17 Burst results for "Jocelyn Robinson"

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:09 min | 9 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"In the niche by by and talking to so many individuals. I reference things that are that I'm reminded of outside of radio survivor but. The unique thing about talking to people every week on these topics is that. They don't just remind me of a youtube I watched. They always remind me of a conversation. We just had I mean the the the conversation day with with Kenneth a about Uber Web really reminded me of the conversation that we had with. I'M GONNA look it up now Sido screw up and. Not, remember the guest's name for the second time like I did in the it's hard to have that encyclopedic knowledge know normally. Wait was Jocelyn. Robinson. Robinson who was on talking about? Their project to archive historically black colleges and universities talked about this unique transition that we've made from the Twentieth Century to the twenty first century where people were not their own folk archivists. Back in the nineteen sixties in the way that everybody. Everybody is carrying around an archive of their life now, either on their laptop computer or on hard drives. End IT'S A. It's a really interesting. New World and we certainly are rated survivor appreciate the the the folk archivists of the twentieth century since they were forward thinking and. Kept a copy of things that we care about. That's Boy That's every episode it is, and because I think what? Once you start dipping your towing, you realize that it's wide in deep and. And how much there is to be remembered and preserved And and once you see it, you can't unsee it right once you know it you can't unknow it, and that's why we continue to traverse and I think I mean it seems to me that that we're not alone as we continuously learn and you know every so often. Bubbles up into the mirror mainstream recognition such as the the woman who recorded all the Philadelphia television that the Kenneth. Reference Rights and you that's a moment and. It. Like how this allows us to sort of Canada's a lot us to do with sort of a way. That's a bit more. Just slightly academic I know. But, but you know puts a bit of things to to to both a pithy summation. and to a little bit of theory if you will. With a small T.. And is very helpful. It was very helpful for me and reading the book. To. Have a fresh perspective fresh eyes on the work that I see other people doing that we are. We often get a chance to engage with another doesn't makes I'd like to do more. I just need to reserve. Those three hours at night with a nice nice classic of Bourbon. I you know. The thing is I met my youth..

Kenneth Robinson Jocelyn Canada Philadelphia
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

02:49 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Jennifer. I love him to death Jennifer. Goblet that's my homegirl. Hi Jennifer. Brat of a hey. Bill Good Morning Good, morning, Veronica. Watkins Johnson. Hey girl good. Morning China Baby, is he? A Hey China baby how you feel this morning ratio Gonzales is in the building. Hey! Teller is. Harlem honey, just popular building. Robert Andrews in the building. Hey Jocelyn Robinson. Good morning, the heavy burden who Josh will, and then you tune in again back. To. Jamaica kill or do is here good. Morning Kyw K. is here. Hello, are you knew I knew what the show thank you. tell us how did you hear about this show? Thank you. who was Lynn, that net Nassarawa was in building. Good morning, Lynette. How are you today Dray Shaw? Is here hey drake? Annetta George Henry is in the building diplo Harris is here. That's my favorite. The KEA stagger is here good morning key. Believe your new also welcome to the show. Thank you for tuning in. We appreciate your now share and tell us how by the. Julius Gillis in the building whisk over knowing Kishan Williams is here. Hey, Kisha Avis. Denise is in the builds in. Just, make sure. I didn't Miss Anybody right quick I think that's all that is. If make you Jones's here, good morning, they then you. If you guys WANNA, get shot lease. Mesa this they hire something. So economia O'Brien these sizes in the build the make. Showing. You a mess, just pop alad king just packed in you guys. I. Mean Thank you for Tuning. In March super. Kubota of David Shepherd. Shepherd despite the squishing. Sending. Somebody inform. I want to thank. Everybody for listening especially our newest. Please make sure that you follow us on social media to Sean Harvey Morning Show featuring the week of team, which is the page that were broadcasting off now? Please make sure that you like 'em. Follow because you'll be notified. Every time we go live, so that's great to know. We also have a group page that's on facebook. The Sean Harvey Morning Show featuring. Featuring the wakeup team grew, please. How growth grew at your friends. Grow the finding. Grow this show. We truly appreciate it. We're also on iheartradio forum, so please make sure to follow us arm there as well if you'd already have it, it's a free APP and it's very five on..

Jennifer. Annetta George Henry Sean Harvey Watkins Johnson Harlem David Shepherd KEA Dray Shaw Veronica Jocelyn Robinson Kisha Avis Julius Gillis Robert Andrews Teller diplo Harris Lynette China Kubota Kishan Williams facebook
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:24 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"So You know part of it is, let's all stay in touch. Let's figure out how we might be able to pull together some workshops and do some rudimentary trainings on best practices in audiovisual archival preservation and and see what happens. So and and and everyone's been onboard. Even those who really don't have the time or the resources They know that that it's a it's an important thing and that the fact that they've been alerted to its importance and and realize their their role in this continuing legacy, this continuing broadcast legacy then they start to say you know that what I'm doing today is important too. So we have to make a plan for all of this. Are there. So you know I visited radio stations where people have told me. Things to the effect of you don't WanNa know the sorts of things we've thrown away. So have what sorts of things should people not throw away maybe maybe you can send the battlecry people about the types of things they should be keeping at radio stations. Well I guess. You know any. Material that is that you can't play back. Until you figure out what what the content is. Don't throw it away. and. Don't throw away the playback equipment that you have at this point I was just at Elizabeth City. State University and they have cart players. They have at least two huge reel to reel machines they. They have other equipment that's in the storage area. This offsite storage area that also houses some of their. Media and. You know that the one of the librarians who has an R. Archives background was a part of our our conversation. You know that that material is now not going to be thrown away. Don't throw it away. Even if it doesn't work, someone might be able to use parts from it for a another unit that that actually can be used at a library and the good thing is. That most state archives associations are really good at sharing information. The Society of American, archivists is good at sharing information. There's list serves for all of them. You can. You can find somebody who can and resurrect an old piece of equipment or you at least try to find somebody who can re read an old piece of equipment and there's another institution that may be able to help you out with playback to figure out what you got. So I mean I think part of it is don't feel like you exist in a vacuum. There's a an incredible network of of of institutions and people who can and will. Help if you know, they know that there's a need I think archivists are some of the the most generous generous colleagues I've ever worked with. So you know. Don't don't throw it away until you talked to somebody no matter what it is. Jocelyn Robinson..

Jocelyn Robinson Elizabeth City State University Society of American
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"To. To preserve something because you did it you know so I think that they're all kinds of layers to to the preservation puzzle. preservation question and certainly you know being humble and and and having humility and feeling like Oh what I do is not that important. Is is a factor that leads me to the question Jocelyn. Robinson have you uncovered any sort of musical programming that's been archived in any decade at all at these historically black colleges and universities Yes. I have I haven't listened to it because we didn't have the capacity to play it back where I where we were. But at a South Carolina state, there is a Sunday morning radio show that features choirs from black churches in the in the region, and they come in live and and perform. And there's a whole stack of of You know a whole spindle of. CDs. So there's some of them are fairly recent, but they go back years and And there are a few folks who have recorded their own shows here and there have said, yes, I have tapes of of of my of my shows but that's that's something that does exist. Yes. Yeah. I'm thinking about an episode of survivor where we spoke with an individual that was running their own. Like I don't know off the Books Archive, how do we put it? It was RIMAC Michael with his hip hop Radio Archive where there was just There's just these bootleg tapes essentially that fans had made sometimes college radio sometimes community radio especially of hip hop in the late eighties and early nineties, and just you know how it was played that day on the radio by that DJ is really a unique. Archive. Because it's not just the list of songs. It's it's how they're mixed and how they're presented and and what people say about them when they played them on that particular day Joe so you know we we've learned how the college radio in particular played an enormously important role in in the early days of hip hop. And I wonder if you've uncovered any connections to hugh stations in particular these archives. I haven't really and I think that's probably because I have been focusing on at risk materials. So, our conversations have tended to be do you have open reel tapes? Do you have cassettes and not really looking to you know later formats and the music that would have been. You know naturally going along with that but that's not to say that that doesn't exist for sure. A suggestion. I'm curious what you know you've been kind of serving the landscape and visiting stations and obviously learning. That a lot of introductions need to be made between Arcus and radio stations. So what what's next? What's the next phase for you after you can complete the survey? Well, I think my findings are..

Robinson Jocelyn South Carolina Arcus RIMAC Michael hugh Joe
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:37 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"You're learning and what you're seeing. Oh absolutely absolutely even in the the HBO that I visited when there's been a particularly charismatic and and forward thinking GM there there might be. Something, not necessarily archival material, but but growth in the station more wattage more equipment a a stronger relationship with the academic program I mean it it. It should trickle down into the the historical record but at I haven't really found that to be the case quite yet but I wouldn't rule it out because again, we're. Even a few steps away from really identifying whether or not a station has archival materials. We. As you're mentioning some of those trajectories I think A lot of stations aren't even aware of just their general history so. Even I found you know I found in my research that that sometimes I'm digging into student newspapers to learn more about a radio stations history that often the students aren't aware of. So I think they're often there are these. An incredible accomplishments that that go unnoted? So yeah, not only the audio. Not, only the audio that you're talking about whether or not that's been preserved, but even just the goings on of station and right it's program guides. All right. You know posters from concerts that the the the the radio station help sponsor or MC or whatever I mean. Yeah. There's. There's a lot of that. That's the voice Sir Jocelyn Robinson Project Director at the historically Black College and university radio station Archival Survey, project we're talking with radio on radio survivor today about preserving the sounds of historically black colleges and universities radio stations. Our guest has informed us that about thirty percent of the existing H. have. Radio stations or have had radio stations. So that's like a about less than three dozen existing possibilities to archive or or to hear these sounds and what's very exciting. About today's topic for me, is that the history of radio in this country and college radio are extremely Interlinked, and in fact, in a Lotta ways called radio is is is really like the. The the foundational moment of of Radio in the country and so to think about college radio on campuses of historically black colleges and universities, and the you know what what has gone on at those stations and how how the every story at every station Is such a unique portrait of those communities It's very exciting I'm glad that Jocelyn Robinson somebody's on the job now it's a, it's A. It's a, it's a unique, but it's very interesting that you had to that you had to write your own job description to get this someone needed to do it Thank you for begging for taking up that That Mantle Jocelyn you mentioned you mentioned learning about the first FCC licensed radio station at an HP see you so I'm curious if. What you're if you're looking at radio stations that don't have licenses as well..

Sir Jocelyn Robinson Jocelyn Robinson Mantle Jocelyn GM Black College HP Project Director FCC
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"This was a specific latin-american mystery but we're on the line today with Jocelyn Robinson, project director of the historically black colleges and universities radio station, archival survey project here on Radio Survivor Mine Eric Klein with me as always been. Just so now I want to kind of dig down here because I think you have a unique position if unique experience. To me in my mind and my experience W. Y. S. O. stands out as unique in having an archives project and that's that's Antioch College in Ohio in Ohio Yellow. Springs Ohio. Yes. And Unique Radio Station College public radio station much more. So I think I in its functioning these days but still with a lot of community involvement and it stands out as unique is having a formal archives project I would say that Those don't tend to be in the majority and you've had experience to work there. and I wonder if you have a sense from from both working in higher education working at. An historically black college. And then working there it w why. So if you have a sense for for why a place like any college and to be a wire, so heads this archives project if that illuminated all why then perhaps. These. Other colleges and universities both HP US and. Just in general don't I don't know if you if you have any insights there. Oh, absolutely do and it's not what you think. Well full disclosure I also worked at Antioch College for a time in a higher ed capacity, the an in administration and. Back in. Believe. It was nineteen ninety-one. The radio station moved from the second floor of the Student Union to building on campus. And when it moved, the tape library was pulled off the shelves and thrown into bags and boxes hauled across campus to this other building stuck in a musty storeroom and there it lay for nearly twenty five years That is why Waso has a collection to a large degree. It was almost A. Benign neglect, would you say that? Yes, they. So at the very least, they didn't throw it. Away Right. which, which is often what what happened or that didn't get somewhere where you wouldn't ever find it again if it was California real estate instead of Ohio right. warehoused somewhere where I guess it also wasn't subject to many environmental threats. Well it it it had a bit of threat you know the. It was an older building, musty mildew, e There was a a mold bloom after it had been stabilized, and there were some difficulties with environmental apparatus, but You know for the most part the fact that it was still there in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety,.

Unique Radio Station College Ohio Antioch College Eric Klein Jocelyn Robinson director Student Union HP W. Y. S. O. Waso California
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:53 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Spur these conversations on on various campuses and in some cases, the radio, the station manager and the institutional archivists have never met and never spoken and and now they're thinking of ways that they can write a grant together to. Start Thinking about? You know how they're going to to preserve the radio stations materials. So I in many ways it's even more fruitful and and interesting and exciting than finding. You know forgotton tape of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior. Right. Jocelyn it rings true rings true for me as somebody who visited called radio stations all over the country as well and I think you're absolutely right that often those conversations are happening between radio stations and and college archives it it's sort of a rarity when there is an established archive in special collections or in the library and the university archives. And I asked agree that the day to day work of a radio station can be overwhelming and so the archival projects get pushed aside. I think often often these collections are housed elsewhere too. So alumni often have tapes squirrelled away and so that adds to the complexity for you is that. You know there may be some of this material but it it may be it may not be on campus anywhere right all right that was part that's been part of the conversation everywhere we've gone and it's not just students it's former programmers you know that may have been professionals or you know station managers who thought well, this would be important to keep a take it with me when I go and. You know. I think that is the case almost everywhere and certainly during periods of time when the. To record a show and and keep it, you weren't. It's not like it was going to get. It will wasn't a podcast that could be played multiple times or something like that. So who else was what? You know. What you need Jocelyn. Robinson. Is like cart that you can produce that they could play on all these stations to ask the community of anybody has any cassette tapes in their closets I know we Jennifer. You brought a guest on earlier in two thousand, hundred where. The, the the clue, the missing clue for that detective as far as radio archives goes wasn't found until that guest was able to get onto the radio station and ask a elderly listeners if they remembered anything. I think this was..

Jocelyn Dr. Martin Luther King Junior Jennifer Robinson
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:09 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Well, they're just as diverse as HCC US they're incredibly diverse, they're large, they're small rural, urban, their public private. the radio stations are sometimes public radio affiliated with NPR sometimes commercial based. Some of them have a very strong relationship with their institutions as a teaching tool. some of them are a little bit more removed from that but. It. So they're diverse and and they'll the number is finite. It is a number that is something of a moving target and a shifting target because. in the I, know of at least three radio stations that have sold their licenses. and. One of them was Shaw University that was only in two thousand eighteen fit Ville State University in the in the UNC system sold theirs to WNYC in a two thousand fifteen. So there's a bit of urgency around at least identifying the the the landscape is you say Because, the FCC license is an institutional asset. And when an institution is at risk. which some HPC's are and many colleges are in this day and age that's that's not something that's unique to HPC's. But those assets can be turned into cash to keep the lights on and keep the doors open of of a college. So. which is one of the reasons why Waso Did the the the work put in the effort to? fundraise and and. Their own license and and Kinda strike off on their own, not so much because any college is at risk but. But the the landscape for Liberal Arts colleges is is sometimes pretty bleak. So Yeah that that doesn't have to be a factor in what goes on at the station. So Jocelyn Robinson is on the line we're talking about her project. Well, she is the project director of the HCC radio station archival survey project and and we're talking about what you're up to with with understanding this landscape of College Radio, Station Archives at historically black colleges and universities why why do you think it's so important to catalog the audio at these college radio stations Well there's a couple of different reasons and one of them is that HEC US tend to be keepers of culture in our communities in in black communities. particularly in the southeast, they are you know they to to my mind they are hallowed ground and believe it's incredibly important to to. Preserve and protect the legacy that that the institutions have and and as and as they are represented in their in their radio stations You know I. I think it's as simple as that they're they're important to their communities they're important to a larger Higher Ed the higher, the larger Higher Ed, universe and reporting to American history and culture. So you know. I think it's for me. It's it again it's kind of a a sacred. Duty to protect and preserve. Them. And can you can you give us a glimpse of some of what you've found so far as you've been going out visiting radio stations, interviewing people about their collections. Well. I. I have to say that I'm not finding what I had hoped to find initially which was. would have been collections. what I'm finding is I guess I use that word loosely? Yes. What? I'm finding is that it's in a number of cases fee institutions don't have the infrastructure for. Collecting. Historical materials that are related to their radio stations. the radio stations themselves I think are very much dependent on the general manager at the time. In some cases, there's two one or two professional staff. And keeping the service on the air is the priority..

Jocelyn Robinson HPC HCC NPR Shaw University Ville State University FCC Station Archives Liberal Arts Waso general manager
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

04:38 min | 11 months ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"So today, we're going to dig into college radio, but we're going to dig into a set of colleges and universities. We haven't ever really touched on on specifically and those are historically black colleges and universities, which it should surprise nobody many of them also have radio stations, and then we're also dipping into their archives as they may or may not exist Jennifer what brought this on this topic onto your radar Lou. There was an article about an amazing project that's happening right now being led by Jocelyn Robinson and she is basically doing a survey reaching out to learn more about collections of archives at historically black colleges and university radio stations. And that piqued my interest because I am interested in college radio archives generally, and so I was excited to hear about this project that's taking a look at it very specific slice of college. Radio. Yeah. In one of the things the Jocelyn will explain to us is that. HP. As they're known often play this very pivotal role in in community life and in cultural. Life. For African Americans wear in places where these universities are situated, which sort of adds an. Additional layer additional magnification. I think to the to the importance of that work. So it's it's really great that just took some time to talk with us about that project. Yeah. I mean it's it's like everywhere you go a college station, I mean or a community radio station on a college campus or Integrated into a college campus is going to be a very useful way to understand a community to understand a place, and so the notion of preserving the sounds of college radio at historically black colleges and universities is definitely a very exciting story for us it radio survivor and what a great guest run the line with Jocelyn. Robinson the project director of the HP YOU radio station Archival Survey Project, Jocelyn, welcome to radio survivor. Thanks for having me. So you're in midst of a really exciting project to document a very specific type of college radio material audio at historically black college and university radio stations. I wanted to just first of all have you explain? What a historically black college and university is to our audience. Well, it's a designation that was established by the Higher Education Act of nineteen sixty five hsbc us, our colleges that were established prior to hundred, sixty four and their mission is to educate African Americans. That's that's pretty much it. So, Hec, you is the acronym, and so you're looking specifically at radio stations that are at HSBC us and so I'm curious what prompted the project? It's kind of a long story. I have a background in African American history and culture I. have. Worked with the African American Museum community for some time and at a certain point I switched to higher education and I. Have a master's degree in cultural studies with a concentration in race gender identity, and I have eight years of experiences a title three director at Historically Black College. title three is a an institutional development grant that's made through To to ABC's it goes through the president's office and it really is an. Influx of resources of federal resources across divisions in the universities and in two thousand thirteen, I took a production course at ISO. And got. Bit by the. Bug, the radio bug. What kind what kind of radio station is Waso? WASO is a public radio station that was originally founded at any college by students in one, thousand, nine, fifty eight, and there's a very robust community based program to train. Local.

Jocelyn Robinson Historically Black College. Waso HP director Lou Jennifer African American Museum HSBC Hec ABC president
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

"AM zoom call now we can't go background three and four year olds gather around their screens some of them still in their PJ's others scoops serial into their mouths some of them twirl around oblivious to the camera morning meeting the meeting starts just our normal day would college coop preschool in Pasadena it's school with friends with all of it teachers kids learning stories it's all a laptop or desktop or iPad adults are spending more time than ever with screens and so our kids under safer at home orders lots of kids now have more time with their parents which is great of course but plenty of other parents are working and screens have become both teacher and family favorite baby sitter for years you may have been told to limit your kids screen time so now a lot of folks maybe you to worry it might be too much what are the experts say reporter deeper Fernandez digs into it four year old hazel has a lot to share with her friends and she sits on the couch and twirls a long strand of hair view full capital backed young one watch our client H. the morning zoo meeting is just one way the college coop preschool is keeping this small students connected to each other and it's a huge departure from a pretty fundamental principle the school used to it here too so at our school we had no screens whatsoever Jocelyn Robinson is college co-op's director in addition to the lack of devices there were no academics no letters phone numbers of the week this preschool is all about play yeah you get just about everything you need really just from playing when you're young child when you're playing and I'm not talking about video games but playing in the world's you move your body through space you make creative choices you might enlist other people and they go sheet the terms of it in other words cognitive development happens in sand pits and want kids create their own imaginary worlds now the preschool has to figure out how to nurture kids who stuck inside often alone turns out maybe screens aren't the worst thing I Joslin I'm having a good time and I am ready to read books and when I have I have a YouTube channel for the kids I'm just reading stories on there Mr Steiner was as sharp as a tack you were artistic sure having the children see and talk to their teachers is important Robinson says and they can give parents a small break moms and dads juggling work and also needing some timeouts themselves the thing people are coming to me about is just being badly driven crazy by being home with their three year old thank you wow that's exactly what's happening to Culver city mom Halina Newberry grant murmur that's my phone prior to quarantine she had never touched a screen with the exception of maybe flipping through pictures on one of our phones now grant husband both working there full time jobs from home and dividing up the schooling and Kate taking the kids three year old Alice and seven year old to Sora it has many meetings during the day as she juggles Alice's needs so he's watching a lot of Disney plus frozen.

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

"Zoom call now we can't go background three and four year olds gather around their screens some of them still in their PJ's others scoops serial into their mouths some of them twirl around the bloodiest of the camera morning meeting the meeting starts just our normal day would college coop preschool in Pasadena it's school with friends with all of it teachers kids learning stories it's all a laptop or desktop or iPad adults are spending more time than ever with screens and so our kids under safer at home orders lots of kids now have more time with their parents which is great of course but plenty of other parents are working and screens have become both teacher and family favorite baby sitter for years you may have been told to limit your kids screen time so now a lot of folks maybe you to worry it might be too much what do the experts say reporter deeper Fernandez digs into it four year old hazel has a lot to share with her friends and she sits on the couch and twirls a long strand of hair view full capital backed young one watch hi Pam for climate change the morning zoo meeting is just one way the college coop preschool is keeping this small students connected to each other and it's a huge departure from a pretty fundamental principle the school used to it here too so at our school we had no screens whatsoever Jocelyn Robinson is college co-op's director in addition to the lack of devices there were no academics no letters or numbers of the week this preschool is all about play yeah you get just about everything you need really just from playing when you're a young child when you're playing and I'm not talking about video games but playing in the world's you move your body through space you make creative choices you might enlist other people and they go sheet the terms of it in other words cognitive development happens in sand pits and want kids create their own imaginary worlds now the preschool has to figure out how to nurture kids who stuck inside often alone turns out maybe screens aren't the worst thing I Joslin I'm having a good time and I am ready to read books and when I have I have a YouTube channel for the kids I'm just reading stories on there Mr slinger was as sharp as a tack you were artistic sure having the children see and talk to their teachers is important Robinson says and they can give parents a small break moms and dads juggling work and closer needing some timeouts themselves the thing people are coming to me about is just being badly driven crazy by being home with their three year old I think that's exactly what's happening to Culver city mom Halina Newberry grant murmur it's my phone prior to quarantine she had never touched the screen with the exception of maybe flipping through pictures on one of our phones now grant husband both working there full time jobs from home and dividing up the schooling and Kate taking the kids three year old Alice and seven year old to Sora it has many meetings during the day as she juggles Alice's needs so he's watching a lot of Disney plus.

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

"It comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly archived and purest Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and barked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkens Ralph Abernathy and many others the library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep the radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or backs reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything saved from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what they've got I come.

Jocelyn Robinson producer Wilkens Ralph Abernathy H. B. C. Sophia Albers Martin Luther Greensboro Dr Martin Luther Stokely Carmichael James farme
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Them I've got a son going to be less that movie is gonna get out from there like many chassis is scarred by his own country's decades of war quite literally with bullet wounds starting his arms he came here nearly two decades ago just after nine eleven since then some half a million Afghans and more than twenty two thousand Americans have been killed or wounded in the nearly one trillion dollar conflict for NPR news I'm Serra Hussaini in Fremont when it comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly archived and purest Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and worked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkins Ralph Abernathy and many others library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep the radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or bags reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything say from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what.

Serra Hussaini Fremont Jocelyn Robinson producer Wilkins Ralph Abernathy H. B. C. NPR Sophia Albers Martin Luther Greensboro Dr Martin Luther Stokely Carmichael James farme
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KCRW

"This is weekend edition from NPR news under the Garcia of RO the twenty twenty race is shaping up to be unlike any other in recent American history consider the fact that the current front runner on the democratic side Bernie Sanders hasn't actually been a member of the Democratic Party for most of his career the head of the Republican Party Donald Trump isn't a traditional Republican either he has reshaped the GOP in his image inverting longstanding conservative cannons on issues like debt international relations and democratic norms is the two party system as we know it breaking down and if so why when I joined by the Obama cannot a professor at Texas a and M. university welcome thank you very much is my pleasure to be on your program used any populism where more trust is put in a person like president trump then in political institutions and you contend the populism breaks down the traditional order I'm can you explain how all this could be affecting the two party system in the United States right now so in the US definitely there's been no change in the last few years we've seen that the GOP has been taken over by president trump using mechanisms like fear retaliation personalism and these are populace methods explain personalism when you're saying personalism what does that mean personalize arm is where on individual leader uses the connections and they're sometimes even their friends and their families in order to become more popular to gain support in present trump case it's been quite evident in the last few years read that these these are the families connections even the usual Twitter itself so that his followers will seem almost there he's talking to them directly skipping the institutional apparatus can you just talk me through some of the perils you see in president trump's rise to some of the other places you have studied their own is probably the best example in our in Argentina in the fifties his ability was to be the kind of a theatrical in performance if so his appearance the way that he behaves his image president trump is definitely use that model and then in the case of a more of the left wing populism unlike in America we have somebody like able moralis who again is has a pretty good persona narrative and he wrote again the use of a repetitive stories about the elite versus the masses is something is also quite similar in the way that Bernie Sanders is rising one of the things that has been so striking is how quickly voters shed the ideology of their party wants a populist comes to power does that show that all this political edifice all the political sort of an intellectual underpinnings of a liberals and conservatives are simply a house of cards which populace can exploit to their advantage in then I would say that is the case I do think there is a crisis in the U. S. party system I do think that the edifice constructive by long before very long time in the G. O. P. by intellectuals are who are conservative is is falling down breaking down because of the use of certain tropes by president trump so for instance the idea of race gender and the us versus them dialectic and then the idea of the strong men are at least four elements are really quite visible in the case of trump for the Democratic Party I think Sanders and Bloomberg see that younger voters especially and us also in the case of Bernie Sanders immigrants Latinos have babies Celts are excluded from some of their traditional approaches by the Democratic Party so definitely I think they are taking the trump model seriously as someone who studies populism I suppose I I'm gonna end by asking you do you think that the two party system can survive what's happening right now so in politics it's very difficult to predict but I anticipate centers will continue to be successful and that will change the mainstream and I think in the case of the GOP dump trump is definitely already almost call up to the party so he has won that fight so definitely the Democrats have to respond in kind in some sense and if they will be a lot of self reflection within the ranks that's the A. over McConnell a socio political science professor at Texas a and M. thank you so much thank you very much the US is working on the first stages of what officials hope will lead to a peace deal with the Taliban in Afghanistan so far both sides have agreed to only a one week period of reduced violence not a total ceasefire watching these developments closely is the large community of African Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area Sarah hosts a knee from member station KQED reports the preliminary agreement announced Friday is the first step toward ending the US's longest running war administration officials say the Taliban would be required to stick to a week long reduction in violence after which you would have to sit down with Afghan officials and civic leaders to figure out just what role the Taliban will play in the future of Afghanistan how does that strike you yeah bori eight that's no heed photo here Fremont as the Taliban tightened their grip on her home town of her right back in the mid nineties photo he says her parents made the agonizing choice to sender to Canada at the age of fourteen to marry a man who promised to provide her a better life and education the marriage she says was unbearable and she divorced today you know I'm I'm a successful woman but none the less it was also a victim of the Taliban a victim of the system and so that's why when the peace talks with the Taliban started it was just very anger provoking for many Afghans photo he argues that many things have improved since the US invaded such as education for girls and she wants to make sure those gains are locked in to any plan for the country's next phase it should ensure that any agreement with the Taliban serves and respects the human rights of Afghan women as well as does off T. diverse religious and ethnic groups and other marginalized communities I just hope that it's a peaceful transition and I hope that the people are not going to be you know caught in the middle national chains of Elsa Rideau who escaped to the U. S. with her family as a toddler just after the Soviet invasion in nineteen seventy nine says close family who still live there report feeling less safe with the constant threat of bombings and attacks over the last half a dozen years than they did under the Taliban's oppressive grip I never ever thought that that day would ever come where the only option for peace and that country would be too we invite a regime of sorts to come in and run the country again but you know if the US pulls out of me what other choice does Afghanistan have Jane says Afghans like her aunt who never left the country are skeptical that American troops will actually leave the trump administration has only outline the possibility of reducing its troop presence from twelve thousand to eighty six hundred so far in the midst of what seems like an endless foreign interference in internal chaos Adam shook lessee of Fremont is not convinced his home country is prepared to be without them I've got a son going to be less that movie is gonna get out from there like many chassis is scarred by his home country's decades of war quite literally with bullet wounds starting his arms he came here nearly two decades ago just after nine eleven since then some half a million Afghans and more than twenty two thousand Americans have been killed or wounded in the nearly one trillion dollar conflict for NPR news I'm Serra Hussaini in Fremont when it comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly archived NPR's Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and barked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkens Ralph Abernathy and many others the library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep a radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or backs reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything saved from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what they've got I come.

Bernie Sanders NPR
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've got a son going to be less that movie is gonna get out from there like many chassis is scarred by his home country's decades of war quite literally with bullet wounds starting his arms he came here nearly two decades ago just after nine eleven since then some half a million Afghans and more than twenty two thousand Americans have been killed or wounded in the nearly one trillion dollar conflict for NPR news I'm Serra Hussaini in Fremont when it comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly are caught and purest Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and barked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkins Ralph Abernathy and many others the library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep the radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or bags reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything saved from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what they've got I come.

Serra Hussaini Fremont Jocelyn Robinson producer Wilkins Ralph Abernathy H. B. C. NPR Sophia Albers Martin Luther Greensboro Dr Martin Luther Stokely Carmichael James farme
"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Son going to be less that movie is going to get out from there like many chassis is scarred by his home country's decades of war quite literally with bullet wounds starting his arms he came here nearly two decades ago just after nine eleven since then some half a million Afghans and more than twenty two thousand Americans have been killed or wounded in the nearly one trillion dollar conflict for NPR news I'm Serra Hussaini in Fremont when it comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly archived NPR's Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and worked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkens Ralph Abernathy and many others the library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep the radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or bags reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything saved from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what they've got I come to find that very few radio stations have a relationship at all with the archivist on their campus about a third of historically black colleges and universities have a college radio station but today she's going to an H. B. C. U. where the radio station doesn't exist anymore the university of the district of Columbia she meets with curator Jim with Cory twenty three years ago the university with in a financial crisis and it had to make a sacrifice it sold its radio station W. DC you for thirteen million dollars to C. span selling a a license it's a it's an incredible asset and that asset is at risk in.

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn robinson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've got a son going to be less that movie is going to get out from there like many chassis is scarred by his home country's decades of war quite literally with bullet wounds starting his arms he came here nearly two decades ago just after nine eleven since then some half a million Afghans and more than twenty two thousand Americans have been killed or wounded in the nearly one trillion dollar conflict for NPR news I'm Serra Hussaini in Fremont when it comes to preserving important documents and recordings it's often a race against time with few resources that's what Jocelyn Robinson has seen on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities or H. B. C. use she's a radio producer has been on a year long project to find out what recordings those institutions have and whether or not they've been properly archived and purest Sophia Albers boys went to check it out when Johnson Robinson and barked on this project she was hoping to find something special that hidden Martin Luther king tape or some other kind of audio that would be remarkable and she's heard it's out there here's an email she got from a school in Greensboro North Carolina I know we made recordings of Dr Martin Luther king Stokely Carmichael James farmer boy Wilkens Ralph Abernathy and many others library since moved to in your facility and I don't know if those tapes made the transition or if they were thrown away that's an issue Robinson has come across often she's been to a dozen college campuses and the majority of them are not archiving or preserving their work properly if at all for folks who are trying to keep a radio station on the air or who are trying to educate students that's not necessarily a priority but also as black folks prioritizing our history in prioritizing our legacy is something that we don't get to have time to do preservation is time consuming and costly work an H. B. C. use tend to have limited funding and much smaller endowments the non H. B. C. use in some places Robinson has seen cassette tapes and floppy disks thrown into unlabeled boxes or backs reel to reel tape that's passed repair at one school she says there wasn't anything saved from over forty years of broadcasting so Robinson is trying to get more schools at least thinking about preserving what they've got.

Serra Hussaini Fremont Jocelyn Robinson producer Wilkens Ralph Abernathy H. B. C. NPR Sophia Albers Martin Luther Greensboro Dr Martin Luther Stokely Carmichael James farme