18 Burst results for "Joan Mitchell"

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:16 min | 4 months ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"And quote following up on something. We've been following all year long. After the years of trade wars companies like foxconn petron and others are increasingly offshoring their industrial production away from china to places like india vietnam and mexico but geopolitics aren't the only consideration it turns out that finally as you maybe could have predicted over a long enough time horizon. China has simply gotten comparatively too expensive quoting bloomberg these splintering of the global supply chain that began during president. Donald trump's watch look set to persist under his successor apple. The largest tech giant's that rely on chinese factories to make their gadgets will move some production of its ipads and macbooks to vietnam key seven partner on high precision industry also known as foxconn has allocated two hundred seventy million dollars in new investments to the southeast asian country these moves per a larger and longer term migration that may have ramifications for the iphone maker as well as china's role as workshop to the world. Foxconn founder terry gow coined the term g to to describe the trend of a unified supply chain splitting into at least two company chairman. Young leo said in august that the likes of india southeast asia and the americas could each in the future end up with a dedicated manufacturing ecosystem of their own. The trend now looks irreversible. As other countries including india and vietnam are boosting their infrastructure and efforts to lure manufacturers through lower costs and fewer geopolitical worries quote as china gets more expensive and as us politics have been unpredictable. Companies have shifted production of some goods out of china. That trend will continue as china gets more expensive and as vietnam. India improve their competitiveness said dan wang a technology analyst at call dragon onyx and quote. So i actually pulled the trigger. I signed up for a masterworks dot. Io account and am now the proud owner of shares of a multi-million dollar appraised joan. Mitchell painting did i ever mention that. I was an art history minor in college. That's kind of why masterworks that. I is right up my alley. But if i'm being honest. I also did it for the reasons i've told you about..

foxconn petron china vietnam India terry gow Young leo Donald trump bloomberg mexico apple southeast asia dan wang americas us joan Mitchell
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

Motorsport Radio

15:16 min | 11 months ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

"The number fifty five. Hi Most spoke of common point in keep the show. Mclaren had a rice where it a did what it needs to then had a problem that needs to again and then the problem. So this was was indicated when having lost out on the lead to the forty two Daniel McKay took his turn back into the lady then built up a gap when phone royal Redgate corner into the gravel kept it going but lost positions came back home in fourth place. He managed to get back. Post the academy multiple. Ask the Malton and again pulse the the microwave. Brian Driven Tolman McLaren then made his move on Ben Green to retain early just before the pit window opened the second. Half of the rice was a fairly quiet affair. Gt Full. This is pretty lucky. Given the fact that GT three was was given us. Oh we all we could just to keep up with that but issues in in the second half for Jack. Mitchell meant that. He picked up a stopping the penalty for problems in the pit lane. He held onto eight the line and it secured his title by one point from the team. Teammate which was doing all it could take the winning gloss and reverse that unfortunately for the two bedrooms that wasn't bay so the championship was secured by but Jack Mitchell on his own given that you had different co drivers during the season the big mover in the second half of the rice was Jerry walls born he shared with David Pattison and he fought through the GT fulfill to an overall podium position. He took the wooden impr- oab but it wasn't enough for him to take the title that went to the number sixty six team. Parker racing Mercedes so the final results of the final race of the season. So number thirty three. Take the wind. Joe Mitchell and Phil. Cain the number eleven car of Malt farmer. Nikki team held on to second despite the time penalty which just shows how despite the fact that were battling hard king and team really were moving pretty quickly from failed because he Alabama Birmingham once post. The Johnny Item Asked A. Maltese was unable to get into place. Despite that time penalty in GT four Daniel McKay of Finley Hutchinson despite their travails in the first half of the race held out to take victory from the number four Toma Multiple but Michael Brian and Charlie Fag. The number fifty six told them multiple McClellan of partisan and Osborne took side cheesy four lead for drivers champion. Glittery this was. We had four cars dying. Four say genetic serve COUNTERPOINT CENTER. Patrick the sauce and they had told me a car on a mock Lebron Saudi fag the Batmobile and also then Jack Mitchell in the end the except right by seven points between the four cars and it was down. H Lobby was changing. Who's been championship? Couldn't keep up with it. It was it was a thrilling race or around and Donington. Oh ways provides good racing action. It was actually at nine to keep track of it in the media center. That's that's all I can barely remember. Here is just something happens on track. Oh get spreadsheet figure out who's winning and in gt four. It was it was a bit of a mission that was it was fairly simple. Three in the if the number seventy five was in sixth place or better than that was all she wrote. Gt Four kept US guessing pretty much the last minute Joan Mitchell and Phil Kane achy winning the last race which the last two years before that would have gotten championship some layers on those years. You win it. Unfortunately the season results they want in the wasn't good enough for him to Clinton Championship yet. You you've got to feel for Joe men show particularly I mean so as well in the fifth for many many years. He's been in a position to to win it an at the child's but fa John Minshull you you you've really gotta fill. Because it was his lost Jones off the he. He retired from the championship. At the end of the season. We'll see author rice Nicotine being sawed it so even though the roles are doughnuts sold the rules on Diana's loss of patients coming out from him down at the Melbourne happened burning. No size bits. The end of the Rice Nikitina wanted to make a tire engineer. But it's one of the reasons. We loved having Nikki Team in the championship and it was a reason we love to have nicotine in the township last year. Well until he got a little bit impolitic and start offending moneymen. is one. He has a complete disdain for regulations and other bloody bar now he says he stated regulations you would have run the rice him getting busted for try limits with cost independently as previously discussed regulations in Europe for different to to. What they are over here team is as close to social media in frozen motorsports Galt. He's he's all about entertainment for the fans. It's it's it's why we love him but it does sometimes get out water sports radio SYNNEX DOT on the podcast. I am delighted to welcome along with Andrew from the team. Michael O'Brien Bom sport driver on. Gt Four hello. Hi everyone yet. Thanks for the welcome. I'm greats behaviors. Well looking forward to chatting with your getting stuck into the podcast kicking off. Then I've been doing a little bit of a we scour around on the which I can entirely block because everybody news. I'm the relative newbie and don't have the knowledge that everyone else does but it means I can say for my kind of looking around see that race in does run in your family was always something that's on your radar you wanted to do was any salt you anything different. Yes Oh like you say it has to give everyone a bit of background like you say so. My Diet basically started out embracing from from a young age. His parents were by schoolteachers but it was something that he always wanted to do. So so out to try and gain sponsorship and by his own race. 'cause guy racing that way which he did all the way up until the late eighties. When he raced in British touring 'cause that was the last sort of big thing the big series he did when he drove hold and enbridge storing us and aided that something that a lot of people don't actually know. Is That my a Godfather David couvert say race for McLaren like I do now in full bloom and obviously one thirteen Grand Prix? So I've always been around it. Annoys had people in my life that have been racing a high level but it wasn't really until two thousand seventeen. Which is my first full season of racing. It wasn't really until a couple of years before that I really started to get the bug and actually want to compete myself like always been two races. Ottawa's watched it on. Tv Was played the Games growing up. But until you until a couple of years ago it wasn't really something I wanted to do and like switch one day. I just woke up and to my dad. You know what actually really likes give this ago now so That's how it went really eats you move and you decision to move into racing. We'll something just clicked one day. What was the plunder Fulda? Had you got anything in particular that you are thinking about doing will basically if you haven't gone down the racing route. Yeah I think that's that's a really good question and Something that is is quite difficult to answer because I really. I can't really remember back so what I would have liked to have done at the time when I was in my teenage years. I enjoyed my mountain bike racing and did that quite successfully us or knew from the outset the although I enjoy it and I had some success at more of a club level informed on me quite quickly the. I wasn't ever going to be good enough to do it as a job or full time so so with that I moved into I had a couple of normal jobs. doing various things and then moved in to do some work with a family business which is based around sport. Is you go back to what you love. And what you've always known and although I wasn't driving still really love the sport so I went in to do that and enjoyed that a lot to be honest so even if I hadn't done racing I would have quite liked the progression in the business and two of may be taken my over one day and that such. I think actually that that change into going into the racing world time if you like every day so being around race 'cause or race provex Is probably what flipped that switch. Luckily for me so doing that job yet where we actually took me to where I am today in the sense they. It lit the fire. Yeah I mean looking at if you will history in terms of kind of what you did prior to being taken onto the driver development program with McLaren moving into British city after you did start a little bit differently to to some can see some classic car racing on the and you'll see participated in the Samuel Challenge which sounds fun. I can't see the being to many transferable skills from not necessarily but how did you find the classic car racing as preparation for what was to come after? I think the the classic car racing with the historic actually really good like okay. The 'cause relevant to what embracing now but the racing itself was just as competitive. Okay that probably wasn't honestly the strength in depth like there is in breach. Gt with how many people can potentially win a race but at the front you still had a number of drivers like Cameron. Jackson would always give you a good run for the money and the 'cause the racing was so close to cause seen the way they're designed was lots of slipstreaming cross ply ties. Didn't have much grip. So once you're in front you could never really get away. And that was great. Practice to learn race craft to lend slipstreaming to learn overtaking. So really that other. The car was very different to. I'm driving now. The actual core skills the island in the historic Israeli transferred over to British. Gt and same for the pickup truck. Thing really like of see. That was a really good year for me in that series. I very new to racing didn't really know much about the other drivers around me So naive leap of racing. James Gould for for that success during that series. He's now gone into touring 'cause it was a similar thing to the film afford. The racing was really good. Even though they were quite slow the pickups they were still quite challenging to drive so I sent me of core skills from by ties championships. Even though the relevance of the car doesn't really carry over. We've retouched briefly on the fact that you did move into the McLaren driver development program unusual in the fist. Take into June. Tell me a little bit more as to how it came about what the program enfold fully and how you found out as an experience yeah absolutely so obviously firstly at the drive development program that they run at McLaren just absolutely life changing for me from gaining a place through the selection process to having the success. We had with my teammate Charlie Fag in the first season together during two thousand seventeen going back year in my first year racing of enjoying quite a bit of success that year which surprised me surprise my dad as well and then obviously we were already thinking about what the next step might be whether it would come from of see with him knowing the challenges of of modern modes sports well and when when I got the chance to have a try in the McLaren. Try The car test my pace and go through the selection process of so of wanted to take with both hands which of say I did to looks at. I did and that was a process of driving the car. That was a new tire run. That was a race run. That was evaluating a fitness levels. It was a meteor interviews. So that was. It was quite daunting process at the time because I hadn't really had that much experience and you have presented with this amazing brandon manufacturer. So we'll give you an opportunity to get into professional racing so yeah I just tried my best stuck to my guns and and just wanted to be myself and of say it works out. Say That then moved onto your first season in British T. with toleman which even as a Newbie. Rc was a massive success with the top three finish a role in GT fall which is see outstanding. What were the highlights of the season fully and also what were the biggest lessons? She learned from that so that that first year really was incredible really so unlike the year before we we surprised ourselves. I think so Me Coming into that year's while with Louis Charlie and Jordan on the team. I think I was the person that hadn't raced. Gt Car before the start of that season but the professionalism of not the professionalism of teammate. Charlie and I had to drive coaches well Charlie Holdings everything just clicked and I think it was the sole perfect recipe for success on in terms of highlights. I mean there's so many good moments that year. I mean from offense race and Park where I qualified the car on the front row. And we finished second round to at Rockingham where we go. I spoke position Man I on average we are on Poe by by the two seconds on the average times and then spa was the highlights of me. I was on pole in my class. And let every single after the race. My fest race SPA and then coming those see so clear to the championship to of winning the championship as well. So so many highlights from that first year and I let huge amount along the way as well what you say. The biggest lesson was fully. I think really just for doing things that hadn't done before so being sound so basic but being told about the pit stops and doing things like that driving changes they all. These things were new to me so outside of learning how professional the team was in how professional McLaren basic things like pitstops driver changes doing an hour stint in a race That sort of numerous things I learned but really the basics of GT racing was disorder foundation away from that first year of see you work on you improve all the time but they were the new things for me off..

Brian Driven Tolman McLaren Jack Mitchell McLaren Daniel McKay Joe Mitchell Nikki Team Charlie Fag mountain bike racing Phil Kane Louis Charlie Nicotine Europe John Minshull Redgate Rice Nikitina enbridge Ben Green US Fulda Joan Mitchell
"joan mitchell" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Good morning you know him well the it would be great if they did open up the golf courses obviously you have to follow the rules of under and I'm not going to name them because I don't want to throw him under the bus but but you know they they're golf courses have been open the whole time wow and he played you place three times a week and the reason men's group it's an older group and any gaps who loves a good manners no specially now with what's going on you stop playing because if people won't follow the rules come through you know and then at the age group that they're in you know they're most susceptible in in what he loves to do the most he's retired is play golf people wouldn't follow the rule mmhm though he didn't play anymore yeah then it's really too bad so the whole point is is when this does open up yet follow the rules and then there's going to be real role could you play golf the new rules when you go to a restaurant when you go to a movie when you get on a plane all the gone there's going to be also the new rules you're gonna have to follow it because I don't want this thing to come back when the you know one thing certain is loosen up a little bit he couldn't be more right in it even even like before virus you just you know it's like when you go to airplanes and people like I don't know board ahead of you or something just people always looking to bend the rules and everything in life and and then and their daughter here now too and we know the governor now shut down the southern California beaches were like it's gonna be a showdown because northern California maybe a little less beach obsessed in southern California yeah yeah yeah well I just think he's not only you know if you don't follow the rules yeah you know it you'll do it with golf courses too yeah you don't follow the rules that's it let's just be happy that we can get out there anyway all of a sudden I sound like I'm really curious now it's all good and bad that we're having fun though it in general to and we had Tim Kurkjian on earlier this morning was fun he wrote something about Boetsch because he's doing you know he's Killin time B. he's doing a like on this date in baseball history pieces and it was the anniversary approaches first win as a manager and it led to him he rang up Bojan puts him in the same kind of rapid gave us about trying to learn French it's pretty funny you he said he has but bones your bones your is as deep as you go I mean he's looking at a French menu from some restaurant that's about the only thing more French wine may be right yeah all something going on but you know what it is I think a lot for him is this first year away from management and and this is going on unique but I'm sure that he needs a baseball six two just because you're not doing what you usually build it doesn't mean that you stop following the game and and I'm sure that you use like the rest of us were to CNC milling we need to do something the we had a the resume gas last night with the yeah I think those will Clark I wanted to see that we had family things going on it was great and guess who popped in for the last ten minutes done Joan Mitchell well that's awesome tell us about it I mean you talk about you know they used to call themselves salt and pepper and you know the one thing that I forgot about was no good for your current year that Kevin Mitchell head wearing white hair are you know came in second bookmark wow that's awesome memory now but that that does that back to back games and then later on that Williams joins the group and then any of those guys the other so it was great and you know that they had they had a lot of laughs and you know we're a guy like Mitch hearing he's going to be a little gun filter yeah the so here this one line but I guess of Mike said so Mitch you know yeah I mean you're just a natural resource you know can your girls hit any goes COS gotten better than he looks around and you said well Mike I get I get girls he goes you know maybe they take a hit up a joint every once in awhile I'm not saying that what he did well it's legal now it's legal permission yes we want to get a quote it's yeah well look that gets back a miss you got to do be for dupont right yeah yeah well it's only we had you guys on the list eight and you know the way they run on this and the way they remember things and who's really really enjoyable so last week we had card reader on it yeah yeah that was a lot of fun so anyway well last night two guys two guys about that every P. and then the runner up and that's in line with the release vancity him that's like maize in the country you know that's like Aaron Mathews that's when you think about it yeah exactly finished second is huge I I did not remember that and that's that's a great great stat you know it's funny you mention well because he was kind of part of our discussion we did our non bay area icons for our list yesterday and one of Polly's really thrilled me was Dwight Gooden and we were saying why couldn't he's one of those guys was so thrilling it was such a star and I put him in that that will Clark level of there are guys who aren't in the hall of fame who I absolutely got more thrilled by then certain guys who are in the hall of fame and then I would put it will in in in good in on that list and I don't know it's kind of I'm sorry can't go head well in in when you see those kind of guys when they're at their crime you think they're going to be involved in that decision just winter cruise going to go on and on and on yeah you know the world's got was good numbers you know that that that are pretty impressive so anyway Kylie Jenner of jewelery no no problem and I was gonna say the couple things here first off don't forget to you guys Kevin Mitchell was part of that eighty six Mets World Series team and he didn't know he was pivotal he scored a run in that rally in the Buckner game he was part of that all thanks but kind of you know we were talking to Copeland earlier today our producer copes and and we were saying you know we're trying to explain to why couldn't to him especially around that eighty four eighty five eighty six like that error there so for for galley copes how would you how would you describe Gooden at his best for guys that didn't see him in his it is peak you know what you guys are gonna have to look it up I I I think I only think you ready drain we have the greatest listener of all time Stanford broadcaster John Platt's poly and by Joe at seven twenty Platts in anticipation of your arrival kite looked up and found your only at that Thursday may thirtieth nineteen eighty five you pinch hit for Jim got and you grounded out to short all right yeah yeah actually I remember it which I think I remember it like yesterday because I knew after the game that the woman that I love the ticket for was gonna be my wife this is W. Y. because she was learning why you should pull out we're gonna spend a week or so together she saw me take one at that this was nineteen eighty five was it you know I was supposed to be released and anyway but you know that's another story for another day but I had like five or six at bats maybe more with two counts second place bonds but but I was literally done but I was hanging on an issue throughout and that's the only time she ever saw me play and I I've I've been shipped and I also both right that regular ground ball to third and I was just trying to look good when I'm done first as I wander across the room after the game hello Joe she thought I was one for one because I get the ball I love it Hey don't stop or don't don't mean yeah that's right honey as I said that's the girl for me that's a look at you guys now twenty twenty still go and add is that you get but anyway the way the ball came out of his hands yeah yeah it was like it was just electric it was like J. R. Richards and was like Tom Seaver it just came out of his hands so long to get on yours so fast okay thanks that you just thought that this guy was going to be a hall of Famer and and he was on his way to get a hold tangled up with some other stuff that you know my father later which I'm sure really hurt his career yeah but but at at at at his prime look I don't I don't think he was more than twenty years old when he broke him yeah because you are a kite he was nineteen the rookie of the year is a nineteen year old them yeah so can you imagine being that good at that young age N. B. internally you know capital of the baseball world in New York City yeah he was he was absolutely fabulous by the way you're gonna have to do some research on this thing with with enclosed talking about Mitchell said that in the in the yes it was against the red yeah yeah for you what he thought they had no chance yeah so you won't have service started yet undervalued now want to watch the red Sox Olbrich you know it I think if I got the story right he was yeah this dance off yeah here they needed in the future yeah that's the story yeah you had to recreate yeah yeah I think he's one of those tracks that but I think our you have to get up here so fast you know it's like he's lucky to have a built on but he's got a hit or a walk or not sure I think he got hit by weak I should ask him last night to recreate that well there are a lot of things going on it would be a separate story hands down after he told a story about you know his his daughters I don't think we want to get to that area I in looking this up by it one of the stats that jumps out at me is the Mets one hundred eight games that year wow yeah they were great that you know all the matter.

Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

"Okay for music to art. How many feet famous female artists can you name? No not beyond say or Riana artists like Frida Kahlo and Mary Cassatt. If you're having trouble thinking of more than a handful you may be onto a major problem in the art world. We've been artists are routinely left out of museum exhibits and the work is on average valued much less less than that of their meal. Peers Selley herships and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics. podcast the indicator from planet money. How that story there was this? This artist named Joan Mitchell. She was an abstract expressionist. She died in the nineteen nineties but she painted a lot. Joan Mitchell was hugely successful and to our world insiders. She's a big deal. But if you're thinking I've never heard of her you would not be alone. KRISTA LATCHFORD IS CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. She's doing remarkably well at auction. The prices are very high but are they. High in relative to Jackson pollock no way are they high relative to Kooning nope paintings by the KOONING and pollock have gone for sixty to one hundred sixty million dollars. KRISTA says there is no record of Joan Mitchell getting. We're close to that kind of money for her work. which brings us to a big part of the reason that people have trouble naming famous women? Artists Artwork by women and men is just valued differently. Rene teaches finance at Oxford and she and some of her colleagues did an experiment. They picked paintings at random and they showed them to viewers. There's and ask them to guess if the artist was a man or a woman on average the Experiment subjects couldn't guess it was painted by man or woman. Renee says it is practically impossible to look at painting and figure out the gender of the artist but she says if the subjects guessed that the painting was painted by a woman they like the painting less renee looked millions of records from auction sales and she found out that on average work by women. Artists sells for forty percent less than work by male artists and because art by women is valued for less museums by less of it and that is how less artwork by women ends up on display in museums. Ziems at the Baltimore Museum of art only four percent of the collection is women artists. The problem is the same major museums around the country. Christopher Bedford heard the museum's director he says that's why next year any new artwork. The museum buys will be by women the various different filters that we put in place to consider acquisitions nations and have always had them. Placed considerable additions and that system comes together in various different forms specific to the museum to filter the history of art and to include or exclude. Unfortunately in the case of women artists often museums have been excluding. KRISTA says anyone who's buying art museums included has to be careful of what's called the superstar effect sales of female artists represent just the tiniest slice just two percent of the market but of the two percent. Forty forty percent is five women. That's what can happen with the superstar. Effect a tiny number of artists. Become like Tokens or symbols and art buyers or museums ziems or individuals. Feel like they've bought something by a lady and so they feel like they don't have to do anything else but then museums can essentially say okay. I've done my female show will move back to our normal Sally herships Cardiff Garcia N._p._R..

Joan Mitchell Krista Latchford Baltimore Museum Of Art Joan Mitchell Foundation Selley Herships Frida Kahlo Mary Cassatt Jackson Pollock Kooning Cardiff Garcia Renee Rene Christopher Bedford CEO Oxford Director
"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Support for NPR and the following message come from personal capital helping over two million again people with free online financial tools. Download the APP or sign up today at personal capital Dot Com personal capital invest with logic implant with heart support also comes from navigator. Say Goodbye to meetings that waste time and too low to meetings your team will love navigator Pairs beautiful agendas with automations for the busy work. Most leaders don't have time for dry for free at navigator Dot Com. There was this artist named Joni Mitchell. She was an abstract expressionist. While these giant canvases and lots of colorful scrawling with oil paints. Mitchell insisted on painting mostly at I am only with a company of her dogs. She died in the nineteen nineties but she painted a lot. The Joan Mitchell was hugely successful the list of exhibitions. She's he's been in thirty one pages long. Her work has been shown at the Whitney about forty times into art world insiders. She's a big deal. But if you're thinking yeah I've never heard of her you would not be alone. KRISTA LATCHFORD IS CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation and Sally. You spoke with her. So who is she showing with. So it would be William William de Kooning. Franz Kline Jackson pollock all of the famous painters at the time. All men in two thousand eighteen one of Jones painting sold for more word than sixteen and a half million dollars at auction. The CRISTA says before you go getting excited you've to put that number into context. Wow Mitchell's doing so well. Oh and it's like yes. She's doing remarkably well at auction. The prices are very high but are they high. In relative Jackson pollock no way are they high relative to decoding nope paintings by the KOONING and pollock have gone for sixty to one hundred and sixty million dollars. KRISTA says there is no record decorative Joan Mitchell getting anywhere close to that kind of money for her work which brings us to a big part of the reason that people have trouble naming famous women. Artists Artwork by women and men is just value differently and Joan. Mitchell story is a prime example of that to be really clear. It's not a story of an artist who was working and working the and working and then after her death was discovered. This to me is really indicative of here is a participant within the community who then art history left down just because she was a woman because she was woman. There are a bunch of myth surrounding women and art like myth number. One that art by women just isn't as good as art by men but lucky for us. The subject has been studied a lot. Renee Adams teaches finance at Oxford and she and some of her colleagues did an experiment. They picked paintings paintings at random. All kinds seascapes and abstracts and still lives with bunches of grapes and they showed them to viewers and ask them to guess if the artist was a man or a woman which turned out to be a trick question. So first of all you know if you look at a painting on average the experiment subjects couldn't guess it was painted by a man or a woman right so it's not like look painting you can say. Oh well this is painted by a woman. Renee says it is practically impossible to look at a painting and figure out the gender of the artist so you can strike down myth number one but she says if we know or think we know the gender of the painter it does impact how we feel about the art art if these subjects guessed that the painting was painted by a woman they liked the painting less. That's not cool. Sally totally not cool all not only the subject and renamed experiments like paintings. They thought were by. Women are just less renee looked at millions of records from auction sales Dell's and she found out that on average work by women. Artists sells for forty percent less than work by mail and because art by women is valued for less us. Use IEM spy less of it and that is how less artwork by women ends up on display in museums and that brings us to myth number two the argument that female female artists have a style that does not appeal to men. But remember now we know that most of the time we just can't tell if the artist of work is male or female so you can kind of automatically scratch that myth off your list as well. Oh I have scratched that authorised so the reason that we don't value art by women more highly and the reason isn't that there isn't more of it'd museums good old fashioned gender bias. I viewed this paper. So it's about art but really it's not about out or it's about gender so a lot of times what people say is You know well. Women are not represented management. Because we all know that women Shy away from negotiation and they're not very competitive so there's always this narrative that it's the woman's fault which it's not at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Only four percent of the collection is by by women artists. The problem is the same major museums around the country. Christopher Bedford is the museum's director. He says that's why next year any new artwork. The museum I am buys will be by women the mock it never lies and I think if you look at the if you look at those numbers you see the residue of great great bias and that's what we're trying to combat Christopher says it putting art on display in a museum can be absolutely transformative for the way that an artist's work is perceived it can lead to fame increased creased reputation higher prices but there are a lot of hoops that an artist has to jump through to get on those museum walls in the first place so there are there are collections. Collections committees their executive committees of the board. The board of trustees curator's there are peer curator's and that system comes together in various different forms specific to the museum to filter the history of art and to include or exclude. Unfortunately in the case of women are often museums have been excluded and this it can be a really hard problem to fix. KRISTA says anyone who's buying art museums included has to be careful of what's called the superstar effect sales of female artists represent just the tiniest slice just two percent of the market but if you zoom into that tiny slice that chew percent of about two percent forty percent is five women. That's what can happen with the superstar. Effect a tiny number of artists. Become like Tokens or symbols and art art buyers or museums or individuals. Feel like they've bought something by a lady and so they feel like they don't have to do anything else but then museums can essentially say okay. I've done female show will move back to our normal but the Baltimore Museum is trying to change that. And this April Joni it Mitchell's work is going to get some big shows starting with the Baltimore Museum. Sally herships bringing us this story. Thank you this episode of the indicator was was produced by Lena Sons Gerry. It was fact checked by Brittany Cronin. Our Editors Patty hearst and the indicator is a production of NPR. Hi Sally it's Jose. Just wanted to call them that you know that. Without seeking it intentionally. It took me Livia about two hours to stumble upon a female artist at the met and it was rose up honor honor and the Horse Fair painting which I have since learned apparently require the artist dress up like a man in order to not get harassed while sketching the animals.

Joan Mitchell Joni Mitchell KRISTA LATCHFORD Renee Adams Sally herships Baltimore Museum of Art William William de Kooning NPR Joan Mitchell Foundation Baltimore Museum Christopher Bedford Jackson pollock Mitchell Dot Com Patty hearst Joan Franz Kline Jackson Livia Whitney Brittany Cronin
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

14:42 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It indeed beautiful today in New York City is a freezing cold. Well, it's about to be freezing cold. But it was is even having bipolar weather. In the fifties high fifties today, but tonight, it's plunging again. So we all have colds as I do now. Well, are you going to recover you're coming out to Santa Fe for this? I am I wouldn't miss it. I'm flying out on Monday with Barney boss's widow. Barney Rossett is the subject of our film and his widow Eighty-eight going on sixteen. Are you? Sure, she'll be h-have. Oh, I hope not after it is as you can imagine. She was she was just so helpful to us because she's the executor of Barney Rossett state, which is balloonists since he never threw anything out. He saved everything and. The material and she gave us free access to. All right. It's called Barney's wall portrait of a game changer. It will show at CCA next Thursday, which Valentine's Day at six PM. So he can't forget that super simple CCA, Valentine's Day, six PM Barney's wall, and sandy you will be there along with Barney's widow. And so who the heck was Barney. Barney was a rebel to change the culture of America. It's hard today with game of thrones. And Chris rock, it's hard to imagine that there was a time in mid century. Nineteen fifties sixties when it act of congress for bad, the publications of anything considered to be so that was you can imagine a very slippery. Barney went to the mat to bring down. Censorship. He wanted to publish books that everybody should be. And it was interesting to me in pursuing this job is that he thought it was censorship. Not only as a suffocation of the imagination of artists and writers. But he also saw the classes you because those Ford to go to Europe could buy the book that works can you read here? And in addition a lot of the economics at higher university had access to those that they sell they were dangerous if they were because they were easy to read, and they were well written that they would be. They mine inflame the public imagination. Which Christ they had done much to our advantage. I think is a culture for baby would Viney did with to break down the Pearson culture, mid century America and to sixty he was the he launched he helped create started himself firmly into the cultural ferment at in nineteen sixty so many of us have bought these books in probably the books that he published in the past from grove press. But tells a little bit about grow press. Well, good passes an accident. Barney had actually been as a teenager nineteen. He's been a combat photographer on the China front. Facing the Japanese in World War Two so he had an interest in and photography. And he wanted to become a documentarian not. Not wanted to be a filmmaker. And they made a documentary when he got back in his early twenties called strange victory, which was about the Jim crow south, and the fact that he is a country we're heading heading yourselves on the back for having eliminated, fascism, which we did, but we were practising in our own country against our people. The film was not a great success. It is now considered a classic and issued remastered, but that was a failure. He tried writing. That was the failure. And then he just stumbled upon publishing when his first wife Joan Mitchell and abstract expressionist painter whose works today are second only to. Georgia cheese, and the prices they I gather at auction. First wife told him he needed a life project. She had one it was hard. Three bucks of small publishing company called growth. And that was the beginning for many years like you said until recently with the sale of our work by Giorgio keep job neutral was in the highest highest price of female artists. Correct. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. And she had a great Joan Mitchell had a great influence on partying. So did she help finance his venture know Barney got free thousand dollars is a loan from his father was a banker in Chicago and went on after his body died leaving him quite a bit of money to spend a massive of it on the legal battles that he fought around the country, sixty sixty battle. Throughout. Cream court, and then one how many excuse me, how how many of these great authors. Sandy was he able to meet. I mean, did he meet Samuel Beckett or William Burroughs or my all time favorite Henry Miller? Did he have a chance to only? Their work and make them famous and support them. But did he have a chance to meet them in person? Oh, yes. He did in fact Samuel Beckett. Whether it's best friend and Barney named his son Beckett Rossett. And he had he had read poor kids. Still waiting though. Oh, I mean, what barrelled name to give a child. Yeah. But no, he knew everybody. He was he was he was everywhere. He was internet, and Andy he was really very good company. You like to party, I'm head red wine in the morning as Artemis at lunch shit. And during the day and took instead of means wild, man. Oh, man. Which makes him a perfect subject because he had such a back story. And that's what makes him a charismatic subjects. I still did you meet him. I met him to when I wanted to make a documentary about him at about growth fast. Because like you I grew up reading gross that sucks, which I discovered as a teenager in lockout were Puerto into everything that my very putting down parents really trying to keep me from knowing about he. So he kind of hero. And I went to try and make a documentary. But he was he wanted to be behind the cameras and not in front of the camera. So I ended up I gave it up, but I ended up helping him with his biography and became good fats and all these years later, I finally been able to do this. But he died in twenty twelve I don't think. What age so if he's doing drinking cabernet for breakfast for dinner and inbetween? Not need for lunch. Inbetween snorting coke. Did. He live a long life. He did. He died just short of his ninetieth birthday. Uh-huh. Example, isn't it? It's apple live. About. No, he he was. He was like Winston Churchill nothing stopped. And he was was it somebody remarked that he had a. Steal whatever he wanted to do did any debt, he lent. His exactly as he wanted to degrade story. What a great story and just by publishing all these great people. All these great authors. Obviously, he had a big impact on a lot of people. I mean, you know, not just these books be look at other books that came along and came along at a time when they needed to come along. I mean, even eastern books eastern philosophy Siddhartha came along and propelled propelled things forward. As did Henry as did boroughs as did Beckett and good dough. And all of that. I mean, it really it really kind of influence created generations like the beats like CARA wack in really propelled things along art music. In culture. It's a beautiful summation. He was he was on questions relating daring publisher and distributor of films as well. And he discovered all these. Evergreen review, which I was in college was a bible for college students. As well as evergreen as malice. Predatory in bringing new voices. He was always looking for the newest freshest voices, and those he would publish something that would not be published anywhere else. That was great. In fact, he he made only one mistake really in terms of of writers to change the cultures and selves, and that was training down Tolkien. Otherwise, he he discovered. Becket Miller all published the diaries a bar. He even went to Bolivia defined the diaries after was was murdered. The audio autobiography of Malcolm X, he gave voice to the counterculture at night and the counter. Which you're back today all the battle that Barney was fighting that we're fighting now against tolerance against divisiveness against censorship. Which is a very different thing. Of course today. Interestingly. Our guest is sending me in or sandy Gotham in Gotham a real name. This is no marched where you live. Yeah. It's a real name was my father's family name. I stood have kept it when I moved to New York. But I I took by then husband's day. So it's like, okay. But it sounds like so the the film's going to be once again it'll show at CCA. We all know where CC is on Valentine's at six PM. We can all remember that. And it's called Barney's wall of a game changer. Definitely a game changer. There's and it sounds like, you know, we should invite your Dr Martin because George a lot of is influence was the one that that Bharti passed on. And that was token. Absolutely. And also, he would I think Barney weather published definitely publish Martin. Oh, absolutely. Why Martin was Barney kinda guy is Marian original and spicy. I understand that. He's he's transformed. A bowling alley into next me. I wall set. Wolf. Bowling alley. Now, it's an immersive art experience. Oh my God. That's right down his alley. He would have loved it. So, but I'm so pleased to be or they have a full really would have loved to have a full Barton. Farney did love to party did. Beloved by many writers artists. Yeah. What did we all could have such a light? I gotta ask you before you go, sandy. I don't want to keep you too long or give away too much about the film. Did he lose? Did. He lose any cases with the ever. I mean, really in legal jeopardy. He was always illegal deputy. And if he had lost the battle to publish lady Chatterley's lover Amaechi said in today's nearly two million dollars and five years to push up to the supreme court and one but had he not he could have been jailed for attempting to send been materials through the mail and that. Which was traffic of cancer at as was naked lunch. I mean when you think of how shocking naked lunch, but. And how it's in the canon today. In fact, may Henry Miller did not want Bharti to defend tropic of cancer. Said his worst nightmare would be to be read by college students. He wanted to say the outlook. And he went to Paris when Bernie was saddling in Brooklyn court to get tropic hung out with the ex pats and then came nexus. Plexus? And yeah. Right. Then he moved to Big Sur and caused all kinds of trouble down there. Yeah. He was a troublemaker to all right? If when you think about artists are meant to be, of course, they're like the prophet visionary. But our cultures turning are turning into. And they have a sensitive before. I think we even do which is why we read them. Do you have a website? I do it's WWW dot Barney wall be a are anyway, S W, A L, L dot com. It's extensive videos and background on Barney photographs it's quite so be careful be careful images. There are political things are sexual things. You have been warned be very, very careful. We don't. Anybody to be upset? Trying to censor your listeners. Richard trying to protect them from you from the likes. He's my role model. I mean, you know, I'm channeling him in making it felt so Valentine's Day, you're going to show this film, which is kind of a perfect day to do it. You you will be there along with with barn. There will be there. As will like oh director William Cole and cinematographer Lightner, we will all be there to celebrate Barney's legacy. And along with his his widow eighty four going on sixteen. Yeah. She's and she's into film. She's quite irresistible. She's a natural. It was in fact that she was a dancer at her youth. And he's a character. You'll see the film look forward to Santa Fe film festival dot com for this film and all the films, sandy great pleasure to talk to you today. Thank you, Richard. And thank you everybody. Who's who's listening? I hope to see they've trip in have good stay in Santa Fe. Thank you. Ten minutes until three o'clock and back, and we got to talk about anything in your mind. You wanna talk about and call in right now for two four twelve sixty same phone number will use to give.

Barney Rossett Valentine Samuel Beckett Becket Miller CCA Santa Fe sandy Gotham New York City America Joan Mitchell Dr Martin Chris rock Bharti China Winston Churchill Malcolm X Europe Georgia congress Jim crow
"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"I don't know censorship's the right word, but it certainly was not at all in sync with the kind of subject matter at that time. That's not to say there weren't artists such as Larry rivers in particular who wore hall credits as an influence who were playing with that kind of figurative subject matter. And also that had this, you know, kind of coded campy coy aspect to it. But it it was not what they were gonna show at those galleries back, then the art will was dominated by macho abstract expressionist, wasn't it. Absolutely. I mean, you know, I it's the women the great women of that period from grace, Oregon, and, you know, Joan Mitchell are, you know, GOP there do but much later on in a lot of ways. So yes, it was very male male defined. Although a number of women who were working at that time. And you know, you have early John. In Ralston Berg working at that time. So, you know, Warhol's part of a group of artists who for whom that subject matter would would not have appealed or that bravura, you know, was just out of sync, and he's also younger he's a younger generation. So it's extremely difficult time. And but he keeps you know as persistent in making his work like any any driven artist this show has examples of his early handpainted work. There's the Coca Cola bottle, for example, which he apparently painted in a drippy at Texas specialist style. But he also painted it in a way that resembles a commercially printed image. Now, I mean, this is really seen as kind of breakthrough moment for him because much of the work that he was making you know, and many the other artists, by the way, we looked sign James Rosenquist many artists who were still in that late fifties period. You know, we're making we're interested in subject matter. But still feeling that they had. To insult away tip their hat, abstract expressionism. So wore homemade two versions of the painting, and one was a giant coke bottle that had drips on it and a invited very famous story invited for friends Irving, Blum, Ivan Karp, a Tonio and Henry godsall or to look at the painting. And he wanted to see what they thought about leaving behind the drips, essentially, and and then what about the other image, which really appeared printed and very mechanical, and there's very little trace of the orders fan, and they all preferred the tighter version, but I find it fascinating that you know, he he none the less needed that. You know, I've always said now that Warhol's way of asking everyone's opinion would probably be called maybe a degree of crowd sourcing today. But he was very smart to get you know, these are four extrordinary people that he's asking who are very knowledgeable and very much tapped into what was going on in contemporary. Art at the time. So, you know, he wanted their opinion. And thank thankfully, you know, one often conjectures what might have happened. If they'd said prefer the drippy version, maybe world still would have gone forward with the other. Then sixty two you see him shifting to a mechanical silkscreen technique was that kind of breakthrough. Well, I think there's a Evelyn. And that's why I think the fifties is so important because he's already very much engaged with using techniques of reproduction to the constructors images. He goes from you know, he used carved Gumma racers. Then he moves to stencils. And so eventually, and there's a famous always often describe with is very earliest technique was this blog at line where he would blow it on one. So he would draw one side of the piece of paper in ink blot it with the other analogous to a monotype, and it would create this kind of quirky line that looked very much like Ben, Sean who was very pop. Amongst commercial amongst art directors at the time, but it also allowed him to make copies of it. And even had a couple of assistances early early fifty. So in some ways, the move to the silkscreen is seems inevitable. What's differentiates it from that earlier time was the the insertion or the use of the photograph? Because now you're moving from a something he draws himself. And there are some silk screens that were based on drawings. But to use the silkscreen photo the photo soak screen to make painting is this really when form and content come together. So he's using the very technique through which these images are disseminated in the world to make the painting, and that's the radical shift..

Warhol Henry godsall Larry rivers James Rosenquist Ralston Berg Joan Mitchell GOP John Gumma Oregon Texas Irving Ben Ivan Karp Tonio Sean Blum
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The lightning doing a pretty good job so far defensively. Keep the Golden Knights away from the dangerous areas of the ice with the puck point wins. The draw from carpenter Palau was after the left corner. Fumbled it away to Merrill, rattles. It up near side gonna keep left point at least voluntarily carpenter. Finally muscles it out to center ice raided points. Back in sixteen left in the second. Pre one lightning Merrill for howl at center ice Jan lighting line circuit tip. Not a chip at four word four Polat. Puck edge calls it down and muscles his way across the right point gourd, right circle. Braided point sliding toward Yanni Gord right corner. Board jiving out for point by good work by the lightning here in the offensive zone. That's more. It's gored by the goal point. Ryan mcdonagh a little shoddy voted away. Right. Cornfields a great circle. One lightning in the second. Alex, florida. The right circle shoots blocked. By talk and it pinballs off the block out to center. Sergei quick counter and the left wing slaps it in once more worry stopped to find the Vegas stat. A little feet up the nearside Ford went fishing port. Couldn't get away from carpenter to center ice Girardi knocks down though, rattles it back in. That's on side. They said horrible ski to it by that looked off to me Lord, right circle. Chosen a shot. Save made by flurry. Joseph left corner quarter. Sara Lee back from Joseph Joseph, turning right circle. Fetters that caloric backing at shot blocked throat again right circle pressure been lightning three one of the second Lord cycles to sorelle in the right corner. Anthony, Sara Lee back right circle. Right. Cornucopia? Lord, worn behind the net, turning left, circle shoots. Rebound Girardi said again, my flurry and finally covers the rebound four forty eight left in the second straw Cipollini. They maintain their three one lead on lighting radio hockey season is here and nothing. He goes better with hockey than a nice cold shadow Viagra. Miser the official shed on the Tampa Bay Lightning younger, Meister and hockey are the perfect combination. Because the perfect ice cold shot served at precisely negative eighteen degrees celsius. There's nothing like a shot of ice cold Meister, the official shed on the Tampa Bay Lightning. Thirty five percent alcohol by volume master, muster US, White Plains New and Joan Mitchell team marks the property of the NHL teams. Check passive watcher now back to Luba GIC. Wait a minute, folks. Now Luebbe checks running off the ice. What's he doing out there? Now coming back and he's driving. Zamboni..

Girardi Tampa Bay Lightning Merrill Joseph Joseph Sara Lee hockey Ryan mcdonagh Yanni Gord Palau Golden Knights nearside Ford US official florida Sergei Alex Joan Mitchell Meister Viagra NHL
"joan mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:08 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all of it. I'm Alison Stewart. We're back with Mary Gabriel. Her new book is ninth street. Women crasner, Elaine de Kooning, grace heart again, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthal or five painters and the movement that changed modern art, I wonder about Helen Franken dollar for a moment. You write in the book Helen was raised in the rarefied climate benefiting the family of a New York state supreme court judge how did her upbringing what impacted that have on her work as an artist and her ability to work as an artist Helen was one of the five she was probably the most self confident. And I think that that's that's a tributary where she came from. And how she was raised her father as I said was that was a New York state supreme court judge, and he he saw in Helen his youngest daughter. This the spirit he called her a fantastic child. And so he did everything to encourage her and everything she did from her writing to her little child drawings. They would preserve frame or or. Put in book form when she entered competition. She entered a competition in sacks at the height of the depression. And he she won. And so he bought her a a charm palate. Artist's palette charm from from Tiffany's. So he she was absolutely given from the moment that she was, you know, cognizant of of this possibility of being an artist she was given every encouragement to do. So and that meant it by the time, she was out of Bennington. She didn't go through any of the she. There's no artists that doesn't go through soul-searching on the canvas. That's so it's not fair to say, Helen and didn't. But she didn't show that angst. She didn't show the kind of trepidation and showing her work that let's say John Mitchell did Joan Mitchell also came from a very wealthy family. But her father was a completely different had a different form of parentage and so parenting, and so he he criticized everything Joan did. So when Joan came to the point of of showing her work, she was terrified so. So so Helen. I as I said earlier, she was very sophisticated as young woman right out of school. And that's why by nineteen fifty two. This would have been she was on the scene for two years at this point. She created a work that was so confident in so original that it actually spawned a new school of painting and the color field school. And I think that those massive steps that early can be attributed to her her her family, and and the actual kind of support she had early on you mentioned Joan Mitchell, and she like many other artists have been criticized historically for dressing like men, and quote acting like men, but you disagree with this. Right. Oh, it's it's, you know, meeting these women before they arrive in New York is so critical because you see Joan from the time she's in high school, you know, she is Joan Mitchell. She's foulmouthed. She's confronted tive. You know, she people want, you know, her. She went to vary left high school, and yet even there she she assaulted her teachers. And risked expulsion. She was exactly who she was before she ever arrived in New York as we're grace hard again as whereas Elaine de Kooning as was Lee crasner before she became part of the scene. And and as was Helen, and what they got from the scene was the ability to be who they were. And so this I think it was in retrospect that this sort of comment, which was essentially criticism that they were trying to be like the boys by drinking a lot and having served free having a lot of sexual relationships. And and and, you know, Joan in Grace's case cursing is so unfair because they didn't have to become boys or they didn't have to act like boys. They were already strong and independent women. Elaine tuning was described by a friend is a quote genius at life. The greatest description ever. Yes. She was one of the original Chelsea girls. So tell us what that meant and what was happening at Chelsea at the time. Chelsea was really fascinating. You know, the village was full of the WPA people though, works progress administration and federal art project, and Chelsea had an entirely different scene at that point. And I'm talking now late thirties still before the United States entered the war and forty one the loss. There had been abandoned during the depression, they had been small manufacturers. And so that's when people artists and composers and poets started moving in and decoding Bill de Kooning had a studio there. And so he was part of that group when Elaine came into his life. She was introduced to it, and she was just out of high school and the people she met there. She said, you know, I was I was at the center of this scene. I was one genius after another. And I started thinking, you know, that this is the way life was and they were people like Virgil Thomson, and Jane and Paul Bowles and Edwin Denby. Rudy Burckhardt and lot Elaine yet. And I edited for governor easy, you know, just an incredible cast of characters, and they were all living there because it was cheap because they could be completely out of the world and the and the life. They lived was going from one studio to another going from cafeteria to another and exchanging ideas at once again where the things that today we take for granted. But for then we're so cutting edge. No one else was paying attention to it. And finally, there's a reoccurring question. The book for so many women is whether or not to have children and in some ways, grace heart again struggle with this question is is really difficult. Can you find our listeners for set of circumstances? Yeah. They all made that that choice. And it was it was a big issue for all of them. And in fact, a lifetime disruptive issue for them. But for grace, it was it was it had a material form, and that was in the in the body of her son Jeffrey when grace was nineteen she had a son. She was on her shoes. If ultimately married four times, this was marriage number one, and they were living in California. And the husband realized he was going to be drafting drafted. It was the beginning of the war. And so they moved back to New Jersey in Greece had a child at the same time that she discovered that she was an artist she discovered this love she had for drawing in for painting in it became all consuming. And so as she stayed in her in laws house while her husband was overseas with this son working drafting job. Trying to paint on her own. She to start making decisions, you know, who was she going to be in life. Eventually in nineteen forty SEO's forty-seven, she moved to New York with her lover by then her husband had decided to stay in Europe. And her lover, I news who is as irked her art teacher had moved them to New York and she had her son with her in nineteen forty eight. She saw politics I drip show at Betty persons gallery. And even though it wasn't what she wanted to do on campus. It was so strong, and it spoke to her so directly that it changed her life, and after that, she couldn't do anything but being artist and one of the things she had to do was free herself from all personal entanglements that didn't have to do with art. I commute was one of them her first husband was another. And unfortunately, her son Jeffrey was was third. And so she gave Jeffrey to his paternal grandparents in New Jersey, and she would see him on the weekends and grace had struggled with struggled with it for many years until Jeffrey ultimately moved to California with his father. But she knew that she couldn't be the mother she needed to be. If she was also going to be the artist she needed to be. And there was no way she could live her life by turning her back on art. Because that's who she was to the core. So it was a it was a traumatic decision. But but grace was a very difficult person in that she had no relationships and no life outside of art. And she could be very cold in that regard. But her one of her closest associates wreck Stevens said that what it was was not coldness necessarily, she he described her as lacking a guilt chip, which he said that a lot of people who are who are dedicated who dedicate their lives to something more than what the rest of us do which is earning a living waking up in the morning, making sure we have food on the table in our families are taken care of people who have to become pioneers in their field often lack this thing called a guilt. Chip. And they're willing to sacrifice anyone in everything to do what they need to do. And that's what grace did we have just a few more minutes with Mary Gabriel. She's written a book. Ninth street women, and you're right. I'm aware of the irony of writing about the characters as women artists. What's the irony? Well, they would have not wanted to be in this book. The none of them thought of themselves as a woman artist. I mean, they in that milieu. They did just didn't think of themselves that way. There wasn't an auxiliary group of women who worked next to the men a subgroup. They were part of the scene. They weren't grace wouldn't even call herself an artist she call herself a painter. And so I think that. In that environment. It would have been they would have been considered secondary. If they declare themselves women artists, and and I think today one of the reasons it's valid to do. So is that in order to explain the history of that time as you pointed out initially that story is often told as a story of a few kind of macho men, but that's just one fraction of the story at at most. It's one half of the story and the other half, which has been really neglected and therefore robs a lot of us of tradition. Is that there were women in it? And so I think to draw them out momentarily at least if we're permitted to and call them women artists and described them in that scene and really embed them in that scene as they were. I think helps us to understand the full history. And now, maybe maybe we can go on. And appreciate it for what it was which was an absolutely wonderful incredible revolution in art. The name of the book is nice, treat women Lee crasner, Elaine de Kooning, grace heart again, Joan Mitchell and Helen Frankenthal five painters and the movement that. Changed modern art Mary Gabriel. Thank you so much for joining us in all of it. Thank you so much, Alison. This afternoon, mayor.

Joan Mitchell Elaine de Kooning Helen New York Mary Gabriel Helen Frankenthal Grace Chelsea Alison Stewart Jeffrey Helen Franken New Jersey Bill de Kooning Lee crasner California John Mitchell United States Bennington Tiffany
"joan mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:07 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all of it. I'm Alison Stewart. We're back with Mary Gabriel. Her new book is ninth street. Women crasner, Elaine de Kooning, grace heart again, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthal or five painters and the movement that changed modern art, I wonder about Helen Frankenthal are for a moment, you write in the book Helen was raised in the rarefied climate benefiting the family of a New York state supreme court judge how did her upbringing what impacted that have on her work as an artist and her ability to work as an artist Helen was one of the five she was probably the most self confident. And I think that that's a that's a tribute to where she came from. And how she was raised her father as I said was that was a New York state supreme court judge, and he he saw in Helen his youngest daughter. This this spirit he called her a fantastic child. And so he did everything to encourage her and everything she did from her writing to her little child drawings. They would preserve frame or or. Put in book form when she entered competition. She entered once competition in sacks at the height of the depression, and he she won. And so he bought her a a term pallet artist's pallet charm from from Tiffany's. So he she was absolutely given from the moment that she was, you know, cognizant of of this possibility of being an artist she was given every encouragement to do. So and that meant it by the time, she was out of Bennington. She didn't go through any of the she. There's no artists that doesn't go through soul-searching on the canvas. That's so it's not fair to say Hello and didn't. But she didn't show that angst. She didn't show the kind of trepidation and showing her work that let's say Joan Mitchell did John Mitchell also came from very wealthy family. But her father was a completely different had a different form of parentage and so parenting, and so he he criticized everything Joan did. So in Joan came to the point of of showing her work, she was terrified so. So helen. As I said earlier, she was very sophisticated as a young woman right out of school. And that's why by nineteen fifty two. This would have been she was on the scene for two years at this point. She created a work that was so confident and so originally that it actually spawned a new school of painting and the color field school. And I think that those massive steps that early can be attributed to her her her family, and and the actual kind of support she had early on you mentioned Joan Mitchell, and she like many other artists have been criticized historically for dressing like men, and quote acting like men, but you disagree with this. Right. Oh, it's it's, you know, meeting these women before they arrive in New York is so critical because you see Joan from the time she's in high school. She is Joan Mitchell. She's foulmouthed. She's confronted give you know. She people want, you know, hurt. She went to vary left high school, and yet even there she she assaulted her teachers. And risked expulsion. She was exactly who she was before she ever arrived in New York as we're great heart again as whereas Elaine de Kooning as was Lee crasner before she became part of the scene. And and as was Helen. What they got from the scene was the ability to be who they were. And so this I think it was in retrospect that this sort of comment, which was essentially criticism that they were trying to be like the boys by drinking a lot and having served free having a lot of sexual relationships. And and you know, Joan and Grace's case cursing is so unfair because they didn't have to become boys or they didn't have to act like boys. They were already strong and independent women. Elaine de Kooning was describe our friend is a quote genius at life of the biggest the greatest description ever. Yes. She was one of the original Chelsea girl. So tell us what that meant what was happening at Chelsea at the time. Chelsea was really fascinating. You know, the village was full of the WPA people though, works progress administration a federal art project, and Chelsea had an entirely different scene at that point. And I'm talking now late thirties still before the United States entered the war in forty one the lofts there had. Been abandoned during the depression, they had been small manufacturers. And so that's when people's artists and composers and poets started moving in and decoding builder Kooning had a studio there. And so he was part of that group when Elaine came into his life. She was introduced to it, and she was just out of high school and the people she met there. She said, you know, I was I was at the center of this scene. I was one genius after another. And I started thinking, you know, that this is the way life was and they were people like Virgil Thomson, and Jane and Paul Bowles and Edwin Denby and Rudy Burckhardt and lot Elaine yet. And I edited at governor easy, you know, just an incredible cast of characters, and they were all living there because it was cheap because they could be completely out of the world and the and the life. They lived was going from one studio to another going from cafeteria to another and exchanging ideas at once again where the things that today we take for granted. But for then we're so cutting edge. No one else was paying attention to it. And and finally there's a reoccurring question. The book for so many women is whether or not to have children and in some ways, grace heart again struggle with this question is is really difficult. Can you to our listeners for set of circumstances? Yeah, they all made that choice, and it was it was a big issue for all of them. And in fact, a lifetime disruptive issue for them. But for grace, it was it was it had a material form, and that was in the in the body of her son Jeffrey when grace was nineteen she had a son. She was on her shoes ultimately, married. Four times. This was marriage number one, and they were living in California. And the husband realized he was going to be drafting drafted. It was the beginning of the war. And so they moved back to New Jersey and grace had a child at the same time that she discovered that she was an artist she discovered this love she had for drawing in for painting in it became all consuming. And so as she stayed in her in laws house while her husband was overseas with this son working at drafting job. Trying to paint on her own. She to start making decisions, you know, who was she going to be in life. Eventually in nineteen forty s ios forty-seven. She moved to New York with her lover by then her husband had decided to stay in Europe. And her lover, I muse who is as irked her teacher had moved them to New York and she had her son with her in nineteen forty eight. She saw politics I drip show at Betty persons gallery. And even though it wasn't what she wanted to do on campus. It was so strong, and it spoke to her so directly that it changed her life in after that, she couldn't do anything but be an artist and one of the things she had to do was free herself from all personal entanglements that didn't have to do with art. I was one of them her first husband was another. And unfortunately, her son Jeffrey was was a third and so she gave Jeffrey to his paternal grandparents in New Jersey, and she would see him on the weekends and grace had struggled with struggled with it for many years until Jeffrey ultimately moved to California with his father. But she knew that she couldn't be the mother she needed to be. She if she was also going to be the artist she needed to be. And there was no way she could live her life by turning her back on art. Because that's who she was to the course. So it was a it was a traumatic decision. But but grace was a very difficult person in that she had no relationships and no life outside of art. And she could be very cold in that regard. But her one of her closest associates for Rick Stevens said that what it was was not a coldness necessarily. She he described his lacking a guilt chip, which he said that a lot of people who are who are dedicated who dedicate their lives to something more than what the rest of us do which is earning a living waking up in the morning, making sure we have food on the table in our families are taking care of people who have to become pioneers in their field often lack this thing called a guilt. Chip. And they're willing to sacrifice anyone in everything to do what they need to do. And that's what grace did we have just a few more minutes with Mary Gabriel. She's written a book. Ninth street women, and you right? I'm aware of the irony of writing about the characters as women artists. What's the irony? Well, they would have not wanted to be in this book. None of them thought of themselves as a woman artist. I mean, they in that milieu. They just didn't think of themselves that way. There wasn't an auxiliary group of women who worked next to the men a subgroup. They were part of the scene. They weren't grace wouldn't even call herself an artist she call herself a painter. And so I think that. It environment. It would have been they would have been considered secondary. If they declare themselves women artists, and and I think today one of the reasons it's valid to do. So is that in order to explain the history of that time as you pointed out initially that story is often told as a story of a few kind of macho men, but that's just one fraction of the story at at most. It's one half of the story and the other half, which has been really neglected and therefore robs a lot of us of tradition. Is that there were women in it? And so I think to draw them out momentarily at least if we're permitted to and call them women artists and described them in that scene and really embed them in that scene as they were. I think helps us to understand the full history. And now, maybe maybe we can go on. And appreciate it for what it was which was an absolutely wonderful incredible revolution in art. The name of the book is nice, treat women Lee crasner, Elaine de Kooning, grace heart again, Joan Mitchell and Helen Frankenthal five painters and the movement that. Changed modern art Mary Gabriel. Thank you so much for joining us in all of it. Thank you so much, Alison. This afternoon,.

Joan Mitchell Helen Frankenthal Elaine de Kooning New York Mary Gabriel Grace Alison Stewart Jeffrey New Jersey Chelsea Lee crasner California Tiffany United States Bennington Europe Betty persons gallery John Mitchell Virgil Thomson
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"So I wish Lindsey, Graham and been asking the questions put Mark down and he thinks it was a bad idea to bring Rachel Mitchell. Joan, Mitchell repeatedly asked questions she, she was sometimes hard to follow where it was going because of how the whole thing was set up in any permits. But she asked repeatedly about motivation, and if anyone had helped Blasi for it, I don't let me play this for you. Listen. Did anybody besides friends and family refer you to any attorneys. I think that the staff of Diane Feinstein's office suggested the possibility of some attorneys including the two that are sitting on either side of you not both of them. No. It didn't get back to again. And again, if there was Democrats involved process, if you will. I mean, she says she was no one's pawn, but you think that Republicans got a point with that. No point with that. I don't think they did because she was very clear all along about, yes, she did go to the Democrats. She was. She happens to live in Palo Alto and she's represented by Democrats, so she never hit. It's not like she tried to hide it or or she secretly got help. She was always transparent and said, yeah, I think they did recommend a lawyer. I, you know, I don't. I don't think you can play Gotcha with it as much as Republicans try. My favorite moment was when they asked, why did the polygraph person come to be w I and well, I'd been at my grandmother's funeral. So you know, I think that she tried to impeach your gently. She's very respectful, but I don't think she succeeded because she was always transparent about how the story came out and then actually gets to one of the questions that we kind of enduring for me from the top. Wendy is from the top. When Mitchell start asking questions, she told boss. Ford's. She was not going to ask about the attack the incident inside the room itself. Blase blase four did seem relieved, but why was was it fair to not ask? Was it smart not ask about it because the the search was for truth if this had happened or not? Yeah, I don't think there was a lot of searching for the truth going on today. I, I agree with everyone who said this was really much more of a partisan battle and about the midterms and all sorts of things that I think most of the public watching had no idea why. Why certain questions were being asked. I think it's a tough call whether to ask someone to relate the details of an attack where it retraumatize them, but I think it would have been the right thing to do even if she might have suffered some kind of trauma in answering because that's when you can see the emotion connected to the incident that we're all supposed to be wondering about. Right? Is it true that this happened? How'd she described it in some detail, especially by the Republicans attorney? I think we would have been able to judge her emotion really well, and it almost was like the the missing elephant in the room. Actually there was so much little so little focus on not only her attack, but the attacks the other women have described. I almost I didn't really quite feel like we were talking about what we should have been talking about, and that goes from the start of the hearing to the end. The women got lost. That's how I felt. And you think it was smart to bring in outside counsel after seeing it? I think that, yes, I think it was disagree with you Mark, but. I think that the members of the judiciary committee, one into the politics out of it, and they wanted to be respectful of this woman and to ask the kind of questions would be asked of her. I think it's much better coming from somebody who's not a politician in who's just trying to ask the questions that need to be asked. If I'd been in that position and I actually have been before congress and testified. I, I think that that was the right move. She's not a professional politician. She was there to give her testimony and tell her story, and she was able to do that in to do it in a way that was very respectful of that. Not one of the six Republican sent with female senators on that committee. That's maybe we'll talk about that another day real quick. I know we've no time did this day change the supreme court game forever..

Rachel Mitchell Democrats Diane Feinstein Blase blase Blasi judiciary committee Ford Mark Palo Alto Lindsey Joan Wendy attorney Graham congress
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Speaking with me, one hates to be too naked about this upfront, but the basic gist of this article you've written in the paper. And also the book is that not only as women's are undervalued, but now's a really good time to buy women's art because it is undervalued. It's funny. You know the the point of the book is about the sort of spirituality of art and his wonderful seen this pure seen before art became a business, but what we inherited from this group from the abstract expressionist in the nineteen fifty. Is the art market because basically it was born in the mid nineteen fifties. The American art market for a number of reasons. Tax reasons, tax breaks given to collectors and the economy was booming. People didn't know what to do with their money. And so women are part of that though. Historically, they've been neglected. Can I ask a really non art connoisseur question. It goes like, this is the art that women do different than the art that men do. Now. It's amazing. Lee crasner one of the women I write about said that this discrimination or this bias against women artists is old as judeo-christianity. And in fact, it is because the very notion it is born in the very notion of God who is a he, you know the initial creator. And so that's quite a burden for a woman artist. But the women abstract expressionists really broke through that gender barrier and became very famous in their own time. When the art world became an art business dealer stop showing. Women because collectors once again because this was the tradition and the history of art collectors didn't think women's work had as much value. And so that's when you begin to see women be really being discriminated against what about though sort of contemporary issues artists working today who want like gallery space, right? Are women getting that are getting the exposure they are? And it's really, it's really heartening to see finally, because this has been a fight that's been going on for decades. What's happened is that galleries for number of reasons. One because of the kind of renewed interest in women's rights in general society another because there's been activists feminist artists who've been really working for many, many years to try to draw attention to women artists. And Thirdly, once again, the economics of it dealers are awakening to the idea that women artists are of value of interest to collectors. And so now thirty percent of the galleries stable might be women artists. Now to put it in perspective in the United States, fifty, one percent of the professional artists are women, so they're not represented in galleries at the rate. They are in existence, but but we're getting there. So give me your guests for the upcoming. I guess there's it's a fall auction season. Right are are we gonna see women artists getting the dollar amounts that that maybe they haven't in the past? Oh, I think definitely. You know, whether it's the dollar amount the deserve just yet. I don't know, but I think definitely they'll be getting the attention because it's really a fantastic time to be a collector and to be able to discover these women who you know might have painted seventy years ago, but their work is completely new because it's been so neglected. And so you take an artist, Joan Mitchell who is really one of the strongest painters to emerge out of the abstract expressionist period. But she was also very timid and she didn't want become part of the art market in the whole hustle of trying to sell. And so she moved to France and worked on her own a property where Claude. Had had once lived and painted, beautiful, you know, masterpieces and now collectors are discovering her and she's actually broken record last spring at auction. They were fifteen women who broke sales records because collectors are discovering that there's this entire market of incredibly talented people. Gabriel, her book on the subject at hand is called ninth street women, Mary. Thanks a lot. Thank you very much guy..

Joan Mitchell Lee crasner United States France Gabriel Claude Mary thirty percent seventy years one percent
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Make an impact towards a more. Or just and peaceful world. Welcome back into Sunday night football to Sunday night football. I should say on Westwood One. From the progressive insurance studios. I'm Scott Graham, pick from a range of coverage options with the name your price tool to find a price that works for you. We'll continue along following Detroit's domination of the New England Patriots on Sunday night football tonight. And speaking of domination Kansas City. Chiefs of be doing a lot of that plane at home at Arrowhead stadium today, and this is an opportunity for Kansas City to flex a little bit more muscle. They did behind their young quarterback. Patrick Mahomes memory at ten touchdown passes over the course of the first two weeks of the season. Well, he was added again today and not just one not just two. But he just keeps rolling the home slant inside the ten yard line to the Sammy Watkins. Jan. Dr Patrick Mahomes such another NFL record twelve yard touchdown pass. Started the game gene in three weeks. But to nine different receivers as finds the sweet nectar of the Joan Mitchell to somewhat on the FOX and the chiefs radio network is the second team in NFL history with nine different players with a touchdown. Catch. The other nineteen Ninety-seven patriots Mahomes now has thirteen touchdown passes and no interceptions through three games. Breaking Peyton Manning's record for most touchdowns during that span. Kansas City wins thirty eight to twenty seven Kareem hunt had a couple of touchdowns in this one as well. And the chiefs a very gaudy three and to start things out on the other side. San Francisco falls to one and two Jimmy Garoppolo through for a couple of touchdowns in two hundred fifty one yards before he ended up leaving in the fourth quarter. With a knee injury scary part about that is when the game was over the talk around San Francisco, forty Niners locker room with speculation that it might be an ACL at upsets head coach Kyle Shanahan anytime. You lose your starting quarterback. I mean, that's. Everyone. That is a big deal was when we lost our starting running back to so obviously feel for him. Personally. I know how disappointed he is haven't got a chance to see him yet. But I feel for after the testing we'll find out more about what's going to happen with Garoppolo over the next couple of days. Chicago coming off an opportunity had another opportunity after beating Seattle on Monday night. They went to the desert to take out to Arizona Cardinals team. Arizona though trying for their first win of the year jumped out the two quick touchdowns including one for David Johnson. But Chicago was methodical in coming back. They got three points before halftime. They got ten more points to get close in the third quarter. Then a field goal in the fourth quarter. Put them up by a sixteen to fourteen scored. Sam Bradford had thrown two touchdown passes. But also two interceptions. And that meant it. Steve Wilks was going to turn it over to his drafty. Josh rosen. Well Rosen over the course of time got his opportunity to play got his opportune. Ready to show some of his. Ability out there. But also got the opportunity to show how green he might still be frozen now at four and five to ten eight waiting the snap. He's got a trio, right? Safeties grows in the stat. Hi. Taking it away price. The takeaway they hit by. And then. Home in Arizona. Jeff Johnny act with the call WBZ NewsRadio seven eighty and one zero five point nine FM, Chicago pretty much was your ballgame. Alternately Rosen got the ball back for one final try, but was sacked on the game's final play in Chicago wins it by a score of sixteen to fourteen they do so without a touchdown pass from their quarterback. Mitchell Trubisky Chicago's now two and one riding their defense on the other side. Bradford lifted Rosen put in frozen did go four for seven for thirty six yards in that pick and the head coach Steve Wilks asked about his decision to go with a rookie. Well, you know, I felt like we needed a spark. You know, again, we got out to early star fourteen points stagnate there and wanted to try to spark the team we're going to evaluate Josh as well as Sam watch the tape works. Exactly what I wanna do for is moving forward with that. Gotta be some cardinals fans hoping evaluates how to get the ball to David Johnson who had just sixty one combined yards on the day. Arizona now. Oh in three Baltimore. More quick offense. You start to the year continued today against Denver. They beat the Broncos. Mt. Bank stadium twenty seven to fourteen the final score in this one. Joe flacco throws for a score. Buck Allen had a couple of scores in the game about Justin Tucker now six career games with multiple fifty plus yards field goal. That's the most NFL history. Is Baltimore goes to two and one on the year two straight weeks without a touchdown after case keenum, more importantly, the Broncos. Just don't like the road. They won their first two games at home. But they are now one in ten in their last eleven road games. Royce Freeman had a touchdown in this game for Denver's. They fall to two and one. All right. The Miami Dolphins trying to get to three zero. Now, they need to get there. Because to and over the fourth time in the last sixteen years each of the three previous times though, they ended up missing the playoffs. This game got well got crazy. It got wild. It got nuts after the Oakland Raiders were right there in the fourth quarter. And that's why when Miami found itself another gear Albert Wilson through. Touchdown passage Akeem grant, then later on a few moments later Albert Wilson found himself on the more correct side of the combination. They picture it out to Albert real sit down. Well. Everyone. Everyone laugh Joe rose and the crew on the w q AM dolphins radio network. Albert wilson. Just the fourth guy in NFL history to get a fifty yard touchdown plus throw and a fifty plus yard touchdown catch in the same game. Miami Winston by a score of twenty eight to twenty Ryan tannehill three touchdown passes and how bad him ten and one in his last eleven starts Miami's undefeated at three and Derek Carr. Threw for three hundred forty five yards one hundred seventy three of them went to Jordy Nelson. But the raiders are and three for the first time since two thousand fourteen that year, they started. Oh and ten New York. Giants knocked off the Houston. Texans today in Houston twenty seven to twenty two to put the game away late after leading early behind the arm of the manning manning in a shotgun Paul's out, the signal takes the snap back to throw steps up to the end zone. Touchdown giants. Sterling shepard. Throw by manning. Excellent. Route by Shepard. Away to go. The giants now lead it twenty six to fifteen with the extra point pending clean pocket. Bob and Carl banks WFAN New York Giants radio network. It was a clean pocket for most of the day you lie. Manning had time to throw. And when he got it. He used it. How about twenty five hundred twenty nine for two hundred ninety seven yards and a couple of scores. Saquon Barkley scored a touchdown today and Odell Beckham junior went for one hundred nine yards receiving as the giants. Get their first win the bad news for the Houston. Texans. Shawn Watson three hundred eighty five yards. Couple of scores on the day today and JJ watt at three sacks. But Houston is now Owen three last time. There was no one three team that made the playoffs. You gotta go back twenty years to the Buffalo Bills in Texas now, the longest active losing streak in the NFL at nine games. All right. There is one more game talk about today. If you're waiting for highlights, please do not this. Tennessee titans and the Jacksonville Jaguars. And just not a whole lot happening in terms of scoring today. Really shouldn't be that surprised. The Jaguars last year. In their games against Tennessee were able to reach the end zone twice played them two games. It got to the end zone twice. And it was in the fourth quarter of the second game. They didn't get there today either. But the Tennessee titans Blaine gabbert got hurt early. Marcus mariota ended up playing. Blake Bortles threw for one hundred and fifty five yards. But this was a field goal game. Tennessee head three of them. Jacksonville had two of them. And the final score was nine to six is Tennessee improves the record two and one on the year shocking. The Jacksonville at home after their win over New England last week could not get into the end zone. But they fall to two and one on the year wrap things up on a return..

NFL Chicago Josh rosen Peyton Manning Arizona Kansas City Houston chiefs Giants Albert Wilson Sam Bradford Tennessee Jacksonville Jaguars Broncos Baltimore Steve Wilks Jimmy Garoppolo football Denver Miami
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Boy lord of mercy if the broadest thursday liable mayab reimbursement from me his when they were with me in the atlanta journal instead of incapable of old sleepy the back door guenter gutted the poem the gut gutted the rules applicable by april yes he got a gold medal that we while they is holding me ghana fake mongezi among the wounded late at home and weighed down they bottom the breathing new home owlry not liam neeson oh dude did you the joan mitchell do no june them by name we you.

atlanta journal gold medal joan mitchell ghana liam neeson
"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Look i would be honest may eight minutes is a long term for me to have the we don't chicken so just give me my spicy felt it don't forget my business that affect can be changed that should keep england poisoning there's big vips thank you so much give their bitter ground water young we have a lot of things right now history joke crown of course he would appeal live from levies stream was produced by the kitchen sisters with nathan dalton and brandie how long nixon recordings by jim nikki special thanks to our collaborators jamal cyrus in jabbari anderson of oda bank of jones and associates and project and and thanks for support from the ruth you for tell foundation and mckenna properties you can see photos of levy stream and links to the prospect for artists in their art works at kitchen sister's that work thanks to all the by you read businesses pagoda cafe community book center the half shell material life cocoa hot the cupcake ferries domino record shack the joan mitchell center and king and queen emporium thanks to all the musicians joe crowned kid and marlon jordan the jones sisters but becker crenshaw and the students from homer a a community school string orchestra dj rockaway dj matt knows and dj flash gordon parks thanks to the neighborhood story project w hiv at them that broadcast levy stream live all day w w oz michael pause laney caplan for recording visitors all day in the tiny house on meals provided by uncommon construction and to all of the guests who participated in levy strained there were so many more than you heard today thank you to you all to traverse the mekran all the prospect for artists prospect for staff jennifer williams ilva rows allison glenn olivia patera and thanks debbie leicester in handy for town.

nathan dalton jamal cyrus oda bank jones joan mitchell center marlon jordan becker crenshaw laney caplan jennifer williams glenn olivia patera england nixon jim nikki debbie leicester eight minutes
"joan mitchell" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 2

LA Talk Radio Channel 2

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 2

"Exclusive rights to cover the wedding now i also found this to be interesting and i think that is just so complementary to the fact that this date was chosen in honor of a lexus late mother's birthday boukar they have a twoyearold daughter who is beautiful to i'm sorry you're right she's two months up she's two months ole and she became the focal point the winning and i want to know how you feel about this and guess what they named her obscurity beautiful it is gorgeous it's different lowkey alexis olympia oh hanan joan mitchell jim junior oh oh oh we bowed to get some things jump in also they get ready to start the whole female junior trend can you imagine what it will be like for her going on an interview for a job in man yeah so they have made his legs somebody is going to read the application in black wow i want to hear this person is really qualify and male she comes in it we like for a junior letters junior that's me wait a minute i was looking for debts now this on wedding took place in new orleans at the contemporary art center it was a starstudded event no less okay so some of the attendees beyond say kelly rolling oh kim kardashian sierra good la la anthony or laguiller yeah i'd two and evil lung goria and many many more the panel was impressive visit serena thaw out of the box her seat an arrangement it was set up like a fashion show recco fashion like a fashion ruggedly yes so is celebrating 10 years and she has sofas okay and everyone was space in that i'll instead of the altar ochre moorer morosely everyone had a front row seat no whiplash none of that okay now serena wanted to whole wedding to have on nontraditional feel if this is not thinking of the box and creating something this totally nontraditional this was it hands down now what i really like was at the groom had a massive surprise what do you think that surprise was begun the panel earlier buys nobles through the process that's the standard well was a pool vaca curtain and they unveiled a carousel inside of.

new orleans hanan joan mitchell kelly kim kardashian two months 10 years
"joan mitchell" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"Following blanche's arrest investigators in the state's chief medical examiner held a meeting with i pulled over the medical records and reports of other people in new over light at the blame to a dog at the conclusion of this mating there was a long list upwards of thirty people in the team were concerned about it was decided that exhumations would begin for the bodies of branches father pocket cost boop she reconciled we finally weeks before his death her motherinlaw james tireless mother while attallah whom she noticed and fed on his deathbed and joan mitchell who had worked with blanchard carb is as a butcher and died under mysterious circumstances the heat blanche left her job the rule that came up with woes when someone music seemed that didn't chase ons of arsenic poisoning they would stop the exhumations altogether on on the least to investigators were concerned about when mabel possums another form of craig his coworker print vaughn asylums meant for american bakeries on of vinson the craig his custom up and join rayban a member of reverend most church they also wanted to investigate papal who had become ill but survived two of those being reverend more sons investigators got to work ethic seeming the bodies news outlets across the state of north carolina brought back memories of when serial poisoner velma barfield nine is cranny took a fellow inmate was sentenced to death but poisoning her fiance as well as others but poison of choice was asked me and her execution in naughty naughty full made national news now in 1990 noise north carolina had a new poisnel another swayed while men at grandmother another deeply religious woman while off in the community a new black widow.

medical examiner blanche arsenic poisoning mabel craig vinson north carolina velma barfield joan mitchell
"joan mitchell" Discussed on PTI

PTI

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"joan mitchell" Discussed on PTI

"Probably i think michigan state actually okay so they win that game they're going to be thirteen in only guess where they're going to be they're going to be in the final four pirie shows star so i'm going to agree with you on that if they go all the way through and win the conference it is so hard for me to believe that that the playoff would exclude a big ten undefeated champion if they're not but if they lose it then you're conferences so what an owner that you're on defeated and people are looking at notre dame and the loser of alabama georgia and oklahoma tcu these are one here's the days are gonna be favourite against miami in south pizza favorite against stanford if they are favorite will be by one some nominal lunatic don't think wither batic from vague we agree that if they win the both theriot yes i don't believe in what all three games clooney insisting yours have already ones you agree that if wisconsin loses in the big ten championship tara knew conferences cooked it's not cooked they didn't earn your way you earn your way in the think wisconsin is undefeated all the way through they will be in i could see both alabama and i conceivable one moss yeah but don't noted although now you you've got a winner now really i do by the way in my year and i'm not joan of arc on not hearing voices what notre dame favorite by three and a half of miami thank you let's take a break but coming up was this a harder cash than it look like for julio joan mitchell from should feel real big tent guy i take you to my name jimmy garoppolo was room which should be a forty nine i rushed ohio state without fiji made me happy did to me interruption has presented by sky that make every day please drink responsibly happy hour and in part by unapologetically overprotected otter fact series cases.

georgia oklahoma miami stanford theriot wisconsin alabama julio joan mitchell jimmy garoppolo fiji michigan final four pirie clooney ohio