18 Burst results for "Joe Berlinger"

"joe berlinger" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:46 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"But just before the bottom of the hour. We were talking with John Douglas about serial killer police officers in that motif gets used all the time doesn't it about, you know, mostly in works of fiction about you. And I were not so different. You know, the killer tells the cop and the cop feels wonder one way or another about it. And but that that duality I think the idea of the, you know, cops and robbers that they're much more connected than they have more common than they don't where are you with that? You were just talking about a case of a police officer who had committed serious crimes using the cover of the badge. We we didn't have a whole lot of those cases the head of a case out of San Diego where it was a a police officer who would teach rape prevention ended up being a a rapist, and we're able to Lincoln forensically through a badge the fibers from the bangle badge. We're on the victims that we got into the interrogation and able to get the concession out of him a big one we did part of our thirty six serial killers. In the initial study was guy named Gerald safer in Florida bounced from department to department small departments, and and they would get rid of him. But they would give him a good recommendation. Just so they could get get rid of him. He ended up getting caught. He he picked up two girls hitchhiking in his police vehicle took him to a motel later on it came back. The next day to pick them up in his personal car on his personal car trailer hitch and his thing would be sex. Hanging. So he took these girls out into no. Area up to the girls got away got away. And then the rest was made. But then the search search was done of residents. We had diaries where he wrote about some previous crimes at the police never really tied anything to him. They found some Keith belonging to victims as well in the search warrant, so he was good. He was convicted on to they Lincoln Lincoln about thirty thirty homicides, and he was killed in nineteen ninety-five another inmate stabs into death in prison down in Florida. So when you hear that would you hear something like that does that bring you some sense of relief for or Justice, or how do you how do you process that? Yeah. I. I have when it comes to death valley. I've changed a little bit a little bit here. I was on a panel two weeks ago New York with Amanda Knox, the Knox get out of prison in Italy. And they also heard of the case the west Memphis three. Oh, yeah. Totally. Yeah. I case very, and so I helped Damien Echols was on the path. And Joe Berlinger was on the panel with mix. I helped him get out of prison with Peter Jackson director Lord of the rings. Brought me in at the time. Everything was secret along with this group of forensic, you know, experts. So you see cases like that. And now that I'm out of the bureau. I I couldn't do these kind of cases in the bureau, but now out of the bureau, I've been helping on cases where I see false. Confessions have been been given by innocent people wrongful wrongful convictions like in the west Memphis three like Amanda Knox with where they bring in attack team the case, Amanda Knox. They brought in ten police officers. Detectives who were gonna interrogator attached team over forty hours to break down. And I always say an innocent person is easy to ensure gate. Than than the criminal himself or herself because the innocent person when they're curated light like this by some say, it's a corrupt the investigator. They think that the person being targeted that this will be over here that will come out. I get my attorney they'll know that. And but meanwhile, you can fast or you've you've signed a confession. And the problem too. Is that it should be required everywhere, including FBI FBI doesn't use. This is is the tape tape the interrogation tape, the interviews. And I mean from the beginning to the end not turning the tape record on after you got the confession. Because you've made or a scrupulous cop of facts of the case. Now, you regurgitating back. So all the jurors will hear is. Oh, yeah. He knew everything about the case. So he had to be him. So. So I changed. But when I see these predatory types, and is all kinds of evidence that we have all not just I witnessed testimony or some jailhouse snitch or something like that that I I I worry that. And I get a lot of calls from people are saying because my attitude when I when people say, oh, yeah. That prisons are full innocent. You know, people kind of sarcastically. But they are we have a case in Virginia here Norfolk four four four navy then independently confessed to a crime they had nothing to do with. And they got a concession. But then there's DNA didn't match. But then they got him to give another navy, man. Name cough up a name. They did an interrogation the DNA. Imagine this what four four. And they end the guys went to prison for years, and they finally got out not too many years ago. Joseph in Boston has a follow up question about police officers. Don't know Joseph you're talking with John Douglas on coast to coast AM. And I wanna say hi to my friends and shade tree, computer guy. Yes. I'm here. A blind person. We have a police officer. Can you give your contact info out of the end? 'cause I don't I'm not too good on the engine case people need we have a lot of people in prison that are innocent. What does one do when one is going to be questioned because I know police officer. I don't know personally. I saw the video that killed a guy that was in a fire, and he went rammed and Ray he wasn't respond. He blood all over this. And he was doing this in the witness said, he did nothing then there were other police officers Ozark the guy on the ground nineteen times at one handle it. And if we ever get arrested. What should we do if especially for innocent and questions go ahead? You don't talk. I don't care if it's you're pulled over for traffic. Stop. I tell my own children as you go. And and say, I want to have an attorney attorney ITO represent right away. I'm not saying there is a small percentage and every look at the FBI as well. We have we have percentage we'll have David Hanson, Robert Hanssen. Gave information. Yeah. To russia. You should not be taken to a room interrogated, and you should require request. You wanna speak to your your attorney as soon as soon as? Innocent. This will come out. But, but you know, you can nip you late the manipulate someone even to confessed do be browbeaten and a lot of innocent people won't request in an attorney. They don't because they think I'll explain it to them. And but the tactics that us. You can be vulnerable. I mean, I've seen so many cases and people even like Amanda stage with her so people think she's guilty. There was no forensic evidence. Lincoln case, it was one guy. Rudy good day is bloody prints thing. Prince the fecal matter in the toilet. It's him. It's not Amanda. It's not Ravi else. Licio the boyfriend that nothing nothing the west Memphis three. They they interrogate a kid with a seventy two I q you told them. There was cheese on the moon, any would've agreed with you and broke them. You know, broke this down. He had nothing, you know, nothing to do. None none of the crime. But they spent eighteen years in prison Damian spent ten on death row when they were finally freed. And fortunately the ice. I spoke to the that the district attorney says what do they want? What are they want? They want to be exonerated. And he says, well, I don't know. I don't know about. That what do you need turned out? Why you didn't know about exonerating because he was running for political office. Right. And he votes looking for, you know, this is so engine we're talking with John Douglas. You'll have a few more minutes, and then we'll get to open lines. But I'm going to. I'm going to ask you at the very end of follow up question from this. But first, let's get to sue in Atlanta on wildcard line on coast to coast AM for John Douglas, sue. Thanks.

Amanda Knox officer John Douglas Memphis attorney Lincoln Lincoln FBI Florida Lincoln forensically Joe Berlinger Gerald rape Peter Jackson San Diego Joseph Damien Echols Virginia russia Keith
"joe berlinger" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:46 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Just before the bottom of the hour. We were talking with John Douglas about serial killer police officers in that motif gets used all the time doesn't it about, you know, mostly in works of fiction about us. We're not so different. You know, the killer tells the cop and the cop feels wonder one way or another about it. And but that that -ality I think the idea of the, you know, cops and robbers that they're much more connected than they have more common than they don't where are you with that? You were just talking about a case of a police officer who had committed serious crimes using the the cover of the badge. Yeah. We we. We didn't have a whole lot of those cases. I had a case out of San Diego where a a police officer who would teach rape prevention ended up being a a rapist, and we're able to Lincoln forensically through a badge the fibers. The basil. Badge on the victims that we got into the interrogation and were able to get a concession out of him. A big one that we did part of our thirty six serial killers. In the initial study was got him Gerald Shafer in Florida. He balanced from department to department small departments, and and would get rid of him. But they give him a good recommendation. Just so they can get get rid of him. He ended up getting caught. He he picked up two girls hitchhiking in this. Police vehicle took them to motel and then later on it came back the next day to pick them up in his personal car on his personal car had a trailer hitch and his thing would be sexual hanging. So he took these girls out into no area. Hi, them up to one of the girls got away got away. And then the rest was made. But then the starts search was done of residents. We had diaries where he wrote about some previous crimes at the police. Never really tied anything to him. They found some Keith the longing to victims as well in the search warrant, so he was good. He was. Onto they Lincoln linking about thirty thirty homicides. And he was killed in nineteen ninety-five. Another inmate stabbed to death in prison and Florida. So when you hear that when you hear something like that does that bring you some sense of relief for Justice, or how do you how do you process that? Yeah. I I've I have. When it comes to death valley. I've changed a little bit a little bit here. I was on a panel two weeks ago New York with Amanda, I helped them get out of prison in an Italy. And also heard of the case the west Memphis three. Oh, yeah. Totally. Yeah. I felt like very closely. And so I helped they need Damien Echols was on the patio. And Joe Berlinger was on the panel with helped him get out of prison with Peter Jackson director Lord of the rings brought me and at the time everything was secret along with this group of forensic. You know, you know, experts. So you see cases like that. And now that I'm out of the bureau. I I couldn't do these kind of cases in the bureau, but now out of your I've been helping on cases where I see false. Confessions have been given by innocent people wrongful wrongful convictions like in the west Memphis three like Amanda Knox with where they bring. In a tag team education. The man that I know they brought in ten police officers. Detectives who were good interrogator attack team over forty hours to break down. And I always say an innocent person is easy to ensure than than the criminal himself or herself because the innocent person when they're curated like this by some say, it's a corrupt the investigator. They think that the person being targeted. Well, this will be over here to will come out. I get my attorney they'll know that. But meanwhile, you can fast or you've you've signed a confession. And the problem too. Is that it should be required everywhere, including FBI FBI doesn't use. This is is the tape tape the interrogation tape, the interviews. And I mean from the beginning to the end not not turning the tape recorder on after you got the. Specia- because even or a scrupulous cop. Facts of the case. Now, you regurgitating back. So all the jurors will hear is. Oh, yeah. Just personally he knew everything about the case. So he had to be him. So I changed. But when I see these predatory types, and there's all kinds of evidence that we have all. Not just I witnessed the money or some jailhouse snitch or something like that that. Yeah. I I I worry that. And I get a lot of calls from people are saying because my attitude when I when people say Minnesota. Oh, yeah. Prisons are fully innocent is, you know, people kinda sarcastically. But they are we have a case in Virginia here north four four four navy then independently confessed to a crime they had nothing to do with. And they got a confession. But then his DNA to match. But then they got him to give another navy, man. Name cough up a name. They did an interrogation the DNA. Did this? What four they got four. And they and the guys went to prison for years, and he finally got out not too many years ago. Joseph in Boston has a follow up question about police officers. Don't know why. But Joseph you're talking with John Douglas on coast to coast AM. And I wanna say hi to my friends and shade tree, computer. Yes. I'm. A blind person. We have a police officer a lot of them. And can you give your contact info out of the end? 'cause I don't I'm not too good engine case people need we have a lot of people in prison that are innocent. What does one do when one it's going to be questioned because I know police officer. I don't know personally. I saw the video that killed a guy that was in a fire. He went rammed. And Ray he wasn't response. He blood all over this. And he was doing this. In the witnesses said he did nothing, and there were other police officers Ozark taste the guy on the ground nineteen times one handle it. And if we ever get arrested. What should we do if especially for innocent and questions? Go ahead talk. You don't talk you you. I don't care if it's a pulled over for traffic stop. I would tell my own children as you go. And and say, I have an attorney we'll have attorney, you know, represent. Right away. 'cause I'm not saying there is a small percentage and every look at the FBI as well. We have we have percents. We'll have like David hazard Robert hand says name. New information. You have you know to Russia? I mean, if you should not be taken to a room interrogated, you should require request. You wanna speak to your your attorney as soon as as soon as right away. Because you're innocent. This will come out. But, but you know, you can manipulate the you manipulate someone either confessed to being browbeaten d- and a lot of innocent people won't request an attorney. They don't because they think well, I'll explain it to them. And but the tactics that use I mean, you can be vulnerable. I mean, I've seen so many cases and where people even like a man that stage with her just so people think she's guilty. There was no forensic evidence. Lincoln case there was one guy. Really good day is forensic bloody prints thing prince the fecal matter in the toilet. It's him. It's not Amanda. It's not Ravi else. Let you know the boyfriend nothing nothing the west Memphis three they they ensure get a kid with seventy two I q you told them. There was cheese. On the moon. Any would have agreed with you? And they broke them broke this kid down. He had nothing. You know, nothing to do. None. None of them anything to do with the crime. But they spent eighteen years in prison Damian spent ten on death row when they were finally freed, unfortunately, the I spoke to the that the district attorney they says what do they want? What are they they wanna be exonerated? And he says, well, I don't know. I don't know about that. What do you need? Well, I don't know. I turned out why didn't know about exonerating because he was running for political office. Right. And. Looking for you know, this is so engine we're talking with John Douglas. You'll have a few more minutes, and then we'll get to open lines. But I'm going to. I'm going to ask you at the very end of follow up question from this. But first, let's get to do in Atlanta on a wildcard line coast to coast AM for John Douglas, sue. Thanks for the completely.

officer John Douglas attorney Memphis Amanda Knox FBI Florida Lincoln San Diego Gerald Shafer Lincoln forensically Joe Berlinger rape Joseph Damien Echols Russia Virginia Peter Jackson Keith investigator
"joe berlinger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

09:38 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Even kill to blame for everything. Trusted you. Another. Yeah. A little goosebumps. At the Phoenix film festival. And that is why we have the director is with us right now. Joe Berlinger is in studio. Joey. You being here. Thank you for having me, something kind of interesting, and maybe below no you directed the documentary conversations with a killer, and the film all Bundy all the time. I was gonna say you are in the Ted Bundy, you and me both have some sort of a fascination with serial killers, I'm assuming well, I have a particular fascination with Bundy because I think he defies all stereotypes of what we think of serial killer should be, you know, we want to feel that a serial killer some creepy. Dark strange social outcasts because that implies they're easily identifiable in society, and therefore somehow we could avoid them. But the reality is many serial killers and many people who do evil, which is kind of the point of the movie, the people, you least expect in life often. Do the worst things Bundy was charming? Good looking personable had a live in girlfriend intelligent. Yeah. All of those things and somebody you least expect and and to me having done twenty five years of crime in documentary. My conclusion is that it's it's the people, you least expect to do the worst. Whether it's a priest who commits pedophilia and holds mass the next day or Michael Jackson. There's a terrific documentary out now. And and how the parents just accepted and believed even being in the kids being in bed together with Michael Jackson was somehow. Okay. Why why did they think that not because they're bad parents? But because Michael Jackson, presented him. Himself in a certain way, just like Monday. Joe you talked about Ted Bundy being charming and good-looking who else is charming and good-looking. Zach Ephron was cast in that role in in. There have been some pushback glamorizing Ted Bundy by castings Ephron. You know, look, the knee-jerk we live in a society where people are very vocal. And that's good. I think the I think that the bay about whether or not doing shows about serial killers or movies is glamour glamorizing or not. I will say this movie does not glamorize. You know, we give him his due at the end of the movie, but what I am portraying the psychology of of seducing manipulating people into believing your one thing when in fact, you're another that is what the movie is about. There are many many great and many many bad serial killer movies that is just a litany of of the depravity violence. And that's I wasn't interested in doing that. And Zach to me is an amazing casting choice because he was willing to poke a hole in his teen heartthrob image. And that is the reality. Bundy was a head-turner back in the day and so- casting. Somebody like Zach to me was essential in the fact that he he was my first choice in the fact that he had the courage to take on this role. And look you could you could call it stunt casting if he didn't deliver. But even the most of the reviews have been good like any movie. That's I feel there have been some bad reviews too. But every review even the worst review has praised for his performance, and I'll co sign on that for us. Well, I thought he did amazing in this film. Again, we're talking to the director of extremely wicked shocking evil and vile. Joe Berlinger, by the way that that that name title that comes from the judge during the sentencing during his death penalty. Sentencing in Florida. That's how the judge described the crimes and described Ted Bundy, so. There's probably more people obviously have watched the documentary on Netflix Ted Bundy documentary the film focuses its different they're not the same. I want to be here today. It's not the same movie. It's not a dramatization of the documentary. You really focus on his I'll use the term normal relationship that he had and how could someone have such a normal loving relationship? And then go out the back door and literally murder people. Exactly. I mean that that to me is what's so fascinating. And what is kind of a new take on the serial killer movie, you know, conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes that was a deep dive into the mind of the killer, and we spare no detail into the utter depravity of he did for the movie I wanted to just take a look at what it's like to be deceived by somebody like that. Because he manipulated the American media who fell in love with him. You know, the the his murder trial in Florida for the sorority killings was the first time cameras wherever let lead into court let let into a courtroom ever. And and that was the kind of the merging of new technology, basically, satellite technology, and electronic news gathering as we know it today was just in its infancy and the. You know, the fascination with Bundy made this the first time a murder trial, you know, serial rape and serial murderer becomes live entertainment for a mainstream audience. And it's I think it's I think the Bundy trial is the big bang of. Why today we are so obsessed with true crime? Because it's the first time Americans just kind of watched in their living room and murder trial. If we're if you're just joining us right now, we are talking to Joe Berlinger. He is the director of extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile, and this is the movie of Ted Bundy. And Joe you you spent a considerable amount of time going through those tapes in the documentary aspect of the first project you worked on this is the second one that is coming out here. Very soon. You spend a lot of time in this world. You've learned things that maybe walking into this project. You didn't think you would learn one what stood out to the most? And to do you think there were more victims? Well, I'll take the second part. I I do think there's more victims. I mean Bundy didn't start confessing until the very end of his life a few days before his execution and his game was to give information in exchange for allowing him to live and eventually professed innocence for twenty years and that which is unusual about a serial killer. Usually by the time, they're caught they they love to spill exactly they they're on. Some are are almost dying to be caught Bundy didn't fit that mold. And then with regard to what I learned. It was just a confirmation the degree to which this guy really could compartmentalize evil which is scary. Because I think what I've learned from that is that serial killers aren't the separate spectrum of human behavior. I think there's one spectrum of human behavior about compartmentalizing evil, and serial killers are the worst expression of it. But they belong on the. In the same category. As people who, you know, there are there are corporate executives who go to bed at night knowing that they're in a polluting industry, and killing tens of thousands of people, and yet they're surrounded by loving, friends, and families that's compartmentalized evil Purdue pharma that created Oxycontin, those guys made lots of money told their their Salesforce to not only repress research that it was addictive, but to tell the doctors the opposite and we've had two hundred thousand deaths. That's and I'm sure those guys all have loving families and friends and people they admire that's compartmentalized evil and a guy like Ted Bundy had lots of friends and belong to the Mormon church had a live in girlfriend played by lily Collins. And with a young daughter and compartment, and he really did seem to there was a side to him that like that. Family normalcy. And yet he's responsible for some of the worst acts that a human could do to another human being. He's the director of extremely wicked chuckling evil involved, and and also covers the killer. The Ted Bundy tapes, Joe Berlinger. I think that both of them are important pieces of work. And I do you can also hear the documentarian in him. I think we have a one coming up on Purdue pharma, we might be able to make make a pitch for here. Pretty soon. You seem like you've already got an argument in how can people watch extremely wicked shocking evil and vile. Well, luckily, this little company called net. Flicks is releasing it on may third and so on may third people can tune into net flicks. And for people in Phoenix. It is the opening night of the Phoenix film festival tonight tonight, and I will be there to give Cuna so people want to hear me participate a little more. I shall be there showing up to advocate here with us. I appreciate you having me. Yeah. Outstanding job earlier. Thank you so much for your free. We sincerely appreciate again. The director of extremely wicked shocking, the evil and vile the Ted Bundy, or at least part of Ted bundy's story, and again, kicking off the Phoenix film festival tonight will be on Netflix soon. I would certainly suggest you take a look at it. And not just because I'm fascinated by serial killers. Kind of weird. I am. I know I am. Hey, we've got a check of the headlines. Bob McClay gonna give us all cut up right now..

Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger director Zach Ephron Michael Jackson murder Netflix Florida Joey Phoenix Purdue pharma Salesforce Bob McClay Mormon church lily Collins rape Cuna twenty years
"joe berlinger" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm your host John horn. If you're in Detroit crime, filmmaker Joe Berlinger has a lot to offer you right now. I is his current four part Netflix docu series called conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes featuring never before heard interviews with Bundy recorded while he was on death row. The series takes a deep dive into the mind of the man who brutally assaulted and murdered dozens of women and girls in addition to that documentary series. There's also a nurse. Feature film that Berlinger directed. It's called extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. It recently premiered at the Sundance film festival and was also picked up by net. Flex Zack Ephron plays Bundy in the narrative film, but it's told from the perspective of his longtime girlfriend, Elizabeth club for who believed bundy's claims of innocence for years, she's played by lily Collins in the movie, I spoke with Joe Berlinger about both projects while I was at Sundance and he began by explaining how Ted bundy's nineteen seventy nine murder trial change, the media's relationship to crime. We have this insatiable appetite today for true crime programming. And I trace that back to Bundy Bundy for me is kind of the big bang of true crime. And that's because it was a very interesting time in the media, basically, just a few months before the Bundy trial. Many news stations were still shooting on film. So there was no such thing as kind of live coverage and this new technology. Of electronic news gathering was just coming into its own around the time of bundy's Florida trial. This new thing called satellite technology was happening. And there was such growing interest in Monday because he had so manipulated the media and Utah, Colorado. And in Florida before his trial started that there was great interest. Liz man on the.

Bundy Bundy Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger Bundy Detroit John horn Netflix Zack Ephron Sundance Florida Liz lily Collins Utah murder Elizabeth club Colorado
"joe berlinger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:56 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm sure you've been hearing about the sentencing hearing of Bruce MacArthur. He's the serial killer who has pleaded guilty to killing eight men in Toronto. It's very disturbing story, especially for the LGBTQ community in Toronto. And I think it's got a lot of people thinking about similar stories. They know as well. You know, and this has been on my mind a lot this week. You might have noticed these days that so many people love reading about listening to and watching true crime. And why people are so interested in true crime is interesting, especially interested in as entertainment, and whether that's even okay, given that true crime is by definition true. Joe Berlinger believes there's value in exploring these stories in this way. He's the filmmaker behind the paradise lost documentary series about the west Memphis three which won an EMMY and was nominated for an Oscar. His two latest projects are centered on Ted Bundy, one of the most notorious serial killers in history, the documentaries already out, and maybe you've caught conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes on Netflix, and the film, extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. That's the name of it. It may be coming to Netflix soon as well. So you're going to hear from Joe Berlinger in a minute about how he make sure he respects the victims avoids glamorize. Ising murder even how he feels conflicted and hypocritical about it sometimes. But I I just to give some context I wanted to go back to Joe I heard about Ted Bundy in the news just back when he was a teenager. So I asked Joe Berlinger the director of this Netflix series. Did he remember that moment? I do scared scared. The living daylights out of me because of his seeming normalcy. And I remember watching the televised trial thinking, it's so bizarre. Were watching this on television for me. That's what that's one of the main reasons to look back at Bundy today because as I think many people are aware, well, there are two lessons for for Bundy one is that he defied all expectations of what a serial killer is and the other reason for me taking a look at the story now, which I think is deeply resonant is that for me Bundy was kind of the big bang. Of our current insatiable appetite with all things true crime, which I think is a, you know. Has its pros and has its cons. But it's where we are today that people can't seem to get enough of this stuff. And I trace it all the way back to Bundy when I was a teenager watching it on TV because that was the first time that, you know, cameras were allowed in the courtroom in the United States, and because of the growing interest in Bundy intersecting with new technology, meaning electron news gathering and satellite. Technology was just starting to come into its own that phenomenon kind of just pushed it's way into a Florida courtroom and created the first nationally televised murder trial in Americans couldn't get enough of it and basically Bundy made serial murder live entertainment, and you can trace that line from from Bundy right to the OJ Simpson trial decade and a half later to where we are today where people can't seem to get enough of this kind of programming which self reflexively I look back on and I see it as both a positive and negative thing. I definitely want to. Talk a little bit more about how we got to this place with true crime where we are now. And especially by the details of trying to make it. But I want to go back to the first thing you said around the conversation route ten but Ted Bundy, not being your typical idea of a serial killer. He was a charming, man. He was he was warm. He was friendly. He was laughing. And these are things you hear in the tapes that you play the tapes that your documentary series is based around that you got from conversations with Ted Bundy with Stephen Michaud and Hugh Ainsworth who who were journalists who interviewed Ted Bundy back then. How did you come across these tapes? How did you get them? Stephen is a fan of my work, and he reached out to me. He had written a book conversation with a killer that came out in the early two thousands, and he's been sitting on these tapes. And so he reached out to me in two thousand seventeen and said, hey, you know, we have these tapes that the book was based on and do you think, you know, because of where we are in true crime programming that there's a show there, and I was actually dubious when he first reached out because you know, a lot has been said about Bundy. So I only wanna take something on where you can, you know, add to the dialog, and I listened to the tapes and was killed by them. Do you? Remember the first time you listened to them. I mean. Yeah. I mean, basically, I mean, you know, I was sent to tapes, and I had to evaluate whether or not I thought there was a show there, and you know, after a week of engaging with the material I thought they were quite compelling and revealing and because it's an it's an emotional way into a story that you've read a zillion times. But when you read it clinically it's not the same as hearing it in in the in the words of the killer himself, and, you know, raise some issues for me about are we going to give him a platform, you know, or not. And that's why it was important for us to contextual is, you know, a lot of the information that he was giving us because he is an unreliable narrator. So the the delicate dance of the show was letting him speak, but then contextualising it and making sure he wasn't giving us false information. What what do these reveal to you about Ted Bundy and his character? Like the thing that I couldn't quite get over was that he was reticent to talk about his crimes until he was able to talk about them in the third person. Yeah. I mean, look Bundy is unique amongst. American serial killers in America, sadly has many serial killers we have five percent of the world's population. But we've had sixty seven percent of the world's serial killers since they've started keeping numbers and at any given time the FBI estimates there's twenty five to fifty active serial killers in this country. So one of the reasons I'm putting this out there as the that's that's profound. And we need to ask ourselves as a nation. Why we produce that kind of a result? But getting back to your question. I think I think what I got out of these tapes was just understanding how devious diabolical manipulative he is in presenting a good guy image. And I was fascinated as you were by the whole third person aspect of it because you know, he did not want to implicate himself. And as I was starting to said before bundy's unique among American serial killers in that he never confessed. Until a few days before his execution. You know, most serial killers when they're caught kinda can't help help themselves. But you know, relishing the details of their crimes once they're caught. But Bundy maintained his innocence to all of his friends around him when his legal woes were mounting. Fathered a child on death row with the woman who believed in his innocence. And it wasn't until the last few days of his until his execution was imminent that he started doling out information in kind of a, you know, attempt to keep his keep himself alive by becoming useful to a lot of investigators in multiple states who had cases they wanted to close. So he was unique in that denial. So that when Stephen Michaud gave him the opportunity back in nineteen eighty which was right after his conviction, but still he had a ten year. You know time period left in his life. To to fight the charges on appeal. He only would talk in the third person because he didn't want to implicate himself legally. But that that. Device that Stephen came up with out of frustration because the conversations were going nowhere just demonstrates. Just this compulsion to kill in this reveling in the details. That is so common among serial killers. You really see that come out. Right. If you're just tuning in a speaking with filmmaker Joe Berlinger who's Netflix series about that Ted Bundy, Ted Bundy murders conversations with a killer of the Ted Bundy tapes a streaming now. And yeah, I mean, Ted bundy's murders were they were horrific there were violent. There are so many victims. And you know, when I was watching this. It's a it's a salient time or earn. Interesting time to be watching this Netflix series in Canada because we're dealing with that right now particularly in Toronto. With the Bruce MacArthur case, the serial killer murdered man in Toronto's gay community. And you know, I was listening to the radio, and I heard one of the friends of one of the victims say something along the lines of, you know, I just want people to not focus so much on the guy who who killed my friend. But I want people to focus on my friend. I want people to think about the victims, and you. Hinted at this earlier when you were talking about listening to these tapes when you're making a film, or when you're making a documentary, how do you balance that, you know, recounting these horrendous crimes, but also respecting and telling the stories of the victims and what they went through. It's a very tricky issue. And I'm also highly aware of the hypocrisy. Of, you know, making quote, unquote, entertainment out of other people's tragedy is so for me. You know, the way to honor the victims to tell their stories within the work, which we do and to tell it responsibly, which is why the series has gotten some criticism. Oh were glorifying Ted Bundy, and we're giving them a platform. And we're you know that criticism actually is deeply hurtful to me. Because the last thing I'm going to do as someone who has spent twenty five years in the criminal Justice system advocating for victims, both as a filmmaker and my non filmmaking work brother's keeper paradise loss. I'm somebody who really, you know, the the Wikipedia caused me a true crime pioneer filmmaker like the pioneer part. I like the true crime makes me wins the little bit because that phrase true crime somehow conjures up an image of, you know, wallowing in other people's misery for the sake of entertainment, the entertainment of others, and I'm very sensitive to that criticism. And there are certainly works in this. Category that fulfil that. So my answer to how to you know, honor the victims is to tell a responsible story. And you know, I'm the father of daughters around the Bundy victim age, and you know, I spent a lot of time with young people and people don't really know the Bundy story, you know. And so the reason to tell it again and to tell it again, and again is that I don't think you can learn enough the core lesson of Bundy, which is the person next to you is often capable of the worst evil and somebody really needs to deserve your trust. Whether it's a priest who commits pedophilia, whether it's the core a corporate CEO of a polluting corporation or a CEO of of a company, shoving Oxycontin and other opioids down people's throats, while repressing the research to show that it's addictive all of this is compartmentalized evil by people. You would least expect to execute it. And that is a lesson that I think people can't hear enough and Bundy lured many women. To their deaths because he was he was sympathetic and charming. And so, you know, I want young people to embrace that lesson that, you know, you need to be careful. There are sick people in this world capable of terrible evil, and they are often the people, you least expect would do it. I appreciate what you're saying. There. You know time is an interesting part of this too. Because as I've been watching the Bruce MacArthur case unfold and speaking to people friends of mine within the gay community, and and talking to people it seems unfathomable that I would ever want to sit down and watch a story about this right now as it so rise, I'm hearing the victim impact statements today..

Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger Bruce MacArthur Toronto Stephen Michaud murder Netflix Memphis EMMY FBI Oscar Ising Joe I United States America CEO Florida director OJ Simpson Canada
Netflix picks up Zac Efron’s Ted Bundy drama Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile

Jason and Alexis

01:32 min | 3 years ago

Netflix picks up Zac Efron’s Ted Bundy drama Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile

"Net. Flicks is kicking off two thousand nineteen with the one two punch for to crime obsessive just weeks ago, the streaming service debuted its docu series conversations with a killer, the ten Ted Bundy tapes, which I believe we've all watched right? I have not watched it yet. Okay. Watch. Young. It's me out a little bit in the way that that happened. Himself in the third person. What else lex sorry? What were you gonna say? Lex. I wanna watch. Colin does not want to watch it. So I'm going to have to. Watch it by myself. Yeah. Well, you'll be hooked right away. I starts one hundred and fifty hour. Well, it isn't a full, but he recorded one hundred and fifty hours of tape with Ted Bundy back in the day wrote a book, and this is just shrieked down. It's fascinating love it. Okay. They also have purchased that movie extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. That is with Zach Ephron. That's his Ted Bundy movie that just premiered at Sundance the race to get the projects out. Yes. Nine million they paid for it. Wow. Now, I want to also mention that. It's the same director Joe Berlinger directed conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes on net flicks there and also this other one was Ephron. Oh, so I mean, this guy's an expert in it. So the baby so interested in seeing this. They're also releasing it in theaters that it'll be a contender for awards.

Ted Bundy Zach Ephron LEX Colin Joe Berlinger Sundance Director Fifty Hours Fifty Hour
"joe berlinger" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on KOMO

"Which features never before heard audio recordings Bundy discussing the case. And bundy's much publicized trials. I think things are going to work. We're that charm was on full display. He doesn't look like the type to kill somebody. Joe Berlinger who directed the feature film and the docu series spoke to twenty twenty before the premiere about how the film portrays Bundy, and it's casting and in many ways, we are taking his kind of teen heartthrob image and turning that on its head. We're understanding why women were so attracted to this charismatic killer through Zack's performance. Berlinger isn't commenting specifically on the new trailer. But he did respond on Twitter commenting on a user's tweet that said in part, the reason that trailer seems to be painting him as this charismatic. Good guy is because Ted Bundy was a very charismatic. Nice. All American guy who no one suspected Berlinger re tweeted that with a comment exactly ABC's, Amy Rohbock reporting many wondering if Commissioner Roger Goodell from the NFL will address the fourth quarter. No, call and the New Orleans Saints LA Ramsgate. Game in Atlanta tomorrow, he has his state of the NFL meeting. He's been silent about the absence of the pass interference call that would have sent the saints to the Super Bowl. The Rams though winning in overtime sending them instead to play the patriots in Atlanta on Sunday everybody here in Seattle for the most part just hoping the patriots don't win. Another one come on. Now. ABC world headlines are next attention. Introducing a.

Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger Commissioner Roger Goodell New Orleans Saints patriots NFL Atlanta Rams Twitter ABC Zack Ramsgate Amy Rohbock Seattle twenty twenty
"joe berlinger" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on KOMO

"Believed this garbage to you all the Pacers. Ted the trailer coming on the heels of new net flicks docu series conversations with the killer. The Ted Bundy tapes, which features never before heard audio recordings a Bundy discussing the case story. And bundy's much publicized trials. I think things are gonna work. Charm was on full display. It doesn't look like the type to kill somebody. Joe Berlinger directed both the feature film and the docu series spoke to twenty twenty before the film's premiere about how the film portrays Bundy, and it's casting and in many ways, we are taking his kind of teen heartthrob image and turning that on its head. We're understanding why women were so attracted to this charismatic killer through Zack's performance. Berlinger isn't commenting specifically on the trailer. But he didn't respond on Twitter commenting on a user's tweet that said in part, the reason the trailer seems to be painting him as this charismatic. Good guys. Because Ted Bundy was a very charismatic. Nice. All American guy who no one suspected Berlinger retweeted that with a comment. Exactly ABC's, Amy Rohbock Virginia. Governor Ralph Northam says he plans to sign the Bill approving seven hundred fifty million dollars in Amazon subsidies, the Virginia house of delegates voted overwhelmingly yesterday to give the Amazon subsidies over fifteen years for the company's plan ahead. Quarters at Arlington. Amazon would get the subsidies only after creating thousands of new jobs which are expected to generate several times warranty tax revenue than the state is giving to the online retail giant jobs must provide average salaries of one hundred fifty thousand dollars Amazon announcing November it will bring its HQ to project northern Virginia. And to New York it's ten twenty and time for the propel insurance business update. The government has been opened less than a week at ABC's. Serena marshal says already the assessment on what it's lost is much greater.

Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger Amazon Virginia ABC Governor Ralph Northam Pacers Amy Rohbock Virginia Serena marshal New York Twitter Zack Arlington Bill twenty twenty seven hundred fifty million do one hundred fifty thousand dol fifteen years
"joe berlinger" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

13:45 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Seven twenty WGN, and we are live in the Allstate's guidelines studio here on Monday morning, my dad's gonna call Intel a joke because it's a joke key Juki Juki time. All right. We got Jin west coast skied Eric children's here. They review movies with me every Monday morning. Eric is in these at the Sundance film festival right now. And we're getting live reports from him and Jim welcome back. Thank you, much and Eric welcome back. Thank you. Okay. So it right before the right before the break, you you said from the directors of good night, mommy, which made me perk up big time. So what what do we got here? Well, okay before described this movie to you. I have two things. Really, great one. You have you'll notice that the good night. Mommy. Filmmakers have tight for certain. Okay. The ball. You will probably have to start suspending your disbelief immediately because this movie could also be called world's dumbest, dad. Okay. So. Family. Okay. Two young children are their parents are finalizing their divorce dad is planning to get remarried. He's a writer, and he's written a number of folks apparently on cults, and he's now planning to marry a current girlfriend who is be formally b twelve year old survivor of a cult bat completely committed suicide. Oh, man. Okay. So. So after as their. Married for the holidays Christmas, they decide to go to their lodge up in up in the wilderness and dad's going to go off and do his work and lead kids with the new mom. Former cult number in the house all by themselves. How can this? Go long, right. Okay. The mom is played by Riley geo who just continues to impress more and more every time. I see your she. She should really just stay on my radar. And this is absolutely no exception to get into this will be would be spoiled a bunch. And while I was watching the movie at the movie begins to reveal itself, and what is actually going for. It'd be very hypocritical of me to recommend this movie. Given that I don't think m night Shyamalan has made a good movie in his might. But the difference between the good name. Mommy, still makers in China Milan is one they really know how to stick ending and two they really know how to work fem- up up to through that ending. Yeah. And this, and this is one of those movies that you know, because it deals with you know, and whatnot so deals with religion. And is moving really kind of get them the head of people, you know, have any religion who are so deeply committed to what might come afterwards affects the way that they behave in reality. So that's kind of a prevailing interrupt this movie. And at the movie channel reveals itself. I was sitting there on here. Please don't and it doesn't and it keeps going all good. And then it keeps going, and it does some more. And then it it. Wow. This movie. Yeah. So I mean, you you love goodnight. Mommy. I did you kind of know what you're getting into with these with these guys some people have compared to the shining. I mean, they're isolated in this in this lodge during a snowstorm and stuff and some people go off their meds. I'm not gonna say much more. Okay. Well, you'd say that I really dug the film and very much looking forward to seeing people's reaction to the third activist movie. Okay. All right. That's all right. Well, I mean if you've seen good night. Mommy. I, you know, and I don't know what to say about that. Except that. I love that movie. And it was brutal. Okay. So that's the logic of looking forward to that. Does that have not yet? Wow. Yet. Yeah. Titles here that that were opened get picked up very soon. Yeah. That's true, man. Oh, man. Okay. All right. Where do you wanna go next year? We'll go to a movie called extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. And basically, this is the Ted Bundy at correct, okay? All right. Yeah. This is the Joe Berlinger is narrative feature about Ted Bundy he also has a four hour docu series that either just premiered on Netflix premiering later this week. What I hear is fantastic. We actually did a docu series and Ted Bundy and did a feature film with Ephron. Wow. All right. Oh, yeah. And the moving more or less focuses on the of one of his final relationship actual relationship that he had with a woman played by lily Collins. And then we'll be taking us through his arrest and bed ventral farce of a trial. It's not really about the murders themselves. We there's not a lot of what would like one thing. We don't actually see him murdering people. It's all about the, you know, the aftermath of that. And how either he was in complete denial of what he had done or was just so evil that he could conceal it. And just deny it all the way through almost up until his execution back in nineteen eighty nine. Joe Burlington Joe Berlinger over the years has created some of the best true crime documentaries out there, and and at the same time he treated some of the most maddening narrative features out there like Blair witch to book of shadows. And this one. Because you know, I mean, the Ted Bundy story is I mean, the title pretty much says it all those are words that came directly from the judge movies played by John Malkovich. The the judge one he was sentencing Ted Bundy, those are the words actually used to describe him. And here you have Ron. Who looking chap? Yeah. Backup on. So you have your kind of almost like a playboy image being presented a Ted Bundy and a very charming guy. And yeah, I mean that's part of the story as well. But there's a lot of stuff in this movie. That is that is played for laughs. I mean, the trial itself is is nuts in and of itself. But it the movie, I I don't know if Berlinger, you know, knows that we know that Ted Bundy did commit these crimes, or if you've actually trying to suppress yet you for those who don't know whether he was innocent or not because of the entire movie he's nine everything that he did in only all the state, but he keeps getting arrested and tried for the nine at one hundred percent, and then representing himself in court over it. So the tone of the movie, I think it's completely off. I mean focusing on the relationship, I don't think entirely work. Until the final thing, but between them because it kind of emotionally wrecked hurts, and I think the movie steps a little bit about that a bit too much for my taste, and they'd really focus on him more than hurt downslide after when she she really discovered this guy really was I thought that wasn't played very well. Very good in the movie. I can't I can't fault at Bron particularly in in the back half of the movie. He he's really good in the film. And so it was a little Collins. So you have to performance the kind of guide you through the story. But at the end of the movie, I'm just like, this is a really horrible guy. And he shouldn't be treated in the kind of light that was much by the end of it. I was just like I can't wait to see the net flicks document docu docu series because Berlinger is much better documentaries than he is a narrative. Okay. All right. So that's called extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile. Okay. All right. All right. What do you want? What do you want to do next? Oh, what are we gonna do next? And looking at my list here. Let's do a film called the lack black man in San Francisco. And this one has been eight twenty four brought this movie to Sundance, I don't know the name of the actors in the film. Other fifty were recognizable. But the main stars. I don't have their names in front of me. But the movie was directed by the new coming in kill Talbot's. And this will be really the announcement of a real major talent last year at Sundance both we had both sorry to bother you and blind spotting and one of the central teams all those movies was gentrification. And that's primarily what this movie. I mean what I mean? There's a lot of stuff going on in this film. But it's primarily about gentrification of San Francisco two best friends in the film. One of them has there's this house. Cisco bat his he's been pulled all his life. If that his grandfather built in the nineteen forties, and even though it's currently occupied. He nearly shows up at the house they show up at the house to to paint it and do repairs on the outside of it. But at the end of the owners, and when the owners of the current owners actually get evicted from the house, they move in and begin fixing up the place, and even though they don't have any money to buy anything to hold it with. Maybe you just move in and do their best to just maintain this part of history history. Plays a big big role in. There's a lot of things that the that the creep up on you nuts chapter occasion history sort of the the whole history of African Americans in this country. This movie is either. Ah? Yeah. Both times it's kind of a love letter and hate the hate mail to San Francisco the movie acknowledges both both of those factions it it beautifully shot. If if energetic it's really funny at times, ultimately, very sad. This is a movie dad was over like, wow, we really wanna see that again. And really take a second look to absorb because there's so much going on in helmet so beautifully acted by by everyone involved. It's not really one of the standoff films at the festival so far. That's the last black man in San Francisco in eight twenty four has got that one already. Yeah. And I see thorough purchase and it worse. She been. Well, yeah. I mean, she's had a problems with a career Judy were father and stuff. She's got one of those showbiz dad that really kind of screwed her over the years, and she's only got one scene in the movie. Oh, yeah. This is really the film and there's throw Thorburn's. Okay. Okay. All right. That's the last black man in San Francisco. Alright, Eric how many more movies are you planning on seeing? Let's see I got I got another five later today. And then another five on Tuesday and more movies to see anything standing out that you're looking forward to all the two things there's a movie called the death of dick long. That's actually the next movie. I've seen that directed by the while one of the guys one of the Daniels who made Swiss army, man. Oh, okay. Yeah. And this is apparently again, they have to because there's another movie about a bunch of friends trying to conceal a friend's debt. Geez. I hear that movies kind of nuts. There's a movie called them the follow. That's all about Pentecostal religion that. I here is incredibly intense. I'm looking forward to that. I am the the worst soup caps apprised screening in history. I think of any film festival is playing tonight as well. And it's fighting with my family. Oh, cool. Seeing that as well. The rockets supposed to be here. Reporting Johnson supposed to be here for that. So we'll have a report on that as well. All right. Cool Aryeh Rick. Thanks for hanging out with us man here thing. All right buddy have have fun out there and Eric will join us again with another report. Jim hang on. All right. Okay. Man when we come back, Jim. And I will we'll talk about another new movie, and then we've got some underrated eighties films that we're going to get into as well. So that's all coming up right after we take this break here on seven twenty WGN. The bulls are going back to Brooklyn to battle. The Angelo Russell in the nets bowls. Nets Tuesday at six thirty on WGN TV sports..

Ted Bundy Eric San Francisco Joe Berlinger WGN Jim lily Collins Jin west Allstate Intel Berlinger Sundance writer rockets nets Riley geo Shyamalan
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"Well, I want to also ask you about that social Justice aspect to what you do your most famous documentary paradise lost played an instrumental role in freeing, the young men who were wrongfully accused of murder, and I wanna. Her how you feel about the ethical state of true crime today. Do you worry that you might have created a monster in that too many directors in this next generation are now starting with the innocent man, ending in mind in skewing, the story to fit their desired narrative? You know? Look, I think the worst one of the worst things that could happen to a person is to be convicted of a of a crime that they're not guilty of and that and prosecutors have unique power to take away your personal liberty and sometimes they don't always play by the rules. So and once you're convicted it's really hard to get unconvicted. It just it takes far too long for the wheels of Justice to operate. And sometimes they don't operate at all, you know, it's estimated that, you know, five percent of people in prison by many experts are are wrongfully convicted, you know, with two million people in prison in our country every day. That's a lot of people who are. Potentially innocent, you know, more and more filmmakers taking up the cause and shining a light on these injustices. I think can only be helpful. I just hope that it's done responsibly and not done in a way where we're letting guilty people go free. But I think by the time these cases make it into the lens of filmmaker. You know, there's a pretty good chance that the person is is innocent. So I don't necessarily think we've we've created a problem. We have such a problem with the criminal Justice system is in such need of reform on so many levels from over sentencing from the legacy of the the the the the horribly conducted war on drugs, the racial inequity. There's just so many issues of incarceration that need to be addressed that I don't think there can be enough films and television programmes being made Mike my fear is not that they profile the wrong person. My. Fear is that there's so much documentary activity going on these days the form has never been more popular. There's so much activity that I hope people don't become you know, kind of. Immune to what's going on. You know, it's it's, you know, sometimes we become so inoculated from having any feeling because we keep hearing the same situation over and over again, you know, when brother's keeper in paradise lost first came out, they were rather unique films. And so they were able to cut through and tell their stories now, we have so many of them that I hope people really pay attention to the underlying issue as opposed to just treating it as the latest piece of entertainment to consume. And then forget about we'll before we go. Do you think Ted Bundy was insane? Or is that a cop out, you know, one of the things the tapes taught me is that he was highly aware of what he did. It's not like some act done by a split personality or an M amnesia. He was highly aware, and therefore it's hard to say was. The insane or not insane. Because anybody who would do these kinds of things is by definition insane. But he was a highly aware of his acts, and therefore he got the the punishment. He deserved. Whoa. Conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes debuts on net flicks. Thursday, January twenty fourth and Joe's film, extremely wicked shockingly evil and vile Ramirez at the Sundance film festival this weekend. Joe Berlinger, thanks so much for talking with me. Good conversation. Thanks for having me. Thanks again to Joe Berlinger for coming on the show conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes is available on net. Flicks beginning.

Ted Bundy Joe Berlinger murder Mike Ramirez five percent
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"And that ultimately led to his conviction. For attempted kidnapping of Carol Durant. He was apprehended in Colorado after his first prison break six days after his prison break, he was apprehended and he was apprehended in Pensacola, Florida, which ultimately led to his his final murder trial in Miami for the cuyahoga killings. But in each instance, he was not arrested because the police were on his trail, and they caught the right guy. Each of these arrests were because he was driving stolen vehicles you radically and an alert police officer noticed either a stolen vehicle or the erotic driving. And that's the reason he had been pulled over in each of those three instances, and then only later did they realise who they had in in custody. So I've always kind of thought it's amazing that had Bundy been a better driver. He might never have been caught. Wow. In the aftermath of Ted bundy's killings, you mentioned that the F B started, profiling serial killers. And there's this kind of silence of the lambs mind hunter aspect to all of this where at a certain point Bundy began actually helping the FBI with cases in volunteering is theories and information about different active cases, or what kind of things was he telling them and was it useful? I think a lot of what he's he offered. The FBI was useful. And again, it was you know, sent his cynical attempt to keep himself alive by bargaining information. But you know, he had, you know, a unique insight, and I think for Bill hag Meyer, the FBI agent who interviewed him, and who was part of that profiling program, I think he was incredibly useful to them. So some good came out of the Bundy saga. But at obviously way too high a price. I wanna go back to his execution because as you mentioned the media circus even carried through all the way to his death. Seth you show. Thousands of people gleefully showing up at the prison selling souvenir t-shirts shooting off fireworks in this macabre carnival around his execution in a strange way. Do you suppose that the ultimate sociopaths final? Masterpiece was that he made the media and by extension America as a whole just a little bit more callous in less than pathetic. I think that's an outstanding point. And one of the things that troubles me, including myself. You know, I'm I-. I impartially self reflexively looking at how we've become this nation of what I call rubber neckers where you know, we do want to see what's happened to other people. We do look at crime as entertainment, unfortunately. And while I like to think that much of my true crime stuff. In fact, I hate that moniker. You know, if you look me up in the Wikipedia page it says, I'm a true crime pioneer. But true crime for me is you know. Is a mixed bag because sometimes, you know, it's just wallowing in the misery of other people. And I hate to think that that's what I do. You know, there's a certain aspect to my work that I believe, you know, as I've advocated for the wrongfully convicted I've helped wrongfully convicted people get out of prison with my work with the arise law series. You know? So there's a social Justice component to my true crime filmmaking and yet I'm part of genre. That takes other people's tragedies. The worst tragedy you can imagine the loss of a loved one, and we make entertainment out of it. And you know, I'm highly aware and conscious of that. And I do think all of that the the circus like atmosphere, the t shirts that were being sold. You know, burn Bundy burn, you know, people driving by with banners, you know, FSU students wanting revenge who you know, were not old enough. We're probably ten years old when the crime. Uh-huh. Actually happened. You know, I do think it's it was kind of a low point. And a floodgate of where we are today where there is an insatiable appetite for this type of programming. And I think often the victim is forgotten. You know, we have to remember that there are dozens of family members dozens and dozens and dozens of family members who are the the victims as well of bundy's crimes, and I do think, you know, and I'm applying the criticism to myself. So I'm not immune from it. But at least I I wanted to pull back and analyze I think sometimes our our desire to examine these crimes is often at the expense of the victim..

Ted bundy Seth FBI officer kidnapping Carol Durant Pensacola Bill hag Meyer Florida Colorado cuyahoga murder Miami America FSU ten years six days
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"I mean, the the most notorious example of courses caroll-ann Boone a worker of his from earlier days in Washington state during the Miami trial. She came down to support him. They ended up falling in love he proposed marriage to her while during the mitigation phase of his death sentence during the Kimberly Leach trial, which was the second trial after the Cayo mega sorority trial and he proposed marriage because he became aware that you know, a declaration of marriage proposal in an open court in front of court. Officers crew. Created a legal marriage in the state of Florida. And you know, the prosecution dismissed it as charade designed to you know, you elicit sympathy like who's going to you know, how how can you sentence me to death on my marriage? They give me give me life without parole. Instead that was that, you know, how the prosecution and many people perceived it, and yet the public just kind of ate it up and caroll-ann said, yes and still believed in his innocence. And they actually you know had a child together while he was on death row. So it was it was an extraordinary set of circumstances. I was interested to learn that before he even began his killing spree. I think he worked at the Seattle crime commission. Do you think that gave him an insider knowledge of the weak spots in the system that he could explode to his advantage? Oh, absolutely. I mean, the fact that he had that kind of knowledge of you know, how police investigations worked as. Is one of the many ironies and interesting facts. I think Bundy is very much a product of his of of the era. You know, the the seventies was a time before many police investigation techniques had been created for example. There's a common perception that profiling F B I profiling is what captured Bundy, but it's just the opposite. The failure to capture Bundy after his conviction caused a lot of soul-searching at the FBI and led to the creation of their profiling program. And so Bundy was interviewed by the FBI after his conviction as a way to, you know, start creating this profiling program, you see a fictionalized version of it in in the Netflix series mindhunter. But this was you know, the local police. Departments. All of whom I think did as good job as possible. So this is not to criticize either the King County police in Seattle or the Colorado police because in Colorado, for example, Mike Fisher, the detective there was tenacious in trying to solve the murder of Karen Campbell. But police departments didn't routinely share information there were no central databases forensics as exists now was in a far weaker state. There was no DNA evidence. There weren't even fax machines, or you know, police are police departments communicated by teletype. There was no internet. So Bundy, you know, exploited the system and was able to elude capture for for far too long. In fact, to me, one of the most fascinating and horrifying things about the Bundy case, you know, in particular is that you know, he was apprehended three times he was apprehended in Utah..

Bundy Seattle Cayo mega sorority Kimberly Leach Miami FBI Washington Netflix Florida Karen Campbell King County Utah Mike Fisher murder Colorado
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"He's playing more to the press than he is to the jury. Yeah. Absolutely. He was playing to the press. But also, I think to his own detriment legally some of the things that he did trial. I think greatly benefited the prosecution merg sample very early on the prosecutor Larry Simpson called the PO the first police officer who was at the crime scene at for the Cayo mega murders. The the first police officer to show up at the scene, and the prosecution was not planning on diving too deeply into into the details of the crime scene because they were going to present forensic evidence later in the trial. So is a very brief kind of just table setting establishment of the crime scene, and and this particular police officers role in it Bundy to the consternation of his public defenders. Stood up and decided to cross examine extensively with great detail. The crimes the this officer who was the first at the crime scene and going into such detail that everyone in the courtroom kind of felt like this was a serial killer or a killer relishing going over the details of his crimes, and you know, it it it did not help in the minds of the jury that he did those kinds of things and yet he played to the to the press into the media and the and the and the spectators in the in the galley were hugely entertained by him. And I almost wonder if you think that maybe the theatricality of his defense strategy pre-stages what we see in politics today, where if you can create enough distraction in theory, maybe the facts won't matter. I think that's a I think that's a very good point. And I agree with that wholeheartedly. You know, he was. You know, he was somebody who just kept denying denying the Niang. And and a lot of people signed on but much to their chagrin later when he confessed just a few days before his execution..

officer Bundy Larry Simpson PO prosecutor
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"You know that a guy who, you know, kept declaring his innocence. And yet the legal troubles kept mounting, and he escapes from prison not once but twice and while he's on the Lam does his most vicious killings in Florida at Florida State University in Tallahassee the cuyahoga sorority killings. You would think that somebody who was, you know, had the presence of mind to plan to prison escapes. I mean who who who escapes from prison once let alone twice you would think that he would learn his lesson and lay low, but that compulsion to kill was so strong that by the time it got to. Florida two weeks after his second escape he does some of his most vicious killings. And yet he still had his admirers and fans, and there was this odd duality as you say of of, you know, people, you know, fearing him, but also almost according him some kind of folk hero status which continues today. I mean, it's just it's, you know, a America, you know, has five percent of the world's population yet, we've had sixty seven percent of the world's serial killers. And the one name that constantly floats to the top despite those many, many serial killers. We've we've you know had here in America. The Bundy name is just so well known and I think, you know, it goes back to bundy's trial. He was this was the first nationally televised trial the. First time serial murder was kind of turned into mainstream entertainment because basically technology meeting this increasing fame of this guy. Just a few months before his trial. A number of new stations were still shooting news on sixteen millimeter film. But around the time of the Bundy trial, this new satellite technology, and electronic news gathering as we know it today was was just coming into its own. And so that allowed live coverage of his trial. The Florida judge allowed the cameras in because it was such demand for coverage from around the world by the time the trial started. I mean, there were cameras from fifty states in nine countries watching this horror unfold gavel-to-gavel, you know, you can draw a straight line from there to the Bundy execution when Bundy was executed ten years later. It was the first time mobile satellite. Trucks were kind of in vogue, and his execution was also a live television event. Obviously, they weren't looking at him actually being executed, but all the fanfare outside of the death house was covered, you know, extensively. And I think because he was our first media celebrity in terms of criminality in a whole new way of covering these stories, it, you know, it's made him into this this memorable figure that people have, you know, all sorts of odd feelings about. Yeah. And he almost seemed to have an intuitive instinct for how to manipulate the media you talked about during the trial, and how he was allowed to be his own co-counsel and lead his own defense cross examine witnesses, and he's filing all these crazy motions in court. Like, you know, I want to quote unquote, change of menu because he's tired of eating grilled cheese sandwiches or proposing marriage to a witness on the stand. I it seems like..

bundy Florida America Florida State University murder Tallahassee cuyahoga sorority sixty seven percent five percent ten years two weeks
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"Then it's a hell of a story. And if he's not telling the truth, and and we reinvestigate the case, and we have access to Bundy, it'll still be an interesting story. So they decided to sign on. And kinda Stephen was tasked more with doing the sit down interviews while he went off in tried to put together the pieces of the case. Of course, us investigation turned up the fact that you know, Bundy was obviously the killer. It sounds like he's sent them on a fool's errand. And they actually talk about having a certain amount of buyer's remorse at some point because he would just jerk them around for hours and talk about his idyllic, childhood and bloviate about this and that and anything other than the murders. How did they finally get him to talk about that even though Bundy was looking to tell his own story and look for some investigator to exonerate him. Stephen wanted to drill into the crimes and. Bundy kind of refused to talk about the crimes which defeated the whole purpose of why were they were there? And so Steven had this kind of epiphany in which if he you know, he he offered to have Ted just be an expert witness to talk in the third person. And he theorized that if Ted was allowed to talk in the third person, you know, a serial killer loves to talk about their crimes, but he didn't want to implicate himself legally. And so he suggested to Ted that one one you talk in the third person and tell me what a person like this might do if they were in this situation, and you can kind of be an expert for me, and that idea really appealed to Bundy and Bundy, then it was like the floodgates opened. And he started talking, you know, quite extensively in about. You know what? A killer would have done in these crimes and clearly he's talking about himself because the the level of detail that he knew clearly suggested that that he was the person doing these things, but it allowed him to talk in a way that didn't implicate him legally, they admit in the documentary that they got pretty frustrated with all the games Bundy was playing with them. And eventually they just got sick of being around the guy. Yeah, they were fascinated by the time. He started to talk. But by the end of the process, they were so disgusted by what they learned from this person that you know, they had had enough. You know, I I can relate, you know, I've done now kind of almost simultaneously. I did the scripted movie with Zach Ephron lily Collins, which takes a different part of you. And I've been deeply immersed in the in the tapes and doing the series, and I am, you know, not that I'm sick of talking about the show right now to use to take the wrong way. But but it's it's the. Acts that he did are so vile what he did to another human being so repulsive, and he demonstrates such a lack of remorse, which was one of the remarkable things about my entry into these tapes was just a deeper understanding of how that mind works, and how remorse lis- he was. I'm sick of it too. Because it's just you know, it's the darkest side of humanity. That's been revealed here and their experience of kind of being led along by Ted Bundy was not uncommon one constant weather. It was Bundy talking to the reporters or even to the FBI whether he was on the Lam from the law or standing trial. He seemed to always be one step ahead just toying with people and relishing these little mind games Bundy was a master manipulator. I mean, his whole MO approaching women with fake cast or limping with a with a fake crutch. You know pr-? Paying upon the female instinct to nurture seeking out help and then using that to isolate a woman by his car and then killing them in horrific ways. Whether it's that or declaring his innocence or manipulating his live in girlfriend, which is the subject of my scripted movie was Acque Ephron, but he was always doing things to trip up the police he would change his modus operandi and change up. How he did the crimes he would leave things at crime scenes that had nothing to do with the crimes to confound them..

Ted Bundy Acque Ephron Stephen lack of remorse investigator FBI lily Collins Steven
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"There was enough people who heard him say his name Ted who heard him say he had a VW and enough information was gleaned by authorities that a composite sketch was made of him, and when this newspaper article with the composite sketch circulated around Seattle, including his name in the his first name Ted and the mention of his VW a lot of Ted's friends pointed to the newspaper and said, oh, boy, isn't that a coincidence a guy named Ted, and he has VW to and look at the sketchy kinda looks like you. But nobody thought oh jeeze. Maybe he's the killer. I think the fact that he was able to present himself as a up and coming lawyer law. Lawsuit made people, you know, give him a pass yen at one point wasn't even going into politics. I guess it was on the staff of a gubernatorial campaign. Do you think that he saw himself one day becoming president good question? Well, you know, there's certain psychopaths have lots of things in common in their aspiration for the high the high office. But I I don't I don't think he saw himself that way. I think I think actually, sadly, despite the outward appearance, he had this nagging, insecurity, this nagging emptiness. And that's what compelled him to kill. So I'm not sure he really thought of himself as somebody who was going to have that career. But I think others who looked at him thought he was on the path to success the skeleton around which you built this document series is a collection of over one hundred hours of audio interviews with Ted Bundy from prison win. And how did you first become aware of these recordings was Stephen Michaud? Oh, and Hugh Ainsworth who are journalists. They conducted these interviews in nineteen eighty right after his conviction. The these audiotaped interviews and had exclusive access to Bundy. And they turned it into a book called conversations with a killer and Michaud was a fan of my work and reached out to me. And when I heard these tapes, you know, fairly recently, I thought, wow, this is something amazing to build a show around. I like how you use the word skeleton. But you know, we might wanna use that word a little more careful as as as it relates to this story. Just just kidding. But when I saw that the tapes were, you know, when I listened to these tapes, I thought, you know, because there there is a lot of stuff on Bundy out there already. And so I and I've always been fascinated by his story. But I never. I thought I would be adding to the kind of you know. Shows and media that's already out there about Bundy. But this these tapes, you know, felt like there was something new to say so my partners at radical media. And I went to Netflix and to see if they were interested in they agreed that there's a real opportunity here to tell a somewhat familiar story through a whole new point of view in a new lens, and that is entering into the mind of the killer himself to get some kind of understanding of how he operated and why he operated, and you know, it's utterly chilling. And fascinating to hear the killer himself talk about his crimes, I'm interested in how these two journalists you and Steven actually got permission to do this. Because a lot of people requested interviews with Bundy in prison, and he always turned them down. But Stephen and Hugh convinced him by reaching an unusual agreement with Ted Bundy could you talk about their deal. You know, Michelle. Ios agent. You know, reached out to him saying that Bundy was looking for somebody to tell his story that seemed interesting to those guys because you know, at the time Bundy was declaring his innocence. I mean, that's another hallmark of Bundy in that, you know, most serial killers once they're caught, you know, just love to spill the beans about their evil acts Bundy maintained his innocence throughout the trials throughout the entire appeals process and didn't actually confess until days before his execution in nineteen Eighty-nine. And even that was a cynical attempt to extend his life because he hoped that by becoming useful. And finally talking about the crimes that was his kind of you know, Ason the hall that would keep, you know, investigators investigators would want to keep him alive until they closed. These many cases in multiple states that were still technically open. So I think Stephen and Hugh thought well if he's telling the truth, and he is innocent..

Ted Bundy Stephen Michaud Ted VW Hugh Ainsworth Seattle Netflix Michelle Ason president Steven one hundred hours one day
"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on Kickass News

"Joe Berlinger is an Academy Award nominated and EMMY and Peabody award winning filmmaker behind such landmark true crime documentaries as brother's keeper and the paradise lost trilogy as well. As the rocky memory Metallica some kind of monster in many other films. Now, he's produced and directed a four part docu series called conversations with a killer. The Ted Bundy tapes which debuts on net flicks. January twenty fourth as well as a dramatic film, titled extremely wicked shockingly evil in vile, which premieres at Sundance just two days later. Joe Berlinger, welcome to the podcast. Oh, thanks for having me. Glad to be here. Well, this documentary was just fascinating. And it comes on the thirtieth anniversary of Ted bundy's execution. What do you think is at the core of our enduring fascination with this monster? Yeah, you know, I think I it was convenient that the thirtieth anniversary of his exit. Cuche in kind of gave, you know gave the show an organizing principle, but I think thirty years from now will still be fascinated with Bundy, I just think because you know, he taps into our deepest darkest worst fear. Not that not that we're going to all be killed by serial killers per se, but rather the person next to you is ultimately unknowable because Bundy defied all stereotypes of what you want to think, a serial killer looks like and feels like, you know, people wanna think that serial killers are these odd social outcasts that are easily identifiable in society. But the reality is and particularly for Bundy who embodied this, you know, Bundy was a charming good looking guy that people liked who, you know, he declared his innocence for a long time a lot of people believed him. And so the whole idea that somebody could be so evil could be the. Serial rapist murderer of over thirty women, and he did terrible things to these women both before and after death that it's a person whom many people liked and admired, and that's that's our deep. I think a very deep dark fear that that he and fascination that he taps into. I mean as Bundy himself says in the show, you know, murderers, do not come out of the shadow with long fangs dripping in blood. They are people, you know, you like you work with you admire who the next day or capable of of the most demonic evil possible. You know, so that's that's my fascination with him. And also, I you know, the other reason I thought it was a good time to take a look at him. Now is that? You know, I don't need to tell anybody that. There's seems to be an insatiable appetite these days for anything true crime related. I've never been busier. And there's never been more stuff coming out about you know, that's crime related, and I think we can trace that all the way back to Ted Bundy because Bundy who represented himself at his own murder trial the Bundy trial in Miami was the first nationally televised trial. It was the first time cameras were led into the courtroom and people just saw serial murder as entertainment of from gavel to gavel for the first time, and you can take that line and trace it directly to the OJ Simpson trial in ninety five and then to where we are today, which is just we just seem to have this fascination with this kind of material new just talking about the fact that Ted Bundy wasn't what you pictured when you think of a mass murderer. He was handsome. Well-spoken well-dressed how much of this. Do you think played into his ability to allude capture for? So that that that was part and parcel to how he was able to go on a multi state killing spree and not be captured was people just didn't think that this guy could be capable. In fact, some of his earlier murders were in Seattle in the Seattle area in this place called lake sammamish, which was outside of Seattle the this state park, and he was so he had escalated his killings instead of nocturnal preying upon a female walking alone in in an alleyway type of killing this time at lake sammamish. He he brazenly went out in the open on a very busy weekend day at a at this park that was on a lake and he brazenly approached numerous women to which was his class. Classic Rusi had fake cast on and asked different women. If. They would accompany him to help him put a sailboat on his vehicle, and even though he successfully ended up killing not one but two women that day..

Ted bundy Joe Berlinger lake sammamish murder Academy Award Peabody award Sundance Seattle Rusi EMMY OJ Simpson Miami thirty years two days
"joe berlinger" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"joe berlinger" Discussed on /Film Daily

"From psycho featured all sorts of talking heads in commentary from critics and fans than filmmakers about it. And so having him dive into a movie like alien sounds really exciting. This is a movie that has been explored, you know, behind the scenes and talked about countless times over the year because it's such a revered movie, but it seems like this might have some a little bit more to it. The description says it will also focus on quote, the deep residents of myths and our collective unconscious. And so it sounds like they'll have you know, a lot of. Access to behind the scenes details and arts and development, and that kind of thing so hopefully, it'll be something that allows us to see the movie in a new light and reveal something that we don't know about the the movie see this seems to me like another crisp pick. I'll see this. Eventually, I think I had it on my list of something possibly to see. But I'm not really a big documentary guy. I know people would scoff at that. And I'm not like anti documentary. But I don't really go out of my way to see them for some reason. I I can't even explain why Chris what is your neck mine is the very long, titled extremely wicked shockingly evil, and vile, and I talked about this. I think on our most anticipated movies of the year list. And it's a it's a new film from Joe Berlinger who hasn't made a narrative film since a book of shadows player, which to that was his first narrative feature did not turn out that whale. So he stuck to documentaries since then. He made the paradise lost documentaries about the west Memphis three for HBO. And this is another sort of true crime thing. It's about a Ted Bundy and Ted Bundy is being played by Zach Ephron. And they're the, you know, Ted Bundy he's infamous he's one of the worst serial killers in American history. But there haven't been a lot of movies about Ted Bundy there, you know, there's been a fuelling direct to video movies that are just terrible. And I'm very curious to see what filmmaker Joe Berlinger does with this material. I'm very curious to see how Zach Ephron plays this character. I mean deca from may not be everyone's I thought when they think of a serial killer, but Ted bundy's whole Schick, if you wanna call it that was that he looked like a normal even like attractive guy. And that was how he was able to lower so many women into you know, being his victims. He seemed like a very nice, handsome guy and even just this month. Stir and I've never seen sack Ephron play a character. Like, that's a very interested in seeing how he plays it based on what you've seen a f- Ron's career, so far Chris, do you think he has it in him to, you know, pull off like a huge dramatic turn like this? I think he does. I actually think he's like I don't want to say, he's a great actor. But I think he's got a certain charisma that he's got that like movie star charisma, I guess, which a lot of people don't have any more, and I'm very interested. You know, he primarily sticks to a comedy. So I think he's actually one of those actors who just waiting for the right dramatic role to make everyone else realize like, oh, he's got you know, he has more to him than what we're used to sing. But I could be wrong. And I also feel like we keep on saying that but he's kept on. He's had a couple of dramatic roles that have been kind of acclaimed wasn't he in that? Linkletter film, Orson Welles one. I never I never. Yeah. Either. I actually really liked that movie. And he's good in it. Yeah. You know, there's two things about this movie. Chris that make it interesting to me number one. This script won the two thousand twelve academy Nicholl fellowship awards in. That's like one of the golden standards of screenwriting wards..

Chris Ted Bundy Zach Ephron Joe Berlinger Orson Welles Memphis Nicholl HBO Schick Ron