20 Burst results for "Joan Williams"

"joan williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:10 min | Last month

"joan williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"William was a very fine Tuller. Joan William was a very fine shot took aim. Didn't think about his brother. This'd insanity has got to stop. This insanity has got to stop. This insanity is got don't want Two songs from the album Ghosts of Our former Selves. A remarkable song cycle by the composer Eric Jostle. Oh, eric, you mentioned before. You know, you don't generally write songs now you've written the whole song cycle. Does this feel like some kind of Watershed moment for you like now. I can write songs and that's all I will or or is this a one off? You know, it feels like watershed moment. I think that's well put it. This is a A convergence of Of different streams of my life. Really? That's the way it feels. I you know, I started off like a lot of people of my generation being just deeply affected by the Beatles and hearing it wasn't Beatlemania was hearing the harmony. You know the way that they used courts that got under my skin, and I was You know, whatever, eight years old and too young to know what that was about, But I wanted it on. I pursued it. And then I end up writing, you know, learning about jazz loving it writing big band charts. And eventually that led me into becoming the composer and learning about contemporary classical music and electric Kristen music going through graduate school and now having a whole career teaching composition. But along the way, I actually wrote a lot of songs, but they were really art songs. What I didn't do was write lyrics. I just got this in my head, very young that I just was not good at writing lyrics, but I said poetry by amazing poets by And Sexton by Robert Creeley, who are current got to correspond with a little bit about that with John Berman and then having done song, writing in a folk tradition with my wife for 10 years. Right. I got that inside and started singing back up. And all of that, you know, came together in this project and I, you know, I think now all those pieces will Circle around in different ways. Moving forward moving ahead. Well, we we heard two excerpts in that last set Ghost of John William and proceeding that ghosts that greet me in the shower Your wife, Barbara Cassidy on consigned to backing vocals in in that case. Um, we're speaking with Eric Castle. Oh, the composer about his song cycle that the album called Ghost of Our former Selves will continue with a couple of very different sounding pieces in just a moment. I'm John Schaefer. And you're listening to new sounds..

Joan William John William Eric Castle And Sexton Eric Jostle John Schaefer Beatles John Berman Barbara Cassidy Kristen Robert Creeley
The Voice Of Hunger Games - Sunna Wehrmeijer

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:52 min | 3 months ago

The Voice Of Hunger Games - Sunna Wehrmeijer

"Sauna. So yes. Yes. Okay. I am not even going to attempt your last name. That seems a general consensus. So please enlighten us. Lear mayor. Veer Maher okay. Yes. When you hear it. It's much easier to latch onto versus when you just see the spelling. SIMBA RANDOM H is in there too. You know you don't expect. So. You are quite the composer with a long list of projects that you have worked on and accolades and. including the nomination most recently or is this my looking to emmy nomination? Yes. Eh need the any. Nomination was very recent. Yes. Yes. Okay. There you go. Well, amazing to have you on the crew musician podcast. Taking the time. Thank you. Absolutely as we just discussed I believe you are true superwoman with three young children. Composition career and a studio that you're building. I mean, wow, you're juggling. Yeah definitely. Juggling. Dropping dropping lots of balls don't worry. You're crushing a lot of them too. So I think it all goes hand in hand absolutely, and we met through Derek Jones over mega tracks right? That's right. Right. So thank you Derek for that. Okay. I have a few questions that I like to go through. The each episode and it varies as we go and heard the guest but basically I just want us to be a fun conversation about you and your love of music and how. You. I got bit by the Bug Music Buck. You know talk a little bit about your history and what that was like. Well, should I stay You from the Netherlands. I'm from the Netherlands. Yes. I mean. Yeah Yeah. It is also actually. I love being dirt, it's great. I can say all kinds of stuff from this blame it on being. Young, I mean I definitely started. I mean Dick and around for lack of a better you know. Word at the piano at a young age is coming up with little tunes. I never thought I would actually do this as a living before i. MOVED TO LA three. I studied composition. and The Netherlands but also because I didn't really know what else to do I never fault I could actually. Be a composer. Until I set foot in La and just. Smelled the air and was really inspired by. Everybody around me. But But. The The music bug was definitely I mean being from the Netherlands is great because it's a great country but. I mean, there's a reason. Probably there's no word for film scoring. It's untransparent like scoring a film like the verb doesn't exist. Because there's not that much made and I felt very. I didn't fit in at the compositions because nobody likes Joan Williams nobody likes. Nobody like, Melody. That was just not thing the thing to do and I love all those things. That's what I you know. That's why live for. So I never really fitted in like I said until until I went to a found. So many people who felt the same so I think. I'm very happy I went and stayed for. A long time. Well, that's awesome because US Americans you know oftentimes, we can be so single minded. So it's nice to have people from other parts of the world come in and bring different perspectives and newfound appreciation for the the craft itself yeah I mean I. Love. I love the American view on film and Music. You know I think it's suits me much better than. The continental sound. That's great. Yeah. Did you have? Did you have a primary instrument that you were always more drawn to growing up and in school or? I, mean, I play piano That's my. Thing is I wouldn't call myself a pianist. It's the thing that I play to to us to impose on I used to play guitar when I was younger sixteen and stuff but I. Know it's not something I ever. Want my thing. I mean, piano is still my go-to thing. I like to sort of mess around on instruments but I. Think. Someone said one. The the worst musician you are the better composer you are. They probably said that they were terrible musician themselves. I, I'm. Not. I don't I don't play much for fun. If that makes sense I composed for fun you know

Melody The Netherlands Derek Jones Veer Maher LA United States Emmy Lear Dick Joan Williams
Trump-appointed justice could signal major Supreme Court shift on abortion

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:36 min | 4 months ago

Trump-appointed justice could signal major Supreme Court shift on abortion

"Is likely to dominate the confirmation hearing for President Trump's latest Supreme Court appointee. KCBS political reporter dug, Sovereign says If the new court overturns Roe v. Wade abortion would remain legal in California, but probably not in a number of other states. You see Hastings distinguished long Professor Joan Williams, a renowned feminist legal scholar. Has no doubt Roe v. Wade will overshadow all else during confirmation of President Trump's nominee to succeed with Bater Ginsberg, and that could alter the outcome of the election. On the one hand it could cut for Democrats. If this galvanizes the suburban voters that were already trending for Biden and younger voters who have Not been homage to say politely. They have not been over the galvanized, um, On the other hand, this could really hurt. Biden's in among the voters. Those 80,000 voters, white working class voters who delivered the last election to Trump, Williams says. If a more conservative court tosses out the federally guaranteed the right to an abortion, women won't be able to get one and as many as 30 states in America's Heartland states that are certain where abortion pretty certain proportion abortion would remain legal. They're basically on the East Coast on the West Coast. California is so heavily Democratic. It's hard to imagine any changes to abortion law here. But on our show, the state of California, Williams said many women in the Midwest and South would have to drive hundreds, even thousands of miles to obtain a safe legal abortion, which means they wouldn't Doug Sovereign

President Trump Professor Joan Williams California ROE Biden Wade Supreme Court Doug Sovereign Reporter East Coast Bater Ginsberg Hastings West Coast Midwest America
"joan williams" Discussed on Cincy Jungle

Cincy Jungle

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Cincy Jungle

"The <hes> with the position but hopefully those guys that do not get overlooked like some other bengals in for hall of Fame Contention Gosh John Dewey. We need to go here. <hes> we've been talking about some positivity and trying to trying to think back to some bengals greats in now as we kind of look at the news cycle there is no news but also kind of bad news with Clint Boling. I suppose more more of implied news. I guess Yes <hes> we've talked about the the offensive line ad nauseam especially since Joan Williams if it was found out a couple of weeks ago that he will be missing the two thousand nine hundred and season with a shoulder injury. We don't fully know what's going on with Clint boling probably quite honestly it's probably something very similar to Jona wins. We've heard murmurs of a shoulder issue and it could be a thing much like what the bengals were trying to do. Maybe it's something that they are seeing if it Kinda either heals on its own or is something that he feels that without <unk> strenuous work and rest maybe can get you a point where he can play through it for this final year of his contract without needing surgery again. That's speculation on my part. We have not really been given a lot of information on this but <hes> a recent report from Paul Dana Junior who is now with the athletic <hes> Gosh. What did it say John? Basically it's mum's kind of the word and it's not really looking good <hes> <unk>. I guess is kind of the the crux of the the information there. It's as I've been told the Club is still trying to get a handle on bowling's injury. I don't really know what that means considering been sidelined with. 'em Discos issue throughout the off season. None of that sounds very good. Yeah so instead of you know we could sit here and we guitar. Christian Western is going to get his shot at left guard and all this kind of stuff. I think especially really now with John. Williams Joe Williams twenty twenty campaign right. I mean that's we have to work to that now. <hes> how much of an emphasis does this now yet again place on the offensive line to be invested in next year next off season. I you know I hate to look to next offseason but that's really where the bengals are probably going to need to make adjustments you now have court Glenn another year older at that point Jean Claude bolling whether he plays or not this year free agent. Joan Williams finally hopefully coming back a lot of fluidity there I mean is that now does this now place offensive line as the primary priority see for next offseason given bowling and Joan Williams or is a quarterback. Is it wide receiver with A._J.. Green potentially leaving in free agency WET wet. What's what's the game plan here yeah and when you think something with the bengals injuries bad it's typically worse and it's funny how they're the only team with an M._R._i.? In the stadium I think it's just like branly implemented. These things keep happening but yeah I think we can just basically seeing the worst or Quin bowling right now. <hes> Joe good bears told bovine multiple sources that is just not looking good at all and he's product could be on the team coming up in the season and just you know about a month bag we were talking about this exact situation in how the potential benefits of removing bowling from the roster altogether could and put them in better than for the long term and I think when you're talking about potentially invest in further in the offense line it's going to be at that position and I think the optimum investment right now is looking to be Christian Westerman because again the small sample sizes concerning only only about two hundred career snaps for him but they've been two hundred quality snaps.

bengals Clint Boling Joan Williams John Dewey Joe Williams Christian Westerman Jean Claude bolling Paul Dana Junior Quin Glenn
White supremacist executed for dragging black man to death

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

White supremacist executed for dragging black man to death

"An American white supremacist Joan William king convicted of killing an African American in Noto aureus hate crime two decades ago has been executed in Texas one of king's accomplices was executed in twenty eleven another was given a life sentence. He is Chris Butler Joan William king was one of three white supremacists. Who kidnapped and kill James Burr junior. Forty nine year old black man was hitchhiking. Jasper in Texas when they chained to the back of pickup truck and dragged him for three miles. Then dumped his body in front of an American church twenty years after being convicted of the motor king was given a lethal injection at the state's death chamber in Huntsville in a statement, the bird family said king's death was just punishment

Joan William King Texas James Burr Noto Jasper Chris Butler Huntsville Forty Nine Year Twenty Years Two Decades
"joan williams" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

Tony the Movie Guy

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

"Well, that's a good question. I mean, it depends on your process, you know, and it also depends largely on how the director works because a lot of directors will use what's called temp music, which is they take other music scores from other films, and they cut them in this. And then you kind of have and they added to them, and it's also yelich reference for the complete. Right. This is kind of what I'm going for. And it's kinda starts talking point of where to go. So that's usually how it would go. And then from there composer would usually use a sample ivories and sentenced to kind of mock up as best as he can the score, and what should sound like different instruments again genuine question, set, the tone on the mood of the like if you want if something's violent scene or. Dramatic or emotional different instruments. Like, you were talking about lot of Besson, you know, for like Star Wars or something. Like does that come into definitely does? Yeah. I mean, there's so many factors. I mean instruments have naturally kind of their tone. Yeah. Kind of what they might be good at like, you probably won't use a Piccolo or something and a big dramatic senior. Delicate. But again, I think there will be blood and like that music is just weird. It's all over the place. Right. There will be blood, obviously. I mean, it draws a lot more from twentieth century composers star Meeks slides there's all sorts stuffing kind of pulling from Pendarovski and other twentieth century museum. He's a twentieth century composer. Well known in the field. Yeah. Okay. Cool. And. You know, he just uses a lot more his music is also like the shining, for example, you know, it's like. That you. That you've heard a lot. So I don't really know what Jonny Greenwood's processes. I'd be curious to you know. But I'm sure just working with the director. He probably had ideas of what he's looking for you, probably Johnny kind of try some things or decent things. You know? No one team, especially the NC again spoilers. No. I'm done. Yeah. Like, I like you're bringing me back like, it's cool. And this is a testament to how resonant these music schools on. So these are great picks because I'm thinking these films and these films everyone's seen that doesn't times. I and the music out to me. Yeah. It's interesting because like demoing that sort of music for director is harder than demoing standard film music. I can only with brass and the strings are kind of playing whatever it's easier to make it sound closer to what it'll sound like with samples and get that approved whereas something like this. I'd be curious how he did that, you know, can he probably brought in some musicians to you know. Record some things or who knows. You know? Crazy. That's awesome. Okay. Great pick. All right. My next one. So this is kind of my my other boy, like Joan Williams is my favorite music composer hands. Zimmer is probably my second inception. Yeah. Do you like the movie, I do do you like the school? The score is great the school. Like, that's one way you're elevated the movie and beyond the movie people fell in love with the school. I know so many of my friends who just love the music. Definitely I think inception in interstellar private gray and then dot night as well. Right, which incredible that's hands or as well. The reason I'm most kind of putting those together. Because again, I might have hands him on his the elements of those the score to me is it's quite similar in each of those movies, actually, inception into Stella and the dot night. I think inception is the most unique that like that. That nine minute track time. It's cool. Right. That became really popular on its own. Yeah. That's beautiful piece. No the score for that is is incredible. And also just how thoughtful it is in terms of you know, he was thinking about the different layers inception and kind of working out what that would be in terms of the film score. You know? Mentioned into Stella. I mean, we could spend probably an hour and a half a fan of the movie music incredible. That actually have true offender that move. I've had like knock down drag outs. So people. Infuriates me because there's so many good things about that filming clearly like that comb because you you're grinning, Geeta cheek band, not necessarily very controversial film in that sense. Like, so many potholes people..

director Pendarovski Zimmer Jonny Greenwood Stella Joan Williams Besson Meeks NC Johnny nine minute
"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And the the the fact is there are a lot of situations, for example, someone with diabetes needs to take breaks to eat. Well, somebody who is extremely nauseated because of pregnancy needs to take breaks eat, what's the difference? And what we have seen is that employers who Commodore the person with diabetes often don't accommodate the person with with the pregnancy in blue-collar context. And I think about what Joey. Hannah said she said, we can do the work. I remember reading one woman saying, I can do the work. It's the men I can't take. And that's exactly what Joanna was saying that often blue-collar contexts women can do the work, but the employer my sense in reading hundreds of these cases is the employer didn't want to hire. These in the first place and so- figures. Great I'm just going to wait until they're pregnant, then I can force them out on leave and fire them. And that's what the young persis- UPS decision began to put an end to Jessica, silver, Greenberg and Natalie kitchen have there there have been attempts since at least twenty twelve right to provide some kind of upgrade or modernization of laws around pregnancy in the workplace there. There have been so Joan mentioned the pregnant workers fairness act, and that's been the kind of centerpiece. Of efforts to strengthen the federal law fill in the gaps that the that exist in the pregnancy Discrimination Act there have been efforts since so every congressional sessions since twenty twelve lawmakers have introduced the pregnant workers fairness act, so far it has not made it out of committee. So it has not made it out of the help committee, which stands for health and labor and pensions. I'm not going to get the exact terms, right? But it's never had a hearing. And it has bipartisan support it now has bipartisan support kind of not ironically. But interestingly, the chairman of that committee Lamar Alexander, his home state is where x PEO where that X peo- warehouses base, Tennessee. And so, but you're saying that it hasn't actually sort of advanced to any it hasn't ever had even advanced to a vote or debate. It's never been put on the floor. No. It's you're right. It's never it's never had a hearing. Okay. So Joan Williams just hop back to you here. I mean is what you see in in in this proposal, even if it's not going anywhere in congress yet is it taking us in the right direction. In the right direction. And in fact, something like twenty two states already have similar provisions. There should be a national law that says workers or sometimes women women sometimes get pregnant, and you have to accommodate them when they do on the other hand, I think it's really important to recognize that pregnant women or ready do have sweeping rights and actually have rights, even if the employer has accommodated nobody else potentially under the Americans with Disabilities Act. So any pregnant worker who was in a situation like those described in the article or listening, please go to pregnant at work to to ensure that you can exercise the legal rights that you have because pregnant workers already have a lot of rights under existing law that nothing don't need a new law because situation is very complicated. Simplify it for employers and employees just Natalie though, I wonder I mean, you spoke to so many women in the process of reporting. This story. Even with what Joan Williams just said that the ADA might cover a a lot of women in in accommodations. They could need a while pregnant. I imagined that you ran into folks who were saying, well, I'm hesitant to ask. Because of how my employer might see me. I'm hesitant in terms of. I don't want them to to reduce my pay or limit my future. Vance -ment or just that it would change sort of how they're seeing in the workplace, which then could have future affects even after their children are born. So right. So the women that we talked to were overwhelmingly women who as you point out Magna there in jobs that they need desperately. They're making close to minimum wage, they have very little resources they are pregnant at the most vulnerable moment in their life. They are sick. They're nauseated. They are lifting heavy boxes every day, and they need pay. Check and they need.

Joan Williams diabetes Natalie Hannah Joey Lamar Alexander Joanna congress chairman Tennessee Vance -ment Jessica ADA Greenberg
"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And the the the fact is there are a lot of situations, for example, someone with diabetes needs to take breaks to eat. Well, somebody who is extremely nauseated because of pregnancy needs to take breaks eat, what's the difference? And what we have seen is that employers who Commodore the person with diabetes often don't accommodate the person with with the pregnancy in blue-collar context. And I think about what Joey. Hannah said she said, we can do the work. I remember reading one woman saying, I can do the work. It's the men I can't take. And that's exactly what Joanna was saying that often blue-collar contexts women can do the work, but the employer my sense in reading hundreds of these cases is the employer didn't want to hire. These in the first place and so- figures. Great I'm just going to wait until they're pregnant, then I can force them out on leave and fire them. And that's what the young persis- UPS decision began to put an end to Jessica, silver, Greenberg and Natalie kitchen have there there have been attempts since at least twenty twelve right to provide some kind of upgrade or modernization of laws around pregnancy in the workplace there. There have been so Joan mentioned the pregnant workers fairness act, and that's been the kind of centerpiece. Of efforts to strengthen the federal law fill in the gaps that the that exist in the pregnancy Discrimination Act there have been efforts since so every congressional sessions since twenty twelve lawmakers have introduced the pregnant workers fairness act, so far it has not made it out of committee. So it has not made it out of the help committee, which stands for health and labor and pensions. I'm not going to get the exact terms, right? But it's never had a hearing. And it has bipartisan support it now has bipartisan support kind of not ironically. But interestingly, the chairman of that committee Lamar Alexander, his home state is where x PEO where that X peo- warehouses base, Tennessee. And so, but you're saying that it hasn't actually sort of advanced to any it hasn't ever had even advanced to a vote or debate. It's never been put on the floor. No. It's you're right. It's never it's never had a hearing. Okay. So Joan Williams just hop back to you here. I mean is what you see in in in this proposal, even if it's not going anywhere in congress yet is it taking us in the right direction. In the right direction. And in fact, something like twenty two states already have similar provisions. There should be a national law that says workers or sometimes women women sometimes get pregnant, and you have to accommodate them when they do on the other hand, I think it's really important to recognize that pregnant women or ready do have sweeping rights and actually have rights, even if the employer has accommodated nobody else potentially under the Americans with Disabilities Act. So any pregnant worker who was in a situation like those described in the article or listening, please go to pregnant at work to to ensure that you can exercise the legal rights that you have because pregnant workers already have a lot of rights under existing law that nothing don't need a new law because situation is very complicated. Simplify it for employers and employees just Natalie though, I wonder I mean, you spoke to so many women in the process of reporting. This story. Even with what Joan Williams just said that the ADA might cover a a lot of women in in accommodations. They could need a while pregnant. I imagined that you ran into folks who were saying, well, I'm hesitant to ask. Because of how my employer might see me. I'm hesitant in terms of. I don't want them to to reduce my pay or limit my future. Vance -ment or just that it would change sort of how they're seeing in the workplace, which then could have future affects even after their children are born. So right. So the women that we talked to were overwhelmingly women who as you point out Magna there in jobs that they need desperately. They're making close to minimum wage, they have very little resources they are pregnant at the most vulnerable moment in their life. They are sick. They're nauseated. They are lifting heavy boxes every day, and they need pay. Check and they need.

Joan Williams diabetes Natalie Hannah Joey Lamar Alexander Joanna congress chairman Tennessee Vance -ment Jessica ADA Greenberg
"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Natalie with the code reporters of this New York Times, special series on pregnancy discrimination, just Connecticut. I'm going to ask you. Really patient here. I just wanted to get a lot of those additional stories, but I'm gonna ask you to stand by for one more minute here because I want to introduce Joan Williams into the conversation. She's a professor of law at the university of California Hastings and director of the center for work life law there. And she joins us today from San Francisco, Joan Williams, welcome to on point. So the big question here now after we've heard the extensive reporting from Jessica and Natalie and those three stories from women who just called us is what rights do pregnant women have in the workplace to ask for combinations. I mean, there is a there is a law from nineteen seventy eight on the books. What does that law purportedly do are actually to odd native women far more rights than people typically. No, they have the pregnancy Discrimination Act, which is the law from the seventies says that if you accommodate on people who aren't pregnant, very often, you have to accommodate people. Well, you always you have to accommodate people who are and that may give you additional rights. But the other law is the Americans with Disabilities Act. Now, the pregnancy is not a disability, but a lot of the conditions. Instant pregnancy are disabilities. For example, lots of women get carpal ta. Tunnel as a result of pregnancy. So it doesn't make any sense that you have to accommodate women with carpal tunnel, which is a known disability so long as they, it's not incident to pregnancy. So for many of the kinds of conditions that women typically need accommodations, they're entitled to combinations under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Even if the pregnancy Discrimination Act doesn't help. Jessica and Natalie reported where women were told they were at risk of miscarriage and that that risk was exacerbated because of the nature of the the highly physical labor they were doing. I mean, that's not necessarily a disability, it's a risk. So wh. What rights did they have. It depends on a medical condition, and this is exactly why we need a federal law that addresses directly the need the women's need for accommodations. It's it's been proposed. It's called the pregnant workers fairness act. But depending on the specific conditions they had, they might well have been entitled to accommodations e one under one of these existing laws. The problem is it's a patchwork, it's very complicated. We actually have a website at work nice law to help it's called pregnant at work to help pregnant women know what their rights are, and we have a website to help doctors get them disability, the disability leave or disability accommodations if they need it, but it's really complicated. That's why we need a law, Jessica. About thirty seconds here before the break. But as far as I understand it, the major loophole in laws, it stands right now is if a company doesn't offer a combination to anyone, they don't have to accom- offer accommodations to pregnant women. That's right. Yeah. I mean, and the women in the warehouse, you know, they didn't have any specific condition. They were just told that the having, I mean, in some cases, they had high risk pregnancies. Some had given birth Preterm before, but these were women who were in a workplace that did not accommodate anyone. So that workplace had no obligation under federal law to accommodate them. We'll Natalie kitchen with Jessica silver Greenberg and professor Joan Williams. Hang on here for just a second. We gotta take a quick break. We're talking about pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. We'll be right back. I'm making the chocolate bar dean. This is on point..

Jessica silver Greenberg Joan Williams Natalie professor of law New York Times university of California Hasti Connecticut San Francisco director accom professor thirty seconds
"joan williams" Discussed on The College Draft with Ross Tucker

The College Draft with Ross Tucker

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on The College Draft with Ross Tucker

"So I do like Joan Williams, honestly. He's one of the best overall players I've studied in the country and I, I don't know how you like them compared to trae atoms and some of these other guys that you studied. But I really, really liked Jona Williams. So I really liked them. Also, it's interesting. I watched parts of the national championship against Georgia end the semifinal again in. So I watched parts of both. He actually reminds me, I don't think he's quite this athlete, but and maybe it's just the number seventy three. But he reminds me a lot of Joe Thomas like a lot. I think same body type. They look the same in their past sets. They both have short arms. He looks like he's short arms to me. I hurt them same thing. Yeah, I think I think it was the Georgia game. He got beat on outside club, but I think it was Lorenzo Carter. Or you know, he went with to hand punch Carter, wiped them both hang around down, went around him, you know, especially if you have short arms yet to be more of an independent puncher because you don't have enough time to recover if you miss. And so I but his past set was right on the money every time he's powerful. He's very good as in technique. I thought he had really good pad level and movement in the running gear from what I was watching. I wouldn't be surprised if he's like a Tonio, Zack, Martin, all pro guard type, Brandon sheriff something will might see him that way. Others might try him at tackle first. And his arm length might have something to do with it. Then I also saw against Clemson, it looked like he, he overset got beat inside for a second. I think he had inside help and..

Lorenzo Carter Jona Williams Joan Williams Georgia Joe Thomas Clemson Martin Brandon sheriff Tonio Zack
"joan williams" Discussed on The College Draft with Ross Tucker

The College Draft with Ross Tucker

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on The College Draft with Ross Tucker

"So one guy I studied last fall that I because I kind of heard that he there was a chance it could come out and he did decide to stay at school is John Lewis. He's six, four. He's two hundred and thirty plus pounds from the university of Florida. This kid is pretty interesting because he's at he's pretty quick in and out of breaks. He's better impasse bro than I thought he would considering his size just not was not used often as a receiver. So the athleticism is there, but I'd like to see more to pass targets for this kid, but I'd like to also see him get tacked on a little bit more wake it a little bit more. Str- get a little little bit stronger, but this kid's got upside. I was excited by what I saw from the other players at the. Tight end spiders a few names in the senior class KENDALL Blanton from Missouri CJ Conrad from Kentucky, and then foster Moro at LSU. I talked with Dan yet Ling the quarterbacks Millis you at the combine and link had nothing but good things to say about foster Moreau into said that he could be a breakout player for them because of all the hard work you put in an on and off the field that he's really high on what foster Moreau could be. So I'm excited to kind of see what he looks like with another year of development from the underclassmen ranks at you. Look at Irv Smith mala bama's one Dawson knocks from ole miss. This ole miss pass. Catching corps is really talented. Dawson notch slashed every single time every single game when I was watching that receiver trio lines up mostly in the slot. Just like Evan Ingram when he was there, he lines up in space. He never puts his hand in the dirties. He's going to be a space player a really smooth in and out of I thought he was a receiver when I was watching them. And then I look them up and I'm like, oh, he's a tight end. So you gotta look, Dawson Knox is a guy I expect to continue to be productive, and then Isaac now to from. The university of Georgia as well. Let's go online. The only guy got chance to check out his Joan Williams. Usually I go, I friend, I'm gonna let you go first. So this time. So I, I like Joan Williams. This kid is pretty technically sound. I would say that one issue I've got in terms of his technique is that in past bro, I think he can be a little bit wild with his punch. I think he can be a little bit tighter there and time is hands up a little bit better. But overall, I think he's pretty technically sound. He's really stout. You know, he's a guy that is not going to get pushed back into the pocket off, and I think he plays a pretty good pad level. He's six five. He's over three hundred pounds. He's got that position versatility is played right? Tackle as a freshman moved over left, tackle his sophomore year. I like a lot about. I'll be interesting what his arm link comes in at. But one thing I'd a little bit worried about, I think he's a little bit. I would say that he's more strong than he is powerful and the way it's funny, a strength coach. I know in the NFL I was talking to about this in the off-season. And I said, what's the the best way to explain the difference between strength and power? And he said, think about like water. He said power is like water coming out of a hose, you can't. You can't stop. We're coming out of a hose. It is going to move everything that's in front of it. That's power is a guy that can move people. Whereas strength is like ice a block of ice. You're not gonna. You're not going to be able to move is rock solid. It's not going anywhere. I kind of you that this kid Joan Williams more strength than he is power. He's not consistently blowing people up off the volume when he's got a good angle on a double team. He's not rocking guys back and driving them off the football. But when a guy comes out him with a bull rush, he's not getting collapsed. Back into the pocket either..

foster Moreau Joan Williams Dawson Knox John Lewis Evan Ingram Irv Smith university of Florida KENDALL Blanton LSU NFL Isaac Kentucky football CJ Conrad university of Georgia Dan Missouri Ling three hundred pounds
"joan williams" Discussed on FT Management

FT Management

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on FT Management

"Welcomes the f t podcast i'm emma jacobs and joining me today is joan williams founding director of the center for work life law and author of white working class over coming close clueless nece in america hello here is very nice to meet you last speaking to you on the phone few times about gender and work so what did you to combine the two areas of gender and class me sent you may gender nonissue again and also gender pay gap in the k followed that not as not closely but i know there's a big there's a large amount of attention that's being paid to it so let's start with the boat it sprung from a harvard business review article that you wrote the knights of trump's win indeed why did you write it because trump won i sort of had a feeling that trump was going to win in the last weeks of the election and so i began spending lots and lots of time down at hillary clinton's headquarters in the center of san francisco but of course nobody around me thought he was going to win so people are in shock i left an election night party at seven thirty and i happened to look at my email and i got an email from my hp our editor sarah greene who had been trying to get me to write about the election and i said i'm not going to do it it's just obvious what's happening the gender stuff that happened to hillary clinton was anybody could say it but then when trump won she said now you really have to write because you're one of the very few people who talks about both class and gender and so i went home and started writing and seven weeks later i finished the book i mean did you have an anxiety because you say in the book the introduction that you're not working class yourself.

emma jacobs joan williams trump hillary clinton san francisco sarah greene founding director america harvard business review hp editor seven weeks
"joan williams" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Business Daily

"Another straughter of sort of books taking they need to do i think if they're going to approach this box ticking they should not bother because it's not going to have any effect i mean on the vice interrupters website it we have very very concrete things that managers can do that may give you an example in basically every professional environment there's some work that's very highly valued and some work that's pretty undervalued and the undervalued work is what we call the office housework and women tend to get loaded up with it they also tend to do literal housework like planning parties and a lot of administrative work because what manages just think women to students to have to stay for it yes yeah exactly and when i gave it to a man and he did a terrible job so i'm going to give it to the woman what that really means is that there are cultural signals telling the man that if you do this poorly there will be no consequences everyone kind of expects you to do yeah and if their cultural signals telling the women if you do it poorly god help you if you're a manager of very concrete thing you can do is just sit down and jot down what is the glamour work in your environment and what is the office housework both the literal housework the administrative work and they undervalued work and then just run through your head and see our women doing a disproportionate amount of the office housework and if they are the very simple solution is just stabbed simple rotation easy peasy wealth soto that was professor joan williams on next guest of tackle gender inequality in business in their own way they all the british entrepreneur debbie wolves co and the fullness ceo of hearst and jones and they've set up a women only private members club in central london place for working women to meet a network is cool the old right and it's their onset to the gentlemen only clubs that have been a feature of.

ceo hearst professor joan williams jones
"joan williams" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Business Daily

"And the executive director of research group project implicit there's lots of evidence that you know people interpret events or situations differently depending on the race of the people who are involved in those situations there are political bias e is ability status by his sexual orientation by sees however she questions affective ness of unconscious or implicit bias training there's not very much evidence that having that knowledge will actually give people the tools that they need to change their behaviors in ways that prevent discrimination from occurring take the starbucks situation for example a much more direct route to producing the behavior someone wants is to simply tell the managers these are the specific situations in which it is and is not acceptable to call the police but starbucks in downtown washington this a mix of cynicism as well as pulsa tippety about the training i appreciate the fact that they knowledge that it was wrong but at the same time one is not enough to me recipes in ritual bass in it is a problem it is dead so if they are doing this just to make sure that everybody's off that's fine i support that i think that it's more of a public affairs gesture has done racial bias training on this scale before have successfully proves to be a test for corporate america adrian murray reporting that joan williams is professor of lourdes university of california she's also with the center of work life law at the university that they run a website called bias interrupters which advise his business on how to correct implicit bias in the workplace so does joan williams think a four hour often training session starbucks employees will make a difference a one shot implicit bias training generally is not effective at interrupting bias and that's because vice based on gender and race and also based on social class origin they're constantly being transmitted through companies through every time they hire through performance evaluations even in meetings if you would have starbucks what would you do if you if you want to do this on a more longterm basis employees of course receive all kinds of trainings for all kinds of things all the time and this biased.

executive director starbucks washington adrian murray joan williams professor lourdes university of californ four hour
"joan williams" Discussed on Stick to Football

Stick to Football

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Stick to Football

"Yeah so in this order is just don't read too much into the order of these guys just based on watching their teammates and seeing them who i really liked i ever sean gary at all nick bosa basically tied for that number one spot and they're all very different players nick bose's a true edge i think he is better than his brother joy was coming out ohio state rashawn gary probably going to be a three tech penetrator at oliver's just a comb rats on free no he's freakish he's scary good but i like joan williams left tackle from alabama a lot i like justin her the quarterback from oregon as well dexter lawrence the d lineman from clemson he is like bring on potential he's a huge man kind of like vida where he needs to show something to earn this ranking yep but i think the potentials there and then to offensive tackles trae atoms from washington and greg little from ole miss dream aunt joan's and other delighted from ohio state a kid we thought maybe could've come out this year and then also cleland farrell another edge out of clemson who may be also could come out this season god this is the first year where i recognize guys that were recruits now in the draft class when you said greg little i was like whoa and i'm gonna sick mellow on these quarterbacks tomorrow on his i'm very busy shitty day quarterback son they yeah they're not good less yours i hey it's watch sam darnold play after that huge rose bowl performance or josh rosen that we'd heard about for years and now it's hey watch drew lock get tore by texas.

sean gary josh rosen cleland greg justin ohio nick bose nick bosa texas washington clemson oregon alabama joan williams oliver
"joan williams" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"The it team working at the african union headquarters in a diesel boban made a startling discovery according to an article published in the french daily le monde last week it brings me to my question which country denied a report that it had been systematically spying on the african union's headquarters was that the united states russia china or france stay tuned in we'll tell you the correct answer my book of the week is white working class by joan williams a very smart caustic book that tries to understand the dynamic behind donald trump's legions of supporters the author tries to explain to america's elites why the working class resents them professionals who tell them how to live work get educated eat dress and behave it's tough love for a group that generally doesn't get much pushback the answer to the gps challenged question is see an investigation published in le monde found that african union it specialists will in the organisation's chinesebuilt headquarters discovered that a spike in web traffic had been occuring late every night when the building was empty over a period of five years the article alleges that the spike corresponded with transfers of data to servers in shanghai and that hidden microphones were also discovered in the building this week the chinese ambassador to the african union called the allegations preposterous an eu spokeswoman also dismissed thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week i was eunuchs.

african union united states china joan williams donald trump shanghai russia france america eu five years
"joan williams" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"In all because your report card your age don't make any difference when you have a stronger financial because he rip your inflows have played cashflow you know it's about the financial statement that really counts in the real world and the last thing as was the one the most melissa people always ask about network marketing right ollie's robert we wasn't lots and lots of questions about that and today our question is from joshua and he's from north carolina favorite book ritz dad guide to investing north carolina we have a radio station where our show today wbt bitterly as saying thank you yes said chow show at in north carolina again his question is this he says robert what is your opinion at network marketing businesses and what can i learn and gain from joining one while i love that question there because dial trauma the only guys at endorse network marketing 'cause we come from working class values now you know there's looked as a company called duluth trading and they talk about plumbers but i'm not a plumber that i do have a plumbers and airtime there make fun of the plumbers bought it in the working class guys i buy duluth treading underwear in our main ira late to that so we have a video coming up in has done an honor of joan williams esm i talk on white working class the book but also i complete the other side of it joan mention that there is dole pma professional managerial elite but there's also the e b e.

ollie joshua north carolina robert duluth trading ira joan williams pma chow
"joan williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W n y c independent journalism in the public interest 939 fm and am 820 npr news and in new york conversation oh it's all right a list of all of us they want to read unita added to anything yet because we hoppy readings me of course it looks like we got us of arita summers the time to get a cold drink and an umbrella and all those books you've been meeting to read throughout the year right yesterday we had ron charles from the washington post getting his his picks for best new fiction you can find that list on our website at the take away dot org today we go into the world of nonfiction dana williams is with me she's is the chair of the department of english at howard university and a reader of all things dana welcome thinks that at dana summertime is supposed to be for the novel i guess but i'm one of those people who has to fight the urge to keep reading nonfiction in i often lose so i'm glad you're here having that's true for most people at an end it's great to have you now i wanna go you've got some great picks on this list and i as i was reading down on them i started to compile a list is going to be too long for me to get through this summer so let's start with joan williams's white working class overcoming class clueless nece in america to the top year list yeah this is one that i think has been talked about a lot so in some ways it became that book that you have to read just because everyone's talking about it it emerged out of assertive say that she had written shortly after if not immediately after the most recent presidential election and so i i see is kind of the hollywood get here book if you will and by here we mean on the air of populist and the trump era i think it's relevance to the trump moment in its tear gas interrogation of the workingclass particularly is on what is most attractive about the book for most people it's a little complicated it's got mixed reviews in the sense that on it really tries to push back against the leaders them that it critiques so in some ways.

unita ron charles dana williams howard university joan williams america presidential election hollywood new york washington tear gas
"joan williams" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Boop it's all right a list of all of us they want to read i did think three hockey me crazy to fix that we got ourselves arita summer is the time to get a cold drink and an umbrella and all those books you've been meeting to read throughout the year right yesterday we had ron charles from the washington post getting his his picks for best new fiction you can find that list on our website at the takeaway dot org today we go into the world of nonfiction dana williams it is with me she's the chair of the department of english at howard university and a reader of all things dana welcome thinks that at dana summertime is supposed to be for the novel i guess but i'm one of those people who has to fight the urged to keep reading nonfiction in i often lose so i'm glad you're here telling the truth for most people the and it's great to have you now i want to go you've got some great picks on this list and i as i was reading down on them i started to compile a list of going to be too long for me to get through this so let's start with joan williams's white working class overcoming class clueless nece in america to the top year last year this is one that i think has been talk about a lot so in some ways it became that book that you have to read just because everyone's talking about it it emerged out of concern is say that she had written certainly after if not immediately after the most recent presidential election and so i i see it kind of the how did we get here book if you will and by here we mean on the era of populist this content in the trump era i think it's relevant to the trump moment in its tear gas interrogation of the working class particularly is what is most attractive about the book for most people it's a little complicated it's got mixed reviews in the sense that it really tries to push back against the leaders in the critiques so in some ways the the privilege reince grabs itself that i think it's still a pretty good read in the context of looks like all records means the end of.

ron charles howard university joan williams america presidential election washington dana williams tear gas
"joan williams" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"joan williams" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"These pieces started coming out even before the election and are still pouring down on our heads jesmin last few weeks the new republic had michael to moscow's deploring quote elite liberal suspicion a middle america unquote for such red say practices as churchgoing and gunowning and the new york times had joan williams accusing democrats of impugning the quote social honor of working class whites by talking about them and demeaning and condescending ways as exemplified by such phrases as flyover states trailer trash and plumbers but for plumbers bartho it's one of the diseases colder gross it's really serious and ablest to let them numbers one of my favorite carlos search a she moose four to say but here's my question who is telling the tea party irs and trump voters empathize with the rest of us why is that all one way well one cath i think their lives are should here than yours but you know i digress also again there's this giant myth that there's this huge mass of white working class that voted for donald trump deal most poor people don't fucking vote trump didn't win you lost you fucking fail like like i was relent article in the first half of it were she says i'm sick of all these articles were there fetish izing these these know all horii handed sons of toil who jill abandoned by washington and voted for trump i agree that's like my hand body trump was elected by dunes with you know ingrown pools who also keno dealerships in the suburbs yellow that i agree with around the but but in the second half it she says you know what.

michael new york times joan williams carlos irs washington moscow america donald trump