18 Burst results for "Jocelyn Bell"

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:59 min | 4 months ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And run thanks 5 17 right now in Colorado's morning News, Joe Biden may have a bigger advantage in Florida than previous polls have found, a CNBC change research poll released on Tuesday. Finds Biden up five points over the president in Florida. That's bigger than any lead. Biden has had in any of the five previous polls. The real clear politics dot com average has Biden up in Florida by 1.6% President Trump urging Pennsylvania's governor to open up the state during the pandemic. Pennsylvania has been shut down long enough. Get your government officials say there are over 184,000 cases in the state. Pennsylvania has a mask band aid for people When they leave the house, the secretary of state of Michigan is banning open carry on Election Day, She says she wants to keep everyone safe. We certainly saw a number of pieces of information and you know specific threats, but a lot of concerns from voters all across the state there was expressed to us as well as two clerks. Jocelyn Jocelyn Bell. And added that the threats against the governor, state officials and lawmakers also played a role. The Senate will confirm full vote to confirm Judge Amy Cockney bear it to the Supreme Court on Monday. That will be another signature accomplishment in our effort to put men and women who believe in a quaint notion that maybe job the judge was to actually follow the law Majority leader Mitch McConnell. Democrats argue the winner of the election should choose Ginsberg's replacement. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Not isn't providing a lot of details about his conversation with Senator Dianne Stein. This comes after the California Democrat took heat for her handling of the Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court nomination hearings last week, Feinstein was criticized for thanking Republican Lindsey Graham for how he ran the hearings and also gave him a hug. Afterwards, NBC News Radio's Mark Mayfield. Schumer says he had a long, serious talk with Feinstein but declined to go any further. And the city and county of Pablo being given two weeks to lower their corona virus levels or get new restrictions by the state. You're Nick gratis are we need to wear masks? We need to social.

Joe Biden Chuck Schumer Feinstein Florida Pennsylvania Jocelyn Jocelyn Bell Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Co president Judge Amy Cockney Supreme Court CNBC Senator Dianne Stein Senate Mitch McConnell Colorado NBC
Ex-wife, two teens arrested in alleged murder-for-hire plot in Bellevue, Seattle

News, Traffic and Weather

02:05 min | 5 months ago

Ex-wife, two teens arrested in alleged murder-for-hire plot in Bellevue, Seattle

"Tonight. We're learning more details in a shocking Bellevue murder for hire plot. Police say a woman promised to pay a teenage boy thousands of dollars to kill her ex husband. Know what 11 come, was tending to talk to the man who was shot nine times and survive. Married. That's right tonight. I talk to Baron Lee. And this is where he was shot nine times Now. He told me he is processing so many emotions right now. Relief anger disappointment, so he wasn't ready to do an interview tonight. But he told me he still cannot believe that he survived. The's court documents paint a deliberate and disturbing murder for hire scheme, Bellevue police say sharing Kelly hired a 17 year old boy to murder her ex husband, Baron Lee, and offered to pay the teenager $13,000 something like this is where It is rare on the day of the shooting in July. Police say the 17 year old got his friend to drive him to the Overlook at Lake Mont Apartments in Bellevue, where court documents say he was going to cap someone and empty the clip. Police say the 17 year old gunmen ambushed Lee, shooting him nine times The victim fell to the ground. The suspect stood over him and continued to fire, according to court documents. Lee said he couldn't think of anyone who would want to kill him besides his ex wife, saying they were in the midst of a very acrimonious custody battle that also included a financial motive for Kelly to have sole custody of their child. Detectives say Kelly even bought a GPS tracking device that was found under lease car. She purchased the GPS tracker and that was connected to the second suspect. There is evidence that she conspired to commit the murder. Now investigators tell us, they tracked down those two teenagers and Kelly using surveillance, video search warrants, soulful media and technology. She's expected back in court in the next few weeks back to you. All right, Jocelyn Bell tonight Thank you. Tammy.

Baron Lee Kelly Murder Bellevue Jocelyn Bell Lake Mont Apartments Tammy
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"To make detection said he is different in the sense that the probability might be very very low right but the significance is infinite. The it's one of the most significant discoveries whatever take place and so while we have over the years study observing in general You know we don't do a lot of pointed time like we. Allocate the telescope to a study till scout in the last few years. There have been changes to that the breakthrough. Listen program is a great example where they actually buy time on the telescope and they do pointed observations the nearest million stars in the nearest hundred galaxies. And so on. That's a change. There is now enough philanthropic interest that people are prepared to actually do pointed observations. Oh why another reason. Setia tournaments optimistic is that as good as the current crop of instruments says the next generation of telescopes will transform the surge when we look at the telescopes which are being planned for the next decade or two here in the US. As the next generation very large array internationally there's the square kilometer array. You're talking about collecting areas you know. I was at a number of antennas and so on which are perhaps an order of magnitude more capable than the existing telescopes he then think about the volume of the universe that you can search the volume of the Galaxy. You can search. You're talking about increases of factors of one hundred or thousand coming up. Et is already out there. Why hasn't she many been contacted yet on the intelligent life site? You can't define a priori the probability of success you can't even define you know the basis for a probability if scientists find intelligent life. What would it look like? The first advanced life that we encounter may may not be biological life. It may be much more akin to what we would consider to be artificially intelligent life silicon based life when you think of cutting edge research screen savers on computers. Probably don't come to mind but Castro wind back to one thousand nine hundred nine napster had just been released. The spice girls were breaking up and the X. Files was a hit on TV. The main strategy for researchers at sets was to comb through vast amounts of data collected by their radio telescopes to look for signals from ut. That's required a lots of computing power. Which at the time wasn't cheap. But that's all changed with an idea conceived as a cocktail party. The boom of the nineteen nineties meant that many people had reasonably powerful computers sitting around hope and most of the time they were doing very much computing. What Seti scientists could somehow use that SPEC computing capacity to crunch through them mountains of data sets? He hoped was born. Anyone with at least sixty. Four megabytes of Ram on their machine could download screen saver. That would play a very small part in analyzing. The data set collected the team behind. It may maybe a few thousand people download the program when the project finally ended earlier this year. More than five million people have helped. We consider just the radio search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It turns out that the amount of the radio spectrum that we can search instantaneously is almost directly hinged on the speed of our computers so as our computers get twice as fast. We can search twice as much of the electromagnetic spectrum as we all know just from the devices that we carry in our pockets. Computers have gotten tremendously more powerful. And we're now at the point where we can essentially process and search the entire signal that a modern radio telescope generates and this is the first time in history that that's been possible so that means that we can search more of the electromagnetic spectrum than we ever have and we don't really know where to expect a signal and so being able to search a lot of spectrum is very very powerful the other thing that we have is access to tools like machine learning and artificial intelligence which allows us to look for a much wider variety of signals than we've ever been able to look for in the past we started looking for Radio Signals. Jill Totta and back then we had very slow computers and we had to in fact build our own years transformed chips right our own chips that did a particular mathematical operation that takes stream of data and time and transforms it into spectrum across frequency. You know we inched up from one hundred. Twenty eight channels to Sixty four thousand channels to a couple of million and now we can do billions of channels so that s changed enormously. We're now beginning to open the door to the transient universe. We've never been able to do that in the past. We've required that signals. Stick around for a long time so that we could get around to confirming them but now we are thinking about ways to be able to detect a signal that lasts may be a nanosecond of second a minute and have confidence when we find something that it's really what we think it is. That's exciting. This is a whole new face base right. We haven't looked at transients before. Maybe that is why we've not been successful. So I'm I'm excited about opening another door faster. Cheaper computers have supercharged the search for et Seti at home is now no longer needed. But it's legacy continues. One of the many successes of the project was to prove that a huge chunk of the general public ca deeply about finding intelligent life. Now this can cause problems. False positives are huge problem for everybody interested in life but in looking for technological life we have another problem not just false positives but deliberate hoaxes. Fortunately for the scientific community. Jill says it's pretty easy for them to sponsor fake or they see one. We can nail a hoax really at the beginning but the problem of false positives is more tricky. They raised not just verification issues but philosophical ones. Just because you discover intelligent. Life doesn't mean people who believe when radio pulsars were discovered by Jocelyn Bell as a graduate student at Cambridge. They were initially dubbed. L. G. M. Zero Zero One and L. Gem zero zero two. That's little green man if you ask. Jocelyn Bell Burnell about that. She'll tell you that that was somewhat tongue in cheek. But nevertheless pulsars do in many ways mimic the kinds of electromagnetic emission that we see from technology so we have to be very very careful undoubtedly if we were to detect. A one hurts wide radio transmission. Even though today I would tell you that we know of absolutely no way that natural physics could give rise to such a signal. Certainly many many astrophysical theorists would come up with some way that perhaps nature could do that. Nature surprises so if we do detect such thing. I think it will still require substantial study to actually rule out the possibility that it is indeed a natural source rather than an artificial one doubt has long been built into the science of searching for e t. Yes. Humans haven't yet found intelligent life. But why hasn't it found us so you can answer the? Where are they questioned many different ways? That's Chris impey. I'm a professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He's talking about one of the most enduring questions in the field. The FERMI paradox. I've been scolded by philosophers often critique scientists in their logic. That is not formally paradox. Now whether it's actually a paradox. So not doesn't really matter for discussion. The italian-born Physicist Enrico Fermi is legacy is signed. His work on the Manhattan project.

Jocelyn Bell Jill Totta US Enrico Fermi napster ut Chris impey University of Arizona Castro Tucson Manhattan Physicist professor L. G. M.
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Science Friction

"So this episode begins in the late nineteen in sixty s at the radio observatory in Cambridge in nineteen sixty seven the new instrument was perhaps the least glamorous tennis cope ever built. They colluded washing line. Describe where at Cambridge University and it was to be operated fulltime by one person ago the graduate student who helped to build it Jocelyn Bell and Jocelyn Bell now Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell elating astronomer with along and a lustrous Korea is on the cusp of a warping discovery very annoyed L. Prize winning find in fact using a telescope. She's helped to build from scratch one designed to pick up radio frequency signals from an Atta space doesn't look anything like the Csiro Parks Telescope which is a big dish. This looks more like some sort of agricultural frame a a big version of what you'd find in vineyard. Maybe a vineyard that doesn't grow grapevines instead. It's sprouts radio aerials. Yes in fact more than two thousand of them. It was huge fifty. Seven tennis courts would have fitted into that area. You were building this. Yes they were actually using this telescope to look for quasars because they twinkled this thing specially designed to pick out twinkling things mm-hmm that one particular set of twinkling things court Joscelyn's I and she went on to detect pulse is for the first time time one two three four the first four ever identified by humanity. She's going to tell that incredible story. He end end what pulsars these dense energetic hearts of collapsed or did stars have allowed us to understand about the universe but also more like how growing growing up amidst the troubles of Northern Ireland shaped her life and how Jocelyn reconciles quaker faith with her scientific valleys days but I want to start with what first happened when her and her supervises discovery was announced to the world because get ready to GASP ASP when you head worked at the discovered pulses. You got a lot of attention. It was sort of extraordinary position for each day student to being you were in the media. You were being interviewed by journalists. What was it like bit. If a baptism some of fire I imagine there was a lot of interest by journalists. What was the first reaction of Supervisor Dr Tony Hewish. It's absolute nonsense. You don't believe this at all. It must asked me something artificial. Nothing nature could do this so you're just believe it as long as you possibly can and typically the interview would have both my thesis adviser. visor Tony Hewish and myself there and here we can see Dr Tony Hewish who will tell us more fight it and they'd ask Tony Hewish about the astrophysical significance of this discovery with optical telescopes when is limited to arrange observation about here was made. It has kind of got a greater distances. Everybody's first three actions were that it must be manmade and then they turned to me for what they called. The human interest second reactions not really voice very lied. Were were. Perhaps it's little green men another civilization. This was really as a young female sex object. What were my measurements bust waist hips AP's please. How tall was I would. I describe myself as Blonde Brunette or blonde hair. Colors were allowed. Apparently how many boyfriends did I have at wants. It's all this kind of thing not an ounce of science in it was pretty grim and I would have loved to have been really rude to to them particularly the photographers who asked if I could undo some more of my blouse buttons for them. You know you're a Grad student haven't even written your thesis. You'd need references assist from your lab to get another job. You haven't got another job. I couldn't afford to be rude to them. Did you supervise a saying no I just I forgot what my vital statistics were. Just didn't know willfully regard willfully forgot. Yes very discovery of pulsars for which you played need. A decisive role is a most outstanding example of how in recent years our knowledge of the universe has been dramatically extended did so therefore. I don't quite understand of not understood why you haven't become embittered about what happened next. In nineteen seventy seventy four you'll supervisor and a colleague won the Nobel Prize for the discovery that you had been a K- part of you with the second author on that paper and yet you. You seem to have been perpetually philosophical magnanimous about that. Your name was not on that. Nobel prize is and yet you were a K. member are but I was a student on the Nobel Committee didn't look at students. Do you think that's the reason why Yes oh yes. Yes yes novell. Winning work happens in people's Twenties and thirties. That's well known yes but the there's a supervisor around an electoral ritchie the key figure the picture that we used to have way back of her science was done was a senior male often with a fleet of Minions Nyan Speedy Grad students or technical help or what have you and if the thing was successful. The supervisor took the credit. If the thing was unsuccessful the supervisor took the blame on the other. People just didn't feature. He's what Jocelyn Supervisor Antony Hewish said of the win without Jocelyn lighter onto the baby a a I mean my analogy really is a little bit like when you when you when you when you when you plan to ship of discovery and you go off and somebody up the mouse tied says Landho- that's great but I mean who actually aw inspired it and an conceived it and decided what to do when and so on I mean there is a difference between skipper and crew an controversy for many he told the BBC this to to be honest. I didn't think it would matter who'd be my student. I mean it was a serendipitous discovery because such a piece of equipment had been set up. I mean the discovery pulses was unavoidable. Once that survey had begun that was the way the Nobel Committee was thinking at the time to agree with that no I don't talk chilly and when I've had students working with me their their name has gone I on the papers for instance because they're the ones whose careers need launching but that wars the picture of science for quite a while so it wasn't about gender. You don't think it was about high rocky. Yes they didn't know my gender. They didn't really need to know my gender. I was only a student is in many of beg to differ and think that you will deliver grinding justice yeah but I've done done very well artificial because I've got every other price that moves a lot more fun because there's parties most years and possibly a lot. Let's start lists dodgy than a noble prize with all the formality that goes with that not just the formality the aftermath you're expected to a half wise opinions on everything under the Sun because you're a Nobel Prize winner in something says a lot of pitfalls there but let's go back to the actual discovery of pulsars the team wasn't looking for what they found back in nineteen sixty seven and and if it wasn't for Joscelyn's acute is they may well have missed a weeds hit of signals altogether. The University of Cambridge had one computer the whole university it had less memory than a laptop today and unoccupied a big room. You know it was really really primitive and very few people had time on its we certainly didn't so our data kmart on reams of paper chart rows and rows of paper chart with red squiggly lines over it and I read these squiggly lines to get my data yes. This is the thing about astronomy which intrigues me visit. Uh It's so abstract in many ways you feeling in the dock with the help of your dad with the help of numbers with the help of charts what's and you'll try to read meaning into that data extraordinary meaning so you get these charts and what was that moment when you thought yeah well. I was being incredibly thorough and most of the things I so I could understand but there was one this one one little anomaly occupied really a very small fraction one in one hundred thousand but it was on the normally that Kinda stuck in my brain onto finally my brain twigged. I'd seen this anomaly before and then you could go back through the relevant bits of charred. Co Yes it was there on that day. Owen Owen it might have been there on that day but it didn't actually notice it but it was absent for three or four in between and absent for another two or three and then here's the one I've just seen a blip well well. I I called it scruff. It was a little bit of signal. That didn't.

Supervisor Dr Tony Hewish supervisor Nobel Prize Jocelyn Bell Jocelyn Jocelyn Supervisor Antony Hewi Cambridge University Nobel Committee Joscelyn Csiro Parks Telescope tennis Cambridge L. Prize Owen Owen graduate student Korea Northern Ireland novell BBC Landho
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"In just a few minutes. I'm Cody Gov and I'm actually Hamer today you learn about the woman who discovered pulsars and why they matter and why learning styles don't exist. You'll also learn about cell-sized is robots in the first edition of our micro-scale Mondays miniseries satisfy some curiosity. The discovery of pulsars was a huge step in advancing our understanding of the universe but when the nineteen seventy-four Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for the discovery the person who actually made discovery wasn't even mentioned thankfully that person finally received recognition in two thousand eighteen and the prize may help young scientists the world over plus today's birthday so let's learn about pulsars to celebrate elaborate the birthday of Jocelyn Bell Burnell. She was a graduate student at Cambridge University. When her team finished building a new radio telescope at the Millard Radio Astronomy Observatory they started collecting data as soon as it was finished and her job was to analyze that data <hes> to the tune of roughly seven hundred feet of paper records of that data collected each week her job was to spot unusual signals and she found one less than three weeks later a faint pulse that disappeared and reappeared every one point three four seconds on the dot after spotting more of these pulsing signals she and her thesis adviser started calling them pulsars pulsars are spinning neutron stars that emit powerful beams of radio waves from their magnetic pulse? The beam is what Bell L. Burnell had detected in that first unusual telescope reading. Here's why pulsars matter because there's such extreme objects neutron stars are nature's physics laboratories they experience extreme gravity a density beyond that of Atomic Nuclei Nuclei and incredibly strong magnetic fields and we can't recreate any of those things here on earth. The timing of a spinning neutron star or a pulsar can help us precisely measured these properties pulsars have helped scientists confirm a a lot of things including the fact that massive objects caused a distortion in space time that was an important aspect of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity pretty big impact. Wouldn't you say when the Nineteen seventy-four Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for the discovery. Discovery of pulsars Bell Brunell wasn't mentioned since she was a graduate student when she made the discovery. She's admitted that at the time she didn't feel empowered to fight the decision but in two thousand eighteen she got some of the recognition she deserved in the form of a three million in dollars special breakthrough prize fundamental physics at the time Bell Brunell said she was donating the money toward funding female minority refugees students to become physics researchers and counter the unconscious bias. She believes still plagued scientific research happy birthday Jocelyn Bell Brunell picture a robot. That's can conduct electricity sense. It's environment and change. Its shape seems reasonable right now. Imagine that robots being the size of a human cell believe it or not researchers are working on the technology to make that happen right now and over the next few weeks. You'll be learning all about them on our micro-scale. Mondays miniseries our guests for this series R. E. Tie Cohen Professor of Physics at Cornell University and Paul McEwen Director of the Cavalier Institute at Cornell for Nanno scale science and this week we'll start with an overview of these tiny robots and how they're made. Here's Paul McEwen computer. Technology is created incredibly sophisticated devices says with features down to really tiny scales and because of that you have the computer revolution <hes> you have <hes> you know all of the electronics that is making this this podcast possible <hes> so we have really really tiny electronic devices but we don't have little robots. We don't have a little things that can crawl around at the small scales biology does it sells for example or can think of them as a pair of medium is a little tiny robot but we don't have any equivalent that we can go make in the in the laboratory and then have go down and and and you know interact directly with with a pair of museum and so we decided we would try to build such robots <hes> when you think about a Boston Dynamics robot that's a three-dimensional device it has screws it has wheels it has hinges and one of the big challenges of making things at the micro. Nanna scale is to think about how you're going to build that if you don't have a tiny screwdriver and a tiny screw and hinge of post or whatever so the strategy that we <hes> devised really builds on some work that people had done in making Origami based aced robotics and the Nice thing about or Gami is that it's a two dimensional <hes> fabrication which means that we can steal effectively all of the technology that's available for manufacturing integrated circuits to fabricate are Origami design. Design and then once we release are designed it can fold itself up into the three dimensional shape that we want and using that kind of technology we can achieve hinges that are about ten nanometers to one hundred nanometers in radius radius curvature and that allows us to build robots that are on the order of microns to hundreds of microns and that's about <hes> a thickness of a hair diameter or just about the size of a cell so you said you steal some technology from the way <music> circuits are made. Does that mean that these are basically like computer chips that are just turned into robots. Is that how you put the date on them. That's right basically their computer chips with legs. <hes> and a lot of our job has been figuring out how to build the legs. I should say that's a non trivial thing because <hes> they're having people who have made a very small robots and by that I mean you know you have like a a he'll ical corkscrew-like object with a magnet at the end that can rotate the corkscrew screw in <hes> in the field of microscope robotics. That's kind of where we've been. The big achievement here is the ability to fabricate the robot using the same technology that we use to fabricate are microchips that allows us to build everything together folded up and now we have literally a microchip with legs so in one hand we have made very sophisticated <hes> little robots with no legs that have a whole computer chip on them that we can release off the substrate in <hes> even even put it in the brain of a mouse. Shall we say to record temperature or what have you in report that information back <hes> the ones that we've made with legs that have get up and crawl around have very simple brains in fact they have just a few little electronic devices on board and we power power them and make them move by shooting light at them which activates them so. We haven't quite put all the pieces together but we know exactly how to do it. Don't worry because we'll help you put the pieces together over the next few weeks on our micro-scale Mondays miniseries the last voice you heard was Paul McEwen and you also heard Isci Cohen. They're both physicists at Cornell University and you can learn more about them and their research into this show notes next week will learn about the cutting edge technology that makes it possible to make these micro scale machines. We mentioned this on a full length episode of curiosity podcast a couple of years ago but it bears repeating learning styles are a myth. I'm talking about the idea that different students brains are better suited to different styles of learning as in some people might learn better from reading about. About something while other people would learn better from being hands on with a project even though decades of research showed that it simply not true. It's still an idea that lots of people have including educators. That's a problem because it can actually harm a student's ability to learn so let's get into the science. The most popular model of learning style is known as V._A.. K. Theory for visual auditory and kinesthetic. It's one of lots of models based on the central idea that given lessons presentation should mesh with the students learning learning style in order for it to be most effective but as far back as nineteen seventy education researchers confirmed that there is no evidence to support this idea despite this as recently as May Twenty nineteen a survey of seven hundred people including educators showed that ninety percent of them believed that people learn better in their individual learning style so why can't we seem to get this straight believe it or not the pervasiveness of this myth probably comes down to culture according to researcher Catherine Scott in two two thousand ten paper published in the Australian Journal of Education. She pointed out that Western cultures tend to hold an entity view of people which is the idea that traits are fixed at birth eastern cultures on the other hand. Hold a process view where traits can be shaped by experience the entity model predisposed teachers to decide on a child's learning style based on limited interactions and that may influence the child's assessment of his or her learning style from that day forward studies do show that all students benefit when teachers adjust their teaching style to the subject matter and not the learner so for example math taught visually or language taught verbally that's not to say all students learn the same way everyone varies in their strengths interests and previous knowledge and these do affect our learning ability but as the research shows spending time figuring out students individual learning styles and educating teachers on how best to teach to those styles is the wrong way to go not only is it limiting it also waste time that could be spent on more effective approaches instead researchers suggest the primary focus should be on identifying an introducing the experiences activities and challenges that enhance everybody's learning before we recap what we learned today. We're going to give a special shadow to some of our supporters for today's Ad Free Episode Special missile thanks to Diane Carter at a young Michael Kovic Ryan Day Ben Urich Tom Sayer read and chase for supporting our show snow. It's recap what we learned today today. We learned about a legendary female scientists. That finally got her. Do Jocelyn Bell..

Jocelyn Bell Burnell Nobel Prize Paul McEwen Cornell University Bell Brunell graduate student Jocelyn Bell Brunell Cody Gov Cambridge University Millard Radio Astronomy Observ Albert Einstein Boston Dynamics Hamer R. E. Tie Cohen Professor of P Isci Cohen Catherine Scott Diane Carter Director
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"It's Friday, October twelfth, twenty eighteen and you're listening to up to date on enquiring minds. I'm Andrea Scotus Kishore Hari. Now that's been heard for bit. Yeah. Listeners the case you hadn't noticed. I hope you have. I've been out for the last six weeks or so. I just had a new human being an entire human being. Her name is becka. Oh, congratulates. Thanks. But now I'm back and excited to dive back in. Okay. So where do you wanna start? Well, I guess there are some big news. It was like one of my favorite weeks and science of the year just last week. You mean beginning of them or. No. You probably mean the Nobel prize? Yeah. I mean, when you're waiting by the phone at three AM and well minded ring, but I don't know. I wasn't waiting by the phone. I don't know what you think of my my scientific background, but no one was calling me. This was an interesting set of Nobel prizes because even economics one touches on science this year. So where do you wanna start choose any of them? Well, except he's we're not talking. Yeah, we're not definitely not talking about. I mean, I guess we have to mention the fact that woman won no prize for physics for only the third time. So this is like every sixty years. This happens and it's important to note that there's been two major snubs in physics for Nobel prizes. There was Jocelyn bell who actually discovered pulsars in the nineteen sixties and her graduate advisor was warded the Nobel prize for that discovery, which is widely considered one of the biggest nubs Nobel history because she did the work and then there's beer. Rubin who did all the work that really led to our understanding of dark matter as being eight thing that exists by understanding sort like the twisting of galaxies and unfortunately she passed away. So there's no way for her to win the Nobel prize. This goes into my longstanding rant that I think the Nobel prizes are out of date because they can't be awarded posthumously the committee. See that selects them is oftentimes slightly biased in their construction and that you can only award three laureates per prize. And oftentimes, especially in these physics ones that isn't enough. Yeah, no, absolutely. And you know, I think that I want to focus less on the fact that women and more on the fact that you know, this is really interesting discovery. Yeah, I think this is a fascinating one laser trapping of atoms, which is one of her collaborators won the Nobel prize for is amazing. The idea that we can have a laser and it actually exert s- radiative pressure on an item and you can use that sort of energy that the that the photons are bringing to play to actually trap atoms by having sort of beams of focus. Lasers shine and use that radiate of pressure to keep an atom in place. And then you can use that energy to siphon off energy from the atom leading to its cooling. That laser trap in the cooling is is a really fundamental form of. Laser physics that that has changed the way that a number of instruments work. It is radically changed our understanding of atoms at their lowest energy level. I thought that was great. Now, Donna stricklin one for her work. That was a little bit different because now any anyone that's ever gotten Lazic owes owes a debt of gratitude to Donna stricklin for her work in pulsing lasers to generate greater sort of intensity empower and now that's in so many devices that we use it is it is amazing how lasers have really reshaped physics in so many ways. And just like anyway, is that a is that a Lazic joke? It's fellow. I don't if I have the brain capacity for jokes yet. Madison Reed is accompanying named by the founder, Amy, Eric, after her daughter, and it's revolutionizing the way women color their hair. So for decades, women essentially had two options for hair-color. You could get outdated care color that you bought the pharmacy or you had to spend a lot of time and money at a salon. So EMMY created Madison Reed because she believes that women deserve better than Justice app status quo,.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Madison Reed Andrea Scotus Donna stricklin Kishore Hari EMMY becka Lazic Rubin advisor founder Amy Eric sixty years six weeks
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And when if when I think we start interstellar travel, we will use them as navigation beacons into stellar trip. That's extraordinarily because we're such a huge distances. The nearest one is what nearly five lighters way. That's the nearest star. Yes. Yeah, this huge distances. But if the still humanity owner in a few billion years time, maybe even less than that, we're going to have to find another place to live because the earth will not be habitable and the way to find another place to live is to go traveling art amongst the stars. How poetic can you find little pose is one in your. Nashville won't be lovely. One of my friends doesn't like me talking about the size, the scale of the universe. He says it makes him feel too small, and I can understand that there are some people who are really made anxious by the scale of the universe. Robert frost the US poet has an interesting comment on that. This poem is called desert places. They cannot scare me with their empty spaces between stars on stars where no human race is. I have it in me so much nearer home to scare myself with my own desert places. Robert frost as you said. And finally, people know that Halley's comet comes around every seventy six years and the poet's are quite well attuned to comets. But I think they think every comet comes back with a period of seventy six years, which is, of course about one human lifespan. This poem is by Thomas hardy, the British author and he's using a comet to reflect on his own mortality. It's called the comet at yellow. It Benz far over Yellen plane, and we from yellow height, stand and regard. It's fiery train. So soon to swim from site. It will return long years. Hence when as no, it strange swift chine will fall on Yellen, but not then on that sweet form of vine Dame Jocelyn bell Burnell on space per trip and do listen to science friction a few weeks back on how she did not, but should have won a Nobel prize..

Robert frost US Jocelyn bell Burnell Yellen Nobel prize Thomas hardy Nashville seventy six years billion years
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on The Science Show

"The sun show on RN and we have a sister programme presented by Natasha Mitchell called science friction and a few weeks ago. She featured one of my heroes Dame, Jocelyn bell, Burnell discover of pulsars for which he should have received an Abell prize. Here. She isn't MacQuarie university few weeks ago on her current work, tracking, cosmic bodies that move. It's a bit like moving from a still photograph to a movie. You can make a very deep photograph by adding together, lots of frames. But as long as you have the frames separately identified, you'll be able to see things that move or things that change in brightness. It's been developments in CDs in cameras and developments in computing that has opened up this new way of looking at things in the sky. I have to say that there are some branches of astronomy which have been well aware for a long time that things in the sky varied. Clearly, the pulsar astronomy, which is a bit of radio, astronomy where we see objects posting on timescales of second or a fraction of a second and people who've detected x-rays from the sky. Gamma rays from the sky are very well used to things that change their brightness flare up, die away. What has happened? Is it a number of older telescopes have been re purposed and re kitted out to study the sky for things that are transient, the Schmidt telescope, it's owned by the university of Uppsala in Sweden, but it's based in a stray Ilya. Now, some of the bunny for particularly pan Starrs came from the threat of quotes killer asteroids asteroids that move that because they move. We props, don't notice them unless we specifically consider the moving and some come quite close to the earth. Killer is a bit extreme killer is very extreme. But if you want money, you need to point out the threats. But it's okay. You can sleep tonight. Jocelyn bell Burnell this year. And here she is now in twenty eleven on one of her favorite themes space, poetry. He would talking about who wrote the poems, Robert frost and Thomas hardy. We're both amateur astronomers and had their own telescopes, and there's a suspicion that Gerald Manley Hopkins might have had or at least had a close friend who had a telescope and you can see in their poetry that they know what they're talking about. And then there are poets who have family members who are astronomers. There's a contemporary Welsh poet called Gwyneth Lewis. She has a cousin who is a NASA. Astronaut Robinson Jeffers. The US poet had a brother who worked at lick observatory Hilda Doolittle who wrote under the initials HD. Her father was the director of an observatory in. Pennsylvania, and so it goes on. There's quite a few poets who have serious astronaut Michael links, and there are other poets who are just fascinated by things up there in the sky and space, right poems with such themes and you, of course, been fascinated all your life. I talk to many many years ago about your work discovering pulsars. How back was that? Oh, that's over forty years ago now, that's well back and the idea is extremely dense and they're sending a massive signal across a vox of space. Yes, they are extremely dense. The analogy I use is take a thimble a sewing thimble, take the population of the world. Six plus billion people jam though six billion people into the thimble one at a time. And when you've done that, the thimble weighs about the same as it would have if it were filled with this pulsar neutron star. Material credible, isn't it? And the signal is coming usually on a regular basis, especially with the pulsar's how come it's regular. They're behaving a bit like a lighthouse a typical pulsar ways, thousand million million million million tons. And once you get a thousand million million million million tonnes spinning, it keeps spinning and it's actually quite difficult to make it change it spin, and it's sweeping beam of actually radio waves round the sky and each time the beam falls on the earth. We get a pulse, so it is very, like a lighthouse. And you perhaps know that each lighthouse has its own period and its own pattern of flashes. It turns out that each pulsar has its own period and pattern of flashes. So they really are like radio beacons in the sky..

Jocelyn bell Natasha Mitchell Gwyneth Lewis MacQuarie university Gerald Manley Hopkins pan Starrs Robinson Jeffers Burnell lick observatory director Schmidt telescope Hilda Doolittle university of Uppsala Robert frost Sweden US NASA Pennsylvania Thomas hardy
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on AP News

"Britain's leading astrophysicists is donating her three million dollar purse from a major science prize to encourage diversity in physics Jocelyn bell Burnell says the money will go to the institute of physics it'll fund graduate scholarships for people from underrepresented groups, women members of ethnic minorities and refugees. She told the BBC that people from minority groups bring a fresh angle on things. And it's often a very productive thing. Bell Burnell won the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics on Thursday for her role in discovering radio pulsars, the discovery if the rotating neutron stars won the Nobel prize for physics in one thousand nine hundred seventy four but two of bell Burnell male colleagues were named the winners. CBS is looking for a new chief AP entertainment editor Oscar wells Gabriel reports the metoo movement has claimed another top entertainment executives. Let's moon visits out as head of CBS the company saying its chairman. Has been shown the door a move that comes hours after the New Yorker magazine posted a story with a second round of sexual misconduct allegations against moon vez that brings to twelve now the number of women who have alleged mistreatment ranging from force oral sex groping and retaliation against those who resisted invest denies all this though he acknowledges having consensual relations with three of the women. I'm Oscar wells Gabriel. Journalist Bob Woodward says Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and White House chief of staff John Kelly are not telling the truth when they deny making statements about President Trump in his new book fear Kelly is quoted as calling Trump an idiot and Madison quoted saying that Trump has the understanding of a fifth or sixth grader, but they've said they didn't make those statements. Woodward asked on Monday on NBC's today show about their denial said, they're not telling the truth. He said these are political statements to protect their jobs Woodward, who's won a Pulitzer prize. Staunchly defended the integrity of is reporting and said the book which comes out this week is carefully done as you can do an excavation of the reality of what goes on. Hi, I'm Ralph Rousseau AP college football writer and host of the AP top twenty five college football podcast available on apple podcasts and podcast one. While there be sure to subscribe rate and review, that's the AP top twenty five college football podcast..

Bell Burnell Bob Woodward Jocelyn bell Burnell CBS Trump Nobel prize institute of physics AP Oscar wells Gabriel Pulitzer prize Oscar wells football New Yorker magazine BBC John Kelly Britain Ralph Rousseau NBC Jim Mattis
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on AP News

"When you get started today at indeed dot com slash one of Britain's leading astrophysicists is donating her three million dollar purse from a major science prize to encourage diversity in physics Jocelyn bell Burnell says the money will go to the institute of physics it'll funds graduate scholarships for people from underrepresented groups, women members of ethnic minorities and refugees. She told the BBC that people from minority groups bring a fresh angle on things, and it's often. Very productive thing. They'll Burnell won the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics on Thursday for her role in discovering radio pulsars, the discovery if the rotating neutron stars won the Nobel prize for physics in one thousand nine hundred seventy four but two of bell Burnell male colleagues were named the winners. Serena Williams is find seventeen thousand dollars in the aftermath of the US open final and the Women's Tennis Association calls for equal treatment of all tennis players AP. Correspondent Julie Walker reports the seventeen thousand dollar fine stems from three code violations. Serena Williams received during her loss to Naomi Osaka. In the US open final verbal abuse of the chair on pyre coaching and breaking Haracic, the WTA along with Williams and critics inside and outside of tennis argued that she was not treated the same as some male players. In addition men's champion Novak Djokovic said he thought the chair on pyre who Williams argued with. With should not have pushed her so hard. Julie Walker New York. One of the all-time tennis, great says another grand slam crown do his career AP's, Mike Moriarty with a RAB from steamy. US open six seed Novak Djokovic claimed his second straight grand slam. Settle following up. The Wimbledon championship by defeating third. She'd one Martine dough Potrero in straight sets six three seven six six three twenty two thousand eighteen US open men's singles final Djokovic who missed last year. US open with an elbow injury, which he had surgery on earlier in two thousand eighteen discussed. How far he is coming short amount of time. If you told me in February this year when I got the surgery that I'll win Wimbledon US Open. Would be hard to hard to believe for Djokovic is the fourteenth grand slam title, his career and his third US open title as he was also victorious at Flushing Meadows in two thousand eleven and two thousand fifteen Mike Moriarty, New York. Hi, I'm Ralph Rousseau AP college football writer and host of the AP top twenty five college football podcast available on apple podcasts and podcast one. While there be sure to subscribe Rayton review. That's the AP top twenty five college football podcast..

Novak Djokovic US Serena Williams Jocelyn bell Burnell Julie Walker bell Burnell institute of physics Burnell Nobel prize AP tennis Women's Tennis Association Flushing Meadows BBC Britain New York football Naomi Osaka
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anonymous op Ed in the New York Times are Mara Liasson joins us to discuss what happens next and group of coup-plotters in Venezuela were apparently listening when President Trump talked about regime change it led to secret meetings. We'll talk to one of the reporters who broke the story was an astrophysicist gets heard you in one thousand nine sixty seven Jocelyn bell Burnell made a huge scientific discovery. But rahmael supervisor was given the Nobel prize. Instead, she tells us about her hard road to recognition it Sunday September ninth two thousand eighteen news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Barbara Klein as meteorologists predicted Florence's now a category one hurricane. They say it will rapidly intensify into a major hurricane by Monday and approach the southeastern US coast Thursday in anticipation, several governors in the southeast have declared states of emergency. And that includes South Carolina as Vince called blue, go of South Carolina, public radio reports, South Carolina. Governor Henry McMaster, ordered state agencies and personnel to mobilize especially along. The state's coast were last year residents were told to evacuate ahead of hurricane. Matthew. Forecasters say it's still too early to tell what the impact will be. But McMaster said he's not taking any chances. We are preparing or. For the worst. And course, hoping for the best. But being prepared is always the best strategy the National Hurricane Center forecast. Florence could make landfall anywhere between the Carolinas and Virginia by late this week for NPR news. I'm Vince cope Lugo in Columbia Syrian government. Forces backed by Russia continua weekend of intense airstrikes in it lim- province their targeting the last remaining rebel held positions in the country. Iran is claiming responsibility for yesterday's rocket attack on Kurdish separatists inside Iraq NPR's. Jane Arraf reports the Iranian Kurdish group says at least seventeen people were killed Iran's revolutionary guard says it used drones for targeting and fired seven missiles, what it described as a military target more than one hundred miles inside Iraq. Most of the casualties though, were meeting of the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan at their headquarters in the town, of course. The party is an armed opposition group fighting for more tawny. For Iranian Kurds. Ron said the missiles that fired were short range surface to surface rockets. The Kurdish party said Iran has been moving missiles across its border with the Iraqi Kurdistan region recently, the Kurdish regional government in Iraq condemned the Iranian attack as a violation of sovereignty. Jane, Arraf, NPR news. Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Swedish voters are casting ballots in general election, the populace Sweden, Democrats is expected to get at least a fifth of the vote. The BBC's Gavin Lee reports it's a far-right anti-immigration party. Look back to two thousand fifteen hundred sixty three thousand migrants entering the country more per capita than any other EU state by November year, the government put temporary restrictive border measures in place, those temporary measures off still supposedly Schengen passport-free zone of Europe and the other parties talk about the Sweden. Democrats. Is this fear factor about immigration conflicting with a spike in crime this year? But ultimately a lot of the conversation. The newspapers you talk to people on the streets, migrations, the real central theme ham. The BBC's Gavin Lee, this is NPR from K Q. We d- news. I'm Jeremy Siegel a fast growing wildfire. That broke out in rural Napa county yesterday his ripped through nine thousand nine hundred acres. Lake Barry ASA, the so-called snow fires. Forced officials to issue. Mandatory evacuation orders for some residents in communities northeast of calistoga. But for the most part Cal fire says the blaze is burning in remote locations with difficult. Access for firefighters fires currently threatening one hundred eighty structures and his ten percent contained. Tens of thousands of people marched through downtown. San Francisco yesterday to kick off the public events rounding the global climate action summit on Thursday, environmentalists politicians and business leaders will take part in that event were many are expected to announce goals around reducing carbon emissions cake you Sonia. Hudson reports many marchers on Saturday are skeptical of the summit, and what it might achieve the global climate action summit co-chaired by California governor Jerry Brown is being promoted as a meeting of world leaders to set ambitious goals to stop climate change. But people in the streets of San.

Iraq NPR Governor Henry McMaster Iran Democratic Party of Iranian Ku Jane Arraf Vince cope Lugo South Carolina Gavin Lee Florence Mara Liasson Jocelyn bell Burnell BBC National Hurricane Center Kurdish party Nobel prize US supervisor Sweden New York Times
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is Lula's. Log started September ninth twenty eighteen where we explore matters of space the stars and the universe. In one thousand nine hundred sixty seven Jocelyn bell Burnell revolutionized astronomy, she discovered the first pulsar type of neutron star that launched the field of astrophysics to new heights. The discovery won the Nobel prize, but Brunell was not recognized instead her male supervisor was given the honor this past week though. She was awarded the three million dollars breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for her work. Previously won by among others. Stephen hawking she joins me now from England where she teaches at Oxford University. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Good to be with you. I read you always had to fight take science classes, even when you were a little girl. Yes. Particularly when we were starting out science at the beginning of them. I think what you would call middle school about age twelve. This of course, was made nineteen fifties. And in Britain at that time guys, we're only expected to get married into post. So instead of getting a chance to go the science laboratory, we got directed to the domestic science room to learn cookery and media work, and how did you fight your way into the science classes, my protest stations weren't heard? But when I told my parents that first evening they were extremely angry. Am I think the headmaster's telephone little hawk? And then you went to university. And I also read that you know, you would get catcalled. And and that it was not a very friendly environment for women. No it wasn't. It was about time. They tradition that when a woman entered the lecture hall all the guys whistled stumped by the desks. Kept cold. You should've walked in pretend to you didn't hear. Yeah. I guess I'm leading up to the fact that you know, you went to Cambridge. And you made the discovery of the first pulsar, and then your teacher, your supervisor was given the Nobel prize. Instead, what did you think of that time when that happened? Well, by that stage, I had left Cambridge. I had got married. I even had a small child that was actually a very difficult time for me professionally tried doing because the game this there's some. She's divorced that married. Women didn't work. Yeah. So you so you were you were upset you were you felt that you'd been cheated. No, no. I did. I recognize that the Nobel prize committee weren't going to notice students because I've been a student at the time of the discovery, regardless of which gender the student was. You told the guardian something that made me laugh that you've done very well out of not getting the Nobel. What do you mean by that? Yeah. Well, there's a strong sympathy vote. So if you get the Nobel price, I don't teach you get given anything else because people feel they match the Nobel prize. If you don't get the price, you get everything. So. For the last forty something years, I guess this being summer of a prize or award, and it's been real fun. 'cause there's usually a party attached as well. Fantastic. And your latest one is the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for for your research on pulsars and for being a leader in the scientific community. So what does this latest accolade mean to you? Well, it left me speechless. And I got the news because I never ever dreamt of this. I must admit. And it's a vast sum of money as well. Which? I think a bit hard to believe it certainly is a lot has changed for women in science. But as I'm sure, you know, a lot hasn't. And I think the fact that you're giving away the money for scholarships. Maybe a nod to the fact that it's still hard for certain people to break into the field. Yes, I think it still is hard for some categories of diesel. So I'm keen to support people from underrepresented groups in physics. But also there are people who maybe badly need the money from willow. Household who could be very good physicists. But just don't have that financial cushion. So I'm wondering what advice you'd give to young woman pursuing a career in the sciences. I didn't cover to hang in there. It's not quite as easy for her to spur me Kollek, but it is getting better and working in the sciences is fantastic. You'll never want for job. Jocelyn bell Burnell is an award winning astrophysicist. Congratulations on your award. Thank you very much. Indeed. When the team musical be more chill opened in New Jersey a few years ago. It got a ho hum critical response. But then something surprising happened the cast recording and some YouTube videos went viral next came fan art fan fiction and fan song covers on social media by the time the show opened off Broadway last month, it had sold out entirely as Jeff lender reports the sleeper hit is now headed to Broadway. The premise of be more chill is simple. What if you were a high school student who was unpopular, and you could take a pill, which is actually a tiny computer called a squib to make you popular be more chill? It's from Japan. Nanotechnology it's.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Burnell supervisor Brunell Oxford University Lula Cambridge Stephen hawking New Jersey YouTube England Britain Japan Jeff three million dollars
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is Lula's. Log started September ninth twenty eighteen where we explore matters of space the stars and the universe. Nineteen sixty seven Jocelyn bell Burnell revolutionized astronomy, she discovered the first pulsar type of neutron star that launched the field of astrophysics to new heights. The discovery won the Nobel prize, but Brunell was not recognized instead her male supervisor was given the honor this past week though. She was awarded the three million dollars breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for her work. Previously won by among others. Stephen hawking she joins me now from England where she teaches at Oxford University. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Good to be with you. I read you always had to fight to take science classes, even when you were a little girl. Yes. Particularly when we were starting out science at the beginning of them. I think what you would call middle school about age twelve. Of course was make nineteen fifties. And in Britain at that time guys, we're only expected to get married into house. So instead of getting a chance to go science laboratory, we got directed to the domestic science room to learn cookery and media work, and how did you fight your way into the science classes? My protest stations weren't heard. But when I told my parents that first evening they were extremely angry. And I think the headmaster's telephone little hawk. And then you went to university. And I also read that you know, you would get catcalled. And and that it was not a very friendly environment for women. No it wasn't. It was at that time. They tradition that when a woman entered the lecture hall all the guys whistled stumped banged. The desks kept cold. Sort of walked in pretend to you didn't hear. Yeah. I guess I'm leading up to the fact that you know, you went to Cambridge. And you made the discovery of the first pulsar, and then your teacher, your supervisor was given the Nobel prize. Instead, what did you think of that time when that happened? Well, by that stage, I had left Cambridge. I had got married. I even had a small child. That was actually a very difficult time for me professionally tried to going because the game there's some studios that married. Women didn't work. Yeah. So you say you were you were upset you were felt that you'd been cheated. No, no. I did. I I recognize that the Nobel prize committee weren't going to notice students because I've been a student at the time of the discovery, regardless of which gender the student was you told the guardian something that made me laugh that you've done very well out of not getting the Nobel invite that. Yeah. Well, there's a strong sympathy vote. So if you get the Nobel price, I don't teach you get given anything else because people feel they match the Nobel prize. If you don't get a noble price, you get everything. So. Here for the last forty something years. I guess there's been some other prize or reward, and it's been real fun. 'cause there's usually a party attached as well. Fantastic. And your latest one is the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for for your research on pulsars and for being a leader in the scientific community. So what does this latest accolade mean to you? Well, it left me speechless. And I got the news because I never ever dreamt of this. I must admit. And it's a vast sum of money as well. Which is a bit hard to believe it certainly is. A lot has changed for women in science. But as I'm sure, you know, a lot hasn't. And I think the fact that you're giving away the money for scholarships. Maybe a nod to the fact that it's still hard for certain people to break into the field. Yes, I think it still is hard for some categories. So I'm keen to support people from underrepresented groups in physics. But also there are people who maybe badly need the money from less welll household who could be very good physicists. But just don't have that financial cushion. So I'm wondering what advice you'd give to young woman pursuing a career in the sciences. I didn't cover to hang in there. It's not quite as easy for her to spur her may Kollek, but it is getting better and working in the sciences is fantastic job. Jocelyn bell Burnell is an award winning astrophysicist. Congratulations on your award. Thank you very much. Indeed. When the teen musical be more chill opened in New Jersey a few years ago, it got ho-hum critical response. But then something surprising happened the cast recording and some YouTube videos went viral next came fan art fan fiction and FANG and fan song covers on social media by the time the show opened off Broadway last month, it sold out entirely as Jeff London reports this sleeper hit is now headed to Broadway. The premise of be more chill is simple. What if you were a high school student who was unpopular, and you could take a pill, which is actually a tiny computer called a squib to make you pop. Be more chill. It's from Japan. Oblong? Some nanotechnology it's.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Burnell supervisor Brunell Oxford University Cambridge Lula Stephen hawking Nobel New Jersey YouTube England Britain Japan Kollek Jeff London three million dollars
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sixty seven Jocelyn bell Burnell revolutionized astronomy, she discovered the first pulsar type of neutron star that launched the field of astrophysics to new heights. The discovery won the Nobel prize, but Brunell was not recognized instead her male supervisor was given the honor this past week though. She was awarded the three million dollars breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for her work. Previously won by among others. Stephen hawking she joins me now from England where she teaches at Oxford University. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Good to be with you. I read you always had to fight to take science classes, even when you were a little girl. Yes. Particularly when we were starting out science at the beginning of them. I think what you would call middle school about age twelve this. Of course was the mid nineteen fifties. And in Britain. At that time goes we're only expected to get married into post. So instead of guessing a chance to go to science the borough three we got directed to the domestic science room to learn cookery and media work, and how did you find your way into the science classes? My protest stations weren't heard. But when I told my parents that first evening they were extremely angry. And I think the headmaster's telephone little hawk. And then you went to university. And I also read that you know, you would get catcalled. And and that it was not a very friendly environment for women. No it wasn't. It was about time. The tradition when a woman entered the lecture hall all the guys whistled stumped Bangladesh catcalled. You should've walked in. Pretend you didn't hear. Yeah. I guess I'm leading up to the fact that you know, you went to Cambridge. And you made the discovery of the first pulsar, and then your teacher, your supervisor was given the Nobel prize. Instead, what did you think of that time when that happened? Well, by that stage, I had left Cambridge. I had got married. I even had a small child. That was actually a very difficult time for me professionally tried to keep going because the game this. There's some ships divorce that married women didn't work. Yeah. So you say you were you were upset you were. You felt that you've been cheated. No, no. I did. I I recognize that the Nobel prize committee weren't going to notice students because I've been a student at the time of the discovery, regardless of which gender the student was you told the guardian something that made me laugh that you've done very well out of not getting the Nobel. What do you invite that? Yeah. Well, this is a strong sympathy vote. So if you get the Nobel price, I don't teach you get given anything else because people feel they can't match the Nobel price. If you don't get a noble prize. You get everything. So every year for the last forty something years, I guess there's been summer of a prize or award, and it's been real fun. 'cause there's usually a party attached as well. Fantastic. And your latest one is the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics for for your research on pulsars and for being a leader in the scientific community. So what does this latest accolade into you? Well, that's me speechless. When I got the news because I never ever dreamt of this. I must have made. And it's a vast sum of money as well. Which is I think a bit hard to believe it certainly is a lot has changed for women in science. But as I'm sure, you know, a lot hasn't. And I think the fact that you're giving away the money for scholarships. Maybe a nod to the fact that it's still hard for certain people to break into the field. Yes, I think it still is hard for some categories of diesel. So I'm keen to support people from underrepresented groups in physics. But also there are people who maybe badly need the money from less well off households could be very good physicists. But just don't have that financial cushion. So I'm wondering what advice you'd give to a young woman pursuing a career in the sciences. I didn't coverage here to hang in there. It's not quite as easy for her as it is for her male colleagues, but it just getting better and working in the sciences is fantastic. You'll never want for a job. Jocelyn bell Burnell is an award winning astrophysicist. Congratulations on your award. Thank you very much. Indeed. When the teen musical be more chill open to New Jersey a few years ago, it got ho-hum critical response. But then something surprising happened the cast recording and some YouTube videos went viral next came fan art fan fiction and FANG and fan song covers on social media by the time the show opened off Broadway last month, it's sold out entirely as Jeff London reports this sleeper hit is now headed to Broadway. The premise of be more chill is simple. What if you were a high school student who was unpopular, and you could take a pill, which is actually a tiny computer called a squib to make you poppy. Be more chill.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Burnell supervisor Brunell Oxford University Cambridge Stephen hawking New Jersey England YouTube Britain Bangladesh Jeff London three million dollars
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Science Friday

"Slash p. tech. Listener supported w in y. c. studios. This is science Friday, replay to- later in the hour, a look at robots and how we live with them. But I this week, astronomers reported on these strange sounding case of two colliding neutron stars and a blast from that merger that appeared to be traveling faster than the speed of light. We know how impossible that might sound right to change the laws of physics, maybe not here to talk about that and other selected short subjects in science has Ryan mandible and science writer at Gizmodo back in New York studios. Welcome backs. Could have you nice. Having IRA has everything going happy Rocha Shana everybody out in the radio. Everybody who celebrating let let's talk about these neutron stars or what happened. Oh, yes, going on. So I think a lot of the listeners will remember the colliding neutron stars. One of the big you know that happened that can last August there was gravitational waves at the same time as light beams. So these these jets looked like they were the, you know, when you looked up, looked like there was light traveling fast. Than the speed of light, but that's not really what happened. That's actually an optical illusion when the jet sort of travels from there from the colliding neutron stars in our direction, but slightly askew. The jet is traveling at nearly the speed of light as are the light beams. So the front of the back of the jets light beams and the front of the jets light beams come to earth. And when you look it up in the sky, it looks like zips at fasten the speed of light, but it's really an optical illusion. What's more interesting is that proved that there was a jet that came out of these black holes, which is what scientists were excited about out of these neutron stars. Oh, this is something but something seemed off about the survey ship, right? There was a burst of particles out of the debris or right? So people were wondering whether when they looked up, they notice that radio waves have been brightening in this collision for a couple of months. And so they thought maybe it was because there was a cocoon that was like choking this jet, but the jet must have broken through the cocoon in order for scientists who've seen the faster than light motion. Well, let's move onto other cosmic news and and a big prize. This is really. An interesting story, big price, but to Jocelyn bell Burnell. Oh yeah. I mean, everybody's heard Jocelyn bell. Burnell name. She discovered pulsars, but in nineteen seventy four. The Nobel prize in physics went to her adviser Antony Hewish instead of to her, she was second on the paper and a lot of people consider this a snub. She said that she didn't think it was such a snub because she didn't know of graduate students should get it. But I mean, the pulsar discovery is certainly one of the most important discoveries in strana me. I mean, neutron stars are just so ubiquitous in astronomy today, but the big she won the breakthrough prize, three million bucks and she's going to donate the entire sum of money to a fund for underrepresented students in physics, and she's very typical of a case of the underlings, doing the real work and never getting the credit right deserve, right. He was a very successful leader in physics. I mean, she was the first president of first Email president of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She was a president of the institute of physics. She's had a really in incr-. Stint of leadership in astronomy, but you know her her sort of astronomy changing discovery was the what she did as a student because she went right to, we just went through all the data and saw something that didn't make sense..

Jocelyn bell Burnell Antony Hewish institute of physics Nobel prize Ryan mandible IRA Gizmodo Royal Society of Edinburgh incr writer New York Email president
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If the failing New York Times has an anonymous editorial, can you believe it anonymous? I would correct. The senator's statement there is no rule. There is clearly a rule that applies. Airman and bring the charges. What mattered, and what was just noise, I'm Amy Walter. And we'll take stock of all of that next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. This is science Friday. I replay. Oh later in the hour. A look at robots and how we live with them. But I this week astronomers reported on these strange sounding case of two colliding neutron stars and a blast from that merger that appeared to be traveling faster than the speed of light. We know how impossible that my sound, right. That to change the laws of physics. Maybe not here to talk about that. And other selected short subjects in science sciences. Ryan man, the science writer at Gizmodo back in our New York studios. Welcome back. Have you? Nice. Having IRA has everything going happy Rocha Shawna. Everybody on the radio everybody who celebrating let let's talk about these neutron stars. What happened? Oh, yes. What's going on? So I think a lot of the listeners will remember the colliding neutron stars one of the big, you know, that happened back in last August their risk reputational waves at the same time as light beams. So these these jets looked like they were the, you know, when you look. You look like there was light traveling faster than the speed of light. But that's not really what happened. That's actually an optical illusion. When the jet sort of travels from there from the colliding neutron stars in our direction but slightly askew. The jet is traveling at nearly the speed of light as are the light beams. So the front of the back of the jets light beams and the front of the jets light beams come to earth. And when you look it up in the sky, it looks like zips at faster than the speed of light. But it's really an optical illusion. What's more interesting? Is that proves that? There was a jet that came out of these black holes, which is what scientists were excited about out of these neutron stars something, but something seemed off about the division. Right. There was a burst of particles out of the debris. Right. So people were wondering whether when they looked up they notice that radio waves have been brightening in this collision for a couple of months. And so they thought maybe it was because there was a cocoon that was like choking this jet. But the jet must have broken through the cocoon in order for scientists who've seen the faster than light motion by let's move onto other cosmic news and. A big prize? This is really an interesting story big price, but to Jocelyn bell vernal. Oh, yeah. I mean, everybody's heard Jocelyn bell Burnell name, you know, she discovered pulsars, but in nineteen seventy four the Nobel prize in physics went to her advisor Anthony Hewish instead of to her. She was second on the paper and a lot of people consider this a snub. She said that she didn't think it was such a snub because she didn't know if graduate students should get it. But I mean, the the pulsar discovery certainly one of the most important discoveries in strana. I mean neutron stars are just so ubiquitous in astronomy today. But the ba- she won the breakthrough prize three million bucks. And she's going to donate the entire sum of money to a fund for underrepresented students in physics, and she's very typical of a case of of of the underlings doing the real work and never getting the credit right deserve. Right. He was a very successful leader in physics. I mean, she was the first president of first female president of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She was the president of the institute of physics. Had a really incredible stint of leadership in astronomy. But, you know, her her sort of astronomy changing discovery was the what she did as a student because she went right to just went through all the data and saw something that didn't make sense. Yes. Something had never seen a signal a clutch that every one point three seconds. This signal seemed to blip in default that it was aliens. In fact, they if the GM signal the little green men signal, but you know, it was pulsars. Pulsars are just rotating spinning neutron stars in meeting a beam of light sort of like a lighthouse, and it's interesting because I was reading her reaction to this. She says, okay. So I didn't win the Nobel prize. I've one if I had I would have been never heard from right now from racking up all these other fries. And it's definitely exciting to see her. You know, put the money to such a good causes. And that's great and other news. There's a caution cautionary story about a popular painkiller. Yep. Sodi cloven act, which is a common end said and non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs seems to be causing cardiovascular issues in those who take it in the first thirty days. People didn't actually they didn't give more close and active looked at retrospectively to bunch of medical records. These Danish researchers and found this increased risk now, it's I wouldn't say that it's it's not like a an enormous risk that everybody who takes it is going to get sick. But it's, you know, for every one thousand people who take Tyco fanatic and are low risk for cardiovascular disease. Maybe an extra four. People would develop a major health problem. I gotta tell you. I never heard of this drug before I hadn't heard of it either until a bunch of our commenters said that the taken it in a in a lot of people really around the world. This is a very popular not painkiller. So it's it's we haven't heard of it. But a lot of people have. And it's it's the kind of case where oh, you know, the the rate is doubled or something like that. But then when you look at the actual numbers it's still tiny tiny tiny. Right. But it it, you know, it might explain some of the some people do complain about things like chest pain when they're on it. So it could potentially explain some of those issues finally one of the Cold War stories. Is that there was a hole in the space station and the Russians think it's sabotage that was that was one of the theories that they put forth anything found the home. They found a hole through the story. Yeah. So you look at this. You see the picture of the hall and it first they're like, oh, maybe it's a micrometeorites. But when you look at it actually looks like somebody had drilled into a panel the drill slipped and then created a drill hole right through this panel in and it's not in the ISS itself. It's a Soyuz capsule docked to the IRS s it was when they looked at it. They thought well, what could have it must have been a person if it's a drill hole. So some of the theories that they've put forth are, you know, maybe it was a manufacturing error or during testing. Somebody had made a mistake sabotage is one of the theories, they're not ruling anything out yet. Maybe it was from on the ISS. Although you'd think that there'd be some record of that. If it was true one thing that's important to note is that it will not harm the crew members. They're not at risk the whole been patched up and they're using. Somebody pulled out the duct tape. I wonder what the brand name of the Elmer's glue. I thought a pocket. But I love a poxy. But but you actually look at it anybody who's ever drilled a hole metal see that. That's a drill hall. Right. Exactly by drill. But thankfully, like I said this witness pod returns to earth. Is it something that's meant to burn up in the atmosphere? It's not going to harm anyone. And it's just great that it's fixed. But now the mystery is on the detectives have to solve the case so much mystery this week. Thank you. Thanks. A happy holiday. You too Ryan mound. Science writer at Gizmodo. Now time to check in on a state of science. This is WWE St Louis public radio news local science stories of national significance. Lyme disease can be found in every state in the country. But the northeast is still the hardest hit region with ninety five percent of the cases of tick borne disease coming from these fourteen states in the northeast and last month, the governor of New Hampshire Chris new put out a letter to the asking for exceleron approvals for new tick repellents Andro peak any row peak is here to fill us in on that story. She's an environmental reporter with New Hampshire public radio based out of concord. Welcome to science Friday high era. You know, my doctor keeps telling me that eighty two lime disease as rang. He comes from Connecticut, and he says lime disease is rampant in the northeast. And there seems to Fairmount. Yeah. No, absolutely. I mean, it's interesting we're we're getting warmer faster here than a lot of parts of the country. We're losing our snow in the winter faster. And all of that really creates a great environment for ticks to breed were also heavily forested up here. And we're using our land in different ways. So the less we farm and the more we kind of move into the woods and subdivide those forested parcels the more. We're just really kind of encouraging ticks to spread. And so governor sununu mentioned a specific type of repellent called Newt ketone is our is that right? What did tell us? That's right. Yeah. So this is an essential oil. That's founded grapefruit, it's literally like the smell that that sort of citrus. Herbal smell that you get from grapefruit. It's also found in Alaska Cyprus trees. So a naturally occurring product, and it's already approved for food and fragrance use by the food and Drug administration. So it's deemed safe for for people really to come in contact with you come in contact with it every time you peel grapefruit. And so it is also shown to be really effective at repelling or even killing ticks and mosquitoes there's these crazy videos of CDC experiments where they cover their hands in it and stick it enough container with ticks, and they all just they they move away from it. And then they so it could be really promising as an alternative to more sort of heavy duty things like date. Heavy duty. So it has been approved by the CDC, but not the EPA yet is that right? Yeah. That's right. So you're not allowed to sort of a double market products like that. So the EPA would have to say that it's safe for use as an active ingredient in pesticides and things like that. And that's what they're working on right now. You know, you would think that the companies that sell the bottle is staff would be waiting online to put this in your drugstore. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, right now, they can sort of off market sell it to you as a repellent, but it it is more of a sort of like an alternative remedy at this point. It's not really officially sanctioned. And so the CDC is the centers for disease control is actually who owns the patent, and they license it to a few companies for different processes for deriving it from grief roots and ways to get it more cheaply. And so if the approves it as an active ingredient than anybody could get it in, however, they see fit and market it, you know, all kinds of different products and people like our governor really see that as a sort.

Nobel prize food and Drug administration CDC Gizmodo ISS president writer EPA New York Times New Hampshire Jocelyn bell vernal Amy Walter Jocelyn bell Burnell senator New York Ryan man institute of physics IRA Anthony Hewish
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:20 min | 2 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bay area mostly sunny the rest of today, high sixty s along the coast the seventies and eighties around the bay mid-nineties far inland. Clear tonight except along the coast where it will turn partly cloudy with areas of fog after midnight, especially it will be clear inland, Sacramento, sunny and warm to hot temperatures today in the Sacramento valley Sacramento's high ninety seven and mostly sunny around Lake Tahoe today. Highs will be in the seventies to the eighties around the lake today and clear tonight. This is science Friday Plato later in the hour. A look at robots and how we live with them. But I this week astronomers reported on these strange sounding case of two colliding neutron stars and a blast from that merger that appeared to be traveling faster than the speed of light. We know how impossible that may sound right that to change the laws of physics. Maybe not here to talk about that. And other selected short subjects in the sciences, Ryan MandA violence, science writer at Gizmodo back in New York studios. Welcome back. Good to have you. Nice. Having IRA has everything going happy Rochas Shawna. Everybody out the radio everybody who celebrating let let's talk about these neutron stars. What happened? Oh, yes. What's going on? So I think a lot of the listeners will remember the colliding neutron stars one of the big, you know, that happened backing last August there is gravity waves at the same time as light beams. So these these jets looked like they were when you looked up. It looked like there was light traveling faster than the speed of light. But that's not really what happened. That's actually an optical illusion. When the jet sort of travels from there from the neutron stars in our direction but slightly askew. The jets traveling at nearly the speed of light as are the light beams. So the front of the back of the jets light beams and the front of the jets light beams come to earth. And when you look it up in the sky, it looks like zips at fast speed of light. But it's really an optical illusion. What's more interesting? Is that proves that? There was a jet that came out of these black holes, which is what scientists were excited about out of these neutron stars. Oh, this is something but something seems off about the information. Right. There was a burst of particles out of the debris or right? So people were wondering whether when they looked up they noticed that radio waves have been brightening in this collision for a couple of months. And so they thought maybe it was because there was a cocoon that was like choking this jet jet must have broken through the cocoon in order for scientists who've seen the faster than light motion. Well, let's move onto other cosmic news and a big prize. This is really an interesting story big price, but to Jocelyn bell vernal. Oh, yeah. I mean, everybody's heard Jocelyn Bell's name, you know, she discovered pulsars, but in one thousand nine seventy four the Nobel prize in physics went to her advisor Anthony Hewish instead of to her. She was second on the paper and a lot of people consider this a snub. She said that she didn't think it was such a snob because she didn't know if graduate students should get it. But I mean, the the pulsar discovery is certainly one of the most important discoveries in astronomy. I mean neutron stars are just so ubiquitous. In astronomy today. But the she won the breakthrough prize three million bucks. And she's going to donate the entire sum of money to a fund for underrepresented students in physics, and she's very typical of a case of of the underlings doing the real work and never getting the credit. Right. They deserve. Right. He was a very successful leader in physics. I mean, she was the first president of first female president of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She was the president of the institute of physics. She's had a really incredible stint of leadership in astronomy. But, you know, her her sort of astronomy changing discovery was the what she did as a student because she went right? She we just went through all the data and saw something that didn't make sense. Yes. Something had never seen a signal a sort of Cluj that every one point three seconds. This signal seemed to blip in default that it was aliens. In fact, it's the L GM signal the little green men signal, but you know, it was pulsars and pulsars are just rotating you've spinning neutron stars in meeting a beam of light sort of like a lighthouse, and it's interesting. Because I was reading her reaction to this. She says, okay. So I didn't win the Nobel prize. I one if I had I would have been never heard from again right now. I'm racking up all these other fries. And it's definitely exciting to see her. You know, put the money to such good. 'cause that's great. And other news. There's a caution cautionary story about a popular painkiller. Yep. So declaw fanatic, which is a common and said and non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs seems to be causing cardiovascular issues in those who take it in the first thirty days. People didn't actually they didn't give more Cyclo fanatic. They looked at retrospectively bunch of medical records, these Danish researchers and found this increased risk now, it's I wouldn't say that it's it's not like a an enormous risk that everybody who takes it is going to get sick. But it's, you know for every one thousand people who take low fanatic and are low risk for CV for cardiovascular disease. Maybe an extra four people would develop a major health problem. I gotta tell you. I never heard of this drug before I hadn't heard of it either until our commentaries said that they had taken it. And in a lot of people really around the world, this is a very popular painkiller. So it's we haven't heard of it. But a lot of people have. And it's it's it's the kind of case where oh, you know, the. The rate is doubled or something like that. But then when you look at the actual numbers it's still tiny tiny tiny, right? But it, you know, it might explain some of the some people do complain about things like chest pain when they're on it. So it could potentially explain some of those issues finally one of the Cold War stories. Is that there was a hole in the space station and the Russians think sabotage that was. That was one of the theories that they put forth found the home. They found a whole go through the story. Yeah. So you look at this. You see the picture of the whole, and it I they're like, oh, maybe it's a micrometeorites. But when you look at it it actually looks like somebody had drilled into a panel the drill slipped and then created a drill hole right through this panel in it's not in the ISS itself. It's a Soyuz capsule docked to the IRS s it was when they looked at it. They thought well, what could it must have been a person if it's a drill hole. So some of the theories that they've put forth are, you know, maybe it was a manufacturing error or during testing. Somebody had made a mistake sabotage is one of the theories, they're not ruling anything out yet. Maybe it was from on the ISS. Although you'd think that there'd be some record of that. If it was true one thing that's important to note is that it will not harm the crew members. They're not at risk. The husband been patched up, and I. Somebody pulled out the duct tape. I wonder what the brand name of the Elmer's glue. I thought. But I love a poxy. But but he absolutely look at it. Anybody who's ever drilled a hole metal see that? That's a drill. Right. Exactly by a drill. But thankfully, like, I said this witness pod. Returns to earth is something that's meant to burn up in the atmosphere. It's not going to harm anyone. And it's just great that it's fixed. But now the mystery is on the detectives have to solve the case. So much mystery this week. Thank you. Right. Thanks. You too. Ryan Mandelbaum science writer at Gizmodo. Now, it's time to check in on the state of science. This is WWE St Louis. Radio news local science stories of national significance. Lyme disease can be found in every state in the country. But the northeast is still the hardest hit region with ninety five percent of the cases of the borne disease coming from these fourteen states in the northeast and last month, the governor of New Hampshire Chris new put out a letter to the EPA asking for accelerated approvals for new tick repellents and peak any row peak is here to fill us in on that story. She's an environmental reporter with New Hampshire public radio based out of concord. Welcome to science Friday. I you know, my doctor keeps telling me that line diseases rang. He comes from Connecticut, and he says lime disease is rampant in the northeast, and it seems to bear him out. Yeah. No, absolutely. I mean, it's interesting we're we're getting warmer faster here than a lot of parts of the country. We're losing our snow in the winter faster. And all of that really creates a great environment for ticks to breed were also heavily forested up here. And we're using our land in different ways. So the less we farm and the more we kind of move into the woods and subdivide those forested parcels the more. We're just really kind of encouraging the text spread. And so governor sununu mentioned a specific type of repellent called Newt Cotone is ours. I what did tell us. That's right. Yeah. So this is an essential oil. That's hunted grapefruit. It's literally like the smell that you that sort of citrus. Herbal smell that you get from grapefruit. It's also found in Alaska cypress trees. So the naturally-occurring product, and it's already approved for food and fragrance use by the food and Drug administration. So it's deemed safe for for people really to come in contact with you come in contact with it every time, you peel a grapefruit, and so it is also shown to be really effective at repellent or even killing ticks and mosquitoes there's these crazy videos of CDC experiments were they cover their hands. Stick it in a container with ticks, and they they they move away from it. And then they die. So it could be really promising as an alternative to more sorta heavy duty things like. Heavy duty. So it has been approved by the CDC, but not the EPA yet is that right? Yeah. That's right. So you're not allowed to sort of a double market products like that. So the EPA would have to say that it's safe for use as an active ingredient in pesticides and things like that. And that's what they're working on right now. You know, you would think that the companies that sell the bottle of stuff would be waiting online to put this in your drugstore. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, right now, they can sort of off market sell it to you as a repellent, but it it is more of a sort of like an alternative remedy at this point. It's not really officially sanctioned. And so the CDC is the centers for disease control is actually who owns the patent, and they license it to a few companies for different processes for deriving from grapefruits and ways to get it more cheaply. And so if the.

EPA Nobel prize CDC Gizmodo ISS president food and Drug administration writer New Hampshire Lake Tahoe Sacramento valley Sacramento Sacramento Ryan MandA Jocelyn Bell IRA Jocelyn bell vernal Rochas Shawna institute of physics New York
"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Start the Week

Start the Week

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jocelyn bell" Discussed on Start the Week

"Actual physical explanations and even when we found very extreme things so for example professor dame jocelyn bell burnell discovered pulsars these were very regularly repeating signals radio signals that she discovered my shoes famously doing a phd and of course when you just because we can't explain something doesn't mean that we immediately need to think of alliens of lies asians it's fun to think about that and in fact radio astronomers are using their telescopes to look for those signals while they piggyback on on scientific experiments so we actually know quite lost about our universe now but it still relatively untravelled and twelve people who've set foot on the moon that's right yeah tens of human spaceflight i mean you say we know lot about our universe but in fact about four percent of our universe is what we call barry onic mattis ordinary stuff and we think they understand that quite well which means ninety six percent of the universe dot matching dark energy which we don't really understand so there's a huge amount to explore remotely by capturing signals from outer space but as you say you know humans baseline is really in its infancy i mean let's way before even we i guess we were getting on ships kind of analogy is certainly tens of human health i think before the discovery of itimad see to cure scurvy is kind of the level where at for us astronaut so we try to figure out how to protect the muscles on their bones but yet so missions to will be interesting and challenging and you're using satellite telescopes and telescopes on top of mountains who say do you actually to go into space over yourself the different way not yourself but do extra galactic astronomers need to get into space to discover more we're not really well there have been discussions about having 'em radio telescopes on the dark side of the moon one of the problems we have on earth is the manmade pollution so we have light pollution that's increasing we obviously have radio signal interference that's that's increasing that's actually kind of blinding us and deafening as if you like so the signals that we detect from outer space an incredibly faint and we need to be able to capture those very sensitive to.

jocelyn bell burnell scurvy us professor barry onic ninety six percent four percent