18 Burst results for "Joanne Lipman"

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 9 months ago

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. unpacking Pailin, tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. Well, how can you have the Super Valuable Company? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. Yeah. But one, hundred, twenty, five most. Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, very closely aligned with the trump administration. There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. But in seventeen year history, it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. So surveillance predictive policing, possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, notable backers of talent tear include investor, and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen campaign. Evening. I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. A, huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, Alex Carp investor roadshow, which true to carbs personality, and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. Welcome to Powell, tears investor day. We're very proud to have you here. Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. He has amazing curly hair. He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. Patrol. Tracking immigrants at the border. But Carp in the company not backed off in. That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, values and commitments. Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. If you think, we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. that. That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. Andrew. Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock Exchange. We've had lots of conversations over the years. This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated offerings or listings in a very long time. Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. So let's start with why now? Well, first of all, thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, we really needed to build our products. With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. Deserved a access to liquidity. So we we decided this would be great time for us and so far. It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, very grateful. Outlets. The single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, the company unto itself is still not profitable. So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. Well, you know we build these products years before people build them, and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, nine, percent, forty, nine percent off of a seven, forty, three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our software offering. But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, two, proposition twenty, twenty, three proposition can I put you on that? Well, you you can push me but of course, my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, supplying it and I think that are year I. First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, and we'll see how we do. Confident confident we'll do well. Alex, one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? Can you speak to that? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? Of course we always sold this as a license. Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. So I think the real debate now is. Move significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. The question then is, how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. It could be like that. We are going to deliver the best software. With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. Palette. Here is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. Alex has everybody knows You have contracts with various government agencies, obviously and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, four months, how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? And grow that business. Well, we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, how can you have the super? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. These aren't just any institutions. The literally, I would ask people who are watching this to make. A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, we don't go out and advertise our product, but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. So we want to keep these clients. Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. Year came from our existing clients. What does that mean our existing clients? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. So of course, we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, and we can do it without raising our headcount, and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. We are going to expand our client base. Why? Because now with Apollo, we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, updating and providing them with new products we built. So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, get new customers and continue our march. Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. Well, as I mentioned, ninety, five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. So customers, obviously if a customer wants to leave they, can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. Fees. You can't get out of or building something over years, and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, and it's not because of my charming personality. Alex well, let me ask you a different question. We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, criticized, the company recently for its role of working with ice. How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? Especially, the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. To Your Business Well, look the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. US clients. But it also gets us. Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. Alex. One of the other questions now you all republic company. But as you know, you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. Valley. Defending the. warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, well, why should talent you're having F. structure? What is my? What is my what? What can I do if? I don't agree with them. The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, we will not just blow with the wind. And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, both commercial and government, and that's why I believe they're super important, and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. We don't have to buy challenge your shares. You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, a splinter net if you will. How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. Decision five years from now today. How would you measure success? Here, what would be the metrics which measure it? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. Wow, that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. In favor of things that are good and noble. And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. Carpool. You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But hopefully sooner than that. Thanks so much Alex.

Alex United States Silicon Valley Davos Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Carp New York Cnbc Powell Joanne Lipman Peter Thiel Gotham Us Army Navy Department Of Hom
"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on WTOP

"The Independence Day holiday mayors, governors and doctors are urging Americans to stay home to avoid beaches, bars and barbecues. It's because in the past 24 hours, more than 50,000 new Koba 19 cases have been reported the most of any single day. So far. Correspondents DIF Ottoman, with a sharp reversal from one governor from east to west to South Covina. 19 cases continue to spike in Texas Governor Greg Abbott after resisting such a move for weeks. Order Texans toe wear masks in public places is not intended to be punitive. We just need everyone to do their part to slow the spread. Dr Anthony Fauci on the BBC with words of warning. We cannot give up because it appears that we're losing the battle right now, though, there are a few optimistic signs. Steve Futterman CBS News The woman accused of helping Jeffrey Epstein recruit and sexually abused underage girls, was arrested by the FBI this morning in New Hampshire. The case against Dylan Maxwell will now be tried. Offered to New York the FBI's William Sweeney junior. We moved when we were ready, and Miss Maxwell was arrested without incident. Maxwell made her first court appearance this afternoon. She's expected to be arraigned in New York next week. The Supreme Court is blocking Congress from being able to see secret grand jury information relating to the Mueller investigation, but it has agreed to take up the legal showdown. Former federal prosecutor Laurie Levenson says the justices will likely hear aural arguments in the next term. The decision by the high court to take the appeal is probably a great relief. For the Trump campaign because it's almost guaranteed that the Supreme Court won't make its decision until after the election. A day after the president called the reports a hoax. Top intelligence officials traveled to Capitol Hill to discuss reports that Russia offered bounties to kill U. S soldiers overseas. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says they should have found out about the reports sooner. I will say this It was of other consequential level that the intelligence community should have brought it to us. In that way. The Taliban continues to deny the reports in Russia is pushing back as well. 30 year mortgage rates at an all time low this week, falling to 3.7%. Joanne Lipman of Princeton University, says the drop in rates reflect a reshaping of the real estate market. A lot of that has to do with this remote working So when you have remote working suddenly you're real estate needs shift. On Wall Street, The Dow gained 92 points, NASDAQ up 53 points as NP Oppa's well 14 points This is CBS News. Refresh your business Tech during Del Technology Cyber Savings event with up to 50% off computers, servers and more. Call it 77 asked L. For Adele Technologies advisor. Three. It's Thursday, the second day of July 2020. It is 89 groups outside, but Good afternoon. I'm deal off the top local stories we're following for you With this hour. George Floyd's death triggered a tsunami of Confederate statues coming down across the nation and here at home, another just today in Richmond. Just one day after the statue of Stonewall Jackson was removed your on Monument Avenue, several 100 people watched and took cellphone video. As the statue to Confederate naval Officer Matthew Fontaine. Maury was removed. It took less than an hour for a crude or wrap, a heavy strap and chain around the statue and a cherry picker lifted it off in space. The statue was loaded onto a flatbed truck. People cheered as they drove away, Mayor says all statues being removed will be stored for now. In Richmond, Neil Organ Steamed w T o P new. Meanwhile, a defendant of that Confederate naval commander.

Dylan Maxwell Supreme Court New York Russia Richmond FBI DIF Ottoman Dr Anthony Fauci Stonewall Jackson Laurie Levenson Joanne Lipman Greg Abbott Texas House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Jeffrey Epstein New Hampshire Taliban Steve Futterman CBS
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Like any other things involved. Maybe the weightlessness but I think you can go in check out in a different way. Would you go next year not next year now. All these billionaires from his kids are in college. All they think about is doing the treatise of going into space. is she agree with you but if they can make much quicker than air travel for long distance right that that sounds amazing if they get to that point it was then you can travel to Australia in the space of an hour so the hyperloop. Washington it just go up to the moon and that's this is to go to Muno Saxon book but all those technology. That's being developed. I imagined in a decade or two two decades time will allow supersonic at travel again or whatever it's going to be but that has a point to think a lot of our viewers from Greenwich to New York City a little quick global investing is the Hongkong Australian wherever that was at least at least a handful that will benefit our guest host coming up. There's a lot of travel but he would right in and let us know if you want Joe to go. Just No. It's not me wanted says he's going to go but he's afraid to fly but he's going to go into space now. I'm not going Let's get to our guest host Mohammed Al Arian. I'll eons chief economic adviser years ago when he moved here head of choice he picked stocks and bonds he get a choice to pick teams here. He picked the mets and in the jets not the Yankees or the giants so long time ago. Nineteen sixty-nine doesn't mean anything for for stocks or yeah you're right. Monkeys longtime loyalty comet China Trade. I watched the markets if there's a constitutional crisis. I assume we'll have a pretty big break in in equity markets as if I got that right or could it just could you see no reflexive what's going on politically in the in the stock market Joe. We've had relative stability now now for a while and I think that reflects two things one is a ceasefire on trade. We neither neither have we resolved. No have we intensified the trade war but secondly and more importantly is to hope in markets that we're going to have a hand off a hand off on monetary policy fiscal policy. Will you address what I what I meant though and so let me let me a break I if there was something else another shoe drops that looks bad where could change the dynamic in the Senate in terms of Republicans Republicans change public opinion. Would you expect the stock market at that point to sell off. Yeah I mean if if the Senate evolves in such a way that an impeachment right then we would most likely sell off yes but what's the timeframe for that because Democrats are saying that this is going to be a relatively tight timeframe hearings over the next few weeks weeks deposition of five State Department officials this week and possibly vote by November so does that mean that this could be over and done with relatively soon here it could be. I mean but the market assumes that the Senate will continue to stand by president trump. That's a critical assumption in the marketplace right now but the distraction stays by president trump. If this does not result I think the market has learned to brush off all these political maneuverings and focus on on whether you can get a hand off in policy. If you really want to know what we are going to be in the next three months Oscar Germany is going to be because the assumption is that we're GONNA get fiscal expansion out of Germany. I'm not sure we will but that assumption is deeply embedded so we won't we don't need. We don't WanNa talk about it. We'd rather talk about all this other so it's maybe trade with China behavior. Hey what what does that mean we need to. We need infrastructure. You're talking about a hand first of all it's trade plus possibility of investment war which was Friday plus the possibility of a currency war and watch that okay because the probability of that changes right now when the ceasefire everything is fine. We're talking etc but that can move on the second. Element is is on the policy side. I don't think we've talked enough about what's happening. Repo market as a reflection of of concerns that central banks are no longer in full control of outcomes. It hasn't had an impact on the market yet. Why because democracy has that's okay. Monetary Energy Policy may become ineffective in the case of Europe harmful but we've got fiscal policy coming. If that doesn't materialize then we have a significant downside aid risk out there DreamWorks Animated Adventure Abominable Topped The weekend box office with twenty point nine million dollars in ticket sales abominable marks the seventh number one film this year for Universal or eight if you Count Downton Abbey released by the studios special label focus features. Here's I was glad abominable wasn't in the teleprompter one more time because I think I only got it twice. Lucky to have gotten it twice. Will you see maybe we'll I thought it was a this little fellows is watching. I apologize but I thought it got todd by the latest series dot com but you could re juvenile it in a movie couldn't that you were perhaps we say it if I'm with Mama whatever but I come otherwise you're interested in in getting an update on what Carson's up do with Mrs Hughes and all that's a good car to the rest of them are really tired and repetitive so I advise you to NBC TV because they have milk. I I miss him. I made a live at the boy so we saw it on Wednesday on Saturday and I would recommend you go see it really really does something actually happen. Yes the Countess's back right into the visit of this cousin Matthew Comeback to life that I I should've never that was that was my wife's biggest regret. That's really why come what shame was heartbreaking these to be reminded if the tragedies did he get any good roles after to really know he quit to try thought he was reporting. I have no idea but quit because he wanted more money until he's going to get above his station. You know we're going to Kim rushing back to earth right now because we're gonNA talk. US China trade is that okay. That's more important I think it is just about. You know what tell tell me we. We don't need a little escapism lately. I mean can't we think about other things occasionally or no. You're down there in the middle of next on Squawk pod Peter Navarro Assistant to President Trump and the director of trade and manufacturing policy on trade talks and the impeachment inquiry. I I think it's more time receives declared war and president who electoral process and the American people I'm David favorite join me he crossed into me and Jim Cramer for the opening bell our of CNBC squawk on the street the podcast subscribe for free wherever you listen and you can always catch us live weekdays at nine am eastern. CNBC SWAP TODD FROM CNBC. Here's Joe Kernan three morning and welcome back to Squawk box here on CNBC live from the Nasdaq market site in Times Square Joe Kernan along with Kayla Attache and Wilford Frost Prospect in Andrew R. off today. Our guest hosts know all EONS chief economic advisor. Mohammed Hilarion the US China trade fight remains front and Center for the markets. It's in the latest development treasury spokeswoman Monica Crowley says the trump administration is no plans to impose restrictions on Chinese companies listing on. US exchanges changes in this is following that report on Friday that said the White House was considering an effort to limit US investments in China join us now Peter Navarro Assistant to the president in office of Trade and manufacturing policy director at no time was this disgust are ever something that that was in the works it was fake news news pure and simple for real really Joel. We're going to get to that and I promise you. I'll answer that but there's something I gotta say I last week in a single day President Donald J trump signed an historic Japanese trade deal in New York while in Geneva Switzerland a White House sled team negotiated the most radical reform of a multinational organization in history and those two big trump wins are going to net the American people billions of dollars and thousands of jobs yet there was virtually no mention of these big trump wins in the news this this this news side was just overwhelmed by the second impeachment circus in three years and make no mistake about this. This is an attempted coup d'etat and Enron around the ballot box in these radical Democrats. They told us this much. I I was astonished when Al Green the Houston Congressman basically said look. We can't beat Donald Trump at the ballot box he's too good on the economy he standing up to China. We got secure borders Let's just take them out. with is impeachment stuff so. I think it's it's it's going to be I think it's war the the Congress has declared cleared war on this president electoral process and the American people and and it's going to be as Tulsi Gabbard said very very divisive so I I wanted to just put at that out there joe because I think this country led by the House of Representatives is just taking us in a very wrong direction. Let's keep it in how that affects the China trade negotiations. We're talking about Peter. Do you think that with that as a backdrop it makes it more likely or less likely a The China decides to to grant some of our wishes that that the president stands firm. How does it and actually they just said you would answer about the transact? Do you want to get deep into that job list not translated but but on the table delisting the Chinese let's talk about. I think the last time we talked I proposed Navarro's rule. which is that any sort of story that comes from anonymous sources is likely to be fake news designed department fool from his money and that story which appeared in Blooberg. I've read it far more carefully than it was written over half half of it was highly inaccurate or simply flat out false but it was market moving. Joe Alibaba took a haircut other Chinese companies and it was really irresponsible journalism in the problem we have here. It's kind of like the Gresham's law journalism. It's like these bad stories. Push shout good and what happens is the soon as Bloomberg puts it out there. There's pressure for others to put it out there. Then it comes up on on the cable news networks in surge. Ko Killer just stop I WANNA I WANNA finish this thought out this this story was was just so full of inaccuracies in terms of the truth matter the what the Treasury said I was accurate but but here's the problem I have the Treasury and Peter did not address discussions about investment. Please kill it. I'm trying to ask you a follow up question because we also share your time with your Taylor gala gala so so here's my point.

China president Peter Navarro President Donald J trump US Joe Senate Treasury CNBC New York City todd Washington Australia director Mohammed Al Arian Muno Saxon Joe Alibaba
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Section it's called strategies and this week. It features JoAnne Lipman. She's the former editor in chief of USA today. She's also author of the book, that's what she said. What men need to know and women need to tell them about working together. She joins us on the phone from New York City, JoAnne. Great to talk to you. Likewise, thanks for having me. Jason. I'm a longtime admire of your work. You've been in many many influential positions across the world of journalism, and I wonder as you've gone through those jobs you've really been quite an innovator in journalism. You've talked to a lot of CEO's you've led organizations. What's the one big thing that people need to know about your book? Sure. So the reason I wrote that's what she said is because exactly as you said, I Dan writing after the leadership positions, and as I you know. Spent time in journalism, and I get invited to these leadership summits of women, and you hear women at everyone of beat organizations talking to one another about the issues we face at work, and I'm not just talking about the issues of sexual abuse. But the every day challenges that women face of being marginalized and overlooked. Ignored interrupted and simply not taken as seriously as the guy sitting right next to them. And I grew frustrated I have to tell you about women talking to each other. And I said, you know, what women talking to each other? It's half appreciation, right? Half a solution. We need men to join us. And that's why I wrote that's the chief Ed it's really about getting men into that conversation. And by the way, I have to tell you in my career, which started at the Wall Street Journal, all of my mentors were man. And most of my colleagues for also man. So I know there's a lot of great guy out there who do want to be part of the solution. Enclosing the gender gap. And it's such a good point. And I feel like more and more. We are hearing more about allies, and how men can be involved in this, and I will say, and I say, this is a man, you know, some men enter into this with a little bit of trepidation. They feel like they've got to be careful about what they say. Or don't say what do you say? When when people express that concern. Yeah. So there's there's two types of what you're talking about. Right. There's two levels. One is the guy who say I'm never going to mentor women again right ever gonna hire a limit super lame. Let's let's let's agree. No patience for that guy who are not mentoring women in the first place. Right. However, I'm not going to do the thing that I'm not doing already. Exactly. But for the man who for the majority of that really who are saying, okay? The roles change. What do I give? There's never been a better time than now to talk about the issues to raise the issues of gender equality and to become an ally. Under some really simple ways that you can't be an ally. And a lot of it comes down to awareness. There's so many issues that we see that women experience. For example, the research shows that women are interrupted three times more frequently than men are even supreme court justices female supreme court justices are interrupted three times more frequently than male justices one of the recommendations. I give is simply listen for that interrupt the interrupters, right? If you hear a woman being interrupted listen for that. And then say, hey, Chloe speaking, I would love to hear her finish her her her point. A similarly there's something that actually does happen. This is where the title of the book comes from. Where women make less than a third of a group. Their voices are literally not heard which is why so many women have that experience where they say thing particularly in a meeting, and nobody seems to hear it. And then two minutes later, I guy repeats exactly what they just said. And everybody turns to hand they're like, hey. Right. Yeah. Great idea. Right. And gets the credit we need to listen for that as well. And make sure that the woman get that credit. So you can do that in a couple of ways. Ronnie, simply amplifying her voice, which is one of women has an idea someone else and ally demand could be a woman repeats point. I give her credit by name amplifying her point. And then there's the other issue, which is simply of just giving her credit with making sure that the Boston. No that idea originated with her. Well, and I love that idea of of essentially sort of like having a having a compliment, buddy. Which I think you talk about which is like got your back to sort of make sure that the boss knows that you did a good job. And you're going to do the same thing for me a lot of lessons for all of us in that. Yeah. Absolutely. And the women in a consulting firm actually were the ones who called me about this back concept. They call it bragged, buddy, buddy, buddies. I'll be here. Brag buddy. Right. So that. Can you tell me, you're awesome achievements? And I tell you mine, and then we eat go to the boss and brag about the other one. Well, it's an excellent excellent book, and we're so excited to have you join us and for more from JoAnne Lipman check this upcoming edition of Bloomberg BusinessWeek her book is that's what she said. What men need to know and women need to tell them about working together. Great great to catch up with JoAnne Lipman. Alright. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek here. Live from the Bloomberg equality summit in New York City. Let's head down to.

JoAnne Lipman New York City Bloomberg editor in chief Bloomberg BusinessWeek USA Jason Wall Street Journal BusinessWeek CEO Dan Ed Boston Chloe Ronnie two minutes
"joanne lipman" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on KSRO

"Are. Welcome to the big radio show. Happy Monday to you on this. What is this the eighth day of October already two thousand eighteen by name is Tom Sullivan. And so the cavenaugh story, I don't know how long it takes for it to die down. Sooner is better than later for me. But. The other thing I wanted to get to it on Monday. And I did not get a chance to do it. Which is. The one year anniversary of me too. And this all started back. With Harvey Weinstein. I know I mean, it was going on long before then. But that was that was where everything unveiled last October two thousand seventeen and then there was a list of Milano. She asked followers to tweet hashtag me too. And that really took off that was October of last year, and it just marched on from their time magazine. Named silence. The silence breakers as person of the year that was December the Golden Globes in January became a big deal on the television award programs and. According to Bloomberg in the year. Since Harvey Weinstein was the first one to fall at least four hundred and twenty-five prominent people across a variety of industries has been publicly accused of sexual misconduct. And ranges all the way from. Rape serial rape to lewd comments to abuse of power. And. So at this point that's more than three hundred sixty five days four hundred twenty five people accused as more than one a day. A lot of them are in the entertainment industry Hollywood bad actors, literally. Fired resigned. Will never work again in the in their chosen profession. Some have apologized. Some have acknowledged some sort of vague apology. Others have. Been more hypothetical in their in their answers. Others have held onto their jobs and their offices. And their star power in most of them denied any wrongdoing. Some questioned the accusers. President Trump was down at the Orlando in the last couple of hours, and he was talking to the international association of chief of police so big law enforcement gathering, and he brought up the accusers of Brett Kavanagh is a great person, and it was very very unfair. What happened to false charges false accusations. Horrible statements that were totally untrue. That he knew nothing about frankly terms that he probably never heard in his life. He was this. He was that. He never even heard of these terms was disgraceful situation. Brought about by people that are evil. Any toughed it out? So. Ties in with this whole first anniversary of metoo. And now that we have one year under our Bill and four hundred and twenty-five prominent people who have been outed in one form or another. Twenty five four twenty nine. I mean, it depends upon how you want to count all of this. But the question then becomes and there were some predictions about a backlash because of all of this. You think I could find cutlass here. It is right here. I thought. I thought this was. Kind of interesting. This is Megan twohey from the New York Times who says there still is an inability to handle the accusations that come out of the metoo movement. I think that what remains to be seen as sort of systemically. What is what has changed and what hasn't changed? I think the Cavanaugh what's happening with cavenaugh as a sort of. It's an example of kind of the problems with HR writ large. I mean, there were no guidelines on how to feel devaluations there. Still aren't I mean, this is a point that Anita hell main. How is it? How's it possible? That decades after her experience, the Senate Judiciary does not have a formal process of protocol to feel these allegations. And they've been making up the rules as they go. And I think this is a real example of of why it's so important to have found systems to basically adjudicate these issues you have a even she said, she says nothing changed. So we got four hundred twenty five or four hundred twenty eight hundred wherever you do the county. Men that had been outed. But what has really changed beyond those four hundred and five. And over NBC NBC still has not had an outside outfit, investigate them. And there's a big question Mark about the executives at NBC, and what they know or don't know. Everybody else was brought in outside lawyers. Fox did CBS did when it comes to the media. And in a lot of corporations a lot of corporations where this has happened as well. They brought in outside law firms. So the question then and it ties at this kind of interesting how the cavenaugh hearings all kind of aligned with the one year anniversary. And and the question was is the metoo movement going to have a backlash. We'll Susan Dell perk. Yo who is Republicans just says be careful about automatically assuming that a man is guilty. Just because a woman accused him winning are now finding their voice even having this conversations with mothers and daughters and siblings. They're finding their voice. But it also doesn't make them always. Right. And we have to say that not all men are bad guys and not all women are saints. And that there there is room for for misrepresentation. And we can't just always say, well, the woman said this happened. So it must be true because we have to look at the whole pitch. And I sometimes think that's what we're doing. Because it makes you look bad. If I say, oh, let's look at the whole thing. So author JoAnne Lipman chimed in on this whole conversation and said that there are a lot of sympathizers about Brett Cavanaugh about the fact that he was accused by Christine blazey forward. We'll get into the other two ladies, but primarily that's how this whole thing. Blew up. If you will he was about ready to get confirmed and JoAnne Lipman says the cavenaugh sympathizers relate to him. And now see an opportunity to start speaking out for themselves. I would agree with you. We what we need to do is have we need protocols in place. And what we've had is at this point. We are now seeing experiencing, but a lot of women have have feared which is backlash. Particularly among men who in the past year have felt like they're being beaten up. And I think a lot of what we're seeing in the empathy particularly among white men for cavenaugh is they're seeing a reflection of themselves. They're they're saying I feel like all year. I haven't I've had to bite my tongue. I haven't been able to say anything as I have been beaten up before being a white, man. And by the way, I think it's a great point that last majority of guys out. There are not harassers are not abusers. And and we're we were talking earlier with Willie like, you know, you got a lot of good guys out here. And I think it's really important for us to understand that and not turn this into sort of a black and white kind of situation and really understand that women and men together really have to work on this issue right together. It's about okay. So it's all very interesting. But what you brought up and what Susan Dell Burke yo brought up. Was that just because a woman says something doesn't mean that you take? It s gospel simply because she said it you have to have something else. Some some evidence improves some cooperation, and that is where that whole system broke down during the cavenaugh hearing about nobody could find a cooperation. But now, you get these women like JoAnne Lipman and Susan Dell Perkeo saying men feel like they are being beaten up and she brought up white men. I don't know. I know. Black guys probably the guys that I talked to that are African American. They're they're they're not feeling any different. They're feeling it too. But there is this thing about the toxic mail. There is this thing about white privilege. As if you did something wrong by your birth. Because you're white. You're a male. Would I go back? Black men. Also. I'm sure go, wait a minute. He talked about feeling like you did something wrong because of your birth. They talk about having protocols in place. HR needs to have policies. I don't know if people are. Fantasizing they're dreaming as long as there have been men and women on this planet. The the tensions between the genders. I don't think it's it's commonly there we get along just fine in general. But there are obviously God made us in two varieties, and there are differences. And I don't think you're ever ever have protocols or HR rules that will somehow make men and women exactly the same. We're not ever going to get there were different. Enjoy it. Celebrated. Celebrate the differences. I mean, here's a woman in the hallways of the Senate yelling at Orrin Hatch. Listen to what she says you.

JoAnne Lipman Harvey Weinstein Brett Cavanaugh cavenaugh rape NBC Tom Sullivan Milano Susan Dell Hollywood Susan Dell Burke metoo Golden Globes Senate Judiciary New York Times Bloomberg Orrin Hatch Megan twohey President Trump Anita
"joanne lipman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Yam birches. Sixty he's believed to started hiking at the longs peak trail had last Sunday. Afternoon his exact hiking route is not known Park Rangers would like to hear from anyone who's been in a long, speaker mount meeker area since. Sunday a former North Texas police officer is being sentenced to prison for killing an unarmed black. Teen, we the jury found the defendant Royal her guilty of murder in having made a negative finally special issue passion Assess the defendant's punishment and imprisonment institutional division. And the Texas Department of Justice for fifteen years former ball springs officer ROY Oliver was found guilty of murder for, killing fifteen year old Jordan. Edwards last year Edwards was a passenger in a car leaving party when Oliver fired at the. Vehicle, our next update at ten o'clock I'm Cathy Walker KOA NewsRadio eight fifty AM and ninety, four one FM Got a little bit of a delay westbound to seventy tonight looks like we may. Have a crash up. Near York that's got traffic. Backed up pretty solid now protein Vasquez speeds down into the teens through that stretch so. A lot of heavy stop and go westbound. To seventy cross commerce city tonight, the eastbound. Side unaffected actually looks pretty good. Coming off of I seventy six. As you make your way down towards I seventy all the rest. Of the highways in good shape little construction backup. Westbound I seventy. Approaching board road they've got a couple lanes coned off their an. Inbound, pin yet tower through doing roadwork that's backing you up, CBS for weather tonight partly cloudy, overnight lows, sixty two partly cloudy ninety two for a high. Tomorrow right now it's, seventy seven degrees I'm Aaron oneal KOA NewsRadio Colorado's news traffic and. Weather station quietly she waits ready to unleash your world at, information whenever you want all you have to. Do is ask Alexa play KOA. On iheartradio finally thanks for asking she can't do it on her own Own just ask you don't even. Have to ask nicely only job is to be at. Your Beck and call I heard that Colorado's news traffic and weather station just. Say Alexa play KOA on iheartradio for. What, it's worth I'm Cheri Preston when New York governor Andrew. Cuomo debates democratic rivals Cynthia Nixon a lot of people might be wondering what the. Temperature in the room will be see governor Cuomo is notorious for liking the temperature the places where he speaks to be downright chilly but his opponent actress Cynthia Nixon has asked. That the thermostats be. Set at seventy six degrees. Or spokesman says cooler temperatures are sexists JoAnne Lipman author of the book that's what she. Said what men need to know and women. Need to tell them about working, together says. Is true according to the journal. Nature climate change stat in offices. Has been set for the past fifty years for a hundred and. Fifty pounds ban in a business men have a. Faster metabolism they. Run hotter than women and so women an officer anything I know. I, haven't stay Peter in my own why so many of Us keep sweaters. Tucked away in our doors at the office some say. This really is about hot and cold others oh say all this, is just plain old political gamesmanship before the. Debate for what it's worth Cheri Preston ABC news this, is a. Bloomberg market. Minute stocks advanced in midweek trading the NASDAQ and s&p closed at record highs the Dow. Jones industrials rose sixty points quarter percent the, NASDAQ gained seventy nine points or one percent the, s. and p. five. Hundred closed up sixteen points or six tenths percent Brown Forman posted stronger-than-expected sales and earnings for. The latest quarter but the maker of Jack Daniels. Lowered its profit forecast. For the year on the assumption that European Union tariffs on whiskey will be around for a while home loan demand declined. Last week mortgage bankers report fewer people sought purchase loans and there was a drop in the number of homeowners looking to refinance. Application volume was down one. Point seven percent and there. Was a drop last month and. The number of houses going under contract to buyers the? National association of Realtors reports pending sales of existing.

officer Park Rangers Alexa Cheri Preston murder Vasquez governor Cuomo Colorado Edwards Cynthia Nixon longs peak ROY Oliver mount meeker Texas Department of Justice National association of Realto JoAnne Lipman North Texas governor Andrew European Union
"joanne lipman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Joanne lipman who is having and his had an incredible career head of usa today started at the wall street journal founded major media companies what role does the mother play in all this is how we bring up our sons as opposed to our daughters who still we want them to be the best little girls right mother's mother's father's parents and teachers because one of the things that it'd be talked about in that but she said is unconscious bias so so much of what we see in the workplace is not the outright sexual predatory behavior which makes headlines so much of it is the everyday things that happen to women one hundred times a day you know things like being overlooked marginalized interrupted not heard woman says something in a meeting nobody hears it and a guy repeats it two minutes later and everybody says oh he's a genius great idea you had dave but all of that starts in childhood and one of the most astonishing pieces of research i came across was about mothers of infants who it turns out routinely overestimate the crawling ability of their baby son's but they underestimate the crawling ability if their baby daughters so it starts from birth and then two year olds parents of two year old who typed into google is my child genius they're more than twice as likely to type that in about a boy two year old as girl two year old so parents have to be really really conscious of the expectations we have our children well think about it you brought up something in that's what she said that really struck home it was about if you ask women successful women how they got to where they got to you point out and i'm paraphrasing i don't have the book open now most women in that position would say i was lucky a guy would never say that and i remember when i first joined the women's forum an organization that's all over the world and we were out of conference table i forget what it was and the same thing they were asking women how did you get to be president of the.

Joanne lipman wall street journal google president usa dave two year two minutes
"joanne lipman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And women ever really work together you know i mean i grew up when i came of age when there was a lot of gender discrimination the world has changed and we're now at a time when so many men i know say veteran even a how to deal with women at all they're afraid that everything they do is going to be inappropriate there is a lot going on and no one knows better than joanne lipman who has written that's what she said what men need to know and women need to tell them about working together and joanna todd and it's having a great career editor in chief of usa today part of the gannett giant publishing company started at the wall street journal became deputy managing editor no woman had ever been in that post before and then founding editor in chief of conde nast portfolio magazine and portfolio dot com so your timing is perfect tell me we're hoskin and this is something that you have been aware of since you were in college and out of college you and your friends all smart talented and all how to deal with a lot of the same issues you're so right about that give back in the workforce.

joanne lipman usa wall street journal managing editor joanna todd editor in chief founding editor conde nast portfolio
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Tshirt that said that inclusion rider people go for it all right that that's what she said anyway thank you joe in her new book is called that's what she said what men need to know and women need to tell them about working together joanne lipman joined it was great talking to it was great being here thank scare thanks for coming on the show if you enjoyed the interview as much as i did be sure to subscribe to the show you can find all our past interviews and whatever app you use tillerson is or on our website rico dot net slash podcast if you have a minute please leave us a review on apple podcasts that helps other people find the show now that you're done with this you should check out our other recode radio podcasts on recode media with peter kafka here no nonsense interviews some of the smartest people in media and entertainment i also host to embarrassed ask along with lauren good of the verge branch all of your questions about consumer tech and on recode replay you can find audio from all recode's live events including the code conference and code media thank you for listening to this episode of rico decode and thanks to our editor joel robbie and our producer eric johnson i'll be back here on wednesday tune in then today's show is brought to you by ibm sixteen million new collar jobs will be created by twenty twenty four help fill them ibm's new education model gives high school students workplace experience and an associate's degree ninety p tech schools are already preparing graduates for tomorrow stem careers let's put smart to work find out how at ibm dot com slash p tech.

joanne lipman peter kafka joel robbie producer eric johnson joe apple lauren rico editor ibm twenty twenty
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Right so he so here's the thing all based originally around sexual harassment which is right and this is the thing that that people really really need to understand is that the focus has been on sexual harassment and there's a lot of people say oh you jumped on your book and tober and those people are not journalists i mean this is like three years of research voter but the focus on the worst of the sexual predators right if we only focus on the sexual predators and sexual harassment we are totally missing the point and that could be we'll waste this moment because it's really not every woman has been sexually assaulted at work but every single woman knows what it feels like to be marginalized and underpaid and over literally right that's what this moment interested in charleston we're just said friday and stage with me said great they have to stop sexually harass him and that's not really the point we have to have opportunity that's exactly right that's exactly right all right we'll talk about that and more when we get back with joanne lipman she's a journalist and author whose new book is called that's what she said what men need to know and women need to tell them about working together when get back here and talk about tech and some solutions today's show is brought to you by european wax center they wanna tell you about pink tax an unfair tax on goods and services that are marketed to women as a result every year women pay more than thirteen hundred dollars more than men for the exact same things women's basic clothing white t shirts and jeans cost more forty percent of the time women's personal items like deodorant and razors costs more fiftysix percent of the time european wax center wants all.

harassment charleston joanne lipman thirteen hundred dollars fiftysix percent forty percent three years
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We're here with joanne lipman an old friend of mine and journalist and author whose new book is called that's what she said what men need to know and women need to tell about working together okay joanne what do they need to know there's so much okay he went around for three years interviewing lots of different people from tech people to find everywhere yep i'm what were you looking to do your goal was to teach men the things they don't know and so they don't feel like victims and there our allies yeah partly partly i what i wanted to do is understand what are the primary issues both that women face but also the things that perplex men about their female colleagues yen then i wanted to find solutions fix and this is scientific all kinds of science so much research red i both talked to lots of executives who are trying to get this right and then i also like delved into the research so this is very sandberg ian sheryl sandberg i guess in you know in a way it's it's also like a lot of benny award has won out recently i think of it more in the in the realm of like the power of habit right that that explains to you sort of the underpinnings of what's going on and then tells you how do we fix those sort of things right so told me some of the things you found on the way and i do want to focus in the next section or on tech because i think tech has really accelerated a lot of the problems but will tech has is one of the biggest problem areas so tech and finance are definitely i looked at a variety of industries and without question tech is bottom of the barrel along with finance in terms of let's that's over.

joanne lipman sheryl sandberg benny three years
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Um and you know you can see the difference okay so here's the big difference between iceland and the united states after two thousand eight the financial crisis in two thousand eight probably the only country that had it worse than the united states was iceland iceland the bankers had guncrazy crazy all kinds of foreign money poured in a lot of guys have been fishermen were suddenly in finance they didn't really know what they were doing the country blew up financially so did the united states in the united states noone of any stature went to jail or paid for it at all in iceland the there are three major banks the bankers were all fired they went to jail they were to twotothree i believe were replaced by women the government was toppled the new prime minister was female they then and this is absolutely mindblowing they decided we want to understand the government wants to understand why do we get into this mess in the first place they hired a couple of gender studies professors from the university of iceland to study why and their basic answer was an excessive testosterone that the eyes just hata as one of the head of the chamber of commerce said it was a competition and that was what blew up the country and so they they basically the whole country rose up to basically kinda washed the testosterone out and try and bring in a dose of now leadership while that of the macho you know i'm bigger and rare right exactly so real quickly and then i ask you something about you had call out bias especially with your boston you know a lot lou the industries that are particularly in we focus on energy and sustainability but innovation more broadly and when you're change agent and when euro uh in these on a nontraditional employee one of these companies if you will um you're challenging people all the time so you're pushing buttons right and those situations are more likely to give birth.

iceland united states prime minister testosterone boston lou university of iceland chamber of commerce
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Aid paternity leave not just maternity leave and so we are in the minority there in that has a huge impact on women in america so you've got that piece of it which is incredibly essential absolutely central so you don't lose woman in the first place but beyond that you know in terms of the pay gap right there there is a lot that can be done by publicizing the the wage gap and requiring companies organizations to post a wage gap audit companies that have done at voluntarily uh have have done you know it's expensive so people don't want to do it but it makes a huge difference i mean salesforce tech company mark benny offer ends it to says tells the story of how he felt like he again was like a really good guy like he really was a social leader he is one of those guys who is you know really in very liberal the west coast guy who felt like he was a champion for women and he said and then a couple of women came up to him and said hey guess what women and this company or not pay the same as men and it was a wakeup call he ended up doing a wage gap audit and ended up paying three million dollars to nor all eyes wages a couple of years ago and in the following year did it again another three million dollars three million dollars in back pay to catch them off or what you mean million dollars to equalise pay amounts of going forego wet cdc decoys them right at that at that time right and so he didn't go rassat on well i don't know exactly how what the mechanics were but what i do know is they did it again the following year the point being that doing at once you're not once and done that this is something it's a.

america salesforce mark benny three million dollars million dollars
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"All of us i'm sure you've experienced this i know i've experienced it there is always one or two of these men who just they did it day it's like they're stopping their feet and they don't want to do what you tell them and they don't want to listen and or the passive aggressive or their pass they say oh he assured than they don't do it the at and that is a big issue but guess what when the women's in charge those men end up losing their jobs so you know we hope well you know if the woman if they're not performing in their job they are not going to run their job and that becomes also a model for a message sent to the other men who might behave that way one of the things i ask you a couple of questions that a cup questions about you but one of the things you talked about is policies that need to change now we all know about paternal up paid family leave and i'll say paternal because it's should be for men and women and whether it's biological are adopted or what have you um and some argue that that should also be for um any kind of family on this you know a than elder care kind of situation for example as well but what other policies what can policymakers due to make it easier for women in the workplace and four companies to promote women was obviously good for the economy this is not like we need to make the business case right the business case has been made for decades with the enough research to fill this building and maybe there isn't a role otherwise her policymakers for what ken policymakers due to create a framework that sort of four is a foresee mechanism right so i mean there are a number of policies that actually do make a difference and starting weird that parental leave i mean if you look at the united states is the only industrialized country in the world that does not have paid parental leave and the majority of countries even thirdworld countries have pay.

united states
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Thousand tiny little adjustments every single day to live in that world one of the most fascinating pieces of research that i came across was about enron so enron was the you know turned out to be a big financial fraud the government prosecuted it um and in the prosecution they subpoena ten thousand email strings the emails were it was the largest corpus ever of emails ever in one place and so a researcher actually ten thousand dollars bought the enron corpus of emails and now researchers are using it to study how people communicate digitally there is a researcher i spoke with whose specialty is looking at gender differences in how people communicate digitally so when he lifted the enron corp as he found not surprisingly that the men were much more declarative lay like i need this this is wrong and the women were use much more hedging language like please would you mind and but when he found that was really surprising was the higher a woman ranked in her in the hierarchy the more she diminished her persona digitally the more she was like please and hedging and i hope you don't mind and could you please maybe when you have a chance drop this off and his theory was it was for the exact reason that is a woman get higher in power she is less liked and so she has to diminish herself in order to be accepted by the men who worked for her well why she's the bus she can fire them all is she is she had and one of the pieces of advice actually that i talk about in that's what she said is there are there are certain men who actually have a very very difficult time working for women not you know not all of them and and many men are totally fine male or female boss but other a certain men who who basically turned into like 12yearold boys as i and i as i say the way put it is she is your boss not your mother and i think.

enron fraud researcher ten thousand dollars
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Against women by the time you get to the top level of that company it's sixty five percent male so you can see how the smallest amount of bias has this outsize impact crazy outsize impact now in real life what you can do about that is awareness is the very first piece of understanding how to come to counter act it and you know there are a lot of things that hold women back that are again summit is unconscious bias some of it is we've all heard the code words for women she's oh she's abrasive not a good culture fit all of these things that you aggressive too aggressive yup we've heard him all we've probably heard them all about ourselves and and those are things that that keep that women from being promoted now one thing that actually has helped is publicizing the numbers and we see this now the uk pass legislation that just went into effect where you have to putt bush your wage gap there was some legislation in canada that did the same thing and what that does is you know first of all it shows you what the wage gap is but secondly it's highly motivating and i and i site in that's what she said i cite the example pwc big consulting firm that in the uk decided ahead of this legislation going to affect that they would publicise and publish their own wage gap and their own promotions gap and one of the executives there are said to me look you know we knew at the numbers were we knew what they were internally but there was something when we published it it was so motivating and within a year we were doubling like the percentage of women who were being promoted because we were realizing you know it's just even though you sort of you have the numbers there you see him on a piece of paper when you see them out loud it changes everything and publishing them but um i like the eu saying it's not just the wage up that is the promotion gap because.

canada pwc uk eu sixty five percent
"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Um so that's an example of a good guy who doesn't even know he's a good guy right right i you you put your finger on something so important that the change that we are talking about its cultural change it is systemic change and it has to start at the top with leadership of company it is not something that you can't should offload to the hr department right doing a little bit of diversity or unconscious bias training is not the answer it you have to eat breathe drink feel it in your bones as the leader and then another piece that your boss did there was you have to bring in the right people and entrusts them to do their job so that everybody else knows that debt you've got their back and so you you hit on exactly the right recipe that i'm advocating for in that's what she said that's exactly right while i won't tell him you so that because he'll probably like no no no no i was just doing the right making the right business lewis but the other really important fact that you just mentioned he he wouldn't consider himself a feminist right so for that's what she said the research i did i entry interviewed hundreds of people and i really sought out man particularly senior male executives who were trying to close the gap in their own workplaces and to a man each one of them when you talk to them they wouldn't call themselves feminists almost none of them that none of them talked about doing this for social the because it's socially morally the right thing to do they all cited it's a business imperative i need to do this because my company has challenged and if i want to be successful i need the best possible people in the position to do it i need to put them in there they need to have my back and and it's incredibly important that we have diversity in our organization because it will make us more financially successful exactly and i wanna get to that because um you said something that that i feel very strongly about an and frankly i'm writing about in my book too which is it's not about hiring them it's about.

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"joanne lipman" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Champion they they are overwhelmingly mao they know they have a problem with that so he really felt it was a business imperative to figure out how to bring women in how to keep women because they were hiring women he had he he said we need understand how to retain them promote them at cetera and so he wrote a post unlinked in that talked about the importance of diversity and it was a very is pretty anodyne post it was pretty basic like let's listen let's bring people end there's a business case for this and you should see the comments linked in people go on there were their real names they were saying you know they were calling him horrible names they were telling go home and be a house husband there were just smearing him unlinked on lengthy then it was vicious and i'm adam grant who has written was sheryl sandberg on issues of equality and he also cowrote option b with sheryl sandberg agrout dealing with grief so he he's written a lot with her on the importance of of gender equality and he told me that he has gotten attacks for it he will get letters from people men and women saying what right do you have to speak about these issues i think we need to get past that we need to transcend those sorts of issues we need to take away the fear because men do have fear of talking about these issues and by the catalysts are really that i mention one of the fears that men talked about was fear of seeing the wrong thing they're afraid that if that they're going to misstep it's not their topic in some woman's going to bite their head off we need to get beyond that as women we need to not bite their heads off and actually engage them in a productive conversation.

sheryl sandberg