18 Burst results for "Joanne Lipman"

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Nash following his former bandmate, Neil Young and removing music from the platform. India Ari also posting on Instagram yesterday that she's pulling her music from Spotify after Joe Rogan's comments on race. After dropping at the end of last week, the stock has since rebounded. But joining us right now to talk more about it is Joanne lipman. She's Yale University lecturer and a CNBC contributor. And she's out with a new op-ed about Spotify in time. Joanne, Spotify has kind of made the argument that this is a free speech issue. You say that that is not something that really stands up at all. Absolutely. First of all, thank you, Becky. Spotify is much bigger problem than Joe Rogan at this point. And the reason is that it is trying to fall back on this sort of free speech issue, Daniel came out and he said, you know, we don't want to be content sensors, but the fact is that they are not content sensors. Nobody is asking them to be content sensors. It's a total straw man argument. People are basically saying if you're publishing misinformation, you need to be responsible for it. So no, it's not a free speech issue at all. I think the real problem that we come down to is, what is Spotify? And this is a problem that goes well beyond Joe Rogan, right? It's positioning itself by suggesting that it is some sort of neutral platform. We have creators. We want them to have creative. Freedom. And therefore, you know, we're sort of hands off, right? But in fact, when you look in the Joe Rogan situation, as we all know, they paid him a reported $100 million to have that content. So they have aligned themselves, they're paying for the content. There's really no daylight between Spotify Joe Rogan. They are one. And this is where they really, really get into trouble. They are not some sort of neutral platform..

Joe Rogan Joanne lipman Neil Young Ari Nash Yale University CNBC Spotify Joanne Becky India Daniel
"joanne lipman" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:30 min | 5 months ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"American Express business platinum card. Got the card that's built for business. By American Express Spotify has a much bigger problem than Joe Rogan by Joanne lipman lippmann is the author of that's what she said, what men and women need to know about working together. She is the former editor in chief of USA Today. Her next book is on the art and science of reinvention. Spotify has a much bigger problem than Joe Rogan, the streaming service has been in damage control mode trying to quell the outcry of recover COVID-19 misinformation spread by Rogan, the wildly popular podcast host. Earlier this week, Spotify released its internal rules prohibiting dangerous content and said it will attach an advisory to any podcast that discusses the pandemic directing listeners to a new COVID-19 informational hub. But despite these moves, CEO Daniel eck also suggested this is a free speech issue. He stressed that Spotify doesn't want to become a content sensor, and that he is committed to supporting creator expression. That's where his trouble starts. He is hiding behind the same argument that platforms like Facebook and Google make, that Spotify is a platform that distributes content created by others, but isn't really responsible for that content. That's a dubious proposition for Facebook and Google, and it's completely nonsensical when it comes to Spotify. Spotify isn't some sort of neutral conduit. It isn't just a tool that podcasters use to upload their work. It's a publisher. It makes intentional choices about the content it disseminates, especially when it comes to Rogan. This is a crucial distinction. Spotify paid Rogan a reported $100 million for exclusive rights to his podcast. He is the streaming services biggest star. It's calling card. It's billboard name, Rogan is Spotify. There's no daylight in between the two, for Spotify to maintain that it's not responsible for what comes out of his mouth or that somehow it's too difficult to moderate their content is ludicrous. I've spent my career in publishing, including as editor in chief of USA Today. Anybody in my field would be out of a job if we knowingly published nonsense and then disavowed any responsibility for it. We would be liable if we intentionally published false information. My role was always to ensure that the news we published was accurate and fair when sources pushed falsehoods our responsibility was to challenge them and to report the facts, not to hand them the microphone and turn up the volume. Spotify is in a similar position. The Rogan episode has thrown into high relief. The question of whether it's a platform that simply allows creators to spread content or whether it is a media company, which has legal liability. The answer has implications, not just for Spotify, but for other digital platforms that have begun paying some content creators, including Facebook, SnapChat, and TikTok. From my vantage point, the answer seems pretty clear. When you pay to acquire content, you're it. You don't get to have it both ways. You can't both own it and profit from it as Spotify does, yet not take responsibility for it. This isn't a First Amendment issue. I miss fierce and offender as you will find if freedom of speech, Joe Rogan and his guests have the right to believe and say anything they'd like without fear of government reprisal..

Spotify Rogan Joe Rogan Joanne lipman lippmann CEO Daniel eck USA Today American Express Facebook Google SnapChat TikTok
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Slate Money

"To the thank you for smoking episode of slate money goes to the movies where we watch movies and talk about them with me. Feel examine of axios and emily beck. Hello and in this case an extremely special guest joanne. Lipman welcome thank you. Great to be here joanne. Who are you introduce yourself. I am joanne lipman. I am a journalist and an author. And i a reporter. An editor in an editor in chief editor in chief most recently at usa today and the usa today network and before that entering in at conde nast portfolio where. I was fortunate enough to work with the lx. Were you hired me. What one of your underlings. And and before that many years at the wall street journal and i'm also an author. My recent book is that's what she said which is about how to close the gender gap at work so we are going to have a lot of gender politics to talk about in this show. There is some problematic representation of female journalists in may but has lots of other stuff going on ivan reitman's movie of thank you for smoking from the book by chris. Buckley coming up on slate. Money goes to the movies so joanne. Let's with the question. I love to start with. When did you first see this movie in. Do you remember when you. I saw this movie where you are. And what the circumstances were. I actually don't remember when i first saw. The movie did not see it in the theater. I saw it at home. But i do remember my reaction to the movie which was very strong. The initial reaction is exactly the same as your reaction now. it doesn't change. it's a hundred percent the same which is why are we seeing yet another movie. Where the female reporter sleeps with her source. That was my reaction then and i just watched it and i had the exact same reaction. Now this is a trope which we see in. I don't know if it's absolutely every single movie with female reporter but it certainly seems to be most of them and you have a wonderful list of movies where this happens but this movie more than any other movie that i can think of. It really is decentral. Plot point in the is totally shameless. About really came with it. Is the plot twist it is the twist katie holmes is the reporter. She is a bad reporter. I think we can all agree on this point. Joanne can probably dissect it even better than i there. Sleeping together the whole movie and then. Of course i'm not spoiling it. Fifteen years old. We're here to talk about it. Three quarters of the way in everything that aaron eckhart character has told her about his job as the merchant of death and tobacco. Pr pitch man. Everything he's holder. Apparently he's told her everything. Which i think is weird anyway like who does that every little detail about what he does like paying off the marble man all that stuff. Everything is in the front page story. That i guess is supposed to be like the washington post and she is just like becomes this evil person like flip the switch like she's the worst everyone. All of a sudden hates her. The whole newsroom is looking at her cockeyed right. And i mean it's just so awful and then she gets like banished cancels in today's parlance and at the end of the movie. Totally spoiling it winds up like covering a hurricane on the beach somewhere in the middle of nowhere. It's dislike the worst plot everything. Oh this is the classic revenge fantasy any business person who hates the media that yes i can get my own back on the terrible reporters who were you know. Mistreating us in such terrible way. See what i actually think. It is just lazy screenwriting. It is a lazy lazy lazy device and it is used constantly and it always it is virtually always female. Reporter is either fm fatalities. Who's going to get her goods. Which is what the case was here. Or she's basically an idiot who falls for her source who turns out to be the murderer. The bad guy but it's a way to get a woman and a man to meet and have sex pretty much. That's it right. That's what it's all about. And i would be willing to bet you. There are far more movies where the female reporters sleeps with her source than those where she does. Not you could probably count those on one hand just and you know if you would like i could mention a few of the others. I know we talked about this. I think i get your list out. Joe i believe the felix. I wrote a grant to you in an email about this. Here's just a sampling of a few and this was literally top of mind without even imdb. Searching absence of malice trainwreck. sleepless in seattle. Hitch scoop rock of ages. Iron man how to lose a guy in ten days the fly top five. The richard jewell movie which is supposed to be like a legit regular just sort of adoptive style movie of a real life event. Were they took this poor reporter who has since passed away and suggested that she was using her feminine wiles to break the story which was just rub. The i believe that was and by the way every tv show right scandal house of cards. That was a calamitous in the original english house of cards. You gosh the house of cards though with kate mara as the where like in pretty much the first seen. She's basically like pushing up her boobs. And showing off to kevin spacey to try and get the goods show up at his door. So there's almost famous. There's you guys had a few that. I even i hadn't regular season the hudsucker proxy and the fountain head. I mean it goes back at least in one thousand nine forty eight stroke l. My gosh i think it goes back to the beginning of film but it's crazy it's lazy and what really frustrated me in this movie was. I actually really liked the rest of the movie. I thought the satire was quite clever. And i actually thought that the satire you know if you listen carefully as i did in the second time around probably fourth or fifth time around viewing it. Recently they actually give you some pretty sharp funny but accurate descriptions of being a lobbyist. Actually talk about what is it. Because you've got the son. He has his son in there so that was a clever device where he has to talk about being a lobbyist to his son. But what was so frustrating to me. Is that part. Actually it was tirico but it was also in a way accurate. In other words it was. The best is accurate right. I mean that's the point of that right right. It was getting to a truth whereas when they switched to his relationship with the female reporter it suddenly was off in this fantasy land. I don't know about you guys. I just first of all. I don't know female reporters. Who do that and i know a lot of female reporters. It's not a thing. Just like i hope your listeners. Now this is not a thing. I mean when it happens which is so rare. It is a huge big deal. There was a story in elle magazine. I think it was last year about Reporter at bloomberg who had a relationship with martin. Shkreli the farmer bro. It was a huge feature story. Everyone was talking about it. Super rare and to note she did not use that relationship for reporting purposes. Like she stopped reporting on him once she had the relationship so not relevant and i think there was one other story could think of where a new york times reporter had a relationship with someone in the defense department or something and like face to repercussions for this. Like it was a big deal. This was never happens. Never have it poses. Do meet interesting men in the course of bed job and sometimes you know they. Suzy jackson suzy welch. I mean god knows barbara. Walters remember when she was famously. Dating like alan greenspan and greenberg at the same time You that the meteorologist. The economist is married to kyle bass Covering them and that's like that's the case they're going to make a movie about it there and i think the difference between what you're talking about..

joanne lipman katie holmes alan greenspan martin greenberg kyle bass joanne imdb aaron eckhart Joanne emily beck Suzy jackson last year Shkreli chris Joe first Walters fourth Lipman
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 1 year ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. . unpacking Pailin, , tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. . And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. . So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, , but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. . Well, , how can you have the Super Valuable Company? ? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. . Yeah. . But one, , hundred, , twenty, , five most. . Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, , and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, , very closely aligned with the trump administration. . There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. . Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. . I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. . Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. . But in seventeen year history, , it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. . One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. . Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. . So surveillance predictive policing, , possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, , Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. . We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, , notable backers of talent tear include investor, , and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen , campaign. . Evening. . I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, , but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. . He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. . A, , huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. . It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, , Alex Carp investor roadshow, , which true to carbs personality, , and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. . Welcome to Powell, tears , investor day. . We're very proud to have you here. . Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. . He has amazing curly hair. . He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. . He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. . This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. . Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. . Patrol. . Tracking immigrants at the border. . But Carp in the company not backed off in. . That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, , Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. . But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, , values and commitments. . Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. . If you think, , we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. . that. . That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. . Andrew. . Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. . This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock . Exchange. . We've had lots of conversations over the years. . This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated <hes> offerings or listings in a very long time. . Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? ? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. . So let's start with why now? ? Well, , first of all, , thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, , we really needed to build our products. . With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. . And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. . You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. . Deserved a access to liquidity. . So we we decided this would be great time for us and <hes> so far. . It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. . So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, , very grateful. . Outlets. The . single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, , the company unto itself is still not profitable. . So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. . Well, you , know we build these products years before people build them, , and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, , which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. . And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, , nine, , percent, , forty, , nine percent off of a seven, , forty, , three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. . And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our , software offering. . But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. . I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. . Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. . Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, , the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, , two, , proposition twenty, , twenty, , three proposition can I put you on that? ? Well, , you you can push me but of course, , my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, , supplying it and I think that are year I. . First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. . That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll . be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, , and we'll see how we do. . Confident confident we'll do well. . Alex, , one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? ? Can you speak to that? ? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? ? Of course we always sold this as a license. . Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. . So I think the real debate now is. Move . significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, , we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. . The question then is, , how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. . We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. . And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. . It could be like that. . We are going to deliver the best software. . With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. . What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. . Palette. Here . is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. . Alex has everybody knows <hes>. . You have contracts with various government agencies, , obviously <hes> and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, , but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. . About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. . Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. . How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, , if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, , four months, , how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? ? And grow that business. . Well, , we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. . So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, , , how can you have the super? ? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. . These aren't just any institutions. . The literally, , I would ask people who are watching this to make. . A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, , we don't go out and advertise our product, , but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. . So we want to keep these clients. . Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. . Year came from our existing clients. . What does that mean our existing clients? ? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. . So of course, , we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, , and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. . Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. . So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, , and we can do it without raising our headcount, , and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. . We are going to expand our client base. . Why? Because ? now with Apollo, , we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. . I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, , and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, , updating and providing them with new products we built. . So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. . It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. . So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, , get new customers and continue our march. . Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. . Well, , as I mentioned, , ninety, , five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. . So customers, , obviously if a customer wants to leave they, , can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, , we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. . Fees. . You can't get out of or building something over years, , and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. . Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. . But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, , and it's not because of my charming personality. . Alex well, , let me ask you a different question. . We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. . I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, , criticized, , the company recently for its role of working with ice. . How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? ? Especially, , the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. . To Your Business Well, look , the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. . US clients. . But it also gets us. . Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. . We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, , those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. . Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. . So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, , we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. . We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, , and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. . We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of . Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, , we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, , we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. . Alex. . One of the other questions now you all republic company. . But as you know, , you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, , this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. . Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. . Valley. . Defending the. . warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. . I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, , well, , why should talent you're having F. structure? ? What is my? ? What is my what? ? What can I do if? I ? don't agree with them. . The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, , we will not just blow with the wind. . And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, , both commercial and government, , and that's why I believe they're super important, , and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. . We don't have to buy challenge your shares. . You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. . Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, , the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, , a splinter net if you will. . How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, , which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. . We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, , and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, , which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, , it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. . Decision five years from now today. . How would you measure success? ? Here, , what would be the metrics which measure it? ? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. . Wow, , that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. . And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. . We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. . In favor of things that are good and noble. . And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. . Carpool. . You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But . hopefully sooner than that. . Thanks so much Alex. .

Carp donald trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Peter Thiel CEO New York Co Founder and CEO CEO Elon Helen tear CNBC Joanne Lipman Pailin Gotham US US Army Navy Department of Hom CIA
Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 1 year ago

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. unpacking Pailin, tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. Well, how can you have the Super Valuable Company? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. Yeah. But one, hundred, twenty, five most. Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, very closely aligned with the trump administration. There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. But in seventeen year history, it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. So surveillance predictive policing, possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, notable backers of talent tear include investor, and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen campaign. Evening. I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. A, huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, Alex Carp investor roadshow, which true to carbs personality, and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. Welcome to Powell, tears investor day. We're very proud to have you here. Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. He has amazing curly hair. He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. Patrol. Tracking immigrants at the border. But Carp in the company not backed off in. That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, values and commitments. Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. If you think, we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. that. That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. Andrew. Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock Exchange. We've had lots of conversations over the years. This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated offerings or listings in a very long time. Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. So let's start with why now? Well, first of all, thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, we really needed to build our products. With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. Deserved a access to liquidity. So we we decided this would be great time for us and so far. It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, very grateful. Outlets. The single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, the company unto itself is still not profitable. So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. Well, you know we build these products years before people build them, and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, nine, percent, forty, nine percent off of a seven, forty, three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our software offering. But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, two, proposition twenty, twenty, three proposition can I put you on that? Well, you you can push me but of course, my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, supplying it and I think that are year I. First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, and we'll see how we do. Confident confident we'll do well. Alex, one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? Can you speak to that? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? Of course we always sold this as a license. Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. So I think the real debate now is. Move significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. The question then is, how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. It could be like that. We are going to deliver the best software. With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. Palette. Here is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. Alex has everybody knows You have contracts with various government agencies, obviously and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, four months, how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? And grow that business. Well, we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, how can you have the super? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. These aren't just any institutions. The literally, I would ask people who are watching this to make. A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, we don't go out and advertise our product, but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. So we want to keep these clients. Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. Year came from our existing clients. What does that mean our existing clients? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. So of course, we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, and we can do it without raising our headcount, and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. We are going to expand our client base. Why? Because now with Apollo, we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, updating and providing them with new products we built. So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, get new customers and continue our march. Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. Well, as I mentioned, ninety, five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. So customers, obviously if a customer wants to leave they, can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. Fees. You can't get out of or building something over years, and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, and it's not because of my charming personality. Alex well, let me ask you a different question. We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, criticized, the company recently for its role of working with ice. How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? Especially, the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. To Your Business Well, look the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. US clients. But it also gets us. Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. Alex. One of the other questions now you all republic company. But as you know, you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. Valley. Defending the. warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, well, why should talent you're having F. structure? What is my? What is my what? What can I do if? I don't agree with them. The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, we will not just blow with the wind. And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, both commercial and government, and that's why I believe they're super important, and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. We don't have to buy challenge your shares. You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, a splinter net if you will. How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. Decision five years from now today. How would you measure success? Here, what would be the metrics which measure it? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. Wow, that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. In favor of things that are good and noble. And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. Carpool. You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But hopefully sooner than that. Thanks so much Alex.

Alex United States Silicon Valley Davos Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Carp New York Cnbc Powell Joanne Lipman Peter Thiel Gotham Us Army Navy Department Of Hom
"joanne lipman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Maybe, maybe, maybe way, have a long way to go in this pandemic. And if we want our economy open if we want our lives back, a fundamental part of that is gonna be wearing mass. I feels to me like that pretty keeping easy thing to do. And I don't know why we as a country haven't really made this a national goal. We really should. That is Dr Jaha, the director of the Harvard, a Global Health Institute, and we do want life. As we have lived previously. But for now we live with things like virtual meetings coming up in a few gonna break down. The real brass tacks coming out of last week's employment report really were some very positive themes and as usual bunch of excuses by economists that are anything but reasonable. The context of what we're going through right now, but First they would talk about thes virtual meetings. You are probably engaged in them. If you're having to meet and tell you it's become a very normal part of my day. I went from having next to no virtual meetings before all of this to just today. Between shows 9 15 I had won. I have another one scheduled at one o'clock, another one scheduled at two o'clock, all different entities to It's just what you do now, with all these meetings, and Kelly, a setup. Our specialist on said matters you may fall her at Kelly has said on Twitter. She is joining us to talk about this one thing in particular, that's come up Wi I suppose Kelly are establishing new etiquette when it comes to meetings in this virtual environment. What is the protocol? What's proper when it comes to showing one space? Well, that is a fantastic question. And unfortunately, studies have shown that women are less likely to turn their cameras on. And I am just here to tell you women. That is the worst thing you could possibly D'oh. It is already so hard to present and and know if your message is really landing with someone over a virtual platform when you can't see someone's face or their facial expressions or their reactions. And you're basically talking to a wall. It becomes even harder and most people that are presenting are not professional speakers and they need your feedback. And they have shown that women tend to keep their cameras off and I can get aren t you? There's a great book out by Joanne Lipman That says that that's what she said. And it talks about the unfair double standard that a lot of women have in the workplace. And it's spilling over into our virtual workspace in regards to you know, I I can show up and he's got scrapple that he's got longer hair and Little bit of a mess behind him. And no one judges. Ah, woman comes to have no makeup and this shovel hair and a little mess behind her and not just the man judge. Also, the women. And so I think it's time we have on all of us a bit of grace and understand especially women. We are doing the best we can with every thing we're having to juggle. Do you think it's best for whoever is leading a meeting to kind of set in expectation? As to if yes should be showing your face. Absolutely, and you know it. Also, it would be great for them to set expectations off. What dress code. You know if they're getting together, and it's an all hands, and they want to have things a little bit more professional if we feel differently when we're dressed, and I'm doing a lot of coaching Brian right now, and I would love you direct any of your listeners to Goto my length in page. There's a post that I did recently of just some basic tips on presenting virtually that will really, really help and I just encourage you. I've been coaching a lot of people on howto work from home for the first time, people don't know. Getting dressed and getting ready for your day. Even if you don't leave the house. I've worked from home for 20 years, and I've learned through that that course of him. Of learning the hard way that you are more productive when you are dressed professionally. You've got your hair and makeup done. So don't discount that. But then also don't give your don't judge yourself and be this perfectionist that you have to be every meeting. You know, 100% your best foot forward. That's that's not realistic in this day and age, either. Kelly s ETA on Lincoln. Teo. Get that information article she was talking about Kelly when I ask you a question, and you got me thinking about due to the dichotomy between my wife and me so She has worked from home. She travels for work, but when she's not traveling, she works from home. That part's normal, But she hadn't been doing all these virtual meetings to the extent that she did them before. They're just on the phone, and she is used to feeling as though she has to have her hair done a certain way. She has to be in the business suit, and she has travelled her make up done. Just however, she feels she needs it in order for her to join one these meetings, and she said that she hasn't been doing that. You know, she hasn't been showing herself largely because she doesn't want if she's not traveling to go through the hassle of doing her hair the certain way and putting on all the makeup. When I think she looks perfectly beautiful without doing all that nonsense anyway, But I mean, how much is there you mentioned, you know, kind of dressing for success and going about her day. Should she do that, anyway, even if she had been accustomed to all she's working at home previously. It really is it. There's so much research out there to show that we when we get up early, we get ourselves ready. We get herself dressed and put makeup on. We just are more productive. But it's not something that Especially the hair done and the makeup that's that's optional. It really is. Don't hold yourself to some person, you know, level of perfectionism that is Hard on you. Don't let this double standard affect you. Now, when you're meeting with a client and potential customer, that's a different story. You need to be dressed in your best, of course. But if you're just having a meeting with fellow staff members or fellow co workers, you know, make it fun. Give each other Grace and you are, in my opinion. I have I have Taking an active role to not judge anyone on the other end of that camera because I do not know what they're juggling in the background. They could have kids at home, you know all over the house. Messes that I have no idea that they're having to deal with all sorts of issues in their family..

Kelly Joanne Lipman Dr Jaha Twitter Harvard director Wi Brian Global Health Institute
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Friday, but it's also going to be expanding at the same time through the Fourth of July holiday up to the Canadian border with feels like temperatures in the mid nineties as far north as Fargo, North Dakota, 30 year mortgage rates hitting an all time low this week, Princeton University's Joanne Lipman says it is due in part to shifting real estate needs because of the Corona virus. A lot of that has to do with With this remote working, so when you have remote working suddenly you're real estate needs shift. This is CBS News. Traffic and weather together. The Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes. It is 302 and happening right now. Downtown 93 the North bound side you're down two left lanes through the O'Neill tunnel that has you write it to speed limit south bound. Reducing speed for a triple left lane closure mystic through the O'Neill Exit 24 to government centre's closed as is the carpool lane. No delays in the airport tunnels, but the Ted Williams is down a lane, Both inbound and outbound. Tobin Bridge North bound were crude delays before fourth Street and up to the Chelsea curves. North of town. Route one south bound him slowing down through Saugus, with only one lane getting by from 1 28 to Main Street and Danvers won 28. North slows for a work crew by Endicott Street 93 South overnight, paving in your way by 2 13 and Matthew in and then the left lane is closed on by Montiel have no delay there for 95 will watch for work crew delays. North and after 1 19 Littleton South bound after 1 11 in Boxborough, Route three looks good south of the city Expressway North Valley of a double right lane closure with not much of a delay from the split to Furnace Brook Parkway, South bound side of 93 Randolph the ramp to Route 24th close and for 95 South has a setup by Route 20 in Middleborough with a bit of a slowdown. West. Brief delays with work crews on the pike eastbound right at 1 28 westbound through Newton corner and rude to you going to slow down for work crews both ways and lemons, thereby Route 12 and again through the conquered rotary. Route nine is fine. This report sponsored by Compassion International, We're all feeling the weight of covert 19. But for kids in poverty around the world, things are becoming desperate. Join compassion International and provide for a family in poverty. Make your one time. $40 gift text Hope. 283393 75 degrees on a cloudy sky. Steve Perez, the BBC traffic on the threes. Here's the four day W B Z AccuWeather forecast remaining human early this morning with apparently to mostly cloudy skies alone near 70 than training cooler later today, So I'm giving way to clouds. Couple shot was around, especially in the afternoon and evening with the highest 74 then for tonight a bit cooler. Low 62 For tomorrow. Independence Day cloudy to partly sunny with a cool onshore breeze. Highs ranging from 70 to 75 degrees. Warmer into Sunday Times of clouds and sun. I tempt around 80 degrees in Boston mid eighties as you had inland I'm Maki. Whether me they're all this map ends. W B Z Boston's news Radio Morning I'm Don Huff. Here's what's happening. Boston's Phase three reopening will not happen until July 13th but the Baker administration says Phase three for the rest of the states re opening begins on Monday. Museums, movie theaters and outdoor concert venues will be back in business. Lieutenant Governor Karen Polito says. Jim's can also reopen on Monday,.

Ted Williams Compassion International Boston North Dakota O'Neill tunnel CBS Joanne Lipman Lieutenant Governor Karen Poli Fargo Tobin Bridge Princeton University Middleborough Subaru Steve Perez Saugus government centre Newton corner Montiel Matthew
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

"Original reporting. I'm Bill right Coffee in Washington Texasgovernor. Greg Abbott is being forced to introduce a mandatory covert facemask rule in the hardest hit counties there this requirement. Is not intended to be punitive. I said, We just need everyone to do their part to help to slow the spread in Florida, where cases are also jumping Governor Rhonda Santa's has yet to issue a mask order. Dr Anthony found You, meanwhile, is pleading with Americans to take precautions, not with themselves in mind. But for others, Chances are you're going to infect someone else who then will infect someone else. And then a vulnerable person will get. In fact, that could be a younger, vulnerable person with an underlying condition that could be an elderly person that could be or someone's grandfather. Grandmother. The Supreme Court has blocked a ruling allowing curbside voting in Alabama because of the Corona virus outbreak. They say it could so voter confusion loyal along Professor Jessica Levinson. What we have here is a majority of the court, seemingly ignoring the broader context that citizens must be able to safely exercise. Their fundamental right to vote. Elaine Maxwell, the alleged accomplice of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein is now behind bars, CBS's Mullah Lindy reports, according to the criminal complaint, Prosecutors say Maxwell would try to normalize sexual abuse for minor victims by discussing sexual topics undressing in front of the victim's being present for sacks sacks, the indictment continues. Maxwell encouraged victims to provide massages to Epstein, including sexual massages, during which a minor victim would be fully or partially new President Trump heads to Mount Rushmore in South Dakota later today for the first fireworks display there in more than 10 years. It is a concern for former Park Superintendent Cheryl Schreier pencil for Wild Land Fire. Injuries to people also just the fact that the impact to the natural and cultural resource is of the park. CBS meteorologist Geoff Barrow, Delhi is tracking a heat wave across the nation. This heat wave is going to briefly weakened in the plain states on Friday, but it's also going to be expanding at the same time through the Fourth of July holiday up to the Canadian border with feels like temperatures in the mid nineties as far north as Fargo, North Dakota, 30 year mortgage rates hitting an all time low this week, Princeton University's Joanne Lipman says it is due in part to shifting real estate needs because the Corona virus a lot of that has to do with Did this remote working. So when you have remote working suddenly you're real estate needs shift. This is CBS News. Never miss a moment. Top news from w T o p 24 73 65. Listen on air on Alexa and on the w T o P AP Doubled Ethiopia 303 Sunday morning long holiday weekend.

Elaine Maxwell CBS Supreme Court Jeffrey Epstein Professor Jessica Levinson Greg Abbott Washington Texasgovernor Alexa Ethiopia Dr Anthony Geoff Barrow Rhonda Santa Cheryl Schreier Joanne Lipman South Dakota North Dakota Mullah Lindy Alabama
"joanne lipman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Find podcast K i r o f in Tacoma, Seattle. News on the hour your home for original reporting. I'm Bill right Coffee in Washington Texasgovernor. Greg Abbott is being forced to introduce a mandatory covert facemask rule in the hardest hit counties there this requirement. Is not intended to be punitive. I said, We just need everyone to do their part to help to slow the spread in Florida, where cases are also jumping Governor Rhonda Santa's has yet to issue a mask order. Dr Anthony found You, meanwhile, is pleading with Americans to take precautions, not with themselves in mind, but for others. The chances are you're going to infect someone else who then will infect someone else. And then a vulnerable person will get infected. That could be a younger, vulnerable person with an underlying condition that could be an elderly person. That could be our someones. GRANDFATHER. Grandmother The Supreme Court has blocked a ruling allowing curbside voting in Alabama because of the Corona virus outbreak. They say it could so voter confusion loyal a law professor Jessica Levinson, What we have here is a majority of the court, seemingly ignoring the broader context that citizens must be able to safely exercise. Their fundamental right to vote. Elaine Maxwell, the alleged accomplice of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein is now behind bars and CBS's Mullah Lindy reports, according to the criminal complaint. Prosecutors say Maxwell would try to normalize sexual abuse for minor victims by discussing sexual topics undressing in front of the victims. Being present for sex acts, the indictment continues. Maxwell encouraged victims to provide massages to Epstein, including sexual massages, during which a minor victim would be fully or partially nude. President Trump heads to Mount Rushmore in South Dakota later today for the first fireworks display there in more than 10 years. It is a concern for former Park Superintendent Cheryl Schreier potential for wild land fire. Injuries to people also just the fact that the impact to the natural and cultural resource is of the park. CBS meteorologist Jefe Para Delhi is tracking a heat wave across the nation. This heat wave is gonna briefly weakened in the plain states on Friday, but it's also going to be expanding at the same time through the Fourth of July holiday up to the Canadian border with feels like temperatures in the mid nineties as far north as Fargo, North Dakota, 30 year mortgage rates hitting an all time low this week, Princeton University's Joanne Lipman says it is due in part to shifting real estate needs because the Corona virus a lot of that has to do with Did this remote working. So when you have remote working suddenly you're.

Elaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein CBS Supreme Court Jefe Para Delhi Tacoma Washington Texasgovernor Greg Abbott Joanne Lipman Jessica Levinson North Dakota Seattle Dr Anthony Rhonda Santa Fargo South Dakota Cheryl Schreier Mullah Lindy Mount Rushmore President Trump
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

"Insurance. I'm Pam Coulter in Washington. Governors and other state officials. Air rushing new measures as Thie Corona virus spreads like wildfire, CBS's Chris Martinez reports. Just 24 hours. More than 50,000 new Coben. 19 cases were reported nationwide, the most of any single day. So far, 37 out of 50 states now have rising case numbers Cove it is spreading. Like Never before Texas Governor Greg Abbott is ordering residents and counties with 20 or more Kobe. 19 cases. Toe wear a face covering his reversal on masks comes as Texas reported nearly 8000 new cases Thursday, Florida saw a record setting 10,000 new cases compared to a month ago when it was over 600. Chris Martinez, CBS News Los Angeles The woman who some say acted as a madam for convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein is now behind bars. British socialite Delaine Maxwell was arrested in New Hampshire and charged on six counts, including illegally transporting minors and perjury. The FBI's William sweetie junior. Like Epstein, Miss Maxwell chose to blatantly disregard the law and her responsibilities an adult. Using whatever means she had in her disposal toll or vulnerable youth into behavior. They should never have been exposed and which creates lasting harm the family of missing Fort Hood soldier Vanesa G, and is accusing the army of a botched investigation and urging Congress to step in and find out what happened to the 20 year old private. Major General Scott eh? Flynn reported on developments today and said he's ordering an external investigation of Fort Hood sexual harassment program. For the last three days. The investigation has led to the discovery of human remains and belt in Texas. The arrest of a person from the local community and the suicide of a soldier in Colleen, who is pending apprehension. Excessive heat warnings are up for a large swath of the country. CBS's Geoff Barrow, Delhi This heat wave is going to briefly weakened in the plain states on Friday, but it's also going to be expanding at the same time through the Fourth of July holiday up to the Canadian border with feels like temperatures in the mid nineties as far north as Fargo, North Dakota, 30 year mortgage rates at an all time low this week, falling 23 point 7%. Princeton's Joanne Lipman tells CBS news. She didn't expect them to go back up any time soon. With the mortgage rates. I think they were going to see them staying low. We really need to encourage people to invest obviously. So you know, it looks like they've been coming down. I would expect they're going to stay low for the foreseeable future. The Dow up 92 today. This is CBS News. Quoting home insurance just got easier with progressives home Quote Explorer quote and by online at progressive dot com. 11 03 on this. Thursday, July 2nd GOP news time, 80 degrees outside Thursday evening. I'm Del Walters the top local stories we're following for you with this our new this evening regarding the Washington Redskins, FedEx now asking the team to change its name. FedEx confirmed that request that a one sentence statement that was e mailed to W. T O P Company, of course, holds the naming rights to the team's stadium and FedEx CEO and Chairman Fred Smith is a co owner of the team. He's also good friends with Skins owner Dan Snyder..

CBS Chris Martinez Texas FedEx Jeffrey Epstein Delaine Maxwell Joanne Lipman Pam Coulter Washington Fort Hood New Hampshire Dan Snyder FBI Flynn Governor Greg Abbott Washington Redskins Cove Geoff Barrow
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of items that we're just going to stay at home and just celebrate with Social Dis Ihsan. There will be lots of Fourth of July driveway celebrations with many large scale fireworks shows snuffed out by Cove it 19 Crystal CBS News, Greensboro, North Carolina on Capitol Hill. Today, lawmakers heard more from health experts about Covad, 19 and the surgeon a growing list of states many in the South and West. Over the last six months. Coben, 19 has spread around the world with frightening speed N I h director Dr Francis Collins and from Corona Task Force member Admiral Brett Jerar. We're all concerned about recent data from several states. Indicating rising infections and now an uptick and hospitalizations and deaths. Lawmakers wanted to know when a vaccine might be available. CDC director Robert Redfield. We're doing it on the run. I think you've heard me say before when it comes to public health. It comes to public health. This is something we as a nation should plan to be overprepared, not underprepared. And while several candidates are still being tested, plans are already underway for how to get them to millions of Americans. Once they're proved safe and effective, and that the CBS is candy McCormick it's 6 19 on W. B Z at the White House today. President Trump touting the latest jobs numbers during a short briefing this afternoon, get details on that from the AP SOCCER Madani President Trump is hailing a government report showing employers at Did 4.8 million jobs last month that lowered the unemployment rate to 11.1%. America's economy is coming back, much stronger than ever anticipated, but economists warned the job market recovery may already be slowing. The Corona virus infection curve is going up in 40 of 50 states Man A new round of closings is leading to more layoffs. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden says the president shouldn't be celebrating. We're still down. Nearly 15 million jobs in the pandemic is getting worse. Not better. Johns Hopkins University's running tally shows the number of confirmed infections per day in the U. S. Has more than doubled over the past month. Soccer Megane, Washington and some Senate Democrats are calling for an extension on the extra federal unemployment payments past the end of July. Rep. Richard Neil from Springfield, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, says there is a chance that could happen. But it won't come easy saying it'll quote be a point of battle. Neil tells Mass live. It's also likely Congress will end up passing another stimulus payment program to also this week, 30 year mortgage rates had an all time low, falling to 3.7%. That's down from last week's 3.13%. Joanne Lipman at Princeton University, says she thinks the rates will stay low for some time with the mortgage rates. I think they were going to see them staying low. We really need to encourage people to invest obviously. So you know, it looks like they've been coming down. I would expect they're going to stay low and for the foreseeable future, right, So we'll see what happens as we go forward more and how this affected the markets this week, coming up in Bloomberg business at 6 38 Do you have questions.

Robert Redfield President Trump president Joanne Lipman director Rep. Richard Neil CBS Covad North Carolina Corona Task Force Greensboro Johns Hopkins University Joe Biden Dr Francis Collins Admiral Brett Jerar CDC
"joanne lipman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Independence Day holiday mayors, governors and doctors are urging Americans to stay home to avoid beaches, bars and barbecues. It's because in the past 24 hours, more than 50,000 new Koba 19 cases have been reported the most of any single day. So far. Correspondents DIF Ottoman, with a sharp reversal from one governor from east to west to South Covina. 19 cases continue to spike in Texas Governor Greg Abbott after resisting such a move for weeks. Order Texans toe wear masks in public places is not intended to be punitive. We just need everyone to do their part to slow the spread. Dr Anthony fell CI on the BBC with words of warning. We cannot give up because it appears that we're losing the battle right now, though, there are a few optimistic signs. Steve Futterman, CBS News Woman accused of helping Jeffrey Epstein recruit and sexually abused underage girls, was arrested by the FBI this morning in New Hampshire. The case against given Maxwell will now be transferred to New York, the FBI's William Sweeney junior. We moved when we were ready, and Miss Maxwell was arrested without incident. Maxwell made her first court appearance this afternoon. She's expected to be arraigned in New York next week. The Supreme Court is blocking Congress from being able to see secret grand jury information relating to the Mueller investigation, but it has agreed to take up the legal showdown. Former federal prosecutor Laurie Levinson says the justices will likely hear aural arguments in the next term. The decision by the high court To take. The appeal is probably a great relief for the Trump campaign because it's almost guaranteed that the Supreme Court won't make its decision until after the election. A day after the president called the reports a hoax. Top intelligence officials traveled to Capitol Hill to discuss reports that Russia offered bounties to kill U. S soldiers overseas. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says they should have found out about the reports sooner. I will say this It was of other consequential level that the intelligence community should have brought it to us. In that way. The Taliban continues to deny the reports in Russia is pushing back as well. 30 year mortgage rates at an all time low this week, falling to 3.7%. Joanne Lipman of Princeton University, says the drop in rates reflect a reshaping of the real estate market. A lot of that has to do with this remote working So when you have remote working suddenly you're real estate needs shift. On Wall Street, The Dow gained 92 points, NASDAQ up 53 points as NP Oppa's well 14 points This is CBS News. Presented by Rocket mortgage. Want to see your loan options, adjust payments and closing costs online in real time Rocket can visit rocket mortgage dot com Today now from the Cairo Radio new Center at my northwest dot com We are expecting to hear from Governor Jay Inslee any moment with an update on Corona virus and possibly new restrictions because of an increase in cases. We will bring that to you live among the newer cases. King County Public Health today confirmed 66 UW fraternity members have tested positive for covert 19. The fraternity council says that number could be much higher. Dr. Jeff Do Jin. We understand that there was a lot of socializing a lot of risk taking, not a lot of mask use going on when you do that, and you don't take precautions. You've got a lot of covert in return more troubling news from the state office that's sending out unemployment checks during the pandemic. Piper radios. Diane do wth Wyler. With that story. New unemployment claims climbed for the second week in a row in our state state employment security Commissioner Susie Levine says it's likely due to furloughs and layoffs, many in retail restaurants and hospitality. Since mid March, when Corona virus job losses began. 1.2 million people in our state have applied for financial help because of the record number of claims both legitimate and fraudulent. Tens of thousands of newly unemployed Washingtonians have yet to receive any money. Others have had their payments stopped for weeks while their identity is verified. The father of a 19 year old who was fatally shot in Seattle's top protest zone is speaking out somebody to come to my house and knock on my door and tell me something that you know, I don't know nothing Horse. Lorenzo Anderson senior told Fox News today. He had to hear about his son's death from his friends, not detectives. Police, who tried to reach the scene June 20th were pushed back by people occupying the area. A 16 year old was killed at the zone Monday. There Jenny Durkin into me with the families of what I could directly express my condolences for the loved ones they lost in this senseless act of Serkin spoke after police cleared out the job zone and took back the East Precinct. Yesterday, 44 people were arrested, 25 more were taken into custody. Overnight radios Hannah Scott report, a large group gathered a few blocks away from the area that had been cleared out by police just a few hours. Earlier this morning, she had a police chief, Garmin Best described what happened overnight. There was several demonstrators who were outside of the calendars in area We did have to use a minimal, less lethal, which means some individual pepper spray. Maybe a blast Baller to keep people out of the area confesses the goal for SPD is our goal here is just to make sure That we have maintained through normalcy in the area that we don't revert back to situation we had before protesters have been pushing for police reform. Your Cairo radio forecast calls for cloudy skies today with highs in the upper sixties. It's 62 degrees in downtown Seattle. I'm rock Stream Cairo radio at home on your smart speakers. Cairo Radio at my northwest dot com Cairo Radio Your first source to know and understand Corona virus. Who knew is holiday shot. You know,.

Miss Maxwell Supreme Court New York Russia Seattle Cairo FBI Cairo Radio new Center DIF Ottoman Texas Joanne Lipman House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Taliban Greg Abbott New Hampshire Rocket Jeffrey Epstein Dr Anthony Steve Futterman
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

"The Independence Day holiday mayors, governors and doctors are urging Americans to stay home to avoid beaches, bars and barbecues. It's because in the past 24 hours, more than 50,000 new Koba 19 cases have been reported the most of any single day. So far. Correspondents DIF Ottoman, with a sharp reversal from one governor from east to west to South Covina. 19 cases continue to spike in Texas Governor Greg Abbott after resisting such a move for weeks. Order Texans toe wear masks in public places is not intended to be punitive. We just need everyone to do their part to slow the spread. Dr Anthony Fauci on the BBC with words of warning. We cannot give up because it appears that we're losing the battle right now, though, there are a few optimistic signs. Steve Futterman CBS News The woman accused of helping Jeffrey Epstein recruit and sexually abused underage girls, was arrested by the FBI this morning in New Hampshire. The case against Dylan Maxwell will now be tried. Offered to New York the FBI's William Sweeney junior. We moved when we were ready, and Miss Maxwell was arrested without incident. Maxwell made her first court appearance this afternoon. She's expected to be arraigned in New York next week. The Supreme Court is blocking Congress from being able to see secret grand jury information relating to the Mueller investigation, but it has agreed to take up the legal showdown. Former federal prosecutor Laurie Levenson says the justices will likely hear aural arguments in the next term. The decision by the high court to take the appeal is probably a great relief. For the Trump campaign because it's almost guaranteed that the Supreme Court won't make its decision until after the election. A day after the president called the reports a hoax. Top intelligence officials traveled to Capitol Hill to discuss reports that Russia offered bounties to kill U. S soldiers overseas. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says they should have found out about the reports sooner. I will say this It was of other consequential level that the intelligence community should have brought it to us. In that way. The Taliban continues to deny the reports in Russia is pushing back as well. 30 year mortgage rates at an all time low this week, falling to 3.7%. Joanne Lipman of Princeton University, says the drop in rates reflect a reshaping of the real estate market. A lot of that has to do with this remote working So when you have remote working suddenly you're real estate needs shift. On Wall Street, The Dow gained 92 points, NASDAQ up 53 points as NP Oppa's well 14 points This is CBS News. Refresh your business Tech during Del Technology Cyber Savings event with up to 50% off computers, servers and more. Call it 77 asked L. For Adele Technologies advisor. Three. It's Thursday, the second day of July 2020. It is 89 groups outside, but Good afternoon. I'm deal off the top local stories we're following for you With this hour. George Floyd's death triggered a tsunami of Confederate statues coming down across the nation and here at home, another just today in Richmond. Just one day after the statue of Stonewall Jackson was removed your on Monument Avenue, several 100 people watched and took cellphone video. As the statue to Confederate naval Officer Matthew Fontaine. Maury was removed. It took less than an hour for a crude or wrap, a heavy strap and chain around the statue and a cherry picker lifted it off in space. The statue was loaded onto a flatbed truck. People cheered as they drove away, Mayor says all statues being removed will be stored for now. In Richmond, Neil Organ Steamed w T o P new. Meanwhile, a defendant of that Confederate naval commander.

Dylan Maxwell Supreme Court New York Russia Richmond FBI DIF Ottoman Dr Anthony Fauci Stonewall Jackson Laurie Levenson Joanne Lipman Greg Abbott Texas House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Jeffrey Epstein New Hampshire Taliban Steve Futterman CBS
"joanne lipman" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And that meant a silenced by the need to sort of conform one of after the ideal standard so they engage in some of those behaviors that can be exclusionary all they have to sort of tolerate those behaviours even if it makes them uncomfortable so it's a lot of challenges that manning counting living up to the idea and I think that's really important because when it comes to motherhood you know there is this perception and drives me crazy that this is sort of a woman problem right and so it's just house frame that's how we've been approaching the term motherhood when we're talking about it work it's not but Hey how do we make workplaces work for parents Israeli okay so how do we sort of war we need to apply to help women fit into this work environment and the reality is you're not helping me you know the workplace wasn't designed for me in the first place is actually fixing something and that was originally broken and workplaces need woman in order that we talk about that enough women deserve workplaces that value them and we need in our workplaces need us we have capabilities that you know are expected remain eight and if you look at it you know there's a great study by the federal reserve bank of Saint Louis which found over a thirty year period the most productive workers armadas and specifically mothers of truth and you know so it's no surprise to mothers because we know what it takes to travel all of those but I think people are often shocked when you say that because you know for prices for any one of the most productive workers they were designed for that and so for me it's less about slapping on a flexible work policy or you know providing some current to leave which in the not the United States is a huge issue those are sort of what I consider the bears that have basics that woman not entitled to and women need in order to work in work places but so do men right so may need the opportunity to look after their children in St harming agents like school work but you can have all of those policies in place and studies show you know they still not effective and the reason for that is culture so all of my work the whole book talks about culture which is the lived experience of workplaces if you think of your day to day moments right if your boss is sitting there saying you know what it's really hard to advance mothers Harvard you schedule we're gonna you know dumb are you to this list of low level role because you're on a reduced work schedule you know that's though the old sort of invisible varies it really prevent women from advancing is something called a part time pay a penalty you know where employees to reduce their work hours and work part time have less access to sort of long term career opportunities and overwhelmingly that's women you know two thirds of all part time workers are women and so the challenge is that inequality creates really shows up in those day to day moments it's not you know policies and processes are required but if we have leaders who reading and her managing through the challenges and considering the whole person and your identities outside of work and how best to design a work environment to meet those needs you know that would sort of do away with the need to have a lot of these policies and today we just don't have that we don't have leaders who are meeting creating environments that equitable to both men and women in terms of sort of the whole person and and what their needs are outside of work that said study I hadn't been aware of it but I could have told you that as someone who has hired hundreds of people in my time as an editor in chief but also as a mom of two I totally believe mothers are so productive and mothers of two I have two kids I'm not surprised at all but you know let's talk about you know what the solutions here you've talked about culture change but also about leadership what is the balance to get to the right place in the workplace do we need a change a legislative change do we isn't just all about culture change do we need new laws what what is the right balance here to get to the place we need to get to so what I talk about this a lot in the book in terms of you know a quality is really comes down to leadership I believe it's an invitation for leaders to lead and the reason I say that is because you know leaders set the standard for Walker looks like when it comes to behave as employees live up to that standard by modeling leadership and so when we think about what good looks like we're looking at our latest and many of those leaders today Erin denial about the challenges that women face and most under represented groups and organizations right and if leaders don't understand the barriers that women face and they're not taking steps to remove those barriers and most barriers happen as I mentioned before in day to day moments right is when a woman gets spoken over in a meeting when there's a sexist comment all you know is an office banter that excludes Montreuil has as employees at work so those are the moments that we need leaders to manage and you know outside of legislation which I don't really cover in my book because for me I'm already looking at workplaces tried and how leaders can take action today and what it is they can do today and for me just simply managing those moments it's something that every leader can do you know someone you see discrimination when you see marginalisation when you see exclusion it's your opportunity to pull ploys aside talk about it and use it as a learning moment and ready resetting the standards that behave as an organization the challenges to do that well we need leaders to know what the barriers are so they know what to pay attention to you know what to look out to and in order to know what the barriers are which you know and I recommend reading my book is that you know you need to do that you actually have to disrupt your owned and all right you have to think about Hey as a leader how minor position of privilege how do I sit down with events being with having a want nothing common with on it makes it that much easier for you to advance it if you're a woman you know white woman in a leadership role you need to consider that and understand the barriers that women of color face in organizations but if your manual it's both you'll you've got your masculinity in common and then also said if you want it's going a middle classes ableism so you need to think about you know how you what you have in common with don makes it that much easier for you to advance in the thing here is that some point to mention is that nobody saying in our don draper taught me leaders haven't had to work hard to get where they have what you're saying everybody else has to work out to but they will have to overcome numerous invisible barriers me my book online seventeen and so that's really what we want leaders to do is to stop the purses of becoming aware just ruptured and I'll understand your privilege understand how that makes it that much harder for anybody else to advance get to know the barriers and then manage those moments every day Michelle king speaking with Joanne Lipman her book to fix no matter what you're talking about is unconscious bias right and then some of it is outright bias when you're talking about these these barriers can can you enumerate mention the seventeen barriers can you can you talk about a few that we haven't had on show I mean the thing I'll say I just on the unconscious bias thing to point out is that you know I'm not a massive fan of unconscious bias training and I think this is important point when it comes to the barriers because in a research shows that in fact a lot of unconscious bias training is ineffective because the reason is that you're raising people's awareness and then you're telling them that it's unconscious and so they feel they don't have to do anything about it and is another great HBO study that talks to us and in a research by my university is now found that actually what we need to do shift people from unconscious bias training to conscious decision making and that's exactly what my book tries to do by outlining the various social of really showing how the invisible barrier shows up and then what you can do to navigate it or move it or you know prevent that from happening again and so we've got some great examples as we go through the book you know things that I mentioned before I simply you know not being away so having some of those conditions expectations when you start work so what can you do around that you know all women entering the workforce with the winner because what we find is without that you know within the first three years of working life woman's confidence drops by more than sixty percent in terms of their ability to reach their senior leadership positions and their perceptions of faith so how much they feel like they fit into the organization dropped by more than forty percent now that's a lot you know that takes a toll and the reason for that is simply not knowing the challenges you're going to encounter can really knock your confidence when you do encounter them because you stop to think in or is it me or is it my work place and use you ready sort of grapple with the sense that maybe I don't fit in here maybe I'm not cut out for corporate life and so those are some of the challenges we see early on also things like you know it as a nation of conformity bond or challenges with performance tax so you know because women instead of insurance we don't fit the don draper park drive right just in terms of their behaviors but then also just how they look you know a woman after working that much harder to be seen as competent or capable so almost starting on the back foot so we have to over perform to be seen is just as good as our male colleagues and I can create a lot of challenges and then you know as you approach of motherhood using a whole bunch of challenges with more places that are not designed for mothers and one of the key reasons for that is that you know you can you can sort of really differ from dawn when you become a mother artist for me the most furthest away from that part of town do you can be and it's something that's physically we see and and and that's why you know pregnant woman ready try to hide a pregnancy at work they also will go into work when they're not feeling well you know I've got a great story around a colleague who was given lean in when she was four months pregnant and told by her bosses now because she was pregnant she was seen as less capable and less confidence or she needed to really prove myself and lean and even for about and so what happened which was already performing at a high rate she did even more work and she got signed off for the you know basically over working by her doctor saying that you know was damaging our health and putting your baby at risk and so we see you know this is the whole tax around motherhood something called the mother of a tax and a lot of people may be familiar with the motherhood penalty and it plays out where again women's performances questions simply because they don't look like the prototype and people have a lot of stereotypes associate with mothers and so we see that ready play out in terms of reduction in wages so it's estimated that mothers in off of controlling for all the usual factors that affect wages will face a five percent reduction in wages per child and we rarely see that play out and if ironic you know we're penalizing almost productive workforce which is crazy so you know those are challenges mothers experience and then as you move to what I see is ready the last phase of women's careers one woman to lead is one of the biggest challenges is that you know we often on a way where if the challenges women leaders face it's assumed that once you've broken through that glass ceiling you know you've overcome all the various tried and that's just simply not the case you know woman of hyper visible women leading because every day they have to go into the workplace and defy the standard for what leadership looks like right and so they face numerous challenges like backlash you know way they're undermined all they have the capability and authority question overweight people sort of don't support the leadership decisions and then we also see it play out with things like what a cool stereotypical kat costing right we we label women leaders like you know we see them as ice queen all you know we give them those sorts of turns and then it makes it very hard for them to lead in a way that isn't associated with that so I think it's really important to understand all the different challenges that women face throughout their careers and for women I say Hey you know when you're reading this book it's helpful to have a road map Friday you can sort of see yourself in some of the pasta experiences in and see yourself in the future and you know some of the barriers that might be coming out for you and it really helps you know I think awareness is key because it helps prevent that internalizing purses that we talked about before that seems to knock confidence I think it's very important that you've broken down these invisible barriers because you know when we.

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"Conditions to even things that are in the mental health space anxiety and depression and brain fog and fatigue. There's the whole field of scientific literature referred to as the site of kind model of cognitive function and cytokines or pro inflammatory cells in her body. So it's basically looking how inflammation Asian impacts. How our brain works and something that I've been talking a lot about with? His books are just getting this message out there and something that we've talked about for a long time like I've written articles articles about it for the past decade but we like to separate mental health physical health but mental health is physical health. Our brain is in our body and we need to be looking at the the Component of inflammation in mental health and so inflammation is very important. Like the things I just mentioned and are just about. It are impacting just about everybody in the human race right now sadly and if it's impacting you it's impacting someone. You love so this. This is a book for everybody because the statistics speak for themselves. A lot of people are going through these health issues. I think it's so interesting that we've been talking about how we we as a culture tend to separate mental health from physical health and things have been kind of progressing more. Let's say in the past decade as we're learning more about the gut brain connection and how those are two like so interconnected brain health influences health gut health influences brain health. But we don't really think think about how inflammation can really impact things like anxiety and depression. Could you talk a little bit more about that. Yeah so Basically inflammation is linked to anxiety and depression fatigue and the mechanism at play. There is the brain has a protective sheath covering called the blood brain barrier and research is looking at how certain proteins and certain aspects of the body can pass through the blood brain barrier or things that can increase blood brain barrier permeability So one of the biomarkers mark is that we run. And Thomas Sistine and studies to show that homocysteine which is an inflammatory marker above seven has been shown to inc with increased blood brain barrier permeability. And Act as a neurotoxin What they call leaky brains and drums something that as someone can have leaky gut syndrome or increased intestinal permeability? They also can have leaky brain syndrome or increased blood brain barrier permeability and the mechanism is basically increased permeability to buy brain barrier and some sort of activation of the Mike Gregorio cells. which is the brain's immune cells so creates a sort of this brain on fire and it's a spectrum? You can have mild inflammatory. Ah Responses or a mild inflammatory components to you know people with neurological symptoms and then all the way to the other end which is full blown like neurological autoimmune. Immune conditions And then everything in between so that is definitely something that you can quantify you can always you quantify homocysteine but then specifically you can measure clued clued in Lynn and other blood brain barrier permeability biomarkers on blood labs and also measure Antibody production to neurological tissue to And there's a lab that we run for patients to kind of see is there a neuro inflammatory component to your case or not at that may not be because it's multifaceted. I can't just rally and say what an oversimplify it was just that but is definitely a component for a lot of people and it's not just me looking out on a clinical level or US Auctioned medicine looking at it on a clinical level which it's being done and we see it all the time but I also you can see studies pubmed and look at the What's being don out there and the different scientific journals of people looking at these inflammatory components to mental health problems? So Oh interesting. So let's say someone has had one or many of the countless health conditions and markers of inflammation that we've been talking about right. What are aside from buying the book? Obviously reading it. 'cause it's great What are some of the first steps that the listeners could take if they you think they're experiencing some of these things towards figuring out what that inflammation is where it's coming from? And then what they can do to start learning how to heal it. Well it depends on where they're at had space wise like we have a whole chapter in the book called initiate which is like leaning into things and not like having to figure it it all out overnight so that so I mean it depends on what you're you're at like depends on what you're ready for But the initiate chapter talks about leaning into things and starting with one thing at a time and Going from there so you do as simple as just limiting the amount of sugar you're having Talk about what the core four and the book and its sugar added sugar grains high mega six oils like vegetable double oil canola oil and dairy. So those are what's research shows to be inflammatory. A lot of people not and it's the heart of inflammation spectrum is bio- individuality. There's some people that can tolerate some of those in certain amounts in some in higher amounts and they're fine so we talked about the different nuance like the different kinds the life of say on the grains and the sour dough bread There's definitely ways to get around it So we're not making a blanket statement on those foods it's but those are some things to consider removing for a time seeing how you feel checking in with yourself looking at stress looking at you relationship with sued using food as medicine loving your body enough to feed it good things during this time and then there's the more advanced track called the eliminate track which is the core foods foods that I just mentioned plus four more which includes nights shades which are plant group that includes peppers and tomatoes eggplants and white potatoes and go gee berries and some spices Nuts seeds legumes and eggs again. Those are all whole foods there great for some people not great for other people. So I would say do do a little experiment for yourself removes for Awhile. Bring them back in my teach how to do their introduction which is so important And then you can see what your body loves and doesn't love and you may find do great on six of those food groups but not the other two or I do great on like five of them but not three of them. So we're all different and we're GonNa find that little collection of data for yourself to to find that clarity and then it's not about a diet it's about no. I love feeling great more than I. I missed that food. And it's back to that food centeredness that food piece that we're talking about So that's definitely what we're putting were guiding people through That process and we talk about these. non-food inflames through these weeks. So you can look at stress. You can look at social isolation and getting a community and you we can talk about a screen time and the impact that's having inflammation so it's unfolding of this experience of things to consider you. Don't do everything all at once. You're leaning into it but you're progressing right and checking in with yourself every step of the way and saying like is this working for me or is this too much and then being being again compassionate with yourself and knowing like okay well if you have this history of a complicated relationship with food like you might not the FBI ready to make these changes because that might be a little bit too much for you so then I really liked that you provide the option of. Let's look at these non-food triggers like are you lonely. What is your screen time like? What is your social life like you know all these other things that can do so much for both our mental and physical health without even having to touch hutch food but then realizing that okay? That's an area that I should probably go talk to somebody about. Yeah totally there's a place for maybe seeing functional medicine practitioner additional or seeing a therapist or seeing a specialist in that field Yeah took totally true. But oftentimes people start off with themselves. Kinda see where they're at so they can make that educated decision on seeking help when they need that. Yeah for sure So last time I asu about a book recommendation. Aside from your own obviously and you gave me a new earth which was fantastic so so I would love another book recommendation. That maybe has been new to you in the past year that you've either been recommended to everybody or you've been really really loving yourself. Cool when you start saying that Mike. I better said a new earth or I definitely love card. Tolling for the people who haven't read a new earth or power or have now both of his books I think they're both like very important. Reeds for human race at this point in life. But if you're looking for something less maybe spiritual or conceptual practical book that I really like which is completely different from the neck. Oh totally is. It's someone that we had on. Gook fellas called or this episode will come out maybe we haven't the episode hasn't aired yet so if if episode pumping. Yeah that's right so episodes not out yet but it will be at some point depending on when you're listening to the so- oh by Joanne Lipman. Who has had an amazing career? She worked her way up through the Wall Street. Journal's WHO's head of the Wall Street Journal then she was the head of Conde nast which is like the main magazine company. Where like vogue and all these and then she was also the head of USA Today like she's Ah big deal in the literary world And she's brilliant and we had her on Goop Vela's And she talked about her book called. That's what she said. which sounds like a book of like dirty jokes? I love that but it's not because the subtitle is like basically I'm a this isn't verbatim but the subtitle is basically how men I and women can work better together and it's such a fantastic book for men and women to read talking about unconscious bias and talking about how simple practical steps people can do in their life just being a better human and the statistics and the book are insane Like I knew there was obviously discrimination for women in the workplace and even worse for women of Color in the workplace but I was like like my eyes were really opened in this book and she because she's such a great writer. It's done in a way. That's very engaging in allows information to actually permeate permeate your consciousness way more than if it was just like very dry statistics so very important book very practical book. Do that sounds really cool. I will definitely make make sure to include that in the show notes So thank you so so much for coming on. Please tell people where they can find you and all of your practice stuff on social media and in your book yeah Thank.

Mike Gregorio depression gut syndrome US FBI Wall Street Journal Thomas Sistine Joanne Lipman Goop Vela writer Lynn social isolation USA Today Conde nast Journal
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Just trying to help him. There you go perspective is everything. All right. Charlie pellett. Thank you. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Carol Massar Chason Kelly and this Bloomberg radio. She's making history. Little. That is I mean history, I love taking us back grandmother. No kidding. Wow. Nicole explains a lot does it. Okay. So tough. I am. I'm tough toughen. Yeah. Okay. Toughish? All right. Amy Nelson joins us now. She's the founder of the Riveter. She's facing Seattle joining us on the phone, so Amy we were just talking. You may have heard about the fact that like diversity in the workplace. I said, it's complicated. Carol said, it's not. But clearly people are having a hard time getting to where they need to be and so much of it comes to leadership and perception help us understand what you're doing at the Riveter. Yeah. Thanks so much for having me on. And I love that music. The network at community spaces. So by went in for everyone. So we're building workspaces where we think about when I which is something that is somewhat unheard of in corporate America, and we're working with women and were building businesses providing resources for that group. And then we're also working with corporate America. I was a litigator for decades before I started this company and really thought a lot of these issues around diversity that we're talking about. And he learned what became a mother that still today almost half off brand after they have kids, and to me, I thought that needs assistance broken. So how can we work on it and find pathways to a different teacher because I think it's something that would make our country a lot stronger. It would certainly change our GDP if we could figure out how to retain women in the workforce. We also work with companies on issues around that. So I'm curious to hear what kind of things you guys have come up with that actually works because it was interesting to and we did have this equality summit at Bloomberg yesterday. And I hosted a lunch with a bunch of CEO's talking about gender in the workplace using technology and one of the things that came up as somebody said, listen women, they are the ones who actually give birth. So it is a little bit different. Right. But what's sad is the perception of men versus women in the workplace like how do we change that? So some of it is what providing maybe different kind of facilities, but there's also the perception side as well. Yeah. And I think about this a lot because as if he knows the model of leadership, in fact, is that there are still fortune five hundred CEO is today named John then there are winning two. Which is I think something that should strike us. All it's kind of very very outdated. But I think one of the things that we do with the Riveter is we have very simple conversation. They think aren't happening inside. Workplaces. I think that everyone wants corporate America was different. But we don't really have a guidebook to get there. And so within companies, I think it can sometimes you hard to stop and positive things you can do to change the dynamic here and make sure that all voices are being heard. So we have for example for weeks series or you work with male executives called good guy series, where we really talk about issues around inclusivity as being in the workplace, it can even be as simple as having conversation about something that I think happens in many workplaces across the country every day where you're going to eat. Mixed gender meeting quirks. And you know, a woman is talked over which is something that happens a lot eating statistically. And a lotta times after that meeting. A male colleague will walk up to the woman in the hall and say, hey, I heard Bob talk over you. He shouldn't have done that. And the way we can actually change that behavior is like calling it out in the meeting not in an aggressive way. Because Bob is not a bad guy. If I say, hey, you know, that was Cindy's idea. Cindy, just said that and I think really just simple steps like that can lead us to different place. Which is I think now Charlie Pellett. Don't interrupt. Right. Well. He. Right. Well, it's interesting too because this echoes so nicely Amy with a conversation. I had yesterday with JoAnne Lipman who wrote a book called. That's what she said, you probably read it. And know it she made that exact point about interrupt the interrupters. I mean, it's a really interesting way of changing behavior because Amy as as I think, you're you're pointing out part of this is really just day to day minute to minute awareness. Can I just say we do this at home when we're having conversation my family, and if somebody was like, well, wait, let this person's finished speaking. It gets a little grassy. Anyway, go ahead. And so help us understand just about forty seconds left. Amy sort of where your business goes from here. Clearly, it's catching on and clearly this idea of how we work is very much front of mind for for everybody, women and men. Yeah. I mean, I think we're headed to a place. We'll have thirteen patients across seven states by the end of the year growing faster than we worked in the early years. I think the idea of building spaces thinking about when I but being inclusive of all it's something that's very critical. We kind of fear in the programming that we offer. Also, just. Is that we provide? And I do think that as we see women make up the majority of the workforce, which is where we're trending spaces like this are incredibly important. Amy, Nelson is the founder of the Riveter based in Seattle. She joined us on the phone cool staff. Very very cool. And I mean, it is interesting to think about how we work we spend so much time. Yeah. Here at work the way, we interact with each other. But also, we've seen companies be the good ones at least be much more thoughtful about space about accommodating and whatnot and different people or different whatever needs different spaces, right? For whatever. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek. I'm Carol Massar along with Jason Kelly. Just a quick check on the markets for you. We've got the Dow is up about forty seven points SNP. We're looking at a gain of just about four and a half points, and the NASDAQ is higher by about twelve points. And it looks like we're pretty much at our highs of the session, very close to that. Just coming off. All right. Let's get a check on world and national headlines that we get to the newsroom and Bob moon. Hey, Bob, Jason Carroll. Thank.

Amy Nelson Riveter Bob moon Bloomberg BusinessWeek Charlie pellett America Bloomberg Seattle Carol Massar Chason Kelly founder CEO Carol Cindy JoAnne Lipman Nicole Carol Massar Jason Carroll John
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Section it's called strategies and this week. It features JoAnne Lipman. She's the former editor in chief of USA today. She's also author of the book, that's what she said. What men need to know and women need to tell them about working together. She joins us on the phone from New York City, JoAnne. Great to talk to you. Likewise, thanks for having me. Jason. I'm a longtime admire of your work. You've been in many many influential positions across the world of journalism, and I wonder as you've gone through those jobs you've really been quite an innovator in journalism. You've talked to a lot of CEO's you've led organizations. What's the one big thing that people need to know about your book? Sure. So the reason I wrote that's what she said is because exactly as you said, I Dan writing after the leadership positions, and as I you know. Spent time in journalism, and I get invited to these leadership summits of women, and you hear women at everyone of beat organizations talking to one another about the issues we face at work, and I'm not just talking about the issues of sexual abuse. But the every day challenges that women face of being marginalized and overlooked. Ignored interrupted and simply not taken as seriously as the guy sitting right next to them. And I grew frustrated I have to tell you about women talking to each other. And I said, you know, what women talking to each other? It's half appreciation, right? Half a solution. We need men to join us. And that's why I wrote that's the chief Ed it's really about getting men into that conversation. And by the way, I have to tell you in my career, which started at the Wall Street Journal, all of my mentors were man. And most of my colleagues for also man. So I know there's a lot of great guy out there who do want to be part of the solution. Enclosing the gender gap. And it's such a good point. And I feel like more and more. We are hearing more about allies, and how men can be involved in this, and I will say, and I say, this is a man, you know, some men enter into this with a little bit of trepidation. They feel like they've got to be careful about what they say. Or don't say what do you say? When when people express that concern. Yeah. So there's there's two types of what you're talking about. Right. There's two levels. One is the guy who say I'm never going to mentor women again right ever gonna hire a limit super lame. Let's let's let's agree. No patience for that guy who are not mentoring women in the first place. Right. However, I'm not going to do the thing that I'm not doing already. Exactly. But for the man who for the majority of that really who are saying, okay? The roles change. What do I give? There's never been a better time than now to talk about the issues to raise the issues of gender equality and to become an ally. Under some really simple ways that you can't be an ally. And a lot of it comes down to awareness. There's so many issues that we see that women experience. For example, the research shows that women are interrupted three times more frequently than men are even supreme court justices female supreme court justices are interrupted three times more frequently than male justices one of the recommendations. I give is simply listen for that interrupt the interrupters, right? If you hear a woman being interrupted listen for that. And then say, hey, Chloe speaking, I would love to hear her finish her her her point. A similarly there's something that actually does happen. This is where the title of the book comes from. Where women make less than a third of a group. Their voices are literally not heard which is why so many women have that experience where they say thing particularly in a meeting, and nobody seems to hear it. And then two minutes later, I guy repeats exactly what they just said. And everybody turns to hand they're like, hey. Right. Yeah. Great idea. Right. And gets the credit we need to listen for that as well. And make sure that the woman get that credit. So you can do that in a couple of ways. Ronnie, simply amplifying her voice, which is one of women has an idea someone else and ally demand could be a woman repeats point. I give her credit by name amplifying her point. And then there's the other issue, which is simply of just giving her credit with making sure that the Boston. No that idea originated with her. Well, and I love that idea of of essentially sort of like having a having a compliment, buddy. Which I think you talk about which is like got your back to sort of make sure that the boss knows that you did a good job. And you're going to do the same thing for me a lot of lessons for all of us in that. Yeah. Absolutely. And the women in a consulting firm actually were the ones who called me about this back concept. They call it bragged, buddy, buddy, buddies. I'll be here. Brag buddy. Right. So that. Can you tell me, you're awesome achievements? And I tell you mine, and then we eat go to the boss and brag about the other one. Well, it's an excellent excellent book, and we're so excited to have you join us and for more from JoAnne Lipman check this upcoming edition of Bloomberg BusinessWeek her book is that's what she said. What men need to know and women need to tell them about working together. Great great to catch up with JoAnne Lipman. Alright. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek here. Live from the Bloomberg equality summit in New York City. Let's head down to.

JoAnne Lipman New York City Bloomberg editor in chief Bloomberg BusinessWeek USA Jason Wall Street Journal BusinessWeek CEO Dan Ed Boston Chloe Ronnie two minutes
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Susan's Renske a forty six year veteran of CBS news one of the most beloved people in the building was named president of the news division this week. And the question everyone's been asking is what took so long. She she's the first female, president of CBS news. What took so long? The timing. Also highlights how women are often called in during times of crisis or times of trouble at companies, not just news divisions. But lots of companies in addition to taking on ratings challenges Renske is also going to be challenged to restore morale at the network after a series of metoo scandals. Let's talk about it with JoAnne Lipman. She's a former editor of USA today, and the author of that's what she said a book all about this sort of problem the situation in workplaces across the country. What do they call it show in a glass cliff when women are hired enrolls like this? That's right. So the glass cliff was coined by some British academics. And it shows that women typically get the top job when they do when a company is in. It's called precarious position when it is having problems, and then the women, by the way are given this incredibly difficult job. And when they don't succeed very often are given the blame for the enterprise up WBZ news as well. Debra was brought a number of years ago after the Matt Lauer and curry drama, she had to repair things there. And it's remarkable that we're still celebrating these I in the first place, you know, the fact that we have never seen a female, president CBS news. And that to me is the core issue here is why is it taking so long? The news industry has a deplorable record of getting women into top positions and leadership because if you think about this women make up more than two thirds of journalism majors and mass communication majors. But then when you get into the newsroom look at what happens, right? First of all in television. For example. There was a study done that found that male anchors and mail correspondence outnumber their female counterparts three. One three two one three two one. And if you look at newspapers, and digital outlets men have the majority of violence, particularly front page bylines. And then you look at what does that then lead to it leads to the way, we view news who we've you is new what stories we view is news. I mean, for example, more than seventy five percent of the experts that we quote in the media are male. There was a study fascinating study that found it looked at all English language. News sites across this is globally. And it found that seventy seven percent of the people who we talk about our mail, and it actually found I just want to give you this one quote, it found that women are routinely marginalized and symbolically annihilated in news. You were a former editor he was a today. Here's accessors was a woman. So I look at that. It's okay, that's progress. Maybe and yet most of their major papers in the country are run by men. So it's. Problem television networks to problem in newspapers as well. What is the solution? I hate to ask that in a thirty second question. But what's the saloon? Well, the solution is you gotta start at the bottom. You have to start looking at who are the women who are coming up. And the other thing is this is really important. I found when I became an editor. I five is dragged kicking and screaming into editing. I didn't see myself in that role. Oh, that's interesting. It was years ago at the Wall Street Journal night, then boss, Paul Steiger who went onto create propublica said you're going to be good at editing. And I'm like, I'm a reporter like I don't see myself in that role. He said just try it. And once I did I realized that this I really was well suited to it. There's a lot of women who simply don't put their hands up while men do and I think that the onus isn't just on the women they're having it's on the meant if I'm managers, male or female, it is on the managers..

president JoAnne Lipman CBS editor Debra Susan Wall Street Journal Matt Lauer Paul Steiger USA reporter seventy seven percent seventy five percent forty six year thirty second