3 Burst results for "Joe De Giorgi"

"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"And I mean it helped me or get out of my way. And that's what people who have resources and who have the ability to help a day. What you're not going to do is get stopped me from getting what I want you can. You can talk about it on the wall. You can say all you want you can tweet about it with your little thumbs. But YOU'RE NOT GONNA get in my way to do it. You talk in that answer about the necessity of community and doing things. Sometimes that they will or maybe they won't benefit you but they will benefit the person who comes along after you and keeping that in mind and so I do want to bring us back to out in tech which is part of the reason why we are here today. It is the primary reason. Why we I Sat entity this this It's a pretty powerful organization. You've spoken to their events before and so why. Why does a community like out? In Tech Matter Ooh a post pandemic I mean I do recognize I am black first and then I'm gay then I'm Queer and then I'm a woman though those the order that I think about and I'm thirty nine I I remember when I when I was sixteen or so after I had been outed after my mom knew I was out. I pretty much was okay and I said something in a class once where I wrote I wrote this story about coming out and I kind of came out in the class. Do the story project that we had and I got a lot of flack for it and I was very nervous to talk about it and I had to read it out loud to the class and you know people some people laugh. Some people didn't say anything. Some people are like clapping. Whatever but I knew. Some people didn't like it fast for ten fifteen years later this was when I was sixteen fast forward ten fifteen years later. I get a message on facebook from someone who was in that class when I read that out and to me she had always been like the girl next door all American. She was a athlete. Very smart. Very Blond Very Texan. You know where I was living and I thought you know she is what she is. She's dating this guy. She is what she. She told me she was gay and that by hearing me she couldn't make a sound. She couldn't cry. She could say anything to me. She couldn't even move her face to make a reaction but by hearing me. Tell my story that day in that class. I saved her from ending her life because she just knew she couldn't be gay and be okay and the way in her body right and you just never know who you are affecting and these types of organizations aren't just for accolades or just for membership or just for conversation. Even they can be a lifeline to some people because it was very recent and still today and a lot of ways where people were not accepted for being who they are in this way and so it's it can be really important especially when you're looking at your career. Maybe you've lost your job. Maybe you're you feel uncertain. Maybe your company's not doing well and you have these groups that you can. You can feel a kinship with and go to. I feel so similar I feel so privileged about the fact that in two thousand twenty. We have the opportunity to be so much more present in every aspect of who we are and it's such a privilege that how can we not? I think about that all the time on the podcast talked pretty openly about my wife or my son and I don't even think about that but in your breath lamb. I'm coming out. I'm just I'm being who I am and every once in a while more than every once in a while I'll get a note from somebody listening. Who says a listen because of that because I feel seen when I hear that even interested in tech or careers I feel seen when I see someone who sounds looks like me. Intern An Arlington. That is what you do for our community. It's what you do as a leader intact it's what you do as a founder and investor and it's what you do with your book. We're really excited for it. And we hoping that it has a great launch we to thank you very much appreciate it. So that was Arlan Hamilton. Her Bug comes out in May fifth. It's called it's about damn time. Thanks to Arlen to out in tech for supporting me and for making this conversation possible and here it. Hello Monday we really do want to hear from you. This idea. That Arslan has that she is underestimated and that itself is her superpower. It's really cool idea so I want to hear from you about how you've been underestimated and how you manage to turn it around. What's your secret superpower? Join our conversation by emailing me. Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. You can also respond to it on my post on lead-in using the HASHTAG. Hello Monday also studying Wednesdays. I'm going to be holding office hours if you follow me on Lincoln or if you show up my profile at three. Pm Eastern on Wednesday afternoon. You can find me live and we can chat. I'd really love to see you there if you like our show. Please rate US on Apple. Podcasts IT takes two seconds and it helps me listeners. Find US hello. Monday is a production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Sarah Storm and Madison Schaefer. Joe De Giorgi Mixture show. Francie does head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. My Man Genie Victoria Taylor. Michaela greer and Juliette Pharaoh invest in the show. Every week our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard me sick from Paddington. Bear Den rock the standard or and chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Stay home if he can and I'll see next Monday. Thanks for listening..

Lincoln Lincoln Dot Com Jessi Hempel Genie Victoria Taylor Dave pond Arlan Hamilton Joe De Giorgi Michaela greer Paddington Arslan Arlen Intern Apple founder Francie technical director Juliette Pharaoh Arlington Sarah Storm
"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"I've achieved a level of proficiency and mastery to the point where I can feel confident in what I do. I can read a script and break it down. If I'm acting and enter directing I I know the the the dramaturge I've studied this for over forty years. I've been doing it for so long. I do it reflexively. I don't have to think a lot about it. And and I think that's where my current level of confidence comes from. It's it's it's a knowingness right. That is just not available to us when when we're just starting out. Yeah you'd like to believe when we're young that that we know at all like I said we were really just bullshitting. Yeah I mean it is so you know that that confidence it makes me think about how in your profession a critical part of your profession. Is that other people. Watch your performance. Take it in and judge you for constantly and I'm curious what that experience has been like for you over the arc of your career. One of the reasons why I I became so attached to developing different skill sets was the discomfort that that that aspect of being a performer created for me. I was a lot more concerned when I was younger. About the opinion of others and the opinion of others occupied a much larger space in in my overall personal zeitgeist. The older I have become the less. I rely upon that for for feedback that I feel like benefits me and my process. I still care about what other people think it. Just I just don't care as much or in the same way because I have more confidence in my ability to execute at a level that more often than not results in an outcome of which I am proud my opinion of how I do. It has taken on a greater weight in my life than the opinion of others. Wow Gosh Lavar. I hope that one day I can say that looking back on my own career. It's a solid thing to strive for. I wished that for re body because we we. We live in a society where we are constantly seeking the approval of others and it's baked into the equation where performance or concern you know you. Are you depend upon the approval of others in order to be cast and to make a living right so reaching a place in my life where again I give more weight to knowing that I'm professional I I show up. I read my eight-game I said Brie. Brie bring your a game where you might as. Well stay at home right totally. My standard is to bring it and and bring all of me to the moment. And if I'm able to do that if I do your best more than your best you cannot do if I'm doing my best. Then that's all require. Yeah if I look back and see what will you know I? I was really slacking in that moment and I could have done better. That's my fault that's on. Yeah I walk away knowing I did everything I brought everything I could to that effort then. I'm good I'm good. Say More often than not it's GonNa result in a positive outcome and when I say positive outcome means a something that has value not simply for me but for all parties concerned which brings us back to now and where we are and I don't WanNa end our conversation. Lavar without asking you. What would you wish for everyone listening right now? If you don't already know what your purpose in life is I I wish for you that you discover it discerning who we are in. Why we're here is fundamentally I think the most important thing a human being can do. And so I. I wish for everybody that they come into an awareness of of their purpose in life. Whether that's being a parent or a paratrooper. It doesn't matter. Discover why you're here and then do that thing with all of the purpose passion that you can muster thank you. Gosh I feel so hopeful about the world now. Lavar thank you well I do too. You have helped me Jesse. Remind me in this now moment of who I am and why I'm here and you. You have given me opportunity to get outside of myself. You've given me an opportunity to just show up and be me Jesse and for that I thank you. Well I'm wishing you save times moments of joy in the weeks to come and please whatever you do keep reading stories Jessi Hempel. Thank you very much for reminding me of who I am today and giving me an opportunity to stand in that. That was Lavar Burton if you want to hear more from him. He's reading live on twitter three times a week. Visit him at Lavar Burton. So what are you reading this week? I'm not gonNA pretend that I have a lot of spare time for sitting back and reading books right now with the kid job. I really don't but books are offering me a certain escape Right now I'm reading Glennon. Doyle's untamed because she's coming on the show next week. I want to know what you're reading. Give me some recommendations at Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. That's hello Monday at Lincoln DOT COM or post on Lynton under the HASHTAG. Hello Monday if you like our show. Please rate on Apple podcasts. It takes two seconds helps me listeners. Find US hello. Monday is the production of Lincoln. Show is produced by Sarah Storm with help from Madison Schaefer. Joe De Giorgi Mixed. Show put on C. Show is head of original audio and video. Dave pond our technical director. My Engineer Victoria Taylor. Michaela rear and Juliette Fro can't go anywhere but they can do anything. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Stay home if he can see next Monday. And thanks for listening by in this place. I can go twice. Hey Look it's book Reading Rainbow. Need that right now. One brands to know ways to grow the Reading Rainbow..

Jessi Hempel Lavar Burton Lincoln Brie Jesse Lincoln Dot Com Lincoln DOT COM Paddington twitter Joe De Giorgi Dan Roth Glennon editor in chief Doyle Michaela rear Apple Lynton Engineer Dave
"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"joe de giorgi" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Get your super awesome kit, but podcasts. All right back to my conversation with Tim Brown soils just want to go back to the idea of me as a we as as the as the team me, the idea that in the future all have some sort of a technological assistance or a series of suspense in that world that you in to it are do the ideas ever come from the technology or do they always come from the human? I suppose in theory, if the technology reaches a level of consciousness that it can understand the relevance of something going from nothing to something then. Yes, the ideas could come from the today that's not possible because the technology isn't capable of that level of consciousness because it's not so much having the idea is realizing you'll having an idea that's the important piece right in that requires a high level of consciousness about what they should doing about realizing how it's new where it's new wise new wide applies to the problem that you're trying to solve it's hard for me to imagine that being done through something that's purely algorithm. Make so it sort of like an idea is not about the creator. But about the editor, and that you need to be your own editor. Well, I I've I've always believed that is why the world of you'll willed and my world is pretty close together, actually because the creating the woods and editing the woods, and you'll will a part of the ultimately the same act, right? And that's true in design that creating the idea and then. Editing the idea refining, the idea making the idea makes sense of the people is all part of having the idea. Well, it's interesting to me that we've been talking about ideas. And we haven't labeled and good ideas are bad ideas. And as I just note, my fear around this, and I do have the sort of Israel fairs. You're talking it's yeah, I might have ideas, but they might be bad ideas for good news about ideas as the will tells you whether they go bad. You don't have to decide what good about it's why we test things where we built prototypes. So we'll tell us whether we go to good here about idea. Sure. So your job is just is to create ideas. And the the better you get at being designer the better, you get this process. We we loosely call design thinking, the more often, your ideas will be ones that the world will decide we'll be good and worthwhile. That is the satisfaction of mastering the art of design is that more and more of your ideas will be good ones at the beginning. Most of them will be terrible. Just like when you start learning to play piano. Most of those notes. Awful at the beginning even worse. Right. But eventually more of them will will will sound good. And eventually all of them, Los and good, you know, earlier in the season we had Seth Meyers on the show. And it strikes me that we are saying is actually so similar to his discussion in writing. And he says, you know, I read all these jokes. We write all these jokes. And we go through them, all and not all the jokes. I read are good. He says a lot of the jokes. I right. Don't land a lot of them. Don't fall you just keep working just keep doing it. And you depend on the people around you to hone it in and help you find what lens old credit processes have some social component to them in that way. Right. I mean, some people take a long time before they expose their ideas to to others. But it sounds like theft. Does that very early? We do I do very earliest I-. I'd rather expose my ideas early a know that they're bad before I've invested too much evidence from the white too long for them to be so precious that I'm frightened really of what people think about the idea at that point. I don't. Not want to be frightened about what people think about my ideas ideas. Also feel generative to me if you get them going. It's like a spigot of water they keep going. But if you go for a while without one, or if you get very attached to one, it's also how you make least my will design a team sport. Right. If you tighten that have that mindset, then it then it absolutely can be a collaborative act if instead you want to hone the idea to make it perfect becomes an individual act. And there's nothing wrong with either version except that when it's a team, you can think about bigger more complex ideas. That was Tim Brown CEO of Idaho a decade ago. He wrote the de facto handbook for using design and business, and it has just been released. It's called change by design. There was some solid advice wrapped up in Tim's musings. I really connected to his thoughts on creative confidence. Having an idea is not enough. You have to believe in it enough to act on it. And if you're feeling just dry out of ideas, you know, it's probably because you aren't exposing yourself to enough new people and experiences ideas, beget ideas, he are just us not to get lost in the spiral of thinking. But just to start making things just get out there and test ideas as early as possible there are growing number of businesses that have sprung up to help people do just this. They go by different names accelerators incubators some call themselves startup studios this week. Caroline took a look at one of them. Hey, caroline. Hey, Jesse after hearing from Tim and understanding more where good ideas. Come from. I wanted to speak with someone who turns ideas into companies, but good ideas something start from. I think it will never end up being what you thought it was originally that was Heather Hartnett. She's the founder of human ventures, which both invests in companies and works with founders who want to build them. Her success depends on recognizing good ideas before other people do and then she helps them flourish. The we actually have a term the myth of the big idea because I think people put a lot of a lot of emphasis on ideas, when it's really a lot about understanding the market and being where the opportunity is testing how you're approaching that market, and then listening to the customer and and building accordingly. And so I think it's a match of having an insight and then knowing how to listen at human. She will often start with the person who has an idea, and then she tested out when we say we wanna work with the founder, we put them through what we call our workshop process. For just about one hundred days testing that angle going into the strat, you know, into that market seeing what the customers want by putting up landing pages, putting some marketing and messaging around it and seeing you know, what is gaining traction. Now at the end of the hundred days give or take we then will either green life that company to really start incorporate and go full speed ahead with it and put them capital behind it. Or we we scrap it when we start back from the drawing board. So I asked Heather to tell me about a time that this process really worked. She told me about the startup which makes baby food. But when the founders I came to her their idea it had nothing to do with baby food at all they had a company idea in the parenting space around creating a memory book for new parents the digital version, but they ended up, you know, the company now is called tiny organic it's a brand around baby food, and creating baby led weaning food in the early stages of babies life, and their brand is really. Taking off in their creating products that are going to be synonymous with their vision. They saw the white face which was organic food. And so that's what they ended up launching with. But finding the white space is in everything so much of this is about timing. I think some of the ideas that are really innovative are quite simple and the ones that really make an entire market shift. You couldn't hear them in this state of mind and understand them for where the market was going. So an example of that what I mean by that is something like Airbnb before Airbnb existed, you heard of that concept in in you weren't in the right mindset to be able to think that could be a big idea because it was unheard of that you would have the trust in order to have somebody come into your home. And and that sharing economy didn't even exist yet as a generation went through of a mind shift. Right. The entire generation that had went through the recession. Their mindset shifted. And then you can feed that opportunity. Pretty clearly Heather shows us that ideas. Whether they're big like Airbnb or smaller like tiny organics. They all have one thing in common. They probably weren't what they are today when they first started. Thanks caroline. So last week, I asked you to send voice memos about where you're most creative ideas come from. And I learned that a lot of you like me tend to get in the shower when you're feeling stuck. Why do our best ideas come to us in the shower? I don't know. But I heard a lot of other great stories to like this one from authors, Melissa and Jonathan Nightingale who are also married. You asked about daily creative practices when we were writing. How fucked up is your management one of the things that we found really worked was we were working in our day jobs as tech exacts and we've come home at the end of the day. We'd like eat dinner put the kids to bed, and then we just talk about the shit that tech kept getting wrong or your and over again, and we get really pissed off about it. So anger anger at night after dinner at your boss. That's a source of creative inspiration. I hadn't considered next week. I'm talking to me not to so she's a professional influence or a convener of conversations. It's a line of work that is specific to our time. Not something my parents set out to do in the same way. At all the seasonal featuring interviews with a number of people who have jobs of the future. They're doing things that just didn't exist before autonomous car trainers. For example, if you have ideas for types of jobs, he'd like to hear about or if you have one of these jobs, send me a voice memo at Hello, Monday at Lincoln dot com. That's hello. Monday at Lincoln dot com. I'd love to feature some on the show. If you enjoyed listening subscribe and write a son, I tunes it helps new listeners find the show. Hello Monday is a production of linked in the show was produced by Dave pond. And Loris sim with reporting by Caroline Fairchild. The show was mixed by Joe de Giorgi put on Eddie Endo is head of editor's video. Dave pond is our technical director this week the flu is Hello Mondays arch. Nemesis music was by putting to bear impact. Derm? Dan rock is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jesse Hempel. Thanks for listening.

Tim Brown Caroline Fairchild Heather Hartnett founder editor Airbnb Jesse Hempel Lincoln dot com Dave pond Israel Seth Meyers theft Idaho Lincoln editor in chief Loris sim Dan rock Joe de Giorgi CEO technical director