35 Burst results for "Joann"

Stress, Sleep Problems and Weight Gain

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:46 min | 6 d ago

Stress, Sleep Problems and Weight Gain

"So today I am very fortunate. I have the pleasure of introducing new voice on dishing up nutrition Nikki Daring is. Here with me behind the other Mike this morning Nikki has been working at nutritional weight and wellness for the past two years. been very anxious to get a chance to be on dishing up nutrition. She is also a mother of Max almost four years old. So she has a busy life. Nikki, has also experience some of her own health problems about two and a half years ago Nikki experienced concussion from an auto accident. So she knows a lot about nutrition and concussions good morning, Nikki. It's so good to be here with you today tell our listeners a little more about yourself. Good Morning Joann thank morning much. It is so exciting to be on dishing up nutrition. Talking about my favorite topic nutrition. I'm a self-proclaimed nutrition nerd to the core. Fascinated with the effects of health food affects our body. I want to tell our listeners how I found nutritional, weight, and wellness. My after my car accident and concussion I was struggling. Even though I'd been a Dietitian for seven years working with people going through at last surgery. I didn't really know what I should eat to heal. My brain was like was habit as luck would have it I. actually stumbled upon a dishing up nutrition podcast about food to heal the brain after a concussion. From my concussion I suffered a lot of different symptoms. I had memory problems, poor focus, and fatigue just to name a few. I learned from my experience that nutrition plays a huge role in the healing process. To this day I, still I'm amazed at the healing power of nutrition. Just eating real food and eliminating those process carbs improved my focus and memory. Eating real food helped me sleep better I. Have Good Energy. As my brain continues to heal I. Know I have have to eat well to continue the healing process. I am truly a believer in the power of nutrition. That's great. Nikki. Thank you. Our listeners can appreciate the healing journey you have experienced. So today to prepare for our topic. We asked listeners to send in their questions about stress and sleep, and we received hundreds of questions. If you are having trouble falling asleep. Or staying asleep, not only do we both understand firsthand, but we have many possible solutions to share with you today. I can certainly relate to this topic because a health problem I personally needed to work on with sleep that was huge for me, and now I make sure I get at least seven and a half hours of sleep most nights. Parents you know our sleep is often challenged by our children whether they are babies, toddlers, teens, or even adult children who have moved back home because of life circumstances, our job layoff restrictions, and certainly now do to covid nineteen. We've got a lot of things that have happened for people. One thing I know for sure is when I don't sleep at least seven and a half hours most nights, I start packing on a few extra pounds and my clothes don't fit right. Frustrating, very frustrating. Before, we start answering questions sent in by many of our listeners. Joanna I want to explain why people typically gain weight when they are under stress and lack sleep. In our nutrition for weight loss classes, we explain that people can lose weight while they sleep this really certainly perks people's ears up. I can lose weight while I sleep or sure. So bio chemically I just want to explain a little how that works. So bio chemically. Five or six hours a night your adrenal glands secrete the stress hormone, Cortisol? which can cause you to gain weight. I just want to repeat that because I think that's really really important. 'cause bio chemically when you hear that your ears kind of go. ooh What does that mean told Meiomi Hammock -ly when you sleep only five or six hours a night, your adrenal glands secrete the stress Hormone Cortisol, which can cause you to gain weight.

Nikki Daring Cortisol MAX Meiomi Hammock Joanna Mike
Georgetown's Prof JoAnn Volk Discusses Health Care Sharing Ministries

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Georgetown's Prof JoAnn Volk Discusses Health Care Sharing Ministries

"Joanne Lemme, ask to begin. What's generally the history? or how did these healthcare sharing ministries come about? Well, they've been around for decades, and they're generally for religious communities that opt not to have insurance instead to agree to share. One another's medical expenses think of like the Amish community, rallying around to rebuild a a barn after the. Fire similarly you know folks look to their community to to offset their healthcare costs rather than enroll in insurance in the ACA when they were crafting the individual mandate that said that everyone has insurance, unless you can show a good reason not to say about affordable or some other reasons, there was an exemption created for people who are in healthcare. Sharing mysteries so long as they were enrolled in one that made us specific definition that was in. DEPORTABLE CHARACTE! Okay thank you so these. Go back quite a long while they originally a religious affiliated. My understanding is less so today, and they really became more popular over the last few decades. In fact I'll just note here in my research. It's uncertain, but it appears that as many as a million Americans now hold. one of these plans. Let's go to specifics. Relative to what you're getting or how these health care sharing ministries work, so can you generally describe? These are how they work. Well so at their core. They are not insurance, so there is no guarantee that you will get payment for any of your health care costs if he were a member, but the way they are structured, members pay monthly. Share, it's called a share monthly fee to the healthcare sharing master to be a member and then you can submit as a member. He can submit your health care bills, and so long as they meet the requirements of healthcare sharing ministry, they may be shared with other members who will either directly send a check to you or send the check to the healthcare sharing ministry to redistribute to the members who need help offsetting healthcare costs. But the trick is that It. The though it's not insurance there a lot of features that look a lot like insurance to consumers that are shopping for coverage and frankly act a lot like insurance so. Where there's a deductible in your assurance plan. They call it unshareable amount where you have to pay out of pocket. You know two thousand dollars per medical event before you can submit something for sharing the monthly contribution is to find typically by age number of people in the household and enrolled in some cases. can be adjusted based on whether or not. You have a healthy lifestyle. Were had risk factors unhealthy lifestyle There's a very specific definition of what services can be covered. You know type Beatty's, but not type one prescription drugs only up to six months no pre existing conditions will be covered without a weight dollar limits on the benefits that. That can be covered, so there are a lot of aunts and many even refer to provider network, and with ramifications for going out of network. You have to get prior authorization. You'll pay more if you go out of network so there are a lot of features that look and act an awful lot like an insurance particularly for consumers when they're looking at these documents but importantly, and I would argue it's actually not so close to short-term plans, because at least they're in their many tricks do not pay, but there is some contract between the insurer and the enrolled that there's supposed to be payment for covered services. There is never a promise to pay healthcare sharing ministry. Even if your doctor says it's medically necessary, and what you've gotten for, care is within the definition of what should be covered. Okay, so they're? They're not insurance, and they don't guarantee payment yet. You pay various fees, something that resembles a premium deductibles, etc.. So, what's the attraction why? WHY WOULD PEOPLE! participate in one of these. Well this work. It's a bit murky and I think even more so with the repeal of the individual mandate penalty I think originally there were people and there still are people who sign up for these because they don't believe in insurance, they would rather not pay their money to an insurance company, or would rather not part of a plan that covers certain things that they find morally objectionable, so I should point out that they typically exclude coverage for mental health and substance use disorder. As I said pre existing conditions, prescription drugs for more than six months so not. It's not useful to people with chronic conditions But They, so they will not cover those conditions but for consumer it looks a lot like insurance, and so there's some will by the policy. Because they don't believe it should be covering. Maternity out of me outside of marriage or something that might consider the result of unhealthy living like excessive drinking or drug use but others I think now or buying it because they see it as a more affordable alternative to aca plan, and in some cases, there are brokers in websites that are presenting them as or affordable alternative to ACA. Plan so there. They think they're getting something akin to insurance, but for a whole lot less money.

ACA Joanne Lem Beatty
Chicago - JoAnn Cunningham Faces Sentencing In Murder Of 5-Year-Old Son, AJ Freund

Nick Digilio

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chicago - JoAnn Cunningham Faces Sentencing In Murder Of 5-Year-Old Son, AJ Freund

"Murdering her son age. A friend. A. J was just five years old when he was found in a shallow grave in April 2019 after his parents reported him missing from their home in Crystal Lake. Cunningham pleaded guilty and faces 20 to 6 years in prison. The case exposed failings with in D. C. F S, which dealt with the family since a J was born with opiates in his system at yesterday's hearing, cunning and beg for mercy, but prosecutors are asking for the maximum sentence.

Crystal Lake Cunningham
University of Chicago joins lawsuit against new visa rule for international students

WBBM Morning News

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

University of Chicago joins lawsuit against new visa rule for international students

"Announced new guidelines that threatened to bar hundreds of thousands of international students from studying in the US As a result of the Cove at 19 pandemic lawsuit, which involves Illinois and 17 other states challenges what it calls the federal government's cruel and unlawful action to expel international students. T'pol, Northwestern of the University of Chicago, have also joined the legal action Loyalists President Dr Joann Rooney has called the ice order misguided and inhumane. Bob Conway,

Dr Joann Rooney T'pol Bob Conway United States Loyalists Illinois University Of Chicago President Trump
Chicago - JoAnn Cunningham, mother of slain Crystal Lake boy AJ Freund, pleads guilty to murder

WGN Nightside

00:32 sec | Last month

Chicago - JoAnn Cunningham, mother of slain Crystal Lake boy AJ Freund, pleads guilty to murder

"The mother of a J friend is due in court for sentencing next Thursday. Joanne Cunningham facing up to six years in prison for the murder of the five year old Crystal leg boy, She pleaded guilty to first degree murder last December after denying that crime for eight months. If prosecutors are successful, the maximum in getting the maximum 60 year sentence she would like to spend the rest of her life behind bars. A J's father, Andrew friend, also charged with murder. After failing to stop her from beating the child.

First Degree Murder Andrew Friend Joanne Cunningham
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

04:49 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"High listeners, we have an update for you. Normally we do not have an update this quickly after recording an episode, but we actually recorded this episode back in March I ever call that because it was the first time we recorded separately during quarantine. You remember that Mcginn I remember I was nervous very sad to be a part, but anyway just two weeks later, Joanne parked was granted clemency I did. Did Not know this and I'm curious to hear the process and why? This was more news worthy because I didn't see it to tell you the truth I didn't hear about it as much as I. Thought I would either Gavin Newsom, who is the governor in? California on March twenty seventh. He parted five people who already served their time, and he commuted the sentence of twenty one st inmates. Fun fact other than Joanne. There were three other innocence project clients to who are going to be released immediately so a big congrats to the California innocence project. That is really huge for them. They've been doing so much work for these clients. So that's -gratulations. That's awesome. Let's take a moment and talk about what this actually means for Joanne. Because unfortunately, it's not actually guarantee her release. If you recall Joann was tried in California and the California, Constitution gives the governor the Authority to grant clemency now clemency can be in the form of a pardon or commutation. So, what's the difference? Difference here while a commutation is really just the substitution of a lesser penalty after the conviction of a crime. Is that like what happened with? Samson Toya Brown. Yes, so, What's interesting because sin? Toya's case was a bit different and I want to highlight the difference in just a moment. Okay, so the penalty. When we have a commutation, the penalty can either be lessened in severity, which means someone who was sentenced to death can be commuted to life without parole or endure Asian when somebody say was mandated ten years reduce a mandated eight years or could be some form of both. Point out. Though that clemency does not necessarily forgive or minimize the harm caused by the crime, and it does not erase the conviction, and most importantly, it does not prove innocence recognizes that a person has perhaps been rehabilitated in some way. So. We can incentivize people to maybe take accountability or work towards rehabilitation while incarcerated. As we talked about earlier in the episode Joann was really a model inmate. She has a strong record of education employment counseling, and she even did some with disabled inmates so really quick I just want to talk about how this is different than apart in a part in essentially as forgiving an individual. A pardon is something you would rather have if you're in the situation. Because a pardon can prevent the unjust collateral consequences of conviction, we talked about collateral consequences quite a bit our race crime episode, but this is talking about barriers to employment on the restoration of civil rights, such as voting apart in does not expunge or race conviction, however it does quote unquote. Forgive a person, so the commutation allows her to go before the Board of parole for hearing and ultimately the parole. Commissioner is going to determine whether she a suitable for release, so you brought up in Toy Brown case if If you recall, it's a bit different, so every state does things a bit differently in procedures in the criminal justice system so in Tennessee Worsen Toya Brown's case was the governor..

Toya Brown Joanne California Joann Gavin Newsom Mcginn Commissioner Tennessee
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:32 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"So you know basically the report concludes that the investigators and the jury were misled by bad science. They even say possibly by no science at all. While it sounds unscientific, the original song sorry, the original findings to me, don't sound backed by science. Was this report prepared for one of her appeals? So I was trying to find the purpose of this report because you would think that this report would be used as a jumping off. Off Point for appeals and I think that it is being used so right now. I'm jumping ahead a little bit, but right now the California Innocence Project Has Joanne's case off, and they're relying heavily on the when teeny report among lots of other areas one other thing, I wanNA point out. There is also a conclusion in that report. That says that the type of television set that parks owned had been linked to more than fifty fires. Remember I said at the time of the trial. The defense said it was probably the TV, but they had trouble proving it because they couldn't really say what exact model it was just kind of guessing okay, and some say this was probably one of the bigger parts of the trial that the conviction might not have happened if they could have just show that it was likely the TV that had this electrical issue. Going back to the Innocence Project Joanne had I reached out to the innocence project for help in two thousand and two, but her case was rejected because there was not a firm understanding of the fire science. Remember the Lentini. Report didn't come out until two thousand eleven. So after they'll Intini report the innocence project started paying more attention to arson science as a quote, unquote junk science, right the in two thousand and fifteen, the California innocence project took on Joannes case, and they had an evidentiary hearing in two thousand seventeen. During this hearing, they called new fire experts to talk about these new techniques. However, the prosecution witnesses concluded that they still believe it was arson and the judge really just ruled that it was a battle of the experts. You know we see this a lot of times. The time because the prosecution's expert is saying now it could still be arson. The defense has all these new experts. Experts saying it's not arson at the end of the day. The judges saying all right while it's a battle of you know which is unfortunate, because sometimes it is about all the experts, but this seems like a case where so much more evolved about science and treating it like a science yet that this is not necessarily a traditional battle of the experts, especially when you have Latini like the face of arson science backing this, so they didn't grant it did not grant a new trial, and then a judge in the Los Angeles Superior Court denied a Habeas Corpus petition in November, two, thousand and eighteen. This decision is currently being appealed. Basically, they're asking for new trial based on error, a fall scientific evidence. There's a little more because that's November two thousand eighteen. That decision is being appealed, but there's also a petition that's asking the governor in California to grant a commutation and give her a chance before the parole board, so something called the California twelve. Be Ever heard of this I know where you're going well..

arson Joanne California Los Angeles Superior Court Latini
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

03:25 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"Talk about fire science, though because fire science has dramatically changed since one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty nine, and this is GonNa, come into play when we talk about where her case is currently okay so mostly it was just on the job training during the time of Joannes case in other words, there wasn't really a specific training or a specific certification to be an arson investigator. Okay in one thousand. Thousand Nine hundred eighty to the National Fire Protection Association, they actually did publish guidelines, and they started introducing scientific methods for investigating arson cases, and at this time people started recognizing that there were widely believed myths that surrounded fire science cases, so we see in the early nineties, which right around the time where Joann was convicted, people are just starting to see. Maybe this isn't such a strong science. So, I don't know if you know the name John Lentini, but he is the most well-known fire scientist, and he is the one who led the way for a lot of reforms. Actually now works at the forensic fire analysis. Institute and the reason why I bring him up is because he led an arson review panel in two thousand and eleven that was put together to review the evidence reports and testimony in the parks case, so you have John Lentini again who is? The leader of the Berry Sheck of fire science exactly so he had. This whole panel gets put together him in the panel conclude that the fire in parks home was not an arson. They found that forensic evidence used during the original investigation was invalid, and that the fire investigators who analyzed the case simply did not have a proper understanding of really the behavior of fires at that time I'm sure they increase the educational standards going forward as well and you know they talk about this new evidence shows that. That the investigators Joanne's case really base their investigation on what are now debunked arson myths so in other words. This conviction is tainted because we didn't know then what we know now it was also riddled with biased and unscientific methods. The panel's report also documents how the theories of the police investigators such as the theory that the fire had multiple points of origin was incorrect. Oh, they actually concluded that the fire spread from a single origin in the locker room, and then quote unquote jumped into the children's bedroom. It only appear to the untrained eye that there were two points of origin. In addition. The autopsy of the victims showed that the children had fatally high carbon monoxide levels in their lungs, which means what it means that had there been a fire in the bedroom meaning. If there had been two points of origin, the children would not have survived long enough for carbon monoxide to accumulate got it. So this aspect of carbon monoxide poisoning was not understood at the time of parks, trial and most research about carbon monoxide production during fire, and its effect on victims didn't occur until after the parks trial, the panel also looked at the fire patterns on the closet door again that closet door where Ronnie was found contrary to the conclusions of the initial investigators. This panel determined. Determined that the door was actually not even close at the time of the fire, and definitely not locked. They suggest that the child likely took refuge from the fire in the closet. He was scared he was he was trying to protect himself exactly what I would have thought. Ultimately, the panel concluded that by modern standards. None of this evidence withstand in a courtroom today..

arson John Lentini National Fire Protection Assoc Joanne Berry Sheck Joann investigator Ronnie
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

03:36 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"Something had been place in front of the closet to keep it from swinging open, and then they had to investigators who both agreed that it was the laundry hamper. That had been placed in front of the closet door because it matched the shape, so you have a lot of people getting on the stand here, focusing on these areas, which all sound by the. The kind of subjective to me YEP. I agree so far. Yep, the experts opinion that Joann was the PERP also rested in large part on their mapping of the fire's path, so there was a focus on what we talked about this idea of flash over basically I'm not a fire person, but the way I understand it is one certain. Organic materials are heated. They undergo this type of thermal decomposition and release flammable gases. Okay, okay, so if If that occurs every flammable surface in the room. That's not already burning can ignite in rapid succession. Oh, I, see flash over often makes domestic fires impossible to make sense of because everything gets ignited. Okay, that makes sense to me. Flash over did in fact occur in the parks home? But investigators said that the burn scape implicated the mother. When in fact, there's no way to say that what it really comes down to is. They were saying. Saying we can't find a cost, so it must be our sin. And unfortunately they had like I said they had a lot of experts getting on that. Stand testifying to this. What about the neighbor who first came forward? Did they find it? was there any reason that you could find other than just being a good citizen that she shiva grudge or didn't like her like? Is there a reason why she came forward with this information yeah. Yeah. Apparently, they had some sort of she didn't. She disliked? Joanne for some reason. Oh, that's right. Yeah, that okay. Yeah, it's hard to know exactly because a lot of that's hearsay, right to Joanne, testify Joanne did not testify. I'm not to spend too much time on the defense, because I want to spend more time on the on what happens during appeals, but basically the defense there evidence really did demonstrate that the fire could have actually been..

Joanne Joann
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:55 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"PM. Time, we will be speaking with Jillian from one of our favorite podcasts. Court junky. Who can't wait I'm really really excited about this. We'll be talking with Jillian from court. Junkies about Jodi Arias. As some of you might know. There've been some updates in jody's case lately and some interesting things have happened with both the prosecutor and one of her former defense lawyers. On this episode. We will give you. You the updates and we will also take you a little bit behind the scenes into our assessment of Jodi, Arias from criminologist, point of view, looking forward to that I'm really excited about this and Jillian will be covering a lot of the trial points as well so this'll be a great well, rounded episode, and we're going to allow some time for QNA as well. Be sure to catch US they're. Great excited to jump into today's case. So, do you know anything about Joe and parks I? Really don't I have to say you pick some cases. You pick some stompers for me I. Don't know if that's a word, but you stumped me. I'm always surprised when I research some of these cases and there so shocking and I realized how little information is out there? There's no shortage of cases. That's that's for sure. Have while Joanne was a stay at home, mom and by many accounts she really loved being a mom and did the best she could. The reason I say did the best she could. As they were a bit strapped for cash, and we'll talk about that a little more in just a moment but Joanne at the time of the fire, just twenty three years old. She lived with her husband. Ronald, who was forty. Forty one years old and her three children, so she had two daughters Roanne. Who Was Sixteen Months Old Jessica, who was three years old and Ronald who they actually called Ronnie? He was the oldest at just four years old pay, so Joanne and Ronald were married for six years, so do the math. She got married very young. She had a tough upbringing. She was adopted very young and reportedly she had a very hard time fitting in. Apparently her Stepdad didn't seem to care for her and made her feel unwanted. She was also the victim of sexual assault as a teenager by an adult member of her church, so as a result of that assault as a teenager, she actually got pregnant. And she was forced to give up the child, and soon after her child was placed with a foster family, and then soon after that her child died. Oh, so a lot of trauma happening very early on for Joanne again. She met Ronald when she was pretty young. Reportedly, he became abusive sharply after they met member. They have about a twenty years difference between the two of them. She was quite young, right maybe seventeen when they got married. Does she stayed with him although he was abusive, as unfortunately, we hear often. He reportedly was both physically and verbally abusive. I also just want to mention that. I said that they had got married young. They also got married after. Only know each other for one week, Wollo Yeah. Yeah. And Ronald was previously married, and had an eighteen year old son from a prior marriage, so his son was about the age of his new wife right so the families they could be friends. So. The family lived in the bell city section of La. They actually lived in a converted two car garage. It was less than five hundred and thirty square feet. It was three bedrooms. Two young girls shared a bedroom Rani. The older son had his own room. There was a kitchen, a living room a bathroom, and although this seems like a guess, a small living space. They had actually come from a shelter before that, so they were actually really happy. They were living on their own, and it was a good time for them..

Joanne Ronald Ronnie Jillian Jodi Arias assault Joe jody prosecutor QNA La Jessica
"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

04:32 min | Last month

"joann" Discussed on Women and Crime

"This podcast may contain content that is graphic and disturbing in nature, listener discretion is advised. On the evening of April Ninth Nineteen eighty-nine Joanne parks put her three children to sleep and went to bed. She woke up around midnight to the sound. The for children's screaming and to a home engulfed in flames, although the fire was initially ruled accidental, Joann was later convicted for arson and murder and remains in prison. Even though many doubt the accuracy of her conviction. This is episode Eighteen Joanne Parks Story. Pay.

Joanne parks Joann arson murder
JoAnn Compton Powell: Moving forward after the death of a daughter

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:35 min | 2 months ago

JoAnn Compton Powell: Moving forward after the death of a daughter

"Ten years ago Cindy lost her sister, Laurie but she says she also lost her mother to. Over the years I've done many shows with parents of murdered children and parents who've lost their children, and never knew what happened to their children, no bodies, no person ever was claimed or or discovered and you Joanne expressed what all of those parents have at some point or another express to me over the years is they want everyone to know that? Their children had a life, and that the life was important and not the death. Because what happens when you have a child who's murdered, this way is everybody focuses on the death. Everybody focuses on who did it or who didn't do it, and who committed the crime and the life is lost so. You have an opportunity to say something today about the kind of person your daughter was. Her life, not her death, but her life. She was very happy person. She enjoyed everything she did. She liked everybody she met. She was beautiful. She made me pray out. I really couldn't believe that I had a child like this. I've been buried like with the two children I have. And they make me so proud as mother. She didn't deserve this. She deserved a lot more. A lot more. So now you're stuck ten years. You have not been able to move on, and you have watched into your mother. Not Be able to move on. What do you want to say? Well, I just want to tell her that I need you I, need you? There is a parent a friend. When we lost Laurie you daughter Alice Desisto. And it was really hard. To find someone to understand pain was filling because Obviously, you took be there at that time for me. With her case there were details that you and dad with health for me and I feel like there are people out there. Were you know more about the case than I do? and. Course when I was a newlywed, we were having problems and. I didn't feel like a come. Come to you and share that with you. I had to go in front of you. Know Groups, fashion and. Lay everything out there and. Try to get some feedback on it so I could get on with my life and deal with it and I just from other back, I do. They're look. I need you back to back and I need to back as my parents and that's my friend. I'm so sorry. For. To to be able to share your pain and your feelings with her and your joys, and your things to have your mother back as a partner again, yes, it would be wonderful It'd be a new beginning. We could get, and we can move forward. You know we could deal with new pains. New Joyce, you know and. I'm. No and We caught a lot of rest in Peace Now. I really do. AM So sorry are really ender the sorry. Let me ask you both something. And I'll address this to you because Cindy I think you've moved on. I, think you feel like you have some closure. You haven't forgotten your sister, have you? Ever any less. Every day. You think about every day, but you're not obsessed with it. And you feel that you are. Okay. I ask you if you could accept some things and another thing I want to know if you can accept. And this is so hard people to think about. But can you accept the fact? That the length and depth of your grieving. Does not reflect the length and depth of your life. You can love somebody this much. And if you if you if you agree for a year, that doesn't mean that you only loved them that much. It's not something that you. Oh, it's not something that you give how long you grieve. Is. Not a reflection of how much you loved the person that you lost. That sounds foreign to you, doesn't it? because. You walk around, you say. How can I be laughing today? And my daughter is dead, and I'm laughing at Disneyworld or I'm laughing at a TV show and my daughter is dead. How can I do that? You ask those questions yourself, don't you? But I'm asking you now. Can you at least entertain the fact that how long you grieve is not a reflection of how deeply you loved your daughter. I believe I. Do can you accept that if you get closure on this? If you say I'm not going to be obsessed with this anymore that you are not betraying your daughter. Yes! I think I can. That's a hard one, isn't it? But I'm asking you. Can you do that? Yes, sir, I think I can if she could talk to you right now. Do, you think she would say mother. I want you to hurt every day for the rest of your life to prove that you left me. No, you think that's what she would say to invade very angry, it may. So. It wouldn't be a betrayal. Maybe the betrayal is focusing on the day of her. Dan Rather than celebrating the event of her life, she lived for eighteen vibrant and wonderful years. and. You focus on the day that she died. I never thought of it that way. I really never thought of it that way. Well maybe it's time to say. I'm GONNA do that. Maybe it's time to say I'm going to focus on her life and celebrate what I had rather than what? lost. You suppose that's a possibility. That would be nice. It'd be very nice. But it means you have to let her go. You have to give her to God and say I'm Gonna I'm this is your job? Man I'll never forget. I'll never stop loving. You'll never stopped being part of my life. But. It's time that I move von. With your sister and with my life. Take you with me and my heart. But. I'm not going to be obsessed with this anymore. Like to work towards that really would. Like to be able to do that? I could see that. That was a light bulb moment for you. When that was because you who said earlier in the show today you can't even bear to smile. You smiled when Phil said that where the order and you're smiling now. The idea. Of celebrating her life living in holding onto the moment of her death. Really, never thought about it I just never thought about it that way never. Okay? Were you take one more step with me. I mean one more, really big big step. Because what I want you to do right now is I. Want you to make a decision? That says I've got to get up tomorrow. and not be consumed with what I'm doing I've gotta get up tomorrow and have different life I've got to get up and not spend all of my waking hours thinking about my daughter thinking about my loss. And I've been here before and I'm telling you to do that. You have to willing to give it up now. You have to be willing. To say in your heart to, Laurie. I've gotTA. Let you go. I've got to say goodbye I've got to let you go. Because you, you said yourself be really mad at me. She must be really mad at me because we can hold people to an earthly bond, that way can't wait. I believe so. Really Day. Turn your chair and face me. Real close. I want to ask you. Is it time to say by the Laurie. Yes

Laurie Pain Cindy Joanne Dan Rather Joyce Partner Phil Alice Desisto
Oprahs 2000 Capsule

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

07:43 min | 2 months ago

Oprahs 2000 Capsule

"Joanne competence greatest wish is to tell the world. What happened to her beloved daughter Lori. She says my goal for the year two thousand is to tell my daughter story on your show, and then to let that go and get on with my life. Just thinking of her name or thanking her it brings a smile, Emma Hart, Lori and Powell was having the time of her life. She was eighteen, vibrant and popular. She loved her rock and Roll Music, and the Glamour of entering local beauty heartens. then. The mother's unspeakable nightmare happen. Laurie disappeared on a lonely country road and Joanne. comptons torment began. Police found her body in a nearby river. She'd been stabbed to death. Investigations led nowhere, and Laurie's murder remains unsolved when they found Lori and she didn't have anything on her. Just a little steadier rain. No Clothes No pocket. No check. In the ten years since Lori disappeared daily, life has stood still for Joann. Our never be able to come to terms with the US to me. Lori Dad today just as easy as she died ten years ago in one bedroom. She keeps a collection of mementos. Her dolls that she collected. I care for dress from her. Pageants she used to like to be him. Time has not healed Joanne Compton each day. She says the loss feels like a whole that gets deeper. I keep worry ends memory law of all the time in my heart. That Dayton's part of me I don't want anyone else touch. I keep for all live. In my thoughts. Just. Thinking backs I'll. Lorries buried in a cemetery near the family home. Her mother though. Still is waiting for some kind of peace. Joanne row to Dr Phil and She wants to end her. With this tragedy she knows that she is obsessed. And she wrote to Dr Phil McGraw Asking for help. Fill is here with a plan to help Joanne. Move On. This is a show for anyone dealing with the tragedy. Perhaps maybe you will hear something today. That will be a spark a piece of light to open a door that has gotten you stuck. He is a psychologist and he's alive strategist. Non This letter? You say Joanne ten years ago. Ago My daughter Laurean was murdered since that day. I've not been able to let go. It has never been solved and after all this time I don't guess it will be since then I've spent hours and days looking for answers writing to anyone that might help I have a need in me to tell her story not in a small way, but in a big way. This need is driving me crazy. It's all I think about every day. I believe that because of this need. It's making me sick within. I've had to have heart surgery and have develop stomach ulcers. The stomach pain is unbearable at times, but not as unbearable as Laurie's debt.

Lori Dad Joanne Compton Laurie Dr Phil Emma Hart Joann Roll Music United States Dayton Powell Joanne. Comptons Murder Laurean
AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

Insureblocks

09:24 min | 4 months ago

AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

"Joann thank you for joining us today. I can't believe it's been eighteen months since our last podcast for our listeners. Who Haven't heard our first podcast. Could you please give them a creaky deduction on yourself? Well thank you. Well lead happy to be here again. A lot has happened in the last eighteen months. And it's great to have a chance to catch up with you I have a background technology as a CIO. Even though I'm a operations senior vice president operations today and I've been with a s a national advisory Organization for the past eight years a serving in both capacities so with that We have completely restructured the way we serve as a national advisory organization and that led us to the creation of open idea and I am the executive sponsor of the open ideal brilliant. Thank you so much for that. So like in our lives podcast in September. Two thousand eighteen. Could you please explain to our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work but additionally this time I'm curious to know? How much has your opinion changed over the last eighteen months? Blockchain is a technology. It's a distributed ledger. Technology and that is a a starting point for lots of things that could be done with this technology. What makes what makes it different than other? Say Data Technologies is that it is a distributed ledger in which a copy of the ledger is available on. All of the nodes the participants in the network and that solves a key problem that is existed with other technologies that we have an immutable record with blockchain technology that we don't with other data technologies so it enables us to create systems networks based on that concept and it can be used for a wide variety of a solution such as transactional networks or in the case of the open ideal using it as an analytic platform so the technology itself provides a secure way to store data it provides transparency in how data is used and then it provides that immutable record that is so critical to trusting any activity that happens with with the data on the network. Then after that. There's lots of things that you can do. In terms of private data stores. How transactions happen and get stored on the network And how the results of those applications are delivered to the participants. So we're going to see lots of blockchain networks but they're all going to look very different accents. Thank you very much for that so for our listeners who Aaron familiar with the American Association of Insurance Services. As could you give a little introduction on it please? So in the United States the insurance industry is regulated at the state level and there is a mechanism to provide some consistency between all those state regulations. And that's a national advisor organization so our or our company is formed by regulation and we are licensed in all fifty states to do a couple of things. One is we serve as a bridge between the carriers and the regulators and the way they Exchange information or share data and through that exchange we also use some of that data to create products such as a homeowner's policy with a rating plan or an auto plan and with that we then bring consistency across all the states in the way those products are delivered to the market. And certainly the curious pick up our products and the ad a lot of value on top of that that that baseline is what we're doing for the industry and we've been doing it that way at for over eighty years and we know that it is not as efficient as it should be and it needs to be modernized because we have different needs for data today in our industry so while we've been doing this for eighty years a lot changing for us as well as as for the carriers themselves brilliant. Brennan so in August two thousand eighteen. You launched the open. Insurance data link known as open ideal. Could you please give us a recap on what is over ninety? L? And the problems. It's looking to address well. We didn't know that we are going to create the open ideal when we started on this journey. We actually started with the problems we needed to address. We knew that The way we were collecting data and sending the reports over to the regulators was fundamentally broken. There were a lot of pain points in all of the participants in that process. The old style statistical data plans had been used forever. Don't contain enough information for. As in advise you organization to do everything we need to do. The result of that is that the regulators also found the same thing that they stabbed plans. Don't have the graded answer the question. They're getting from their legislatures. So they started doing data calls many years ago where they go directly to the carriers now and they go around the adviser organizations to get the data they need that was causing a lot of pain points with the carriers they see increasing volumes of data leaving the security of their data centers being transferred to third parties and they don't have any insight into how that data's being used once it leaves they worried about security that data so through a number of design thinking sessions. We were able to identify those pain points. And then look at what the possible solutions might be and as we looked at the data technologies that are available today and were at the time we had a number of problems with those platforms in terms of data security when large files are being transferred from one entity to another the transparency. In how that data's being used in then of course As a regulated industry that audible record that immutable audible record about all of the activities that are occurring with that data. So that's what led us to the use of blockchain technology and we started with a prototype. That turned out very successful. It solve the problems of the curious and the regulators We went through one Pivot on our architecture. We changed the way we think. About what stored on chain and how we ensure the privacy of data in that resulted in the open ideal that we have today so that architecture has been completed. It's it's stable. And we're now building out the network for increased use We have some prototypes around regulatory reporting. it's not being used for all the regulatory reporting that's occurring today but the regulators in the carriers love it and so we're moving forward with it now. Okay so you've been running for for eighteen months and you mentioned on some of the prototypes that you've been running during this period of time. Could you share with us? Some of the data points that demonstrate the impact open ideal has head has added to the property and casualty industry in the US. Will the impact has been? I on how it's changed the relationship between the carriers and the regulators and how they think about using data for the benefits of the entire industry in the past. It was kind of a contentious. The relationship that lacked trust and so the first thing that the open idea brought in to the community was that sense of trust. Then we've been able to work on a number of reports that bring value to both the carriers and the regulators that was a key component of our design. If we're going to ask security is to provide data around for example a cause of loss To the regulator so they can make good policy about that. They'd like to get some value back. And what we've been able to do is create reports on a statewide or national basis that allows the regulators to understand what a cause of loss might be offer fire or some sort of other catastrophe. And then the carriers can see that reported the state or national level and they can compete against the data that they have internally and make better decisions at the same time so the platform itself has changed the way this whole process is viewed and the regulators now are so excited about it that we have a coalition of those regulators that are interested in changing the laws about how regulatory reporting occurs To make the use of this blockchain platform the standard in the future and the carriers are excited about it because they've seen the value and regulatory reporting but they've also seen the value in the new data stores that are available through the blockchain network. And how that might be used not only for regulatory reporting but also for some of their internal operations as well.

Data Technologies Blockchain United States Joann CIO Senior Vice President Operatio American Association Of Insura Advisor Brennan Aaron Executive
Can we use food as medicine?

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

10:59 min | 4 months ago

Can we use food as medicine?

"Guest Don Rene has a compelling story of self care and recovery after a debilitating month in bed and a lifetime of chronic illnesses. She has spent the past decade learning from others while assisting them with their daily health issues their experiences show nutritional support and ways to detox. The body inside and out are crucial to maintaining. Good health. Don Rene is currently devoted to the care of a woman with stage four. Ls focused care for someone navigating. So many obstacles has provided good challenges for them to overcome. Don Rene has gained an intimate understanding of how nutritional support and AIDS affects us and our health and our cognitive wellbeing. The traveling caregiver part came from the fact that I would. I could travel on the phone. I could travel on the email I could travel to your home. I can travel wherever you needed me to and I could at least try to help you get somewhere where you can feel that you're getting some sense of control back in your environment because it can feel so out of control when you're fighting disease disorder. You know a like. How do we bring bounce back? How do I find balance for you? Where are what are the things that are triggering you to to lose the controls that you're not having any more and you know with LS LS is a? It's a terrible thing. It's I mean you lose everything from the neck down you have. Your brain laughed but You know virtually. She stayed for less patients. She's immobile from the neck down. She can't speak to me other than through communication device in. That's if she's feeling like it so usually. We use a lot of mental telepathy and I looked ends by language. Reads and intuition and Basically just basing everything on her baseline where where's her happy place and then trying to keep her at that happy place. No so I know that's the same with ultra so I'm always trying to try to keep my mom and her happy place goodness. It's I visited her yesterday. And the plan was I'm a Rotarians and I go after my rotary meetings. We didn't have a meeting yesterday so I thought okay I'm GonNa go earlier and I will go my plan about noon and they would be down with lunch and then I would take her to a restaurant. I would eat. Get Her something small to snack on. Whatever just so we had that nice socialization. Because she's she still verbal but nothing she says makes sense. It sounds like it makes sense and people will look at me and like Oh you know. What is she talking about like? Give me the historical context kind of question and it's like there is no historical context because this makes no sense and so. I try to give her this nice visit so yesterday we were. I get disrupted like just as leaving. The door landscaper comes and he's got questions. I'm like dude. I'm hungry. I need to go get my mom so I can get makes no sense. It worked and I got there like Korda one and she's still having lunch. I'm like they never have to like eleven as I usually can't get there early enough to actually eat with them break so I was like she didn't see me so I'm like okay and I went out in the courtyard. Did a couple of things on my phone whip back. In most of the residents were done. She was still leading. She's also at the stage of Alzheimer's where she has difficulty with eating utensils but she has difficulty eating with her hands. So that's that's a challenge. And so most of the residents were done. The tables in the floors discuss you just covered in food. And I'm like there's no way I'm eating with these people in this. I'm not a Germaphobe Neat freak but not that bad and it was just it was just too much like she's still eating okay and like at this point. I'm starving because it's now like one o'clock and I usually Thirty noon so it's getting rather late and I'm like okay. Well this is just completely screwed up all plans for that I. I went to lunch and the plan was go. Get MOM HAVE LUNCH. Visit with her for about an hour per back off. And then I was going to reward myself with shopping at Michael's and maybe Joann fabrics because we've just moved and we have a lot of neutral so I needed to find the POPs of color. That was the plan but I had to pass Michaels to get back to her. Okay like that's just dumb. I'm like you know what it's not. GonNa make much difference at this point so I did my Michael Stuff. Which was yesterday was such a Monday. I gather inventory people blocking every aisle Mike Really. I'm just going home going home. I'm giving up underway now by persevered. I went and I had you know I got mom. And you know the I went to Pinera and they always like. Oh you WANNA pastry for ninety nine cents which always say no. Do not need the sugar. I got that for her. You know so. We sat there on the bench in the sunshine. I'm in northern California so the sun is very warm. Breeze was quite chilly. So the combination very pleasant. He sat out of the bench Hannah just sat there eating the cookie. Hopefully she got more cookie than I did. It was the plan and she just wasn't like in the mood to talk. Mike Okay. I've learned the hard way. Not Not push so dumb with them with a cookie and she said something and I said agreed with her. She said I don't know what you're talking about. I'm like just agreed with how I said such a nice to have but we go for a walk. And this is where. My Mom's Alzheimer's is really interesting because she always wants to. Make sure that we're doing what you want. And whatever you need it it's always. Yui New Right looks like well. I don't WanNa be here and I don't want to sit here with you. Not Talk I want to do any of this. But it's necessary so she said whenever you want to find or walking his. She's had a lot of pain when walking. Yeah and she didn't seem to have a lot of pain yesterday so I thought okay. We walked all the way around the residents and we got back and it was about thirty. Four o'clock she starts getting really crabby. So Mike Hey it's time for me to go back to work and I took her back in. And that was that was the end of the day except the as I was leaving. There was a gentleman from the assisted living part of the community sitting on the bench for the cute little dogs target him. I'm like okay well. This was not the way I planned my day. But it worked out okay. Mom and I had a decent visit. We didn't have any any words so that was cool. Yeah the I think we should talk about the nutritional support. 'cause I wonder sometimes. Yeah I know personally if I did not get a good night's sleep I wake up and my brain is going. Let's have some doughnut stuff that I don't it's like don't don't don't don't eat donuts. And it's not gonNA help look brain. You need a nap. Not crabby food is fine. It's fascinating it's like thankfully I know why it's doing it. It's looking for quick fuel but don't Sugar even gives me quick fuel. And so you said you put your this. Gal Aliens on plant based Diet Yes. It's very let's talk. It's very similar to the To the mind diet so I don't know if you're familiar with the mind diet I am but you can. You can give a highlight just in case this is somebody's first episode so basically for me. It's just like saying Mediterranean without all the grains. That's what it is similar is. I don't In that's actually because I had diabetes type. Two through my through my journey with an her sister has now been diagnosed with Alzheimer's and I have a friend a really good friend who's MOM's been diagnosed with dementia and so I've had to go through the journey with them too and Try to help. Help them with some strategies and What I found was is that it was all the same and that diabetes type two can turn into diabetes type three which is actually Alzheimer's dementia. So who knew that my sugar problem could eventually turn into something really bad for me someday. So sugar you know was definitely something. I had to make sure to get off the menu as fast as possible and then jumped to the mind diet so the mind diet is the Mediterranean Mediterranean Diet which is plant based it would be green leafy vegetables it would be Sprouted allies say sprouted seeds. Because I don't think you should eat seeds unless they've been sprouted and I don't think you should eat nets unless they've been soaked but that's just because those those specific seeds and nuts they have a big acid on the outside was protects their shell and when they get activated those that acid comes off while if we just eat it were depending on our stomach. Digestive acids to get rid of that which actually throws a neuro toxin in the mix so your brains like what? Am I supposed to do that so sometimes people might say? I can't eat mets. It always makes my tummy get all bound up or I can't eat seeds same thing so they feel like that's happening. Probably a good chance. They need to break their seeds and nuts down before the item so I generally sprout and So all of them to the point. Where blend them and make net cheese before? I'll eat them right out of a bag just because it seems to again. It's what works for you. Everybody has to find what works for them so with the Mediterranean or the mind diet. I removed rice. No rice rice turns empty sugar so little story drew. I used to have hypoglycemia. And then it turned into diabetes type two because I had a gluten allergy so decided to go get all gluten products at the store Boxes they all say gluten free gluten free gluten free gluten free gluten free. The trouble is is that it's processed food says not really food and it other trouble is is that it's mostly made of rice. Rice converts to sugar whole. That's true I never thought of that within Lena but never looked like if in one year I had diabetes. Tikoo and I gained forty

Alzheimer Don Rene Diabetes Mediterranean Mike Okay Rice Mets California Joann Fabrics Aids Mike Really Pinera Korda Michael Stuff Michaels Tikoo Mike Breeze Hannah
Serial killer Khalil Wheeler-Weaver guilty of murdering three women in 2016

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Serial killer Khalil Wheeler-Weaver guilty of murdering three women in 2016

"Essex Essex County County authorities authorities today today delivered delivered a a verdict verdict in the case of a New Jersey man accused of multiple murder I'm pleased to announce that a serial killer who took the lives of three young women and attempted to kill another has been convicted and that's Essex County prosecutor Theodore Stevens a jury deliberated for just two hours Thursday before convicting Khalil Wheeler weaver and the deaths of twenty year old cerebellar thirty three year old joann brown and nineteen year old robin west in twenty sixteen he was also found guilty of trying to kill a fourth one in the same year the convictions on charges of murder desecrating human remains kidnapping aggravated sexual assault and aggravated arson could bring a potential sentence of life plus eighty years in prison Wheeler reverse public defenders acknowledged their client did arrange sexual encounters with the women but insist he dropped them off safely at the end of each one

Murder Theodore Stevens Khalil Wheeler Weaver Joann Brown Kidnapping Arson Essex Essex County County New Jersey Essex County Prosecutor Aggravated Sexual Assault Thirty Three Year Nineteen Year Eighty Years Twenty Year Two Hours
How Food Affects Brain Function

Dishing Up Nutrition

03:23 min | 8 months ago

How Food Affects Brain Function

"I really believe we need to start. Educating guess what. Our first graders really should be doing this at first grade. Yes on what foods should they be eating for good brain function. Because I don't think people think about that at all. No they don't associate food with their brain function and And why they need to avoid or limit some of those processed foods the candy and the other Treats that are full of sugar and bad fats if we are going to turn this mental health crisis around our children really need to know how to feed their brain seriously as a Dietitian Anna mother. I believe kids need to learn to eat sufficient natural fats. No no more fat free or low fat dairy products low fat anything really and they need to learn how to limit their sugar consumption. Now Joanne. Joann let's get into some of that good brain chemistry. Yes our food choices. Determine how well our brain cells will function so because our our brain needs essential nutrients to function well additionally the other things that negatively affect our lives such as stress US skipping meals process food food additives. I'll throw alcohol in there too. Oh yeah that's rampant at the holiday time uh-huh but even air pollution water pollution. All those negatives do not support good brain health or good mental health. Well our brain is made up of ten billion nerve cells. Yes you heard me right. Fan Billion nerve cells else and they're all supported by the foods that we eat so pondered this every emotion. You feel every thought you think. Ask every decision. You make are dependent on how well your brain functions and the nutrients or lack of nutrients that have Fed your brain so remember ten billion nerve cells. We need them all firing. Wow at the right time right. We do so we have to feed our brain so yeah that's very true and if you've been feeding your brain poorly and then experience some psychological or emotional stress. Your brain tends to overact with anxiety or depression so it was not the stressful event that caused the depression or anxiety reaction action it was the result of a poorly nourished brain. Yes that's pretty amazing. It was the result of a poorly nourished brain right not the stress event. That you that kind of tipped you over the edge. Yeah you know and we're not immune to this either just because we're nutritionists Dietitians. You know we get caught in our daily living and I yesterday I was Kinda thinking. Oh my gosh because this is round the corner I I haven't done that and then I thought oh I must need some food. I got caught in traffic. I had the same experience I got caught in traffic doc and it was just I needed to eat but I was always grabbing something out of my lunch bag but it was just not

Joanne Depression Joann United States
Americans split over impeaching and removing Trump

First Light

00:32 sec | 10 months ago

Americans split over impeaching and removing Trump

"I have over in PC and removing the president a new ABC news Washington post poll this morning says forty nine percent of Americans say he should be out of our dealings with Ukraine forty seven percent say no Michigan voter joann McAlister whether you voted for him or not if he did something wrong and it's against the law and it's an impeachable offense that's what should happen this comes a day after the house in almost party line votes passed new rules by Democrats to change the impeachment inquiry and allow open hearings beginning later this

President Trump ABC Washington Post Ukraine Michigan Joann Mcalister Forty Seven Percent Forty Nine Percent
Dealing With Boredom in Life

Legacy-Dads Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Dealing With Boredom in Life

"And with that i wanna thank one of our listeners one of our readers and <hes> person that's shout to on social media and basically just asking asking lance you and i <hes> you know hard-working guy involve not that he's not disconnected or anything else like that but just finding himself bored board and you know lance you and i had the privilege of going down to a a men's ministry event twelve thousand plus. We sponsored it. We were down there in <hes> at really saw a group of seventy five guys that we were with lord move but i remember there is one passer that we've come to really respect over the years match handler and you would just anointed by the spirit and he said you know guys want to tell you. The most dangerous thing in american household right now is a board matt yep. Would you say about that. Yeah i think martin lloyd james also said something along the lines of like sin sin as always in some sense a life of boredom and i think that's what it is when we're bored. That's what we're going to start getting in trouble. That's what we're going to start doing some things you know and i looked at some statistics on this. This is funny that the barna group found that they did a survey and i think i've talked about the book christian before <hes> but <hes> barna group went out and did a survey of what unbelievers think of christians in sixty eight percent seventy percent of unbelievers said christians are just boring and then you take on top of that fewer than ten percent of american churches are able to establish and maintain a vibrant men's ministry so i think we can point fingers at some so at ourselves ourselves a little bit here too but i think a lot of some of it too is on us donte as guys and i think i mean i said as i know i know a lot of people who who are out doing some pretty dangerous stuff for god's kingdom that took them you know pursuing that in pursuing in god and pursuing what god had in store with their lives i mean i understand onto i mean not everybody can be as cool as me and just so you have a job or i'm constantly jet-setting all over the world and <hes> you know do do an undercover work and all that <hes> you know if you work if if you were going you know in finance or something like that it probably is pretty boring being being husband father but i think god's called us to more than that. What do you think of that. We're where's joann she. Can you go grab my way hawaii. Nobody nobody nobody seriously. I mean i think you know sometimes we fall into this routine of you know in in in our twenties we we have those wild adventurous things and you go out and do some crazy stuff. I'm not saying necessarily sin but just doing some doing some a little bit more adventurous exciting things and then we start settling down and we start getting in our careers and getting married and having kids and then it's like okay this is it now my life's become boring and honestly i think i think it's somewhat out of a choice and i think i get it. You know some guys are working hard to work long hours where can swing shift something like that but i think you've gotta keep it. We've talked about this with the marriage and certainly with the kids. You've got to keep it fresh and you got to keep it. You've got you've got to put some excitement adventure in your life or like you say like matt chandler said once we get bored man. We're going to start fallen towards other things that are you know we get we get small adrenaline russia's from sports and hobbies and drinking porn and whatever else that's where sins going to sneak in and that's that's a dangerous

Lance Barna Group Matt Chandler Martin Lloyd James Russia Donte Sixty Eight Percent Seventy Percent Ten Percent
G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

Tell Them, I Am

11:54 min | 1 year ago

G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

"This episode g willow Wilson, she's a comic book author, and she wrote the first marvel comic with a young Muslim woman as the hero, Kamla, Han aka MS marvel. So when I was in high school, I was kind of a giant Goth. I was the kind of insufferable kid who, who would say that they were not actually cost the Gosper, too pretentious, and that I was above that of. But Nevertheless, I wore the really dark lipstick and like the fish nuts, and the pseudo Victorian jackets, that you could find like buffalo exchange. Yeah. I mean, if you looked up Goss in the dictionary, you would have found a photo of me somewhere. Fortunately, for me around the same time, sort of the late eighties early nineties, this British wave of very literary experimental comics started coming out. And I ran Pedley became obsessed, and one of my absolute favorite series, as was the case for a lot of people was Sandman by Neil Gaiman. Which took a World War, Two era, kind of be list, super hero and turned him into this mythological dream king who goes on adventures with all kinds of different, mythical creatures and kind of deconstructs, western mythology from a really interesting point of view. So, you know, for me as like a fourteen year old fifteen year old mega Goth this was huge and revelatory. Not just the story itself, but the medium of comics. Sandman told a kind of story in comic book form that I didn't really know was possible. It was kind of my first exposure to these more literary more adult kinds of comics, when I was a kid comics were still considered very much a kids, medium, and particularly a boys medium. There were not things that were marketed at girls. There were very few books out there that were adjacent to the superhero world that were marketed to adults so to see a comic book that was very clear and open in its love for that classics Hooper hero story. And yet, at the same time talked about Shakespeare and Chaucer and you know, brought in a very Joseph Cambell kind of U of mythology. Just expanded my understanding of what could be done within the pages of a comic book. I want to take a quick break to tell you about another podcast. I worked on it's called the big one your survival guide. We walk you through what it would be, like, if a major earthquake hit Los Angeles, and we help you understand what you need to know, to survive science and journalism, and immerses you and the experience of being in a huge earthquake. Don't be scared. We help you prepare. You can find it today wherever you listen to this show. Okay. Back to tell them. I am. So as I remember, the first time I found Neil, Gaiman Sandman, I was at the apartment of a friend. Who is I think about two years older than me and had graduated. And they were already living on their own. And so we're, we're very kind of cool and grown up in my eyes. You know, the, the people who live, there had also been giant Goths. So there were clove cigarettes, which were still legal at the time sitting around, and, ashtrays, and that's kind of always what it smelled, like, which I like the smell of. But it had that kind of late nineties, Goth aesthetic, every all the windows were kind of draped in, like, JoAnn fabric in sort of dark colors. It was it was just that kind of place. This apartment had a collective library of all kinds of great stuff, and they were all reading Sandman, and they had they'd just sort of made a rule, you can read whatever you want, but don't take anything out of the apartment. But because their library was so big. I was like, nobody will notice if I just kind of sneaked these back issues out and read them on my own, so I did. And. It was one of those reading experiences that, that kind of sticks out in your mind as being something for which there is a before. And an after he read this book. It made me feel a lot less grubby as a Goth it, oh, it was a very unabashedly Goth comic. And it was kind of cool to see something with such a huge cultural impact that was kind of headlined by this very Goth guy with white makeup, an extremely scruffy kind of Robert Smith, secure hair, and it was kind of a nice affirmation that you could do the stuff. And it you'd be kind of like a mopey teenager. And yet have cool stories that meant something, and that we're all to uplifting, and we're about hope. So, you know, it was in, in that sense. Nice to see Goths doing some kind of artistic service for, for the whiter were. The kind of storyteller that he was was very influential, and then as I got a little bit older. And I I saw him a couple of times back. This is back when he used to tour. I was also very impressed with the way that he approached writing and being a writer and it being a human being. There was one instance, in which I saw him along with a bunch of other really amazing comic book writers, including, I think Peter David, at MIT just a few days, not more than a week after nine eleven. Nine eleven happened just a couple of weeks after my nineteenth birthday at the beginning of my junior year of college. And he you know, I was I was very much a college student, I was kind of going through a late adolescent. What does it all mean phase, I become interested in, in religion and started to sort of rethink what I assumed about life, and purpose and are, are sort of our place in the universe. And like everybody, I think it was it was a tremendous shock. I think particularly people of my vintage kind of elderly millennials or Xeni, all's had never known a time when the US felt really threatened. The Cold War was kind of over, there was a sense that we were separate from the rest of the world or that nothing could ever interrupt. That period of prosperity into which we had been born and so nine eleven just massively shook the foundations of our generational experience and especially being in Boston at Boston University, the feeling of ongoing threat and vulnerability was quite high. Two of the planes had taken off from Logan airport. There are all kinds of rumors circulating that, there were still a terrorist cells in the city. And so it really did feel like a war zone in many ways, and it occurred to me, just sort of walking to class that this is the reality that so much of the rest of the world faces every single day. And somehow we have managed to avoid it for this long. And now here we are just like the rest of the world. as we did for a lot of things during those weeks after nine eleven we kind of hung around to see if this event was actually going to happen because a lot of them were cancelled. And it was clear that, yes, it was going to happen. It was still going on. So we, you know, we decided okay, well, we're not we're not going to give up this, this chance to see all of these amazing authors and artists on stage at the same time. And we decided yeah, we're going to go. We're going to we're going to do it, despite the sort of aura of anxiety and dread. That was kind of hanging over everything. What was interesting to me is the Neil Gaiman was the only one in his kind of opening words who never mentioned nine eleven once everybody on stage when they got up to talk that was what they talked about. It was it was about superheroes in nine eleven. You know, I think one of the people on stage envisioned this world in which wolverine was on the plane with the terrorists, and sort of got up and, and hit them with his finger spikes. And it kind of rubbed me the wrong way because I remember thinking, you know, this is not the time to pretend that are fictional heroes are gonna do us any kind of good. It's too real. It's a nice thought that yes. If we had these amazing heroes who were always in the right place at the right time that they would have saved us, but they didn't. And Neil Gaiman got up and never mentioned nine eleven once he just sort of told a story, I don't even remember what it was that he talked about. But by the end of it for about thirty seconds. We all forgot and in a weird way, I think that prepared us to have them were serious conversation versus the. Yeah. Wolverine would I've got him if you'd have been there, which, which just felt very tried to me. The reason that that stood out to me was because it illustrated, very neatly that for a storyteller in a time of great national tragedy upheaval. The way forward is not always the way through that sometimes we assume we're in a position to attack things head on. And yes, we're gonna fight, whatever it is or or get through whatever it is. And it's, it's very easy to blur the line at that point between storytelling and, and just sort of shallow saber rattling. But what he said at that time illustrated to me that it was possible to speak in a deeper key and not to pretend that you have the answers that you need all the answers. You know, everybody was was in an incredibly tense somber. Reflective mood, and it I think brought a lot of us especially who are about my age. I was eighteen at the time into the realization that we are all mortal that, that, that nothing that we think, is a turtle is eternal, and that the world may be didn't look the way that we had been taught growing up,

Neil Gaiman Sandman Wolverine Gosper Goss Willow Wilson Pedley Kamla Los Angeles Logan Airport Hooper United States Peter David Boston Writer MIT Robert Smith
"joann" Discussed on SOBRadio Show

SOBRadio Show

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"joann" Discussed on SOBRadio Show

"I had been doing divorce law for. Well, now it's over thirty years, and it's unpleasant work. It's very dreaming work, but I always had one or two people every year who really were important to me. And can you hear me Gayle young I can hear you? Okay. That were that, that made my work valuable to me rewarding. So, but I got to a point where I don't, yeah. You just get some you don't wanna do this anymore from I needed a change. And so that's set me off on the quest of what else can I do? So I realized you know, I got twenty plus years to work. I can't just sit here and do this for twenty years. I got bored, frankly. Well, you know, it's interesting JoAnne, because I was laughing when you said, you taught him, do laundry, because I have to tell you that my son taught me to do laundry, when I was serving that your old, I had never done laundry, and he used to come to my place in San Diego. He would say his price for staying. There was doing my laundry and he said, mom, you're smart. I know you can do this, and I teach you how to do laundry, which he did. But now he's put in a new washer and dryer and he said, you're not going to know how to do this. So he's still just announced he'll doing it, but we've got about four minutes left of this art one. And I wanted to, to say that I think it's very important for our listeners to realize here was a successful woman, she had a thirty year law practice. She was doing very well. She just really got bored. It wasn't. A pleasant thing anymore for her to do and she decided to do some changes. But did you listen to what she said? She took classes. She did different things she traveled. She. Read a lot of different books, and so it didn't just come naturally to you. Joanna didn't just. Oh, wow. This is what I'm going to do. But is that what transformed you into the mediation or did or had you already made that shift? I had already made that shift in my work, probably ten years ago. But I renewed my sense of purpose with that work when I realized that I could also do something else, and it didn't have to be an either or proposition and just goes to show, you, it doesn't matter how long you're in business, or how clever you think you are sometimes the up is. It just doesn't show up for a while. And it was in my recommitment to my, my mediation, work has been a very a very nice. Again, transformation just making renewing my commitment to the work instead of trying to run away from it. And so how why did that happen? How did that happen? When I reached a point that I was so desperately unhappy practicing law, and dealing with divorce because I'm sure you can imagine. It's it is fraught with danger, so to speak, and there's a lot going on there, and it's hard to believe how people can treat one another when they loved each other and have children, and I got really down really down about it should the point that I just wanted to do something completely different. In fact, I spent a year looking for a job because I thought you know, I really have to get a change but. God was smarter than me. I didn't get a job when you know, you were wrongfully unemployable that's the reason why, you know, but don't go any further because we're gonna take our break and just a few seconds. And I wanna make sure that we come back to what happened. But yeah, you know, sometimes when you have especially when you've been an attorney, and you've had your own business for that number of years, thirty years. You know, you're not employable anymore because people know you're just going to stay until you find yourself or something else comes along, or you get your renewed energy. So hang on folks JoAnn, we'll be back with us in in just a few minutes. But. It's important for you to stay tuned because she did change her life, and she did change how she did things. So stick with us and we'll be back with Joanna Dell..

Joanna Dell JoAnn Gayle JoAnne attorney San Diego thirty years four minutes twenty years thirty year ten years
Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

All Things Considered

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

"For the first time. Scientists have used genetically modified viruses to treat a patient fighting a life threatening superbug infection NPR health correspondent, rob Stein. Has the story is it bell. Cornell Holdaway was born with a lung disease called cystic fibrosis when she was fifteen a nasty infection started spreading through our body after she got a double lung transplant in London. Nothing could help her not antibody. Nothing. Her mom, JoAnn says the doctors told her there was no hope devastated to be told. You know, we could well be burying all child was just anyone has a child and never expects to have to bury them this this selves. But then is false doctors decided to try something out of the box therapies called Phages their natural enemies of bacteria. So the doctors found Graham hatful, he's an expert on phases at the university of Pittsburgh using genetic approaches with genome engineering were able to assemble this collection of three Phages that we could then combine tile to use the treatment, they know infect the kill efficiently. People have been treated with Phages before with mixed results. But no one had ever tried infusing genetically modified Phages into someone's body. It's kind of a scary thing to go in and administer treatment. Like this full, which we're completely on new ground. We don't know what to expect. Isabelle's doctor started infusing about a billion Phages into her body twice a day and held their breath. There's lots of things to worry about. And so the very first thing was, you know, does something does anything bad happen. But nothing did. In fact, Isabel started to recover she got stronger and stronger and Isabel who's now seventeen is living in almost completely normal life driving lessons. A school making fake city pool. God ning. No. Now, doctors aren't sure exactly how the Phages might have worked and is about is in cured. She still needs to get fade infusions every day. But the infection appears at least to be under control. I think it's amazing. It kind of shows there is completely. No limit. Until they can come up with really her. Mom, agrees them to be able to just have a little fiddle around with these Phages moins blowing valley when you think about it. Stephanie drafty studies Phages at the university of California San Diego. This is actually a historic moment. Fades therapy, seems to be the most promising alternative to anti-biotics that's on the scene. And this is the first time that genetically engineered fade has been used to successfully treat a superbug infection. Anna human being so strategy and hatfill hope this is just the beginning. What can we do for example to extend this to other types of diseases? The most obvious one is closest which is caused by a related bacterium, and that causes a lot of disease, and that's across the world each year and this very prevalent, drug resistant, strains that are very hard to treat. Now, this is just one case. And a lot more research is needed to see how well phases, including genetically engineered Phages really work, and if they're safe, but with superbugs on the rise and biotic losing their power. Researchers hope Phages could help save more

Phages Cornell Holdaway Rob Stein Isabel London Graham Hatful Isabelle Superbug University Of Pittsburgh Stephanie Drafty University Of California San D Anna
Phages, Graham Hatful And Rob Stein discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Phages, Graham Hatful And Rob Stein discussed on Fresh Air

"For the first time. Scientists have used genetically modified viruses to treat a patient fighting a life threatening superbug infection NPR health correspondent, rob Stein. Has the story is it bell. Cornell Holdaway was born with a lung disease called cystic fibrosis when she was fifteen a nasty infection started spreading through her body after she got a double lung transplant in London. Nothing could help her not anti-biotics. Nothing. Her mom, JoAnn says the doctors told her there was no hope devastated to be told. You know, we could well be burying all child was just anyone has a child and never expect to have to bury them United the selves. But then as doctors decided to try something out of the box thyroid is called Phages their natural enemies of bacteria. So the doctors found Graham hatful, he's an expert on phases at the university of Pittsburgh using genetic. Approaches with genome engineering were able to assemble this collection of three Phages

Phages Graham Hatful Rob Stein Cornell Holdaway University Of Pittsburgh London
Joann Fabric asks customers to sign petition over tariffs

KDWN Programming

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Joann Fabric asks customers to sign petition over tariffs

"The, national chain JoAnn fabrics has created an online petition asking customers to support the privately held, companies efforts to, obtain exemptions for tariffs on products imported from China, a spokesperson for the Ohio based chain said Thursday more than, twenty thousand, people. Have, signed the petition since Monday a Joanne's Amanda hey says the twenty-five percent tariffs target hundreds of, imported products, from, China and sold the. US customers including fabrics fleece and

President Trump Donald Trump Andrew Cuomo Michael Cohen Us Bank New Jersey China Mike Pence Rudy Giuliani York Attorney Vice President Nasa Senator California New York Ohio
Virginia city could be under 17 feet of water in 7 minutes if dam fails

Joel Riley

02:48 min | 2 years ago

Virginia city could be under 17 feet of water in 7 minutes if dam fails

"To get a look into by, OSU trustees, appointed panel current OSU trustees a former Ohio house speaker into former. US attorney will convene to help the university worth through the investigation board members. Alex Fisher Janet porter and, Alex Shumate or on. The panel it also includes former house speaker JoAnn Davidson former deputy attorney general Craigmore furred and former US attorney. Carter Stewart the group will provide consultation and direct the work of the invest Live team Jared, Allen, NewsRadio six ten, WTVN there's a media blackout on the, Ohio State campus when it comes to the urban Meyer case not such a, good idea says MARCY Fleischer with Fleischer communications group she talked with ABC community that isn't going to, stop because they don't get information but on the other side former OSU. Football player will be Stillwell says people at Ohio State. Me to do their work for people to not consider what are what our Justice, system, is, considered a due process at minimum give them due process evacuations are underway in Lynchburg Virginia where, a damn might, fail and flood the city officials are warning people to get a high ground because the heavy rain could cause the, college lake, dam to fail at any time emergency services officials. Say if the dam fails parts, of Lynchburg, could be under seventeen feet of water in just a few minutes. The Trump administration's proposing to roll back Obama era rules that would Require automakers to, produce more. Fuel-efficient cars the White House says those requirements Britain to raise prices on news car new cars, and discouraged sales at the same time ABC Stephanie ebbs covers the. EPA she says the administration claims a fuel efficiency rules could cost lives Trump administration. Is now saying that they, actually think there's a safety argument that that's more important cars have gotten more expensive so people aren't buying new ones they are keeping their old cars or buying used cars on the road for. Longer periods of time. Which they say causes more accidents, and ultimately more traffic deaths so they. Have looked at the environmental benefit and this potential for saving lives are making the roads more safe and they say that that argument actually went out White House, press, secretary Sarah Sanders will, not refute President Trump's claim that the news media is the enemy of the people, Sanders saying in a heated briefing with reporters yesterday it's ironic Jim That not only you and the media attacked the president for his rhetoric when they frequently lower. The level of conversation in this country Sanders also accused the media regularly attacking her personally earlier in the day I daughter. Ivanka Trump said she doesn't believe. News reporters, are the enemy of the people Ohio retailers are participating. Again in the state sales tax holiday which marks its first year being permanent starting today shoppers will not be charged sales..

Trump Administration OSU President Trump Lynchburg Us Attorney Ohio Sarah Sanders ABC White House Marcy Fleischer Alex Fisher Janet Porter Ohio State Fleischer Communications Alex Shumate Joann Davidson Barack Obama
"joann" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Sex joann crown stop fair that's cool sex and clough how sexy.

"joann" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on Channel 33

"In writing they knew each other yeah there is there he has this fascinating godly but not egotistical pursuit and how do you balance like what's real and what's not real about it because he's a human being yeah i think that was the key the key thing is like it would be so easy to to sanctify somebody like fred rogers and to be very hagi graphic about it but in fact of his joann rogers mrs rogers who's in the film hoy adore is very charming she's great and actually not at all like fred to you know if fred was very kind of prim teetotalling vegetarian she's she's the opposite of this off the cuff she's fun and you could see how they worked together as a couple but she said to me early on you know don't make fred into a saint and i think that's people always thought of ms twodimensional they didn't understand the depth because he did a show that was simple in deep but people often mistake simple for superficial he felt like people didn't understand that he has dimensional person and distinctive name is also to treat them as a twodimensional person that somehow he wasn't human and didn't struggle and what you realize what i came to realize in making the film early on was that he was a tortured artist really underneath it you know the letters he wrote the memos he wrote the doubt he had about twenty knowing in the same like imposter syndrome that every artist has the same frustrations with their ability to succeed what what what was noggin him i mean i think he said it over and over i mean whatever he was trying to address in children and whatever fears they had whatever needs they had he was really trying to address an himself i mean when he talked to children he was trying to talk to his own childhood self in many ways for playing kind of an armchair psychologist you can't help it do it even as you're.

fred rogers mrs rogers joann rogers
"joann" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Your children we call this here are urban word of the day it's time for the urban word of the day fan right now more hit on the street i can't understand a word you're saying serving day now i've got an intern joann and i've got my other producer name alonzo so we call them the wine cran because he's just a quite the dresser youngsters twenty two and twenty they told me in urban word today because we were discussing this situation about the basketball gm who set up fake accounts and they said oh like fin sta and i said what spinster fenced is your fake instagram account that you put together so everybody could see a wonderful your life is and how pg it is then you got your other account where everybody knows how rated are you really are i said oh this said yeah finn stuff is your urban word of the day thank you for saying that dated urban slain so that our understand that there was the urban were of the day we damn stretch your cranium this whole thing with the gm a with the he's the gm bryan colangelo of of the seventy sixers and it's a weird thing that came out the other day that apparently there are several foe burner accounts of twitter that he has set up or somebody that's close to him potentially his wife is what it's looking like that has set up and is saying basically pillow talk probably about how much he doesn't like certain players how you know what their injury reports are how weak they are how bad they are all of these things it's it's it's an honest thing but it's coming from fake accounts and it's been found out you can't do that you can't no like what are you doing you're grown man coming up next little tech talk paul joins us straight edge chad benson show have you ever taken.

joann gm bryan colangelo sixers twitter paul intern producer alonzo basketball instagram finn chad benson
"joann" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on Giants of History

"But once cleopatra reached the outer walls of rome caesar's representatives would have met her and acted as her escorts now in rome at this time and i found this incredibly interesting cesar had instituted what author dr joann fletcher referred to as quote a park and ride system caesar's decree reads quote from sunrise until dusk no transport cart wagon or chariot of any form would be allowed within the precincts of rome and quote and there were apparently no exceptions to this rule so basically if it was daytime you had to park your carriage or chariot or what have you outside of rome proper and walk to your destination thus it is put forward that cleopatra either arrived after dark so that her caravan could travel through the streets of rome or she was carried by litter from the caravan to her destination either way the scene must have been a wild one as the queen of egypt and sacira her son by julius caesar finally arrived in rome and we can safely assume that the day she finally arrived in rome cleopatra must have been consumed by feelings of joy and excitement given that she was finally getting to see caesar again and introduce him to his son we can also safely assume that the feelings cleopatra would be consumed by on the day she finally leaves rome almost two years in the future would be very different that day would be a very dark day for cleopatra indeed.

rome cesar dr joann fletcher cleopatra egypt julius caesar two years
"joann" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Was a prager it was a moment from heidi we needed bat let's gil joann let's give joann the last word from the call us i joann good how are you on the flip side of the mathurin outrage is the massive import of information that we have in but second we know something of happening immediately where you know a decade ago we find out later and i don't think we had such access to the hot button response so true and added to that i don't know if you heard earlier joann not only we do we have access to the information but now on that very same device where we get the information we can take a moment and type away our views and share them with the world do not agree with that yes i do i do and the information that we get immediately isn't always accurate and not a there's not a delay what we here and what we react jerk reactions to things that we don't zad or we don't necessarily look into enough i've been guilty of that before i'd been to where we see a headline and it's like oh we need to have a pause joann another wonderful point think you for adding to the conversation thing coveting ju joann was sitting we okay that was the irian informative are much authors are very very smart yet yes i we're very sorry but our show is so outsmart ovechkin never right large we do have our mobile phones let there you their view and barbarous william okay we have a half price deal who is the half price oh yes okay this is called these zero hour escape room in two and it's two tickets for the price of one so yeah you can solve puzzles cracked the codes escaped the room in one hour and it's it's.

heidi ovechkin gil joann william zero hour one hour
"joann" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"No no yes i'm putting you on hold because you're smarter than that joann don't be tome don't don't resort to being dumb joann to defend trump when i say that i have 93 interns across the hall from me in a window liz trailed by twelve room hey joann i'm kidding when i say that eight billion people listened to me every night joann i'm kidding he and bragged the other about night in joann wide bout when i said thirty thousand the people number of were people at our who view watch wing party that speech joe when i was kitty dopey stupid don't peace to bid now why would he to do fend that trump all you want again and good i'll trump let bad you trump defend trump why does all he you do this want why does he need to do this but don't be stupid gave a great speech don't be stupid that's good trump there's gave a difference an inspirational speech between that's somebody could trump kitten around gave and a positive somebody speech putting talked it out about there cops as and a military fact now god i'm and gonna put you family back on joann in national anthem and flag it are was you there a wonder yet falls fairly speech common you know the different but this you're morning better than i bad trump i got it europe he brags but also to am bring lies it maybe about he was quitting it being and the you most know what you were watched a former congressman state of joann the union speech maybe ever he was kitty donald trump was he kidding about sent the crowd size out a tweet this cut it morning out the president of the united states cut it out sent out a tweet let me this go to van morning save vince that was a lie habeen jio again i'm you know why you actually why would he a do great that example of what my call about to be uh trump will put that kind of thing out there because he knows your average citizen who may not necessarily follow politiques as close as ahmad of us do not believe that who say it and people just repeat it and then when as certain news media compounds as well there's actually not term you know your average so big cellnet we landestheater what you're saying vinh says he purposely lies about stuff like this.

joann liz joe kitty donald trump president united states vince congressman vinh
"joann" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"And bill hey laid down that is not going well zone cernan has died and god i am long and all dan husband died oh the man and his three oh man all right and though be they well it don't do on a deadbolt cigna joann loud people have loud anywhere men went bad don't be made of that eternal god that's on dealt them conveyed wounding him oh man let me let me about you break yeah ooh.

cernan joann
"joann" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"joann" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"The little stupid baggy thing that's on the leash that has the hopper in it that holds the little plastic bags in it it's empty writing it's empty open and you're looking here like her now you're like looking around a little me think off i take my shoe and i shall follow shovel old dirt on admiral mechanic beer batter or our market or comeback later on and i'll i'll come get it with the bag her that i that i get this is you know much junk how much trash routinely just throw on the passenger side on the floor my car just other's throats there and then later on at some point the week others get gas clean up when i give gasic what is that and like you said the spouse thus the last line of defence of these people like if you're the guy or girl who throws the stuff out the window the spouses the last line of like hey don't you that you do but that is exactly what are you that that's the last that's our vets are safety net after that it's well this joann join as a hero yeah i dedicate this show to you all shows to come to joann the here yeah i love that story all right also levers ziprecruiter man mm you need great talent for your business short on time don't get lost in a stack of resumes find the perfect hire you need smart tools used ziprecruiter ziprecruiter post your job to 100plus leading job boards with one click it's smart matching technology actively notify ice qualified candidates.

joann
"joann" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"joann" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Let's go to miss joann in southeast atlanta miss joann day welcomed yes good day the sean thank you for all dictate thank you want us to quit if he had on a few minutes ago talking about the program i think my by young man yesman exactly abetted carried i have a young lady and my family he needs to yeah okay they she that lack out teenager she's like in her early he's like he didn't have thirty okay he's a good kid but he just got cano we'll let me help you out here now she's in a third of she's not a kid now i know you made our so so was going on her life well he had been at any uh three of laugh okay and now she can come back home are i make a long story short you the moma ranki and we're trying to help her okay what kind of helped us unique well he need a ga okay i'm maybe pavley from job training a he has he already to have her hassler diplomacy get will that one year highly god actually we just need some help with you know so but it's hard to vanapa went by young lady is that way by no means you know let's do this let me put you on hold and i will give a mob reduce would give you my personal sale call me around three pm today okay why mukuye go ahead okay tend to seventy came up about uh uh uh but it corporate welfare outlay wine a day like any kind of bite that daphne analysis may have so basically corporate welfare is will terminology used to quantify win cooperation major corporations specific early received tax breaks and benefits by way of government grants to them so this is free money this is valuable to them oh and so when you talk about people get welfare meaning they get free money or they get government money let me now say free money because they painted to assist them what they it welfare is criticized what corporations get welfare is glorified oh asking what witted me okay yet this like somebody authorisation dan i have government contract date we could consider that commonwealth with well it appears will have they got those government contract sometimes they are receiving added bonuses tax breaks all of it is.

joann cano moma ranki atlanta one year
"joann" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"joann" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"That in just a moment first we'll check your why i download with joann bauer yeah did you hear what happened senator ted he's calling it a damn thing is a he says that it was like causes official twitter account senior she'll sounds like pornographic video this happened early this morning in the texas republican says that multiple members of a staff actually have access to this account and he tells us hoarders today that this action with mistake saying that it was not deliberate any out the sat and at that this is pretty clever he just reporters saying perhaps you should have posted something like this during nap indiana primary as you might learn more attention yeah the lootings out of the complaints that he received that he just didn't enough media tang said well it so he he likes a pornographic tweet from and thank you ted cruz for introducing us to another uh porn twitter account is that was one i hadn't found yet have you ever try to just kind of expand when you're looking to porn on twitter and then you end up accidentally hitting the the heart button deal that i like that i need a unlike that very quickly i've never look at planning missing nothing evidently ted cruz as neither it's only his staffers how does the of a verified accounts if he's not the one posting things that's bs right verified nobody else post crap for me to hear about this guy gone oxygen clad actor knocked off might as well clinton i'm glad then dan's youngest son facing charges this happened during tempe rely tmz reporting that the 21yearold is his name is nicklaus dan barnum burn was arrested yesterday actually sunday in arizona basically he was holding his roommate at night flames and police say that dams kid basically punched the elevator in the his building hurt first had he and pretty bad the cops are called they arrive at its doors roommate answers that door while that sent him into a rampage apparently mad that it through millions at the door gas so the roommate claims that dad van den berg grabbed a nice the roommate was able to get away however ma'am barnum berg was arrested he faces assault and drug charges in that cops had the body came onto the g so there's audio on it yeah this is a dilemma ceiling at the spirit all right.

twitter tempe arizona van den berg barnum berg assault joann bauer senator ted official texas indiana ted cruz clinton dan