're in 2022 now. How has that stuff changed? How has your approach to lighting and light changed with the evolution of artificial lighting solutions like the SB series and whatever else we have available to us today? Yeah, the progress has been astonishing. The technology we have available to us now is photographers is off the charts. And we live in this golden age. I mean, Nikon just came out with the Z 9, you know, I had to I had D 8 50s. I still have them, I thought, well, this is it. This is the best camera I'm ever going to use. And then the Z 9 comes out. That's a better camera. More rounded technologically more tuned up. You know, I don't even know the exact words to express it. But we have these cameras now that we can single handedly express our imaginations in ways that we simply could not have done back in the days of F twos and F threes or certainly would have taken a lot of work and a lot of guesswork. That's the thing that impresses me about the technology. You just mentioned the SP 24. That was an era of TTL flash technology. That was very uncertain. And now we have the SB 5000. And we have the pro photos, the a tens, the B ten plus X's, and all this TTL, fast recycle, radio controlled stuff. So the certainty of approach is so much higher now. The confidence that you can go out into the field with that you will wrestle this thing to the ground because you've got these technology tools that are at your service. That's pretty amazing. I mean, shooting film, 36 exposure film, you know? Wrap that cassette up and with kodachrome and National Geographic..

Joe mcnally Joe Reese Witherspoon Lynn Florida Nikon
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Another episode of this week in photo I'm your host Frederick Van Johnson, today, you know, I say this all the time, but today I really made it. You know, I get to sit down with a photographer who has influenced legions of photographers out there with his work with his work ethic with his story. The lighting just knowledge of photography goes on and on and on. Joe mcnally is one of those photographers. I was telling Joe in our little quote green room. He's one of those photographers where you mention his name amongst other photographers and an eerie hush falls on the crowd, like Darth Vader entered the room, and there's a force there that shall not be challenged. Joe mcnally, you know, the title of his book that we're gonna talk about is the real deal, but Joe mcnally is literally the real deal when it comes to photography, photojournalism, commercial photography, all this stuff. Joe, it is an absolute pleasure to have you on the show, man. How the heck are you doing? I can do it fine, Frederick. Thank you very much for the many kind words there. Should I start breathing like Darth Vader? We should. You should Frederick. I am your father. Yeah, there you go. The force is strong with you. Thank you. It is. It is. This is great. This is good. So like I said in the beginning, we're going to be talking about this a little bit. This is your book. It's out now. It's called the real deal. Subtitled field notes from the life of a working photographer, Joe mcnally. Who's this book for, Joe? Is this book for the average photographer that wants to get better at photography? Is it a glimpse into your life and the trials and tribulations of some of the stories that you've that happened behind the scenes as a photographer? What's the book about? Yeah, it's a good question. My editor and I actually struggled with it. When I was writing and we were discussing it, it's like, well, okay, what is this book exactly? Because so many photo books are like straight line narratives to a destination, like, okay, how to pose better, how to do something better. This book is not that. It's not a superhighway of direct information. I liken it more to a country road. It takes an anvil. Or a ramble, I guess you should say. And a meander could also be applied. Through the life of a working photographer, and there's a lot of information for photographers of all different genres and stages of their life, be they professional or amateur. It's honest. And it talks about the ups, the downs, the failures, the successes, the strategies, et cetera, and the material is generally speaking, presented anecdotally. In other words, couched in the story of a location shot or the story of a failure or the story of some shoot that was going off the rails and then you pulled it back on. Lots of lessons photographically, not only about the technique of photography, but the life of photography. Yeah, and we were talking about that a little bit as well. Just on the life side of photography over the years, being a good photographer and going after the shots and going to the shot, skating to where the puck is going to be. That takes a toll, right? I mean, it's not being a photographer, especially when operating at your level, it's not an easy gig. Can you talk about that a little bit? What kind of wear and tear gets put on you as a photographer constantly going out there and being on the road and getting these great shots and all that pressure? There's a lot of pressure associated across the board. Pressure from the client, you know, to pressure to do well. Obviously, financial pressure, you know, that your next gig is never completely certain. And then there's the physicality of being a photographer going location location, airplane after airplane, gear, hauling, moving, climbing. All of that sort of stuff is perhaps not talked about all that much. But it's a very real presence. Photography is this thing. It's an art and a craft, right? And it winds itself around your life and very powerful and hopefully positive ways. You know, there's lots of folks out there like, well, I do this during the week, but on the weekend, you know, I go out and I do motocross or I sail a boat or something like that. You know, that's how I get my Yaya's out. I think for many photographers, most I would imagine, it's this is it, you know, 7 days a week, you know, we've photographed to work. We photographed a relax. And I always, you know, I've shot dance photography for a long time, you know, in the background of other things I've done. And I always remember those famous quote from George Balanchine, the legendary choreographer. He always said, I don't want dancers. I don't need dancers who want to dance. I want dancers who need to dance. And I think for photographers, we need to photograph whether we're in repose or working hard, you know? We run when others walk, you know, we're working on weekends when others have time off. And we love doing it because it's a very, very passionate endeavor. You think that's a learn trait? Is it learned? Can you learn to have that fire in the desire to have that pull to go out and create photos? Or if you don't have it, you just don't have it and you should find something else to do. Wow, that's a. Frederick, you're good. You're good. What I do, jokes, what I do. It's like I'm going to quote De Niro and what is it analyze this? You, my friend, you got a gift. You've got this. You.

Joe mcnally Frederick Van Johnson Darth Vader Joe Frederick Yaya George Balanchine De Niro
"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

09:03 min | 8 months ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Genuinely care about making accessible to creatives on all sorts of levels and across three, really amazing markets. That's perfect. That's perfect. Okay, so just to get this straight because, you know, I have to ask a selfish question because it's all about me, right? Of course. Of course. So if hypothetically, if I'm someone who has a bunch of gear that I've accumulated over the years and a lot of it sit in drawers, limbs is that I haven't shot with in years and camera bodies that mock me because they're depreciating every time I look at them, should correct me if this is the right perspective to be looking at MPV. I look at MTB as kind of they end the idea of the one way street with your gear. In other words, it used to be by gear and UK, I got that forever and maybe I'll give it to my kid or my nephew or somebody down the line, but this is an investment that I'm going to own for a long time and suffer the depreciation because it's going to be with me for the long haul. I look at MTB as the breaking that shattering that myth. And now it doesn't have to be like, okay, that gear is going to sit in a drawer. I can now harvest that gear and kind of melt it down into cash and get something that's more current or that's more fitting with my current tangent of photography. Is that an accurate way to look at the company? That is an extremely accurate way to look at the company. Gone are the days of feeling like you are stuck with, you know, your tit forever. Not only can you send it all in to get cash, you can also send it all in to get something that we might have in stock that, you know, you might want to add to your kit where the kit that you're not getting rid of, you know, I think one of the biggest struggles for a lot of artists is finding kit affordable being able to have different lenses and other accessories that you're disposal. And I think he has made it extremely more accessible than it's been in the past. It's someone who started photography in the early 2000s, you know, getting a new lens was like a really, really big deal because of the limited options you had to buy things second hand and just weren't that many options. So everything came brand new out of a box. But actually like those days of really, really numbered. Yeah, yeah, no. No, absolutely. And with, it seems like the company is there at the right time because you look at the glitzy and polished marketing for every new camera that comes out. It seems like a new one's coming out every month or every other month. The new lenses and new everything. There's all this stuff. And I can see from a beginner's perspective, it could be it's confusing. And what I've seen on this week in photo interviewing photographers and talking to photography enthusiasts is the flow tends to be okay. I'm into photography what's my genre? Okay, I like landscape photography. Let me find landscape photography tutorials or people that I admire on YouTube or something. And then buy what they got, right? Instead of, you know, it's the path of affinity versus research. It's like, okay, I like that. And Joe mcnally shoots an icon. I'm going to shoot an icon and I'm going to get the lenses and the strobes that Joe shoots with. But then the next step is how to get all that stuff. So to switch gears a little bit into and I don't want to make this all about MPV, but generally, I have questions because I have a box of gear that I'm about to send here. So what does that flow look like? Now I'm sold, I think two camera bodies, or I've sent two camera bodies into MPV. And I was really impressed with the experience. It was seamless. It was easy. The money showed up in my account. And I was like, oh, we crap. But what is it behind the scenes? What does it look like? Once I go ahead and I drop that box off at FedEx. And you guys get that box. What's happening? In my head, I see a white room with people in white bunny suits with white gloves, carefully opening my box with a super sharp knife and get opening it up and taking out the precious cargo and then looking at it with a microscope and all that. Is that kind of what happens or is it a little less dramatic than that? It's a little less dramatic, however, the individuals that are responsible for ensuring that everything that enters and exits the building is in perfectly good working order and that we're making sure that customers are getting things that are completely intact and accurate to the description that are on our website. All of our for the most part, all of our staffs are creative. So that is the kind of the additional sort of thing that makes MPV so unique is that everyone there is a creative and in their own capacity. So they're extremely passionate about making sure that other people who are buying things from us are likely other creatives. So that just makes the job all that more fulfilling. So what usually happens is every day we get in, you know, tons of equipment, the process usually looks like the items end up on a desk, essentially. It's carefully inspected through a chain of sort of like processes that we have in place just to ensure that each item, the quality control is, you know, up to par. And then these items make their way into our lovely warehouse and then and then, you know, they end up on the doorsteps of everyone else. The next person, yeah. Exactly. Exactly. But yeah, the process is ultimately pretty seamless and that's what allows us to have such a quick turnaround with processing all of the different equipment that comes into the warehouse. And same thing goes for the video equipment to not just photo our video checking process is slightly more detailed just because video equipment tends to be on the much higher inside of things. But we do have a dedicated video specialist that is evaluating all of the cinematography here that comes into the warehouse. So we are very meticulous and the thing is the very unique part of it all is that the individual that is the video specialist is a videographer. So that just makes everything just flow in a much more organic way. And we can actually speak to the quality that comes out of our warehouse. What's in that warehouse? Is it just is it still cameras and cameras? Or do we have cameras, drones, 360 cameras, lighting, all that stuff? Or are you strictly cameras cameras? No, we have it all. We have everything from video equipment to cameras. You know, just still photography cameras and video. We have drones. We have already kicked a red cameras 360 cameras go pros, you know, lighting pro photo lighting. Oh, wow. Yeah, okay. Okay. I feel like we cover most of the bases when it comes to what creative need and what they're looking for. Love it. Love it. Okay, so let's switch gears. Let's talk about some of the more popular things that you've seen come through that warehouse and let's look at it through the several different lenses. The first Liz will be the portrait photographer. So obviously, maybe not obviously, but there's no one right lens for portrait photography, but is there a popular lens for portrait photography that you've seen kind of coming through over your desk? Oh, yeah. It's so hard to narrow down to one, but I feel like the just the number one that just never seems to fail is the 85 millimeter easily. Just because the depth of field you get the ability to just really frame your portraiture in your subject,.

Joe mcnally UK FedEx YouTube Joe Liz
"joe mcnally" Discussed on Posts – Imagely

Posts – Imagely

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on Posts – Imagely

"He made a comment about expanding his skill set. And i almost fell off my chair. Because when you think about skill sets and joe mcnally i mean what is there left for. The joe needs to learn and they made a comment that he was gonna use the downtime to finally learn final cut pro. And that's there's another example. There's another shift. This is a good time for people. Just because you're hunkered down doesn't mean you have to hunker down on your business and doing things to build your skill set and this is the perfect time right now to be able to take this down. 'cause we never get it. We don't get downtime during during whatever we consider normal almost forgotten after eight months. Now of the pandemic I've think i've forgotten what a normal day is like when you just have the freedom to get your car and run to cvs or ace hardware and think about anything. I mean in the wedding industry. They had their their their quote unquote downtime in a regular season. But they're still working. they're they're. they're planning their marketing. they're they're. they're doing everything they need to. They're doing the game sessions. They're doing everything they need to for the to build up their weddings but they're still working typically You know where we're now. A lot of wedding photographers do that time. Where hey you learn final cut. Pro you get really good at it. You can then start offering video to your wedding still business rate so There's there's definitely a lot of opportunity there While i'm glad you're still up weddings. Because there's a photographer. You and i were talking about it just before we get started here. Jp alario is over near albany and his business and his dad's business joe and j. p. father. Son wedding photographers. There phenomenal photographers. Although there's nothing they can't shoot but j. p. started doing facetime portrait's and the six o'clock new six o'clock news in albany picked it up In fact i don't mean this assad infomercial but if you go to skip calling university dot com and you just type in j p alario la rico. You'll go to a blog post. I did where..

joe mcnally albany Jp alario assad j. p.
"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Joe McNally whose some of you may recall as big lefty said no because I don't think Clinton is an idiot in other words his point would be that this is an unbelievably idiotic thing to DO to have it in the oval office of the White House a young intern perform a sex act I'd you not at we had already done this a Clinton it already got his finger wagging thing you know what he's pointing his camera devoured your load those I added items like that woman miss Lewinsky the whole thing not to offer they take a job right now it is probably a lot of other people who are liberal believes collected when you put out that denial but when you're generally supportive of someone or let's take it to your personal life if you know the person and like them you're generally resistant to the notion that you're being lied to I want you all just to think of like a friend of yours it's fairly close friend and the some of the comes up or something another gasket well did you do this no I didn't do it the look in the Addison do it and it comes up they lied to you a lot of times people are likely to believe it the first time around I think of the whole Aaron Rodgers Ryan Braun thing and why Aaron Rodgers dumped Ryan Braun and wouldn't it I don't know the spoken to a gad probably yes right brought if he was using steroids and Brian said no that was in use the wood is appeal it I don't think you're a Rogers is appalled at Ryan Braun was using steroids I think he's appalled that you lied to but you're likely to believe the thing the first time around if the person is a friend to be unless you know the person to be always there and a liar and a con artist and he just put up with it anyway you're likelier to believe something if you like the person in the first place SO Menomonee falls the people want to change the nickname may be likely to believe that this is actually an open process because they support what the goal is but the more interesting group to me is this at school board up there a bunch of different members at all if you get a like to the school board you generally have to be somebody that knows a lot of people in the community of somewhat there are people on that school board who know people in the community who oppose the nickname change but there's still a friend they know that you know if that's this take faith Vander or is the head of the school board.

Joe McNally Clinton White House intern Lewinsky Addison Aaron Rodgers Ryan Braun Brian Rogers Vander
"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"News talk eleven thirty WYSIWYG late afternoon John to go back to a point that I made a little bit earlier about do people know when they're being played for suckers by government officials and the answer is I say people that's a broad term and the answer obviously is some do and some doubt using Menomonee falls is an example of the people of Menomonee falls no the school board and superintendent of playing up for suckers on this nickname cage and I'm sure the answer is some do and some doubt the question is how many do what how many don't do the vast majority know what they see is or is it only a tiny majority that is figured it out there is always resistance to what especially if you know the person that is lying to you I go back to I was gonna say I'm not going to betray the person's name but I'm going to cook because it wasn't a secret ease he said it publicly in fact he said it on my television show so it's not like this is a betrayal of confidence he said of the thing way way way way way way way way way way way back but Bill Clinton right after the Monica Lewinsky thing broke when I had this I had my TV show billing company this would have been back in the nineties obviously Joe McNally was one of the panelists is on the show that weekend I did one of my questions that every palaces but do you think Clinton did this right this is right after the story broke this is long before impeachment already this this is like within the first three four five days of this story and.

John Bill Clinton Joe McNally Menomonee falls superintendent Monica Lewinsky three four five days
"joe mcnally" Discussed on X96

X96

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on X96

"What she could be in the eyes for a one year old boy possibly one of the biggest stars this country has today all he wanted was a picture. I have just been. I never kissed anybody like that before. okay. this sounds I remember the logo I think I see the the phone now and I'm like I remember that but I don't remember the movie so was demi Moore getting things mixed up like it that's what happened in the movie and so she thinks it was real well he says he says perhaps this is my fault. one for not for not being very good in bed she thought she was my first. one. I think that's great news copping to that would you not I just wasn't very good this is. really terrible. but but no I love that apparently he said no she does want to apologize for something so they had a little fling for awhile which she didn't take seriously at all and he apparently went to her house one day and the housekeeper said she's out with her boyfriend and all so she kind of broke his heart. Ducky yeah but. she knows me so she's getting all kinds of things wrong but John's taking this well that's not her fault that's my fault for being stupid and Charlie Sheen was last comment on the set I was trying but I was pretty sure he wasn't a virgin I'm pretty sure. but interestingly enough remember who took over for a. Ashton Kutcher yeah took over for Charlie Sheen so Jon Cryer and Ashton Kutcher word in two and a half men together for awhile remote hosts right and Damien I have a chance of demi but I was winning you wonder if they wanna say twelve notes would they would that be weird to work with somebody that they both had slept with. I mean you know they're only you know there are only so many experiences you can have your paths will cross. I wouldn't be weird I know I mean yes or no to work about it. maybe maybe not. always look forward to. it said when she did this thing did she do that thank you. have that because I don't I don't personally I wouldn't want to get that specific I wouldn't get that specific now I mean it's it's nobody's business. you know it's so would be weird. face the same thing is though I I I believe Jon Cryer I do too. because why would you lie about that but I don't believe Ashton Kutcher. I believe that they did have threesomes and that he did think of it as an excuse to cheat on demi Moore why because I don't like Ashton Kutcher. but you like Jon Cryer. one basing it on drunk and I think me look cutis can do better really yes I have no use for either of them she seems very happy yeah yeah but she should be with Seth macfarlane. is he dating anybody he dates people for awhile and then he moves on he D. David Kelly see there for a bit and then moved on you should really settled airline gates himself what now. I think he's even said why would I want to do that. to have a loving relationship with somebody having why don't you want to do that this is I'm having fun what about what's what's her name and the coat hanger who plays his ex wife on the oracle. alternate she was married to the guy who's also on your bill the red headed guy who flies the ship well they were they were married for a just a few months and then and then got divorced just recently. what's her name I forgot the coat hanger that's on the warm feel yeah she's first officer she she was in a GI Joe McNally can't member name and it makes me look now look it up okay we need to know if she's with me as an actress named you'll know who she was she was on agents of shield for a while they were going to give her Adrian Pulaski yeah thank you Bob. thank you. okay so we had some celebrity talk there that should make the cut a consultant happy right yeah because it can't be all the impeachment party all the time. well okay hardly has been. no no no you guys don't don't talk about anything but politics anymore shows the political we talk about whatever based talking about. you turn off the show. reams and reams and reams of. it needs to be better. the consultant right right. louder faster for me of fifty six hundred west itself train crossing between the down fifteen minutes this must be voice to text not making sense straight tried again at three three nine eight six accident northbound to fifteen forty itself the slowing starts at about redwood road in the it is just slowly as it could be worth about my fifteen through draper and sandy I don't see an accident there I think it may be its construction we was just normal morning slower Jever one's going the same place I don't know but I really need extra time coming in to downtown Salt Lake from Utah county snowbirds until.

demi Moore Ashton Kutcher Charlie Sheen Jon Cryer officer Joe McNally Ashton Kutcher. Seth macfarlane. D. David Kelly Jon Cryer. Salt Lake consultant Utah county Ducky Adrian Pulaski Damien draper John Bob. fifteen minutes
"joe mcnally" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:43 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"But if I special investigated Johnny Dollar Do Try Eastern Identity Associates Home Office following an accounting of expenses incurred during my investigation of the Star of Capetown matter expensive item one dollar fifty cab fare for my apartment of the office of Try Eastern Indemnity Associates Joe mcnabb was waiting for Saddam Johnny. Thanks so what about the star Capetown sounds interesting. You're interested. We're worried about ever hear of Andrew Liaoning Forbes the third wars for seems to be seen as picture in the papers a couple of times international playboy type isn't it. That's the one he owns. Star Capetown now inherited the stone after the recent death of his ass johnny like I told you we've got that diamond and shoot for one hundred fifty thousand bucks but Forbes streets it like it was a ten cents store hunk of costume jewelry. What do you mean he carts? That's it from place to place wherever he goes Peres role in the Riviera you name it has been there and so as a star of Capetown. Oh you mean keeps it in hotels. Save stuff like that but that isn't good enough. We want him to put it in permanent custody somewhere see your point but he wants to listen to reason right now. It's particularly bad period for us. How come four seems to be one of his party giving moods? He has them every once in a while about three weeks at a time a big party every night wherever he happens to be then equates down from the two probably arresting up but how how come in Cape Town now who knows who knows what he goes anywhere he does brothers sounds like a real character yeah but what we want you to do is to talk him out of being a character long enough to put that diamond in a safe place to keep an eye on it until he does. We got a plane reservation for you tonight midnight tonight. I just look if it's the money a worried about don't be this means a lot to us. We're willing to pay accordingly so you may not believe this but I wasn't thinking about the money then what those three men who got killed over that diamond you told me about let them over the phone. Oh let the diamonds fifty years old. Those three killings were twenty thirty years ago. Just the same three is always a crowd. I wouldn't like to see an increase by one expense account Adam to three sixty cab fare into my apartment of pack and then to the airport where Joe McNally met me and told me three tired jokes in two minutes in a very subtle attempt to keep my mind off the three dead men as he jumpy story to the plane item three plane fare that Capetown South Africa the plane came in over Cape Town in the early afternoon off one side or the famous devils peak and down below the baited like yeah. It looked like everything was trying to remind me of that diamond as if I forget a stone worthy of one hundred fifty thousand and the lives of three people I don't five fair to.

Cape Town Capetown Andrew Liaoning Forbes Capetown South Africa Johnny Dollar Joe McNally Saddam Johnny Eastern Identity Associates Joe mcnabb devils peak Peres Adam twenty thirty years fifty years three weeks two minutes one dollar
"joe mcnally" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"On the blues. Also Bruins offense Matori crew said this morning, they don't win. They face game seven in our building now outside this building here in Saint Louis Bandmann gathering. Sincerely this morning. The weather is perfect here in Saint Louis. So that now huge crowd in the streets anticipating a wild celebration with the blues win completing their worst to first incredible story. Sink Lewis was dead last, the NHL standings in January. Kenny Albany, Joe McNally coming up with call of tonight's game six right now we go down to the ice back from his. NBC. S N, pre-game TV work. Ryan rinkside reporter sponsored by progressives home insurance. Get your quote at progressive dot com. Brian, what about the atmosphere that you're experiencing tonight here in Saint Louis? I'll tell you what golden mean the outside scene was crazy. These streets are filled with, with fans blues fans in anticipation of this being a Stanley Cup clinching night. The crowd has been, you just feel it during warm up. The building was filled for the warm up session. You don't see that very often. I think the electronic in this building is high right now, in, in hopes that their Saint Louis blues team can wrap it up here tonight, the Bruins trying to stave off elimination all the conversation Bouche about officiating and all that. Most of them we scored one goal in game five. How do they get to the net? Well, they've, they've got to find a way to get to second and third chance opportunities. And whether it's their top line a little bit banged up or is it more? The Saint Louis blues defense doing a great job of defending in front of Jordan Bennington. Whatever it is. They need to find a way to get inside much more than they have their five on five plays in lacking all series long their power play has been silent in the last two games. They've got to find a way to make a difference here tonight at five on five they cannot rely on the power play. They've gotta make a dent early on high suspected, they will come out with a push like they didn't game five. I think it's going to be more about Saint Louis having to weather the storm here early on. I overall the blues setup perfectly trying to win this Cup at home. How much pressure is on them tonight. Not to have to go back to Boston and game seven. I think it's that they do not want to go back to Boston. They realize this is a big opportunity to win it on home ice for their fans. I gotta think that there's gonna be nerves at play early on in this hockey game for the blues how they handle that pressure will be key as to whether or not, they hoist Stanley Cup here tonight motion joy, at ringside we'll get back downstairs to you shortly as we get set for game six of the Stanley Cup final still ahead. We'll hear from Bruins captains today. No charge debrusk of the Bruins chats with Kenny Albert now, have that Rune of the blues in conjunction with NBC sports. You're listening to the Stanley Cup final on Westwood One. Life is lived by moving forward. Seizing the open room, embracing. What's ahead? It's why we created Ford pass everything you need to keep forging ahead in one right in the palm of your hand, only four past combines roadside assistance Ford pass rewards. And now when you buy or lease a new Ford earn points, you could use toward flexible complimentary maintenance for past built to keep you built Ford.

Bruins Saint Louis Saint Louis Bandmann Ford Boston NBC Lewis Kenny Albany Joe McNally Jordan Bennington Ryan rinkside Kenny Albert Westwood One reporter Brian Bouche
"joe mcnally" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

06:21 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"Back in Saint Louis where they're celebrating for the first time in franchise history. The first home Stanley Cup final win for the Saint Louis blues won a game. This was a super game a super effort by the blues and they win game four the final score forty two game five will be Thursday back in Boston. Stanley Cup on what a series. This is shaping up to be is all even now at two games apiece. While the last couple of days, the blues talked about a fast start getting into their game as they put it early on. And starting game four tonight, Saint Louis could not have scripted it, any better for on with the puck shot gets blocked by Nordstrom Broadway. That again carries it to the corner. Swings out to the right point four tranche law. And then across Russia, kicked out by Raph stuff. Forty three. Loosely. He was the first Stanley Cup final game goal in the opening minute of a game since back in two thousand six when Fernando Pasana there's a name for you. Did it for the Edmonton Oilers forty-three seconds in Riley goal sack Sanford in the lineup for Saint Louis inserted during the series, second point for him as many games as this done who was out got hit in the face with a puck in the last series against San Jose back in the lineup tonight gets his first Cup final point and blues opted, a one nothing lead at the blue of the Bruins would come back later on in the first period and respond to tie up the left side for hide it hide to the left circle weights back out to the point for chara, high took a hit jar with a shot stop? Rebound score trolley knocks sit in the escort a goal in free sprayed caves. The Bruins have tied game four at what a piece that goal at thirteen fourteen of the opening day, no chara getting the assist, and we were all even. At one of fees, but it was not tied for long a little more than two minutes later Johann propogate off for high tried the return. The blue start back the other way way up left side Schwartz up the boards for Shan waiting for teammates. Now drops it off to the right side for the transfer weight souped up. Saint louis. Tariff. Echo said the rebound a little shot blues go back on eleventh goal. The postseason for Tarasenko, but Tranquillo in Hsien get the assist that goal coming, just two minutes and sixteen seconds after the coil dole. So we went into the intermission with Saint Louis. Leading Boston two to one now in that second today. No charge up that puck to the face. He left the game was on the bench in the third period, but never played again. So for the second time in the series for a large portion of the game. The Boston Bruins were down five defensemen, in that second some good chances both ways skill to one and Saint Louis really put the pressure on lead to a power play. But the Bruins would end up getting a huge goal from an unlikely penalty killer. Bruins have gone five minutes without a shock. They're short handed here. Marshawn holding up at the live closet across for Berge. Rod. He shoots safe paid out store, shorthanded goal branded Paulo the Bruins tied, the game to do, just simply can't forget about Bergereon upfront on the penalty kill along with Brad marshawn and two veterans. Joe McNally alluded to got the assist Carlos first career playoff goal defense. Minute comes short handed with five forty one to go in the second. So we would go to third and realistically, the blues just had to have thirty four times in Stanley Cup final history, team has been up three games to one thirty three times that team is one, the only exception nineteen forty two Maple Leafs, Saint Louis came out, strong third and midway through the period. Number ninety would strike again. Up the right side for Persia oxygen out, Donaldson has kicked off to a stick required for patrols along back across the right circle of shot say. Second free to. The rebound past two. The blues there. What a play by O'Reilly the portrayal shot. He got the assist was stopped by Rask. The rebound in the air. The hand eye coordination of Ryan Riley, who is just a nominal tonight, getting that goal in the other ships that came with nine twenty two to go in the game, by the way. O'reilly becomes the second blues player in franchise three with a multiple goal game a Cup file red Berenson did it back in nineteen sixty eight against the Canadian so three to Saint Louis. They were really controlling this play throughout that third period. The Bruins finally in the final minutes pulled to grasp the extra skater, but there wasn't much new in the blues state strong in salted away Easter back at their Rask off the expert tackle the Boston atas happy, the flex the puck down. It is played by clipping with a forty five six for the room here comes to center headed. The p. St Louis, four to lead. Kohl without putting. Chan with a goal and an assist the steel the shot and the goal for him. And how about Saint Louis allowing the Bruins just four shots on goal. Third jury when Saint Louis had to have it. They get it they get a couple of goals in the third and win game. Four Stanley Cup final. The final score four to, to pay series has gone. Exactly so far, the way the west final went for the blues loss. Game one one game two loss. Game three at home one game four and then beating San Jose in six. We'll see how this on fold plenty more to come up on our post game show.

Saint Louis Bruins Boston Boston Bruins St Louis San Jose Ryan Riley Nordstrom Edmonton Oilers Brad marshawn Johann propogate Rask Persia Raph stuff Fernando Pasana Russia Tarasenko
"joe mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The and Saint Louis here at enterprise Jenner game three of the Stanley Cup final in the books as the Bruins come back from that game two loss at home, and take it to the blues tonight, seven to the final score. Once again, let's rejoin Kenny, Albert, and Joe McNally, Kenny. Artefacts very much Steve solid all around effort, Joe beginning with the power play four for four four goals on four shots twelve different. Bruins had points in the game tonight. Well, they just they just don't play the blues and and just about every way possible in this game. It started with great defensive play in their own zone. The way they defend with their stick skinny as good as any team in the league and Saint Louis kept on trying to make those passes in the offensive zone when they had their chances and Boston kept defending so they started there. And then they moved up the ice with the rest. They, they looked like a fast again, tonight, which was something that got away from them and game, number two, they were able to carry the puck over the blue line and make plays when the players weren't there. They made the smart place. They got an in deep. They went after it. And they got a couple of four to it deflections at ended up as as goals, but there is no question that Boston in every aspect of this game was the better team. The top line came through as Bruce, Cassidy felt they. Would the got started early with power play goal from Patrice Berge. Ron opened the scoring and did not look back. Bruins lead four nothing five one seven to the final time for the Sherwin Williams player of the game. Well, Boston certainly had plenty of those in to see Patrice Bergeron get things going. That's certainly a positive. But I think you look at Torrey crew gun on defense for for Boston. They're a little short handed because grizzly who got hurt and game number two, it was not in the lineup and to me, Tori crew was the best player on the ice. He handled the puck. Well, he skated out of his own extremely well and, and move the puck. But on the power play he was the man. I mean he did everything on this power play set up a set up goals with his passing. He set up goals with his wrist shots and an added one himself. So for Tory crew he just he did everything for Boston tonight and as deserving of the player of the game I ruin ever with four points at a Stanley Cup.

Bruins Boston Joe McNally Saint Louis Patrice Bergeron Patrice Berge Kenny Steve Jenner Sherwin Williams Ron grizzly Albert Bruce Cassidy Tori
"joe mcnally" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And that term has now stuck the media, which invented the term fake news. Now hates the term fake news more than anybody because that terms been applied to them. So fake news, which started as somebody making something up in planning a story out that says so forth. And so what happened, you know? Maybe it takes a political figure. Ed write a story about how they got somebody pregnant twenty years ago. Ed. Now that kid trying to contact a political figure in their rebuff is totally made up you put that out there and some people are buying into it. It just believing the story out that was the original fake news. And now you've got the fake news. The Trump is referring to the stories were the media puts a spin on something. Presents it as fact or stories that they just turn out to get ROY. Ugh. So many of the revelations that have come out with regard to what Muller was supposedly investigating that were leaked to the media turned out to be totally incorrect. Now, the media has argued that those stories were all reported in good faith that we just made mistakes. Trump. Of course, doesn't see that new watch. It's fake news. It's fake news. It's fake news. Well, it is fake news. It's not correct. And the stories are buying large reported because a gullible media. Got something leak to it. And they just assumed it had to be true. In our own lives. We are guilty of this as well. What are the comments that? I make all the time or one of the things that he used in the show better put. People are likelier to believe something is true. If they wanted to be true. It's part of human nature. We don't have open minds. Our minds are filled with biases. If somebody tells us something, and we really want that thing to happen. If we think it's a great thing, or it's something that we're desiring we're likely to believe it same thing in the opposite. People don't independently examined evidence because. Our desire to come to the conclusion that we want is very very powerful. So you're the New York Times that your CNN or you some news organization and some source at volved in law enforcement tells you hate Muller's gotten this or somebody said that. They go to the media with it. And rather than questioning, maybe this person as it, Rog. Let's say maybe we need to get two or three sources to back this up. They run with it because they wanted to be true. Therefore, they believe it must be true. I remember that will bring up his name. Why not? Way way way back when the Monica Lewinsky story was breaking now nearly a quarter century ago. We're discussing this story, and it was gonna be we talked about it on my TV show, Bellingham company. Joel McNally the left he was a panelist. And I think I asked the question. Do you believe Bill Clinton did this and I will pick on Joe, McNally and them be disproved? He said, no because he didn't think Clinton was in Sade. Well, that was his bias is getting in the way, he couldn't believe that Bill Clinton would be so reckless. To have an intern in the White House performing a sex act on him in the Oval Office. He couldn't believe that Bill Clinton could possibly be that crazy. That reckless. That Moore Radic. That if it ever discovered it with dog him for the rest of his life, which it clearly does. In that instance. The bias of Joel. And I'm not saying, I never got anything wrong. I'm just using this as an example. But he couldn't believe that Bill Clinton was that kind of a reckless irresponsible. Grease ball got in the way of looking at the evidence that we had to whether or not it occurred. The best evidence that it occurred was the fact that Linda Tripp taped the conversation. She was having with Lewinsky, and those taped conversations were leaked what was likelier to be true that Monica Lewinsky would be making it up and telling Linda Tripp, this wild detail or the Clinton actually did it which is pretty much all the evidence that we had at that point. We did also have however was all sorts of knowledge that Bill Clinton had lived his entire life as pretty much a skirt chasing slug, which certainly led me to believe that the allegation probably was true..

Bill Clinton Monica Lewinsky Trump Linda Tripp Muller Ed Joel McNally New York Times Moore Radic CNN Bellingham company Joe intern White House Sade Oval Office twenty years
"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"joe mcnally" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"And that term has now stuck the media, which invented the term fake news. Now hates the term fake news more than anybody because that terms been applied to them. So fake news, which started as somebody is making something up and planning a story that says so forth. And so what happened, you know? Maybe it takes a political figure. Ed write a story about how they got somebody pregnant twenty years ago now that kid trying to contact a political figure, and they're rebuffed. It's totally made up you put that out there and some people were buying into it it just believing the story is out that that was the original fake news. And now you've got the fake news. The Trump is referring to the stories were the media puts a spin on something and presents it as fact or stories that they just turn out to get Rodrigue. So many of the revelations that have come out with regard to what Muller was supposedly investigating that were leaked to the media turned out to be totally incorrect. Now, the media has argued that those stories were all reported in good faith that we just made mistakes. Trump. Of course, doesn't see that new wads. It's fake news. It's fake news. It's fake news. Who it is fake news? It's not correct. And the stories are buying large reported because a gullible media. Got something leak to it. And they just assumed it had to be true. In our own lives. We are guilty of this as well. One of the comments that I make all the time or one of the things that are used in the show better put. People are likelier to believe something is true. If they wanted to be true. It's part of human nature. We don't have open minds. Our minds are filled with biases. If somebody tells us something, and we really want that thing to happen. If we think it's a great thing, or it's something that we're desiring we're likely to believe it same thing in the opposite. People don't independently examined evidence because. I desire to come to the conclusion that we want is very very powerful. So you're the New York Times that your CNN or you some news organization in some source involved in law enforcement tells you hey Muller has gotten this or somebody said that. They go to the media with it. And rather than questioning, maybe this person as it, Rog. Let's say maybe we need to get two or three sources to back this up. They run with it because they want it to be true. Therefore, they believe it must be true. I remember I will bring up as they went. Way way way way back when the Monica Lewinsky story was breaking now nearly a quarter century ago. We're discussing this story, and it was going to be we talked about it on my TV show, Bellingham company. Joe McNally the left he was a panelist. And I think I asked the question, do you believe Bill Clinton did this, and I will pick on Joel McNeely and have them be disproved? He said, no because he didn't think Clinton was in Sade. Well, that was his bias is getting in the way, he couldn't believe that Bill Clinton would be so reckless. To have an intern to the White House performing a sex act on him in the Oval Office. He couldn't believe that Bill Clinton could possibly be that crazy. That reckless. That moronic. That if it ever discovered it would dog him for the rest of his life, which it clearly does. In that instance. The bias of Joel. And I'm not saying, I never got anything wrong. I'm just using this as an example that he couldn't believe that Bill Clinton was that kind of a reckless irresponsible. Grease ball got in the way of looking at the evidence that we had as to whether or not it occurred, the best evidence that it occurred was the fact that Linda Tripp taped the conversation, she was having with Monica Lewinsky, and those taped conversations were leaked what was likelier to be true that Monica Lewinsky would be making it up and telling Linda Tripp this wild tale or the Clinton actually did it which is pretty much all the evidence that we had at that point. We did also have however was all sorts of knowledge that Bill Clinton had lived his entire life as pretty much a skirt chasing slug, which certainly led me to believe that the allegation probably was true..

Bill Clinton Monica Lewinsky Trump Linda Tripp Muller Joel McNeely Ed New York Times Rodrigue CNN Joe McNally Bellingham company intern White House Sade Oval Office twenty years