14 Burst results for "Joan Harrison"

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

05:43 min | 6 months ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Fantastic things already in our mind that lazy screenwriter head. Five minutes of dialogue. you know about it. It's a wonderful comment on how you set up something in a movie as opposed to a novel. That's a beautiful. The whole movie is beautiful in really well constructed russell. Mattie test lakes such an amazing in diverse filmography is metabolized. Are like i was looking it up again to refresh myself before this in. It's interesting to think that he shot this and shot movies with douglas. Sirk in shot with wells. It's it's just Looking great constructed film many he was the one that shut the reshoots for amerson and then he ended up working with wells again on touch of evil. If memory serves and strange all right anything he did like written on the wind the Yet he can do this this very clean. Black and white. That reminds me more of lake. That's why i was thinking about border incident. Because it's a really clean in the daytime very white looking lar- you know it's not like out miramax araca but then he can do those lake glossy melodrama colors from sir. Yeah when you say cirque. That's the first thing that comes to mind. Is those colors. Because seeing written on the wind. I was very fortunate to see that film class. And yeah it's just so saturated and then talking about the screenplay don't get better people than charles lederer and ben hacked to adapt the screenplay. And i think there was credited by joan harrison who is another. Just top notch screenwriter. You're really firing on all cylinders. And i think they are propping up. Montgomery who probably knew he might have been in a little too deep without all these heavy hitters behind him. I don't know how to say it without sending on charitable and. I don't feel uncharitable when i say this. I'm trying to find the good things in his in his presence in this film has it's not like it real life. You don't have people like that. Who look and talk and athlete him on the other hand. It's film so it's not real life. That is true. I do have like a thing. I can say that leads to possibly to the hanged man. Because i felt the opposite way about the hanged man. did a very good job and was working so hard to be that seething angry sailor guy from from a book in a way that robert mugabe was not funded. A student to this idea of us. Changing sailor to and us changing the. I want to say that in one in the book he might just be kind of a near do well but in the movie. He's a veteran. The idea of the bad guy being hugo in the movie but in the book he's send s. c. n. Short for senator. So again it kind of points to this larger corruption that the senator is the one who murdered his buddy. I'm trying to remember his buddies name. Because i think that might also change between the two. Shorty shoddy yeah. Well he he had done like he was being blackmailed. because he had the senator now in in the Movie but in the book the senator had paid to have his wife murdered and so the waxman was about covering that he had murdered his life. Kind of showing that. If you're rich and powerful in america you can get away with anything. We'll make movies. They'll be like no. This is what will make him a gangster over in the hangman. Make jimmy hoffa. It's interesting that that change occurred in the project. Robert montgomery was in be as montgomery was a lifelong republican. And things like that but the film definitely leads left and the to change it from corrupt government official to a corrupt industrialist and have the government man you know the art smith character be the hero or anti hero sides with the government over ride a businessman in the end. Even if it's wore our revenge than justice per se or doing the right thing you know. I mean hugo if this movie were made today you know Based on dick. Cheney air france somebody like that war profiteer and just obscenely wealthy and all right guys. Let's go ahead and take a break l. Be right back with an interview with sarah. Wineman author of unspeakable acts true tales of murder deceit and obsession right after these brief messages. Hi i'm dave. Kitchen filmmaker in los angeles. And i'm the host of the outcast presented by out fest. A new podcast where i have conversations with. Lgbt creators analyze to discuss their work their inspirations their passions and the challenges of getting our authentic voices heard. I was scared. Because i thought. Oh what am i doing like. I am selling my soul. But when i realized what the movie was like i'm in let's do. Let's make this wonderful movie. The freedom of ad. Living in letting things happen in the moment with stephen trask. Let's write something that involves stand up. Comedy drag punk. Rock was so rebellious and precocious. I guess the definition of gay to me is green home. Women gave the so with life. I feel so fast. You guys are right hell. You aren't.

Robert montgomery senator wells hugo waxman Mattie robert mugabe charles lederer joan harrison stephen trask douglas jimmy hoffa miramax lake los angeles Rock america murder Cheney sarah
"joan harrison" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:48 min | 7 months ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Minnesota leads 26 21. The Vikings have fourth inch from just outside the Seahawks five yard line. They're gonna go for it. You like to call I do like the call I do like to call and I think I would go for it as well. Vikings have been successful in the short yardage situations tonight. They happened and they they're they're big honkers up front have done a nice job checking on the left side and Kirk cousins got a sneak the last time. Cousins will go under center. I formation behind him. Ham is the fullback. Madison is the tailback Cousins takes the snap. He will hand it off to Madison Straight ahead. I don't know he needed to get to the five based on the initial spot. He's short. They're saying, See on football. Alexander Madison needed to get the nose of the football and couldn't get it. Bobby Wagner came shooting through and made first contact and the Seahawks defense comes up with a stop in with 1 57 ago. Seattle will take over Wagner, along with Benson, Male, a stop Alexander Madison short on that is absolutely the right call based on a replay. We just saw Madison tried to stretch the ball. I think it was May although who was reaching out to try to knock the football out? Madison had to pull it in. You give credit to Cody barred on the plate, too, because they had lead blocker on him and had he been able to make that block. They would have gotten the first down, but he just smashed it in the lab Wagner to come in to make the place. So the Seahawks with one time out 1 57 to go. They will take over at their own six. First intent. Wilson of the guns. The receivers, right. Single man left Wilson back to pass steps out of the pocket pumping going run 10 15 20 yard line, and he's all the way out to about 23. Go to the full baseball slide that time. Just gotta crouch down. Clock moving 1 43 to go. Wilson gets him lined up. That's a run of 17 yards for Wilson to receivers, right? Single man left shotgun snap. What's coming? Wilson looks Rose, Left sided. It's incomplete. David more working back to the football, but the throw was low. Now it'll be second down and 10 clock stopped. 1 33 to go. David Moore was open on the play, and Russell misfired through it lowered into the ground. Maybe they're maybe the weather. Maybe the balls a little wet. But I was also going to say, Coach That's one thing to watch. Now. If defenders fall down, try to keep a guy in front of him. Defender falls down suddenly throw like that could turn into a touchdown. Absolutely. Three receivers right one left 2nd and 10 from the 23 yard line. Wilson of the shotgun. There's the snap. He's back to pass what's coming again. Wilson slides left steps up in the pocket Surveys throws down the middle when it's incomplete. David Morris around the 45 yard line, Mike Hughes was in coverage. It'll bring up 3rd and 10 with 1 27 to go. Not very often. This year. You've seen Russell Wilson just simply off target with his throws. No, he held the ball. A long time to the protection was pretty good. He's waiting for something down the field pretty far. Now you could see him run again. If if all of a sudden they go into a kind of a pre vent pass defense here to get the first down, two receivers left two receivers, right? Wilson of the shotgun goes with a hard count. Minnesota is not Joan Harrison Smith Up near the line of scrimmage is the Wilsons left? Here's the snap Wilson back what's coming up the middle Wilson steps up. Wilson is his. He throws deep down the field, and it's incomplete. Metcalf. It's stopped his route. Not Wilson was just gonna take off running in the last second, he tried to throw it deep for Dickie Metcalfe, and now it comes down to this. It is fourth and sin for Seattle from.

Russell Wilson Cousins Seahawks Alexander Madison football Bobby Wagner Vikings Seattle Minnesota David Moore Metcalf David Mike Hughes David Morris Dickie Metcalfe Cody Ham Wilsons Benson Rose
"joan harrison" Discussed on Snarf Talk

Snarf Talk

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on Snarf Talk

"No I mean. That was fun. Keep talking like him and then I realized we're going to go into like a really dark knight is like a Billion Times better than begins corrective sounded Oh. Yes, that's the only thing that begins just just want to laugh at it and punch. Tumbler the actual Batman's not that good. Go back and watch. But I'm. Only part of it the best while the best part of Batman begins is when he's up against scarecrow, and you see the black face. Yeah, Batman like. That's He's ledger is probably the best joke representation that we have so far on percents. Data, that makes the movie right there. Yes, sure so. I love the. Great. Push pull in that movie. There's a lot of drama. There's a lot of there's so much to it well and it also. Kinda hits to the to the. Core Batman where Batman believes in people that people are generally good, and if they have a shining light or a person to follow that they will follow that person, and that's it really hits hard in this and being able to accept like the. The bad rule like he's. He's accepting the fact that he's going to be the bad guy by the end of this and saying I'm fine with that long as someone is saved I really think Christopher Nolan's one of the best film makers of our time generation whatever you want to say, but that's a great example of a movie that's able to seamlessly manage like autonomy different storylines. In a way that keep it fast pace, but not confusing. And in a way that engaging and seamless throughout yeah and mean. The visuals are incredible. I remember seeing that in theaters in that opening scene. Robbing a bank. Shot Max to the shoot like the angles of the cameras adapt field and. The. Salads Auditing Yeah! There was really some masterful filmmaking working on that. On top of the fact, he's letter was fantastic and air necker was great I mean Batman was the worst part of the movie. I agree I. IT hurts me to say it, but I completely agree with you, but the way they did it with. Each individual character storyline like you see each person's story. In a different light like everybody has a different. Point of view and you, you physically see that point of view in that movie every aspect of it, and then it all comes together at the end. It's perfect. It's perfect. It's a really good movie, the bad suit. That's the only downfall for me. I am the the motorcycle Batman suit as it's known, right and be well. It looked a lot better than I did in the third movie when he was in the middle of the day out fighting. Yeah, and you're like new. Ben Affleck's much bad ass. He's more bad ass while way better. That was your. Number, four, four, hundred, four, my number four. Another movie we've already about. Logan. Loved it. I love everything about it. I need to Rewatch Logan. Really because I don't really remember it that much. It's so good this. We went there for my birthday. We had a lot of drinks beforehand. What are we going to? Yeah, it's Sushi. We did have Sushi did who would have thought who would affect? Lot So. I really love it I I. Agree with you that it should have went more towards the comic book. Old Man Logan take but I still appreciate the movie for what it is because it's so different than the. Original X men movies in the original Wolverine that they're doing really on a whole different level. Yeah, they re. They remove him from that. Put them in his own little world and. It's, it's just incredible. I don't know what more I can say about it like. It was rated R. so they could do a lot more with it. It is very violent and bloody, but that that part of that movie isn't. What makes it great? It's the Wolverine Storyline Logan storyline that makes it great like his his. His. Character Yeah, yes, and the progression of how dark his life has been, and what he's doing to make it a little bit brighter, and that is to try to. Make this little girl into something that he couldn't be. Of It. It's good movie moving all right my number three. This one is a little iffy, because the first one is a Brian Movie. It's kind of like a godfather situation. You peaked my curiosity. Yeah. I'm going to go with Indiana Jones and the last crusade. because. It's my favorite Indiana Jones movie. I love that movie I. There is no way crusade is better than raiders. I disagree. Temple do hundred percent. That's his favorite I. Love It I. Mean I loved? His heart out of the guys challenge. It's great. It's awesome. It's best part of the movie, but raiders, ten times, butter and crusade no crusades. amick between Sean Connery and Joan Harrison Ford you. Getting caught in the Nazi castle. Yeah, they're flipping around in the fireplace. And then they knocked over. His Dad knocks over. The lights occurred, trying to blow it out. We've got a problem. It's great I mean I I. Love the whole idea of penitent man will pass and the invisible bridge going to collect the holy grail. He chose wrong. Drinks, the wrong I'm not saying I don't. Dislike I, love the crusade, but. Raiders is so much production value is on another level as well. And also like the whole scene in the desert with the tank, going off the cliff. Dude, it is such a bad ass. Movie and I love Raiders of lost. Don't get me wrong. But it's like nonstop action throughout the last crusade, and it's like the best example of a wrap up to a trilogy or not the best, but it's really. It's a really good example of a wrap up to a trillion juice. Satisfied Oh. No, there's kingdom on the crystal skull, which I also enjoyed I enjoy them quite a bit. It was fucking dog shit. I mean. It's not a great movie. But I enjoyed it Megan. Fifth. I'm excited to see it me, too. I hope they don't bring Shiloh booth back. I took beaver now because kingdom in the Crystal Skull did your dad throws head on the ground? He's like this is not what I signed up for. Yeah, he. He was like. Wow, that was not good. I'm like! No, it was not sorry alien. Every. Man Eating ants. I mean I got. To Go to a movie, which was stated itself, and he was Sorta pointed, and I was disappointed. It's not that it's a pretty fun movie. It's fun, but it's not. You know I feel bad because Indiana. Jones no matter what you say, everything is compared to raiders. But I did like the last crusade more than temple I mean. Clearly. So? I, love the young..

Batman raiders Man Logan Indiana Jones Indiana Sushi Christopher Nolan Ben Affleck Max Nazi castle Sean Connery Megan Joan Harrison Ford
"joan harrison" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"She's used it to take kids home. Bring them to gymnastics class or to meet her at the office. It's been a godsend to us. She says this story was reported by Chelsea. She sleep for the Monitor. She was a graduate of the Sorbonne then. She answered telephones for Alfred Hitchcock. Then she helped him produce some of his most iconic films. A new book about Joan Harrison seeks to give the forgotten visionary. Do check out. Today's issue for our book review. I Peter Tongue Gatt now commentary on integrity from the Monitor's editorial board what is often called world order usually refers to the rules imposed by powerful countries or global bodies. So it comes as a surprise when one of those bodies the International Monetary Fund sees order elsewhere. Last week I am F- Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva told the leaders of Lebanon a country deep an economic and political crisis to respond to the call of the Lebanese people by Colt. She really meant the demands of a million Lebanese who have been protesting on and off since October in an upwelling for integrity and governance and against the country's main power the Hezbollah group to these young people who are fed up with electricity blackouts and other effects of entrenched corruption order lies in accountability transparency and democratic equality. The crisis in Lebanon while small on a global scale is big with meaning about the origins of world order the IMF. Chief had it right. The call.

Alfred Hitchcock Joan Harrison Lebanon International Monetary Fund F- Managing Director Kristalin Peter Tongue Gatt Hezbollah editorial board Colt
"joan harrison" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. The New York Times is reporting that President Trump ordered that his aide and son-in-law Jared Kushner be given a top secret security clearance against the advice of career intelligence officials who are concerned about his finances and contact with foreigners during the election. The president has denied any involvement. The chairman of the house oversight committee Elijah Cummings says he's asking White House officials to provide documents and submit to interviews on the matter. President Trump's personal lawyer Michael Cohen wrapped up his third straight day of testimony before congress this time behind closed doors with the house intelligence committee NPR's Tim Mack reports. Congress isn't finished with him yet as Cohen less the private room where he had been grilled for more than seven hours. He told reporters he would be back for more. It was very productive is I said I'm committed to telling the truth, and I will back on March six to finish up. There's more to discuss chairman, Adam Schiff exiting the closed door session praised Cohen's willingness to cooperate shift. Also said that the committee has scheduled an interview with former Trump organization business associate Felix Seder the week after Cohen separately. He congressional aide confirmed that the committee anticipates bring in Allen Weisselberg attr-. Trump financial executive Tim Mack NPR news, Washington. The house has approved a second Bill in as many days that would expand the federal background check system for purchasing firearms. NPR's? Brockton Booker reports South Carolina democrat Jim Clyburn believes the 2015 fifteen Charleston shooting could have been prevented if federal authorities had more than three business days to investigate before the shooter got a gun leading up to the vote Clyburn said his Bill will give federal investigators up to twenty days to do a background check. We'll save lives, and we would be better off for Georgia Republican Doug Collins, disagrees saying it does nothing to make communities safer, but it will make it harder for citizens to exercise their second amendment rights and defend themselves and their families. The measure was approved by the democratic controlled house at faces strong opposition in the Senate where Republicans are in control. Braxton Booker NPR news, Washington, Oregon has enacted the nation's first man. Tori. Statewide, rent control law governor Kate Brown says it will provide immediate relief to people struggling to keep up with rising rents and a tight rental market everyone here in snows that this is a ground breaking piece of legislation as we are the first state in the nation to enact this level of protection for our renters. The Bill is a critical tool for stabilising the rental market throughout the state of Oregon, the new law limits rental increases to once a year and can be no more than seven percent. Plus any change in the consumer price index that measures inflation. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. Rescue efforts continue on the Indonesian island of sullaway wherein gold mine collapsed. Tuesday officials say there are dozens of miners still trapped in the rubble. Eight people are confirmed dead the aid group Doctors Without Borders is suspending operations in the epicenter of the eight continuing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This comes after unknown assailants set fire to do a bullet treatment centers run by the group in separate attacks. Earlier this week NPR's Narita Eisenman reports since this outbreak was declared last August health responders have faced violent resistance from a lot of communities that distrust outsiders after years of armed conflict in the area, but the attacks on the two Ebola treatment centers run by Doctors Without Borders is on another level at the first center in the town of Kotla the brother of a patient died while trying to flee Congolese authorities say at the second in the city of Bhutan. Bo four patients who fled have yet to be low. Located and a police officer was killed for now. The several dozen patients at these two centers have been taken to a transfer facility. Run by another eight group called ulema Doctors Without Borders says it can't resume activity until it can address the risks Narita Eisenman NPR news. Floodwaters are beginning to recede in northern California. Where some thirty five hundred people were forced from their homes after the Russian river overflowed, its banks. Some of the displaced residents may be able to return as early as Friday, meanwhile in the southern US many rivers remain above above flood stage in Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi and Alabama. I'm Nora raum. NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Newman's Own foundation Workington nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's Own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's Own foundation dot org. Welcome to forum. I'm Michael Krasny. In twenty seventeen the metoo movement began exposing Hollywood's culture of sexual violence, which then broadened into a global rallying cry but social coercion and abuse has long had a place in Hollywood is three recently released books attest, the books examined the working conditions of women during Hollywood's golden age and the abuses of casting couch predators like, Howard Hughes, and Harry Cohen. We're going to talk with the authors about the vast contributions and challenges for women in the studio era joining us in studios, Victoria, Riskin. She's the author of fair and Robert Riskin Hollywood memoir about her parents. And she's also former president of the writers guild of America West and a board member of KCRW NPR member station in Santa Monica. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Happy to be here. Glad to have you here. Incur Trina, excuse me. Karina Longworth also joins us for this hour. She's the author of book called seduction sex lies and stardom in Holly in Howard uses Hollywood. And she's a creator of the podcast. You must remember this. Welcome Karina Longworth. Karina Longworth, we have you. Well, we'll try to connect with her. In the meantime, all recognized Jennifer Smith is with us author of nobody's girl. Friday, the women who ran Hollywood. And she's professor of history at the university of work and welcome to the program. Thanks a lot, Michael. Thank you. Let me begin with you. Professor spineless began by talking about this Iraq, particularly since we're putting a good deal of emphasis in spotlight on the casting couch, and and the difficulties during that era, golden arrows, it's often call, but there's also a forgotten kind of her story part of this women played a extraordinarily significant role more than I think even a lot of the historians know in fact, in the words of Bette Davis for those twenty years with a golden era. They ruled Hollywood yes, many people would argue that. In fact, the industry was rather interesting because they put out press releases, and they were calling us to claim that Hollywood was a generation or two ahead of the rest of the country in terms of employing women, and when I was actually doing research. On this period in the great, depression and the second World War. I found statistics that claim that nearly half of all Hollywood employees were women, and they weren't secretaries or women who are relying on the casting couch. They were producers they were supervising editors they were presidents of the screen writers guild. You know, they could do just about anything. And the numbers of in still didn't get the recognition that they deserve or that it warranted. But forty percent of them were actually working in the film industry. And a lot of those were writers and producers and pretty high up in positions. It's a it's kind of forgotten page of American history as I said. But the height of the of the studio system itself really saw. Mainly the stars. I mean, Betty Davis. I mentioned Katherine Hepburn. I mean and many of these stars really did gain their stardom or move to the top. By having to go through a kind of hazing and sexual difficulties in real challenges on that score. Yes. I think that some actresses did. But it depended how well protected you are, for example, Katherine Hepburn came from very wealthy background. She had the agent Leland Hayward who had her back. It was also her boyfriend for a while. And she was rather funny. I think there was one story about her and Harry cohn's office when he was interviewing her for holiday nineteen thirty eight and he made some sort of remark about hearing how good she was in bed, and she just totally blanked him. And he tried it several times and she ignored him. And he just gave up and the same thing with Betty Davis mean she came out. It was working at universal before she moved to Warner Brothers. And it was just you little mousy brunette. Nobody knew who she was. And even you know, one of the first days on the set, some lighting guy said get this brought out of the way, and she screamed, oh, you can't talk to me like that only realizing later on the debris. Rod was another term for a light not for a woman. So there were some women who put up with it because they realized they had to. But there were others that you know, really went after the system and sometimes made it work for them. Because I think Bette Davis is one of those interesting stars who was able to work with the system and a really interesting way and others were not so successful Davis is fighting for the area. But you also had executives like Joan Harrison. Pretty important players in those days. But most of the would-be players. Unfortunately, are playboys were were men, Harry the rat Cohen. I mean that was what he was known as he did a lot. He at Columbia did a lot of promoting for women at Columbia, and certainly made a reputation for himself as one of these almost we could you compare them to Harvey Weinstein was he that. No, I think he's really much-maligned. No, he heeded some horrendous things, but compared to all of his other producing colleagues he hired more women writers and producers than anybody else. And he wasn't just there to proposition them. I think Virginia van op is probably one of the most famous people know her for producing and Gilda and some of the great noirs, and he promoted her actually to, you know, the executive producer at his studio Columbia over the heads of several other men, and when he found out that these other men hadn't congratulated her the next day. He fired them all. Yeah. Well, there there are mixed reviews number. I haven't thinking about Louis b Mayer, for example, his assistant in Idaho run. Yeah. She was pretty powerful in her own, right. But Louis b Mayer was no inferred, reportedly, for example groping and harassing Judy Garland threatening her. I mean, there are some pretty ugly episodes with a lot of these executives and even Arthur free as well to going after a Shirley temple when she was a preteen pretty disgusting. Disgusting. And then you have people like Joan Collins and Marilyn Monroe, even Shirley temple reporting memoirs about tempted molestations and so forth. So it was right? It was just really would Hollywood was at that time. No getting around it. Talking about what holiday was though, I want to actually also bring in. Excuse me, Karina Longworth before we talked the Victoria Riskin who's here with us studio, and she's the author Sudoku seduction sex lies and stardom in Howard Hughes's Hollywood. So it wasn't so much. Maybe the women's Hollywood Corinne along with. It was Howard Hughes. Hollywood you say he's a Trojan horse. Well, that's how I approached writing. This book has that. I, you know, it's a book about Howard. He's as Hollywood. But what it really is to me as a story of of about a dozen women who were involved with him from the nineteen twenties through the end of the nineteen fifty s and the story was uses a pretty sordid and exploitative one. I mean, he was actually hiring informers and detectives and people to follow these women. He was also, of course, playing a PR role. We know that picture of Jane Russell..

Hollywood NPR Karina Longworth president Howard Hughes Washington Betty Davis Nora raum Katherine Hepburn Bette Davis Michael Cohen Narita Eisenman NPR President Trump Ebola Doctors Without Borders Trump Congress chairman
"joan harrison" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"Happen. The secret history of the future is brought to you by American Express. So many of the technological breakthroughs we've talked about on this show would never have happened without backing whether it's a grant to an inventor or an investment in a project or just the support of peers in the science and tech community innovation almost always goes better. When someone's got its back. You don't have to go it alone with the powerful backing of American Express. Don't live life without it. What does it take to disrupt an industry? How can some people do what's never been done before? What will life look like in the future? If you ask yourself questions like these, you might just get hooked on the trailblazers podcast series. It's hosted by the bestselling biographer, Walter Isaacson he finds unexpected stories about today's biggest digital disruptions, for instance, can you believe right now there's a movement underway. Two vertically stacked crops, indoors, monitored by artificial intelligence, amazing stuff. And that's just one of many stories. You'll hear from brilliant guests at the forefront of their industries who reveal all the ups and downs twists and turns and lessons they learned along the way. You'll love these stories. They're fascinating and you'll hear tons of aha moments in each episode. Just search trailblazers on your favorite podcast app or visit Dell technologies dot com. Slash trailblazers. Just like Reinhold going up against Stanford and Carnegie Mellon, Joan Harrison decided to ignore the skeptics rethought. The little guy had no John's and went up against the world's greatest astronomers with his crazy sounding plan. He built a series of Clark's over many years that used clever tricks to keep accurate time it c- he got rid of the pendulum and replaced it with a balance wheel, which was unaffected by the rolling of a ship, and he made key parts of his clocks using combinations of different metals to counteract the effect of thermal expansion and contraction. But his was forging ahead with all this technological progress. His dealings with the longitude prize committee were much twisty or more complicated. He repeatedly went before the prize board and talked gown. His clocks saying they weren't ready yet. Even though they probably were, he didn't ask for the prize money. He kept saying, don't bother to give this trial. Let me go back to the drawing board. He was a perfectionist and winning the prize became. The less important to him than making a perfect device. In fact, off one of his self deprecating appearances before the prize committee, Harrison went back to the drawing board for almost twenty years, and that's when he came back with h full a watch about the size of a t. salsa. When it went on a c. trial, it lost less than two minutes during the stormy voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. And back again at this point, Harrison had finally sold the problem to his own satisfaction. But the truth is he'd probably could have caused a sea trial and made a claim on the prize at least twenty years earlier than he did. This is twenty years that he could have had millions of dollars in his pocket. How old and they, as at this point in in and why is he pointing all the money? He was the different sort of bear. So let's do the math born in sixteen ninety three by now it's seventeen fifty. Nine seventeen sixty. So he's he's getting up there, but it has to be right. That's the thing he wasn't going to settle for less and he had been his own worst critic all the way along. But when he finished the watch, he wrote about it in a way that showed he had finally solve the problem to his own satisfaction that it was really a beautiful thing. And he he was thankful to God that he had lived long enough to complete it. Harrison, meet a tremendous advance for society at large for commerce for exploration, but having solved the tech problem, he faced a new challenge getting the prize committee to recognize his achievement. The idea that this problem of building such an intricate clock would be done by a self educated individual who did what the entire scientific establishment of Europe had failed to do for several centuries. That was the moment that really knocked me over in fact, because the price committee was made up mostly of Strom is they resented the idea that a clockmaker someone they considered a mea mechanic could compete with the legendary astronomer like Galileo. They came up with various reasons not to give Harrison the prize despite h foles impressive performance in the sea trial. The judges claimed it could just have been a fluke. Harrison was as you might expect pretty miffed. He became. Understandably, very angry and difficult. And the case was argued in court on various occasions. Broadsides were published on both sides of the argument. It was was a big flap. What did he want? Why? What was he after Justice. What was due him. He had, he had done the work. He'd proven the point and mostly he wanted the credit for having done it in the end. King George got involved and tested the watch in his private observatory and leaned on parliament to give Harrison the money. So they finally did. Not

Joan Harrison American Express Walter Isaacson Atlantic Ocean Europe Dell Clark John Reinhold King George Strom Carnegie Mellon Stanford Galileo twenty years two minutes
"joan harrison" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Just like Brian hold going up against Stanford and Carnegie Mellon, Joan Harrison decided to ignore the skeptics. We thought the little guy had no John's and went up against the world's greatest astronomers with his crazy sounding plan. He built a series of Clark's over many years that used clever tricks to keep accurate time it c- he got rid of the pendulum and replaced it with a balance wheel, which was unaffected by the rolling of ship. And he made key parts of his clocks using combinations of different metals to counteract the effect of thermal expansion and contraction. But it's Harrison was forging ahead with all this technological progress. His dealings with the longitude prize committee were much twisty or more complicated. He repeatedly went before the prize board and talked gown. His clocks saying they weren't ready yet. Even though they probably were, he didn't ask for the prize money. He kept saying, don't bother to give this trial. Let me go back to the drawing board. He was a perfectionist and winning the prize, became less important to. Him than making a perfect device. In fact, off to one of his self deprecating appearances before the prize committee. Harrison went back to the drawing board for almost twenty years, and that's when he came back with h four, a watch about the size of tea salsa. When it went on a c. trial, it lost less than two minutes during the stormy voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. And back again at this point, Harrison had finally sold the problem to his own satisfaction. But the truth is he probably could have passed a sea trial and made a claim on the prize at least twenty years earlier than he did. This is twenty years that he could have had millions of dollars in his pocket. How old is this point in? And why is he you all. All the money. He was the different sort of bear. So let's do the math born in sixteen ninety three by now it's seventeen fifty. Nine seventeen sixty. So he's he's getting up there, but it has to be right. That's the thing he wasn't going to settle for less and he had been his own worst critic all the way along. But when he finished the watch, he wrote about it in a way that showed he had finally solve the problem to his own satisfaction that it was really a beautiful thing. And he he was thankful to God that he had lived long enough to complete it. Harrison, a tremendous advance for society at large for commerce for exploration, but having solved the tech problem, he faced a new challenge getting the prize committee to recognize his achievement. The idea that this problem of building such an intricate clock would be done by a self educated individual who did what the entire scientific establishment of Europe had failed to do for several centuries. That was the moment that really knocked me over in fact, because the price committee was made up mostly of Strom as they resented the idea that clockmaker someone they considered a mere mechanic could compete with the legendary astronomer like Galileo. They came up with various reasons not to give Harrison the prize despite h foles impressive performance in the sea trial. The judges claimed it could just have been a fluke. Harrison was as you might expect pretty miffed. He became. Understandably, very angry and difficult. And the case was argued in court on various occasions. Broadsides were published on both sides of the argument. It was. It was a big flap. What did he want? Why? What was he after Justice. What was due him. He had. He had done the work. He'd proven the point and mostly he wanted the credit for having done it in the end. Can George Scott involved and tested the watch in his private observatory and leaned on parliament to give Harrison money. So they finally did..

Joan Harrison Atlantic Ocean Clark John Stanford Brian Carnegie Mellon Europe George Scott Strom Galileo twenty years two minutes
"joan harrison" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"How to call it, their arguments they screaming at each other, there. Castigation of h. Was home Merrick. They would scream nearly other in the theater, the mercury, and I be great sports fan. I had a great time to. I'd take the paper and read because it was the kind of screaming near Lang, that sort of you didn't hear again or me was bad. But it was fruitful. And he never did it. Best work we ever did was with Jack Ausman because Jack Hausman was a man of the greatest take, and he did. He -nology had. He was unique. He was great. He should have been in the hall of fame. I don't know why that never happen, but I can never say enough about check-outs. Remarkable and the fact at the end that he had this careers night triumph. Yes. Well, he was a guest on a TV program that also was the host. Up at Alsan by way of teasing him, I guess, said to him, Jack, I, I didn't know your. I'm Jack said to him, you'll never asked me. Perfect. And then you while end up as a guest star in an episode of the paper? Chase, yes, indeed. No. Why did that happen? I don't know how that happened. It was. I'm curious, turn of events, the beginnings of which I don't remember what I'm. I'm glad that it's a wonderful little asterisk in your career. Yeah, the two of you got to work together one more time. Yeah, I love jackass Mun. He meant motor me that now must anyone I've ever known outside wild family? That's a big statement. Yeah. Now, the next big statement person we want to ask about is Alfred Hitchcock because this was in the very early forties you got cast. I mean you had done a couple of bit parts, I guess, but this is a sensually your first movie? Oh yes. Nineteen forty. Two. I came out here to do Sepetu. By the way. Recommended to hit tho the polit. By Jack council. Now, the interesting thing is. Both Jack Hausman. And hit. Well, under contract. To David l. shell snick. And. Hitch, went off on zone. Jaxkar bowl was producing shutt-, but hitch as houseman. If he knew of young actor who could play this saboteur. And Hausmann immediately recommended me. Identified that morning of going over to here. I think eight o'clock in the morning, just research. And. We had a conversation and hit it off, like Hamon aches. I just was perfect from Nord go. That you showed us a photo. In your office over there. It's you and hitch an. I've never seen him that young. I mean, you're a baby face as well, but I've never seen him that young and it's wild. You already looked connected. You already. You said you've just gotten back from filming saboteur. It's, it's incredible to think that that you were part of his. Is movie making that early. This country. He made wonderful pictures in England. Yeah, but then he came to rely on you. Then as with Joan Harrison, we did TV series. And when did he start looking to you. For advice at different as more than an actor. Yeah. Well, I tried to. And I used as I did Wellstone same, I'd have come sations of the set. While we're waiting for the shot. And just Chang. What I felt about a shot, whatever. And gradually the fellas. Would he. I didn't want to use the word help. It's not help an assistant to just be there. And. It happened on shatter where I play the shop. But what hitched liked was that I had all these opinions. Certainly about. Acting particular scenes. So. So he remembered that. And when Lou awesome. Who was the major figure in this town. As hitch to do a television program..

Jack Hausman Jack Jack Ausman Jack council Chase Hitch Lang Chang Alfred Hitchcock Joan Harrison Hamon Sepetu Lou David l. shell houseman Alsan Wellstone England Hausmann
"joan harrison" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on We The People

"This. Will soon be live. It's not all ready re the keel Joan Harrison on the privileges remun- claws and then do further research of your own, including reading Gerard's, superb book America's founding son, John Bingham, and the invention of the fortune amendment current Android. It's time for closing arguments in this wonderful debate, and I'm just gonna ask you the obvious question to sum up as concisely an intensely as you can. Why was done being an important and what was his original vision of the fourteenth amendment? And we're going to begin with Gerard. John Bingham was important because he caught Jefferson's declaration or Lincoln's declaration about fundamental equality of all people into the constitutional text in a very clear way where we'll stand forever. And in addition, he made it clear that he brought that a fundamental rights that our constitution lists ought to be applied to everyone against every level of government. And you know, being in a sense is not as well known as he should be because in his day, he was ahead of his time. He was one of the few people that was really advocating for, especially the extension of Bryce. But now we take for granted what he did, so we don't see the contribution he made for what it was. So I hope that something like this will help rectify that. Thank you so much for that and for your for your wonderful work in your and your book. And we're looking forward to the next one Kurt. The last word is to you. Why was John Bingham important? And what was his original vision of the fourteenth amendment? Well, and I let me say what a pleasure. It's been to engage in this conversation and and especially to talk with your ARD who has brought so much of our understanding of John Bingham to the attention of public and thank him for that. I'll I'll close with something about John Bingham that I think is critically important. I think sometimes is missed. And this comes from the ratification period after the elections of eighteen sixty six Republicans actually increased. They won the support of the people to adopt the Republican policy for reconstruction in the got additional seats in the house and the Senate so much so that the radical Republicans believe that they now have the power to go forward and simple. Legislate and take control of of civil rights in the south in and places health under military oversight in semi permanent basis. And that is Stevens proposed a Bill that would basically abandon the fourteenth amendment and would simply legislate. The provisions of the fourteenth amendment is a simple Bill. John Bingham opposed Thaddeus Stevens effort, and he did Sonal speech which accused Stevens of trying to take away the right of the people to determine their own fundamental law. According to being this was not a matter mere legislative power. The constitution as was should be understood as a constitution of limited power and as much as being believed in everything Stevens was trying to do. He insisted that they do it according to the constitutional rules and that they remained true to the need to adopt a specific amendment giving constitution power to. Enforce the rights of Friedman in the south Bingham prevailed in those early months of eighteen sixty seven. He turned to side of that Stevens efforts to abandon the fourteenth amendment. And he led congress to pass the reconstruction acts acts which secured an amendment to the constitution, an amendment that has become fundamentally important to who we are and our understanding of individual liberty to this day. So beings insistence on principle ultimately gave us this jewel of the constitution, and I believe he needs to be an deserves to be celebrated for it. Thank you so much, Kurt, lash, Gerard milk for riveting. Luminated and crucially important discussion of John Bingham, the James Madison of the fourteenth amendment. Dear. We the people listeners. Keila. Marin John Harrison may have been a little late and turning in their homework, but you have not been laid in Terni in yours. You have been enthusiastically writing to me in response to my request that you read a supreme court majority opinions descent, and tell me what you think is more convincing. And the homework for this episode is is a is a rigorous one..

John Bingham Thaddeus Stevens Gerard milk Marin John Harrison Lincoln Kurt Joan Harrison Terni America Senate congress Friedman Jefferson James Madison milk
"joan harrison" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"So steven spielberg says it is time for a woman to play indiana jones here's what he said he said he knew he would risk fan fearing by casting an actress and the role made famous harrison ford but believes it is time the explorer took a different form make the make indiana jones like a dog or something i guess i'm any different form work apparently in exclusive interviews building knotted when asked this new jones could be added we'd have to change the name from jones to joan and there'd be nothing wrong with that he's been vocal champion of times up campaign for gender equality in the movie industry and of course he was married to the actress kate capshaw since nineteen ninetyone he met her nine hundred four she starred in indiana jones temple of doom she's an off lateral by the way i mean that in in temple do my goodness that's a stinker but in any case he's my mom was strong voice shed very strong opinion actually i knew as mom jeez to run a kosher restaurant on pico boulevard milk and honey which is quite good but he says that he thinks he'll be hurson joan harrison ford's last indiana jones movie would have to be harrison ford is pushing eighty this point he's really getting up there it's indiana jones and the kingdom of the actual skull is where we are at this point but when when you have steven spielberg saying we're gonna take conic male characters shift them to female i've said this before i find it really stupid one of the things that's great about film one things about art is that specificity is universality so the more specific character is the better the art is because inspir we see what we have in common with other people when you draw person really well what you see is what i have in common with that person that's universal if you drop people broadly so broadly you can legitimately just take.

jones kate capshaw indiana jones temple joan harrison ford steven spielberg indiana milk
"joan harrison" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"So steven spielberg says it is time for a woman to play indiana jones here's what he said he said he knew he would risk fan fearing by casting an actress and the role made famous harrison ford but believes it is time the explorer took a different form make the make indiana jones like a dog or something i guess i'm any different form work apparently in exclusive interviews building knotted when asked this new jones could be added we'd have to change the name from jones to joan and there'd be nothing wrong with that he's been vocal champion of times up campaign for gender equality in the movie industry and of course he was married to the actress kate capshaw since nineteen ninetyone he met her nine hundred four she starred in indiana jones temple of doom she's an off lateral by the way i mean that in in temple do my goodness that's a stinker but in any case he's my mom was strong voice shed very strong opinion actually i knew as mom jeez to run a kosher restaurant on pico boulevard milk and honey which is quite good but he says that he thinks he'll be hurson joan harrison ford's last indiana jones movie would have to be harrison ford is pushing eighty this point he's really getting up there it's indiana jones and the kingdom of the actual skull is where we are at this point but when when you have steven spielberg saying we're gonna take conic male characters shift them to female i've said this before i find it really stupid one of the things that's great about film one things about art is that specificity is universality so the more specific character is the better the art is because inspir we see what we have in common with other people when you draw person really well what you see is what i have in common with that person that's universal if you drop people broadly so broadly you can legitimately just take.

jones kate capshaw indiana jones temple joan harrison ford steven spielberg indiana milk
"joan harrison" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

They Walk Among Us

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

"Season two episode twenty two. If they walk among us a counts dedicated to U K true crime. Listen caution is advised as this episode contains adult themes and descriptions that some listeners, my find distressing. Between no and teen seventy five nineteen eighty. The Yorkshire ripper used the north of England as a hunting ground. He spread fear not just in Yorkshire, but across the entire country. The AUSSIE of Ripa Peter suck cliff killed thirteen women and attacked a top. But before his capture police were gpd by recording three letters sent by hoaxer the voice on the tight climb. The tea was the serial killer. This false evidence would derail. The investigation divert attention away from the real culprit police would like to discover the recordings were made by John humble for over a quarter of a century. The answer to the question who is weird. So Jack would remain unanswered, and John will lead detectives on a wild goose chase that may have cost three women that lives. Humble was born on January nineteen. Fifty, six is mother. Violet raised him after his father Samuel passed away. When John was Aeneas years old, he had a brother cooed, Henry assistant coach. Gene lived on the Hilton line of state in Sunderland. John attended by Hilton road school and have looked secondary receiving above average grades. After John left school in Castletown, he found it difficult to forge a career path trying his hand at cleaning windows, working as a security guard and a laborer on a building site. He spent time he would be found in the round Robin pub playing dolls or watching football. He had an interest in crime writing. I'm reading stories of Jack the ripper, an Atari serial killer who stalked the streets of white Chappel in the eighteen eighties. John humble also had a criminal record in nineteen seventy three. He received a conviction for burger. Glory and theft two years on had another run in with the law for assaulting off GT police constable in Sunderland's Locarno borough. You'd viciously kicked the man in the head and receive three months in young offenders institute. During the time. Peter Sutcliffe was terrorizing the ridings of Yorkshire. John humble began sending letters to assistant chief constable George Oldfield who is heading the ripper investigation in March nineteen, seventy eight. The lettuce contain detailed information relating to the attacks that haven't been published police believe that they were written by the Yorkshire ripper. It wasn't until many years later. It was a dente for the information. Police believed to have been withheld actually been disclosed to the press the first letter written by John and address to assistant chief constable. George Oldfield was posted on March eighth nineteen, seventy eight describing himself as the Ripa stating his purpose was to rid the streets of sex workers. The letter imply that he had killed eight women, not seven as initially thought part of the letter read up to ain't now you say seven but remember Preston seventy five. This was a reference to the murder of Joan Harrison. Jason was a twenty six year old sex worker. She was last seen walking towards Preston towne center just before ten thirty PM body was found in a derelict garish on November twenty third nineteen, seventy five Joan had been sexually assaulted and mercilessly beaten. She died as a result items of jewellery had been taken including two wedding rings, and she had a deep bite Mark on the left breast Peter Sutcliffe denied that Joan was one of his victims was never charged with her murder. It wasn't until decades later in two thousand and eleven that the truth would finally be revealed advances in forensic techniques, improved the way DNA could be analyzed. And this helped the Lancaster police force identified individually believed to be the culprit a man named Christopher Smith from Leeds west short. Sheelah may have been involved of the DNA recovered from the crime scene matched his profile.

John humble Yorkshire ripper Ripa Peter Peter Sutcliffe George Oldfield assistant chief Joan Harrison Jack Sunderland Yorkshire Hilton road school England Preston towne center Jason Samuel Sheelah Violet football murder
"joan harrison" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

And That's Why We Drink

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

"Were diverted for several months because they received a taped message that report purported to be from the murderer himself that was taunting the lead investigator george oldfield and it was a man's voice saying i'm jack i see you're having no luck catching me i have the greatest respect for you george but lord you're no nearer catching me now than four years ago when i started so they took this message and then went on this like spree of lake finding the accent and like these linguists narrow down the part of the uk that this person would be from and then the daily mirror started receiving letters and the police started receiving letters and they were published and basically like this totally derailed the investigation because it wasn't from the actual murderer so just like someone like a copycat or like someone pretending not even copy had just someone fucking around with the police rice it which is just so sad so the letters were signed jack the ripper and claimed responsibility for the murder of twenty six year old joan harrison john harrison and at the time police didn't realize that that murder was not public knowledge so they just assume that this person was telling the truth when in fact this person was just taking all the details they knew and writings like detailed letters to the police and actually this hoax case was reopened in two thousand five awhile and they use dna to figure out who had written and it was it so they actually were able to take dna from the envelopes and entered into the national database and on october twentieth two thousand five a man named john samuel humble an unemployed alcoholic and longtime resident of.

george oldfield uk murder john harrison john samuel investigator joan harrison twenty six year four years
"joan harrison" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"joan harrison" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Oh hello and welcome to the main hugh monaco's food and drinks show i am articles he be this week we meet the italian star chef must see him about sewer who has become a powerful voice on the topic of the fight against food waste in a we are their volition because we are altogether we're because we believe in these idea of finding ways through creativity through dedicated that time and you know be part of this we are also getting ready for the festive season and gets drink tips from the british cocktail experts neil really and joan harrison stirred down at a secret to a good old fashioned nothing case the respecting the simplicity ingredients onto before of us we heard to the remote newfoundland island or fogo to peak parts which berries all of us ahead of this week's edition off the menu here on one who twenty four oh today we start with ace heavy at most a chef must him about tworun the man behind the michelin star ristorante austria front just gonna in modena in recent years he has become a passionate voice the topic of food waste back in two thousand fifteen he loans terrific dairy ambrosiano a community suit kitchen to coincide with the milan expert and since then he has launched a number of ventures that repair delicious meals from ingredients that would otherwise be thrown away now must has released a new book bread east gold which documents the first six months at the river terry ambrosiano and inclusive valuable tips for the home kooks on how to use the contents of the fridge more wisely racists wasmosy had to say when he visited me at this meet oreo studio water the message of the book is they could try to put together all their idea they came out in seven month at universal exposition in milan and two thousand fifteen in which sixty.

hugh monaco food waste newfoundland island modena neil joan harrison michelin ristorante austria milan wasmosy seven month six months