18 Burst results for "Jirga"

"jirga" Discussed on Eu tava la

Eu tava la

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"jirga" Discussed on Eu tava la

"Premier in those voice. My thing i spit on somew- issues go speak mailer musk's not that over mashed up all the experience. This abuse who died buckle that is to eulogy allow appropriate salvage. Posers cloud spot. You can assist with other people. You all the ways i spit and our two more days mayes local crew sankafu jirga saints. Yeah well so national nice sweater. A luckily carneval conclusive maya's zilkha fallon was not rise. Nekia other rookie. Thank you even pods Mutiple mark cab you this policy movie. Ms spills on us out on warning in winning equal was the vice forewoman though casual. Nah what gash. Not that. I bought a watch. Which data million billion search saginaw pass as silky Vail inner self. Itchy my voice. I'll dove dr voice. Bill earth voice those each modern mobilised humidity the main one pair of Bizzare salute kupuna who who to another elisabetta complicit equal. But you both the model at the coke or it's just won't so august asthma meeting that keep us to you. Don't seem to follow halloween's celcom laws within tortula phenomenon annette. Vail skela go with aversion. I follow those quizzes. Disconnect from soon. Laurie apec sipa tomato to vangelis. Selena does not talk to comment. Ultra no at only ki ki. Specific key will start asking for shah became facility sola. Susan started yeah full mental foul sample vin quasi-official to me as i emphasize on ad as porsche to serious shaima. Genova about this. Must paul legal jameis regardless of all you circularizing. She says to sassoon just whistle spot the contra mice on the fuzzy on july prakash is this age zero yuki Pollen postponed meal..

jirga saints zilkha fallon Nekia Bill earth kupuna Vail skela Laurie apec elisabetta coke asthma Selena shaima shah Susan Genova porsche sassoon prakash yuki Pollen
"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The i wanted to turn to an exclusive interview. You did with bell keys. Rashawn who has served in the afghan parliament Can you tell us about her before. We hear a bit of this interview. Yes and i'm so happy you're showing this interview because for me. She is a model of a powerful grassroots woman leader. She is brave. She is outspoken. She was a member of parliament until recently in afghanistan. She was one of the only. I think she may be the only representative who stood up to say no to the us occupation. She stood up to saying no to corruption. She has said no to releasing the taliban prisoners and she has really been fighting fighting for years for women suffering in the country. She's from the province of farah where she opened and worked in a mental health center working with the poor and lifting women. And i have to say like she's been very powerful figure to me. I remember the first time i ever saw her. She was speaking out in the loyal jirga. The parliament where she was literally beaten up in the parliament and she didn't stop talking same thing when she went on television. She was beaten up there. She is a fierce defender of of democracy of women's rights of of issues an anti imperialists that she has said from the very beginning that the us occupation would lead exactly where it's led so i feel very honored and privileged that she. She spoke to me and did this interview. And can you tell us where you spoke to her. I i cannot at this point. Her whereabouts are unknown because the security is very high. Let's go to belqis. Roshan who served in the afghan parliament and lawyer jirga hamad may follow current conditions in afghanistan as the world is missing have once again proven or statements were right..

afghan parliament Rashawn parliament farah afghanistan taliban us jirga hamad Roshan
"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:47 min | 8 months ago

"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The i wanted to turn to an exclusive interview. You did with bell keys rashawn. Who has served in the afghan parliament. Can you tell us about her before. We hear a bit of this interview. Yes and i'm so happy you're showing this interview because for me. She is a model of a powerful grassroots woman leader. She is brave. She is outspoken. She was a member of parliament until recently in afghanistan. She was one of the only. I think she may be the only representative who stood up to say no to the us occupation. She stood up to saying no to corruption. She has said no to releasing the taliban prisoners and she has really been fighting fighting for years for women suffering in the country. She's from the province of farah where she opened and worked in a mental health center working with the poor and lifting women. And i have to say like she's been very powerful figure to me. I remember the first time i ever saw her. She was speaking out in the loyal jirga. The parliament where she was literally beaten up in the parliament and she didn't stop talking same thing when she went on television. She was beaten up there. She is a fierce defender of of democracy of women's rights of of issues an anti imperialists that she has said from the very beginning that the us occupation would lead exactly where it's led so i feel very honored and privileged that she. She spoke to me and did this interview. And can you tell us where you spoke to her. I cannot at this point. Her whereabouts are unknown because the security is very high. Let's go to belqis. Roshan who served in the afghan parliament and lawyer jirga hamad may follow current conditions in afghanistan as the world is missing have once again proven or statements were right..

afghan parliament rashawn parliament farah afghanistan taliban us jirga hamad Roshan
"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The i wanted to turn to an exclusive interview. You did with bell keys rashawn. Who has served in the afghan parliament. Can you tell us about her before. We hear a bit of this interview. Yes and i'm so happy you're showing this interview because for me. She is a model of a powerful grassroots woman leader. She is brave. She is outspoken. She was a member of parliament until recently in afghanistan. She was one of the only. I think she may be the only representative who stood up to say no to the us occupation. She stood up to saying no to corruption. She has said no to releasing the taliban prisoners and she has really been fighting fighting for years for women suffering in the country. She's from the province of farah where she opened and worked in a mental health center working with the poor and lifting women. And i have to say like she's been very powerful figure to me. I remember the first time i ever saw her. She was speaking out in the loyal jirga. The parliament where she was literally beaten up in the parliament and she didn't stop talking same thing when she went on television. She was beaten up there. She is a fierce defender of of democracy of women's rights of of issues an anti imperialists that she has said from the very beginning that the us occupation would lead exactly where it's led so i feel very honored and privileged that she. She spoke to me and did this interview. And can you tell us where you spoke to her. I cannot at this point. Her whereabouts are unknown because the security is very high. Let's go to belqis. Roshan who served in the afghan parliament and lawyer jirga hamad may follow current conditions in afghanistan as the world is missing have once again proven or statements were right. The people of afganistan have been drowned in yet. More misery by the west led by the us a nato..

afghan parliament rashawn parliament afghanistan farah taliban us jirga hamad Roshan afganistan nato
"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"jirga" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The i wanted to turn to an exclusive interview. You did with bell keys. Rashawn who has served in the afghan parliament Can you tell us about her before. We hear a bit of this interview. Yes and i'm so happy you're showing this interview because for me. She is a model of a powerful grassroots woman leader. She is brave. She is outspoken. She was a member of parliament until recently in afghanistan. She was one of the only. I think she may be the only representative who stood up to say no to the us occupation. She stood up to saying no to corruption. She has said no to releasing the taliban prisoners and she has really been fighting fighting for years for women suffering in the country. She's from the province of farah where she opened and worked in a mental health center working with the poor and lifting women. And i have to say like she's been very powerful figure to me. I remember the first time i ever saw her. She was speaking out in the loyal jirga. The parliament where she was literally beaten up in the parliament and she didn't stop talking same thing when she went on television. She was beaten up there. She is a fierce defender of of democracy of women's rights of of issues an anti imperialists that she has said from the very beginning that the us occupation would lead exactly where it's led so i feel very honored and privileged that she she spoke to me and i did this interview. And can you tell us where you spoke to her. I cannot at this point. Her whereabouts are unknown because the security is very high. Let's go to belqis. Roshan who served in the afghan parliament and lawyer jirga hamad may follow current conditions in afghanistan as the world is missing have once again proven or statements were right..

afghan parliament Rashawn parliament farah afghanistan taliban us jirga hamad Roshan
"jirga" Discussed on Radio Fajri 99.3FM

Radio Fajri 99.3FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"jirga" Discussed on Radio Fajri 99.3FM

"And Muddy suck and Paula. He'd have been some CMEC Mackenzie Hotel thingy data then in. But Laura did the Mullahs Marin done. Slalom Jirga Kabila's John Deere. Luminous get. Equal Leeann, Kazakhstan any people? Some can only enough because happen double gold. What could this hour Dan grab do? This shoot he the. The. Worrying Veon. A you. Could could've? Fallen. I. And all our high..

CMEC Mackenzie Hotel Dan Paula Kazakhstan John Deere Laura Jirga Kabila
"jirga" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"jirga" Discussed on Pantheon

"The board jobs were there minus one of them, and then also the lady in the in the biggest gray dress or whatever it is that that's free to pain. Awhile Vanden Golden I remember that. I. Hear it is. Yeah. The lady next to smoking that's free pain and then the four tops are holding their star was was free to pay more than she fun. Tanna records the T shirt you're wearing today she was maybe maybe have a bad. Maybe I. Know It wasn't wasn't multi obviously, but I don't know if it was Fontana was another label not sure can't remember but Banda Gold obviously was the big one. I just gave my number three is time for you to share you number three with as ray no oh, harold. My number three is a picture of one of my favorite rockstars one of my favorite musicians one of my favorite people okay and his face isn't even in the picture. Scene is outside the Roxy on the sunset strip, nineteen, eighty nine he's coming out of soundcheck and getting into a limo surrounded by fans. I'm talking about David Bowie the world cloth on his tin machine tour and he's getting into the Limo. And what's happening around the capture you get i. think he'd say you took it from the balcony upstairs. The Look you get of the wave at the crowd is reaching across the car accused security the waiter all encircling him as exit sound check to get into his limo to go and chill before he comes back for the show later it's a moment. It's unbelievable to capture. Yeah I thought that was unique because when I got there why new tin machine were sound checking because I got a phone call. From a friend and they said, you know he's here now come on down. So I race down there part ran up and by then there was a crowd of fans of horse in the car pulled up. It was very end to soundcheck, and then when I noticed when was open and they were all going to slowly come out and you know leave for soundtrack, I could not get near him with because it was just too many people there and I wasn't going to get into any kind of know physical. Altercations with anybody to get in there to get the photo. Stairway outside is an outside stairway that goes up top of the club I just I'm Gonna I'm GonNa just do this and I ran up the stairs and then there was a landing right there I laid down on my stomach on the landing hung over the thing with my camera. So on David came out which I knew it was him obviously I knew the reaction on the on the kids in the fan's faces because that's what I wanted to get because you saw everybody lunging toward. Him. You know whether they have video cameras they had album covers they had you know scraps of paper to get autographed and he was Pretty Gracious. Sat there for a good couple minutes and he signed several things before he actually got in the car and you can see his assistant Coco Schwartz next to him a standing there next to him just you know waiting and trying to get you know get everybody situated and get him into the car. So they could get the heck out of there like a rock and roll traffic cop you know. Yeah, but I just thought that that's why the photos interesting I realize. You can't see his face, but you know it's Bowie. It's why it's my number three man because it is that kind of a cool different stolen moment. The name of the book is stolen moments. He's Herald Cherokee, our guest here on the podcast all this talking and accounting down markets is making me thirsty. What do you say we head to crooked eye fine. I'm totally down at Montgomery they're easy to find and when you get there, you never corner WanNa leave. That place is such a great hanging out. It's the beers all really good. The staff is fantastic. Well, the music has returned to crooked eye and people have returned to crooked I. Don't forget to mask up and that's necessary under state regulations the guys at the pub are taking care to follow the governor's regulations and you can keep up with not only what's going on there but all the music and all the activities going on and you can check out the online open mic. They've got a page to it's all about crooked eye on facebook and you. Can find out what you need to know. Their facebook presence is fantastic and they definitely do a great job keeping people in the know as far as what's going on with crooked eye because we know people enjoy like ourselves enjoy a nice cold pint of beer especially on a hot day like today go in and see what's on the board and have a nice frosty delicious summer pint. Pick it up at crooked eye right in the heart of hat borough jirga is supporting us here on the podcast and serving the cure for what ails you since twenty fourteen. and. Ray Marcus back on the history of rock and roll we're talking with Harold Cherokee who put together this book called stolen moments, and that's a good title for it is you came up with the title Harold but we're down to our last two are two favorite photos out of your book and I'll take the first one air marcus at number to a guy that I discovered as a kid on the radio his show became syndicated after starting as a DJ out there in la I did not know until I read your book that he was also a Rhody for the band spirit and for canned heat I'm talking about Doctor Demento in your picture of him is great because he's looking. You crazed look in his eyes. Yeah. Yeah Berry was always. He was always really sweet I? Always really a nice guy one of the biggest record collectors you'd ever see in your life. Bars in his house you know he's got hundred thousands and thousands of records. I mean more records and stuff where you. You couldn't even find a place to sit down as far as you know he's got everything well organized, but it's all fills up every room, use a massive massive collector very knowledgeable about you know all kinds of music too, which is fascinating. Marcus your number two. My number two is a picture of stevie wonder it's just a head shot. It's real. It's a lot of ways really basic and really simple, but it's Stevie and you still feel Stevie, there's just something about the energy of the picture for as simple and as basic as it is it just Kinda made me double take so I would say my number two definitely that picture of Stevie wonder you have that's almost like a headshot shot. We took that backstage at the universal amphitheater in January eighty nine it was a benefit for for the mini Riverton. Cancer Foundation whatever. She had passed just before that of breast cancer. I think on Wednesay Jones came out and spoke and and that's that's Quincy's the book to if that same time and so they had us come back before the show and we get some quotes air after few questions and then the show began shortly after that and then I went out and shot some live shots as being nice guy sweet guy. He's yeah. He's one of my all time favorites as he is raised. So you're a number one marcus I'm really curious about this I. Really Am I had I think this is the one that we might match. This is the one that we might match. There's this picture there's this picture you took of this. Really Cool. In a leather jacket with his guitar and the way he's holding it the look on.

Ray Marcus Stevie David Bowie facebook Tanna Harold Cherokee Fontana Banda breast cancer hat borough jirga Coco Schwartz Bowie Montgomery Wednesay Jones Doctor Demento Cancer Foundation Berry Quincy Riverton
"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"People through the loya jirga have made the decision now, too. Release the final prisoners that the Taliban had been demanding and then opening their pathway to negotiations, which reportedly was starting the next couple of days. That's an extremely important threshold cross when that I know you addressed with great seriousness and conviction, but also with difficulty giving, giving the sacrifices that your people have made in this conflict. You know very well that you're a man who likes strategy and planning. How do you see this process now unfolding from this point, Assuming that the door is open now to negotiations with, I think tribute to the collective wisdom of the one beaten to the Grand Council. Resolved, but he could not be resolved, released 4600 from the list and then an additional 500 people on our own conviction. But 400 Siri is constitutional and legal issues, but the moral basis that the original provided and the consensus 50,400 Not one many over 700 of the woman he's given us an opportunity to make the last look every hope that during this process would be able to resolve the conflict. Political the tea cold for those people is to get into violence that is hunted us for 40 years, and we have prepared that my team is a national team perspective representing a national perspective. In addition, the nature has provided a framework regarding the values and he parameters which would enable us to talk to the guy.

Taliban Afghanistan United States loya jirga Richard Siri Central Asia Grand Council Ashraf Ghani Talbot FDA president
Taliban prisoner release: Afghan government begins setting free last 400

Overnight re-air of day's programming

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Taliban prisoner release: Afghan government begins setting free last 400

"People through the loya jirga have made the decision now, too. Release the final prisoners that the Taliban had been demanding and then opening their pathway to negotiations, which reportedly was starting the next couple of days. That's an extremely important threshold cross when that I know you addressed with great seriousness and conviction, but also with difficulty giving, giving the sacrifices that your people have made in this conflict. You know very well that you're a man who likes strategy and planning. How do you see this process now unfolding from this point, Assuming that the door is open now to negotiations with, I think tribute to the collective wisdom of the one beaten to the Grand Council. Resolved, but he could not be resolved, released 4600 from the list and then an additional 500 people on our own conviction. But 400 Siri is constitutional and legal issues, but the moral basis that the original provided and the consensus 50,400 Not one many over 700 of the woman he's given us an opportunity to make the last look every hope that during this process would be able to resolve the conflict. Political the tea cold for those people is to get into violence that is hunted us for 40 years, and we have prepared that my team is a national team perspective representing a national perspective. In addition, the nature has provided a framework regarding the values and he parameters which would enable us to talk to the guy.

Loya Jirga Siri Taliban Grand Council
"jirga" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"jirga" Discussed on WTOP

"Is any other country that its head coach come into our position and signed it away from our borders for the period of time that actually sent message that it is very difficult to manage. Afghanistan has agreed to free for 100 Taliban prisoners. The BBC's Jill make covering many of Theis 100 prisoners are accused of serious crimes such as murder, kidnapping and drug smuggling. The government was reluctant to let him go, but the Taliban rejected attempts at compromise. The loya jirga said they approved their release in the interests of peace. The Taliban and the U. S. Signed a landmark agreement in February to facilitate the withdrawal of US troops and paved the way for inter Afghan talks. Another riot was declared in Portland, Oregon last night. Several 100 people set fire to dumpsters outside the Portland Police Association building. This is CBS News. Brought to you by capital one capital One's banking app lets you manage your money any time anywhere. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet, Capital One and a Breaking news on w. T O p wear following a developing story last night. It was this morning. It was a chaotic and horrific scene Last night in one Southeast D. C neighborhood, at least 20 people were shot. One of them is dead. Young lady. She was sick and she got shot in the leg in a gentleman down this way. Got shot. He was hanging over his car. Over.

Taliban Capital One Afghanistan Portland Police Association loya jirga Portland CBS Theis BBC Oregon US Jill kidnapping murder
"jirga" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on No Agenda

"So that's the reason. The daily caller foundation goes after you because it's funded by anonymous tax deductible things by who don't want their fingerprints on a either, but they're certainly happy to have the little all right millions out there playing their little games. Man I would love for this legislation that happens at some point and I doubt that it could that an outlet on their website will have to list their ownership on the front page because we need to know who's funding these messages, because it doesn't matter which political ideology it is bad. Have someone behind something and we don't really understand WHO's paying for. A will be careful what you wish for. So, he said one guy is direct comes is says well. You know there's anonymous jerk are going so let's go, but. Earlier you, you may or may not have missed it, but I have a five second sub clip. After listening to his all, we should have legislation about these people, so we know who they are because they're all anonymous. Listen to this clip, new abnormal and advertising sub clip. Set up this anonymous twitter handle anonymous g mail account and took a screen shot. Of course anonymous, he got out and started off as an anonymous guy himself well the daily, but nobody else can do it, but the daily caller outed him. That's why he's pissed off. The daily caller out at him and then the New York Times got wind of it, and so then he had to come clean and admit that it was him. Yeah well. Gee Poor Baby Yeah. Well, here's here's kind of the the funny, the funny part of this. Variety did a piece about this. So the advertisers when they're pressured by Sleeping giants or media matters, whoever's but sleeping giant? They call up. Fox and they say hey fox. Reallocate. Fox just reallocates that. That commercial into a different time slot that is not being pressured as so basically anything but Tucker Carlson. Actually. Their media spend remains the same they do. They do not spend any less money and the exposure is not during so, but it actually gives Fox News the opportunity to sell ads. Even, if the my pillow guy. To other entities, they are making more money because of this. That's that's what I'd find the funniest. Well they think doing everyone a favor and. Not with that trick. That's not working. That's not working. Advertise Like yes, sure, but they're not. They're not pulling their ads to getting the same reach. They're getting the same ratings not identifiable in that particular segment. Fox's content is pretty neutral. I mean. Did you say sir? Bear I mean it's just like any other newscast. Yeah, I'd say so well. Hannity is anything but. He's just this. Drunken glad you mentioned that because this came to mind, was watching something yesterday and I was watching Hannity Interviewing trump. Lindsey Graham Oh, yes, that was trump came on right, and I yet exactly and I said well. This is interesting. Hannity is never mentioned as a target. No I know that limbaugh was targeted once he warmed his way out of it but Hannity I. Don't recall an Hannity is the TUB thumper for the Republican Party, I don't understand why why they don't target him the only thing I can imagine. Is. He has deep his. I think his parents were both. Maybe CIA. He always wears an FBI and CIA pin day. Boasting about it yesterday mentioned it. He was boasting about it. Yeah! So maybe has I don't know. Maybe he's got some protection somehow, but he's also boring. I mean he's like a block of granite. Just says the same thing over and over again. I I was waiting for trump, and I cut out after Lindsey. Graham I can't watch this anymore. It's too stupid. Lady G Lindsey Graham Lady G. Hear about that. No, it was apparently he was outed for trolling for male prostitutes. I heard handle lady G. It's probably. You probably is but. But yeah, so Hannity is never mentioned. Never mentioned. He wasn't even mentioned he doesn't get now. targeted. Mis Lynch something up with him Lindsey Graham in the streets, lady, G and the sheets. Glad I got a kick out of it. You'll muse yourself. Someone sent me a forty three. One of our producers sent me a forty through second Rick Wilson anti-trump Rant, which he edited together one here it. Sure Donald Trump has rescheduled. His June teeth rally in Tulsa in the Oklahoma Stan. Province now moved it to a day later right and has summoned a Loya Jirga of his trump hotties I'm mixing all kinds of metaphors. All you Middle Eastern. Scholars just let me roll is so that next Saturday. They're going to have super spreader Palooza. It's like A. Concert for Maga people in Tulsa either this rally set to be sort of a delicious toxic slurry of everything. It's got trump racism. It's got someone dividing the country along racial lines in a moment where everything's calm, racially speaking, it's got the chance to jam. People into an arena to serve as plague bearers for the super spread of covid. It's just got everything. We should keep our eye on this guy. A signaling were troubles ahead. You know it's going to be a mess in Tulsa. You know it's going to be a mess. You know that they're going to strike. They're going to do something that's going to be nasty. You can just wait for it. Go back to the. Discussion of striking and the fact that the Atlanta Police Department may have done a walkout. I am waiting for one of the police departments to go on strike. Yeah and I'm surprised it hasn't happened already. And there's an and has happened before in history in the seventies. It happened a number of places including New York City, the police went on strike, and it becomes a real problem for the every now. Is this are all police unionized? All police departments lot police are unionized and this is another thing that gets me. Why is the left the talking points a democracy now folks to Rick Wilson there. All these people, all big pro union, pro union, and then when the police union comes along. They're not pro union with them. Why what is different about any unions or unions, if you're a pro union person and you're like unions, and then the first thing you hear when you mentioned well, you know certain people shouldn't have to unionize. Government workers probably, but then the biggest Jesus. Me Yeah S. The to service employees, international and American Federation of State, government and municipal workers. That's the. Operation and these are giant unions of of government workers that are sold totally supported by the Democrat Party, but a police union. Is Not now. What's the difference? You like to teachers unions, but you don't like to police because the police unions that they decide to go on strike, everybody in a in an old fashioned way, all the unions have. Stop Work here's. Here's. So with this union would the striking officers get a some kind of wage from the Union is that? Is that still a case? That's still a thing like guards fund forty specific fund because you know these guys. Don't make a lot of money man. They don't make a lot of money most of them. Will during these riots, ears,.

Hannity Lindsey Graham Fox Tulsa Donald Trump Rick Wilson Atlanta Police Department twitter New York Times Tucker Carlson Fox News Middle Eastern CIA Democrat Party Variety FBI Oklahoma Loya Jirga New York City Mis Lynch
"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"So so this might pose a national security risk to the US and to spend too many other countries throughout the world. So I I believe that ended up in the next eighteen months or two years, therefore, fundamental elements into to a political settlement. If we're going to get one. I. There has to be cease-fire. What up cease-fire you can't really? You can't really continue talking momentum will be lost. If there is ongoing talks in Doha and ongoing fighting in Kabul. The one on Kabul is gonna take headlines and go and efforts like Doha, maybe elsewhere, Norway. Germany, Indonesia who else Beckstein they have all shown interest to host after Afghan. So so ceasefire will fundamentally overshadow the peace process specific virus critical. First step second step. I think is. As an agreement on a conditional government. I'm not saying necessarily an interim setup interim government, but a government to implement the details of of a political agreement is very very important. And I believe is inevitable not necessarily that. I support it. Or I think this is this is this is the best decision for Afghanistan. But I really don't think that the Taliban would jump on a running train. So the twain muscles top at some point. And then and then the new people get on board, and then continued to journey so some sort of a conscious setup I believe is critical. Third is. Shenouda constitutional Afghanistan is something that Loya Jirga, which includes today also suggested so Oliver's agreed to an extent that they are amendments need it. The question is to what degree I think? That's that's not what. I think that there isn't such a such a great consensus over what the Taliban one or what what changes we want? Fulla Najah facade is the director of Tolo news math ghanistan news network, or as I said earlier is agreeing on a political system. On what kind of a blue Afganistan my tough post to post deal. And then my last point is even if all four happened..

Afghanistan Taliban Doha Kabul US Loya Jirga director Norway Indonesia Oliver Germany eighteen months two years
"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Right. As we speak. Zell ambassador Khalilzad is in Doha for a fresh round of talks with the Taliban. This week. Also in Kabul, Scott mentioned over twenty five hundred people gathered in Loya Jirga, which has been considered one of president Ghani's signature initiatives for this moment in the peace process. And only I think less than two weeks ago. There was a very near miss in Doha. At would has what would have been the first gathering among the Taliban, the Afghan government and other Afghans have a serious discussion of the political issues that could potentially end this war. And I think what brings these three developments together is there's a longstanding vital question. That's finally coming to a head, which is how can we collectively turn positive movement on US Taliban discussions into a serious peace negotiation among Afghans that would actually have a chance of ending the war because it's not something. I think all would agree that just the US and Taliban negotiate by themselves. And so as we grapple with this question, the challenges over later enormous in the United States both parties, I think are impatient. To ultimately get out of Afganistan. There's an insurgency that remains extremely strong, and is at least tempted to attempt to wait the US out. The Afghan political class. I think it's fair to say pretty uniformly wants peace, but is deeply divided including on how to achieve peace, and that's to say nothing of upcoming presidential elections in both Afghanistan and the United States that make everything in this space, just a little more complicated. And meanwhile, the war is really more horrible than ever. I think it looks quite likely that the twenty nine thousand and fighting season will be very very bloody one despite efforts by many parties to achieve a near term ceasefire the twenty thousand fighting season reclaimed Afghanistan's sorry place as I think the most violent conflict in the world. And so it shows the urgency not just the political logic with the urgency of trying to find a way out of this war. And a final comment before I introduced the tunnels themselves is I hope the conversations like this can help advance the larger thinking about what compromises actually can end the war of this kind because it route a peace process is not about achieving what any one of us any one party wants. It's about what they can potentially give or do to accommodate the other side, and that goes for all of them. So for every side, it means on some level, abandoning the dream of ultimate of comprehensively winning the war. It means accepting that if there is a peace agreement it will involve some amount of legitimacy for one's enemy. It might involve political power for one's enemy a degree of anyway. So this is not to be defeatist, but not peace process has ever succeeded without working through these issues, and I hope discussions among panelists of the caliber we have today discussions of the sorts going on in Doha can help advance that question. And so. Moving from my immediate left. Our panelists include let's lessen the Jeff Zada. He's the head of Tolo news TV itself. One of the finest products of post one Afghanistan. Truly a gifted journalist when the keenest observers of Afghan politics that I've ever dealt with. Jared blank is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for international peace. He was previously the deputy special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan among other jobs, and he played a leading role in some really important US efforts on the Afghan peace process during very difficult years when I was working there. At the State Department. Belkacem Mattie is a senior officer here at the us institute of peace over twenty years of experience on Afganistan, very deep networks, especially among Afghan civil society, women's groups. She's just returned from Kabul to speak with many of these groups about where we stand in the peace process..

Taliban United States Doha us institute of peace special Representative for Afg Afghanistan Afghan political class Kabul Jeff Zada Zell ambassador Khalilzad Afghan government Loya Jirga Belkacem Mattie Carnegie Endowment State Department Jared blank Ghani president
"jirga" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

08:33 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Men and women in tough situations where we teach them to be the most deadly and most lethal force on the planet. And they and they get they have a lot of responsibilities of doing protection job that's hard to do. But what is our goal and the difference between conventional warfare is that we're fighting an ideology, and this is, you know, we're we're fighting Islam extremism, and we're fighting in the tactics they're using his terrorism. And until that ideology is thought which I don't think it can be I is extremism terrorism is like influenza, it's something that you can protect communities from. But it's something that can grow his head. And spread pretty quickly. And that's why you know, counting the ideology the ideology is is so important because that's what's going to lead to having less people unless young men from different parts of the world com and do a fight and join groups like I'll Qaeda or ISIS or Boko haram. Is you know, what time is not necessarily even young? Then I mean there are videos at the reformed five year old children who are training with live ammunition, some of them actually killing people. So what do you do? I mean, you've got my dresses that are teaching the Jewish die the west to die Christians should die the infidels should die. Again. That's not all of of Islam. But that is radical Islam, certainly, what do you do do you blow up to my dresses? I mean, how how do you win that war when they're raising them to hate? Well, you win that war by making sure those moderate imams, the people the the other ninety eight percents of Islam, you know, making sure that those communities that you don't see that stuff happened in those communities here. What happened? You know, you can't talk about Afghanistan Pakistan, and I was in when I was in Pakistan. You would go to these communities where there was literally no school. There is literally no place to send your children for for about eighty five hundred miles, and you can't walk that one way back in a day. And so the only place that apparent had to send their child in order to get some training and education was a Majorca. And that's why these extremists extremist Islam understands that and that's why they put these these metropolis in these flung communities where there's nothing else. And so it's a hotbed and the parent think. Okay. The teach them how to read and write. But also they could doctrine Nate them into this this extremist ideology. So the only way you can you can deal this and deal with this is it's hard to do is ultimately winning hearts and minds. Right. When you look at when you look at a what? Happened in California at the end of Passover. Right. That was somebody that was inspired by the attacks in Christ Church. They didn't know those people. They were inspired even though they were like six thousand eight thousand eight thousand miles away. Right. And that's why this this ideology is so tough because you have to deal with an even you know, I'm being being miles and miles away. Yeah. Are we sending a billion or two or three a year to Pakistan? Can't that money be used to make educational facilities where they're not taught to hate and kill. I mean, what is our money spent on you've been there? What what is it being spent on looking? And so during my time there USA ID and State Department was using it on those on those programs when you look at the province in Afghanistan. There's about four million girls that are in school that wasn't happening eighteen years ago. That's what half of the population was uneducated, you're going to change that in all those girls, and those parents know that was because of the United States, but you're absolutely right. Sometimes we forget about our soft power and our ability to educate, folks. And when I was in that part of the region people that were at the time in the in the early two thousand if he were thirty five or older, the first time you had ever seen a magazine that had glossy image or the first time you had ever listened to rock music. Was that the American Center this was a facility that was? Like an embassy. But you know, it was open to the public people came there. That's how we exported in our culture, bright. And that's how people remember this. And so sometimes we forget, there's a great diplomat. Ryan crocker. He was most recently the head of the of the Bush school at Texas, and he was my ambassador when when I was in Pakistan. He said if we had more pumps and wingtips on the ground you prevent boots on the ground. Meaning when you have strong diplomacy, and you can prevent and having to put boots on the ground because boots are significantly more expensive. I want to get into five G the second. But just one last question Afghantistan, if you're the decider you have the button, you can you're the one who makes the call. When do we get out are we there for the next hundred years? I don't know if they're if the next two years what I would do is the United States would call a loyal Jirga. And that Loya Jirga would have all the key ethnic groups that are important there at the key local leaders. It would also include the Taliban to work on a governance structure that actually makes sense. For that for that country. So that you have the political leadership in order to to make sure that voice is not filled by dangerous Taliban. I don't think you can have in the entire Taliban come into to the government. But there has to be some form of Taliban reconciliation. There are some that need to be tried for war crimes on their others that can come back into the government. So that's you have to start with the right political environment. In order to bring some stability to that region and ask it allow us to decrease our footprints, and I would I would continue to use our air force our air forces lethal our air force. You know, can't you can't be beat and using using that a little bit more in that region would be something that would go along way. It is congressman will hurt district. Twenty three Republican the great state of Texas. Let's make a hard shift here and got about a minute or so, but I'm a big time. Techno geek, we talked about this before we even started today how we're recording. This is actually kind of out of sight of a show people. But having said that I love seeing our internet speeds, going faster and faster and faster. I've got a gigabit where I sit right now up and down four G. Lt was a great improvement over three g obviously, and certainly over you know, plain old two d or two g which was nothing narrow talking about a five g and five g LT would imagine what is the argument between the west and China when it comes to that technology. What's going on? Social right now and the digitizing fourteen five if you had four K A four K video, which is the best kind of quality of video, and you're gonna try to download a movie that was four K that would probably take you an hour and a half right now in the best four g in g it's done in an instant. Also, this thing called latency the ability to be connected to the network. That's what's needed for Thomas vehicles. That's what's needed for smart cities, not hospitals things like that. And so what what the Chinese are doing specifically with wild way. They're trying to own five G because they want to own the applications that going to go on top of five we would pay them for the technology. Absolutely and gets wet while ways an extension of the Chinese government. Right. And guess what? They're going to have back doors and the governments can have access to information. The Chinese are looking at facial recognition. They're not using it to try to to make it easier for you to buy groceries and grocery stores, they using it to keep track of their of their citizens. And so we allow Chinese companies to own that application space on five Jeep they're going to be the ones driving conversations around these on these topics like artificial intelligence. I've been to China as you're not adopt my daughter, and when you check out the internet in China, it's not the real internet. It's the the very very controlled internet that China wants you to see I looked up square. It said one guy died accidentally when a bullet ricocheted off the ground you, and I both know their reports up to seven to ten thousand people were killed at Tiananmen Square in Beijing because they wanted freedom and liberty. So we don't want China to have control is this going to be a long fight. Or is it our technologies technology is it. Well, so right now, the antennas and the devices you need on the edge of the network. There's only three company three companies other than while way. That builds it Nokia Samsung and Ericsson those are not US companies. And so we have to use our allies in order to build that the import piece right now is we need density. We need our cities and five G takes more in ten us. And so we need our cities to be incredibly dense. So that's why companies will come in and develop their new tools. New software in San Antonio in Chicago Houston in order to make sure that it's. Companies and our allies that dominates Estee. Let's talk about that again in the future. It's congressman will hurt district. Republican state of Texas will always appreciate the time and access. Thank you. Hey, buddy. You take care of Becca joepags later..

Pakistan Texas United States Taliban China congressman Afghanistan influenza ISIS Ryan crocker State Department California Loya Jirga Bush school Majorca Nate Becca joepags San Antonio
"jirga" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

11:20 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"There. Also Newsmax TV, it's the Joe pags show. Really glad to have you here. Really glad to have back Republican from the great state of Texas. It's my good friend will hurt. We'll how are you? Hey, buddy. I'm doing fantastic man, always pledged to be on with you. I gotta tell you. We're both a couple of young hip guys happening guys know about technology, and that was the most exhausting angst filled thing. Through today, you're in congress and talk radio and television. So so, yeah, I'm glad that we're able to define the connection. It looks good. It sounds good. Let's go with it. As as we can. And I apologize waiting. I'm I'm putting that computer science degree to to work, man. You know it. It's it's always good computer technology makes life better. But he's also paying Rick sometimes technology, let's circle back at the end of the conversation about technology. Let's talk about five G four G LTA's. Okay. But it's not great five G would be better. I mean for up to ten g but I think that's down the line of bit. So we'll talk about that coming up. I want to focus on Afghantistan. We've been in Afghanistan now since two thousand three right? And and is it three or four when we go. We've been in Afghanistan since two thousand one so we go white in. Okay. I guess Iraq with two thousand three. Iraq rockets two thousand three and I think it's important to go back to a December of two thousand and one December two thousand one is win candle heartfelt candle heart is a city in southern Afghanistan, which was an essence the capital of the Taliban. And when it fell in late December, a one we did that with four hundred and twenty-five Americans on the ground about three hundred twenty five US special forces hundreds and then of course, the most amazing air force the world had ever seen. And it's it's interesting when you talk to Afghans about the invasion of Afghanistan, they say what invasion? All right. And so we were able to kill about seventy five percent of Al Qaeda leadership and push all the Taliban out of the country, and we did it with an incredibly small footprint. It was probably one of the most successful military operations. And in an essence it was run an orchestrated by the CIA those those three hundred twenty five special forces. I was telling you about. Out they were operating under the operational control of the agency. And that's that was December of a one in the mission was to go there and get those who harboured Qaeda, let Al Qaeda train they're sort of planned the attacks along with Al Qaeda, and we did that should we have left. Right. Then should we have been out of there by two thousand two if we would have gone out by two thousand and two the Taliban would at reconstituted, you would have probably seen Al Qaeda come back and metastasized because while we did kill about seventy five percent of Al Qaeda leadership. There was still a number that left that went into Iran went into Pakistan, and so you would have seen an Al Qaeda reconstitute a lot sooner had we left in in two thousand and two. I think one of the you know, when there's a political vacuum that vacuum is gonna get filled. And I think when we look over the last eighteen years there has. Been oftentimes a power vacuum. And when you look at the problems right now while you have a there's an unit with the Afghan special. Forces are pretty really good. They were trained in run by the by the US forces they can operate, but they need political leadership. And right now that political leadership is lacking there in Afghanistan, we've had twenty four hundred deaths in Afghanistan, and in my teen years to put that number in context context in Vietnam. It was about seventy thousand deaths and the civil war was about six hundred thousand right a little bit. Plus, so so it is it has been a long war. And it's something that the goal now is you cannot allow a space where a group like Al Qaeda or ISIS to come back and continue to plot against the United States. Congressman will hurt race Texas district twenty. Three right will always wanna see twenty eight. I guess they're they're round numbers. And for some reason. Eight and three always confuses me. All right. So you've got on the scene expertise. You know, what's going on over there? I'm a simpleton. And you tell me this off the air all the time. I just want to will if it's going to be a war. Let's win it. So what is the goal because normally you're gonna war if we prosecute the war and get Hitler's military this that or the other we win if we go into the war, and and this happens to North Korea versus we win this. What is the goal here? Because at this point, we look to be a police force and our military isn't trained to be police officers. They're trained to win wars. You're absolutely right. And we put we put our young men and women in tough situations where we teach them to be the most deadly in most lethal force on the planet in and they get they have a lot of responsibilities of doing protection. Job that's hard to do. But what is our goal and the difference between conventional warfare is that we're fighting an ideology, and this is, you know, we're we're fighting Islam extremism, and we're fighting in the tactics they're using his terrorism. And until that ideology is thought which I don't think it can be I think Islamic extremism terrorism is like influenza, it's something that you can protect communities from, but it's something that can grow as head and spread pretty quickly. And that's why you know, counting the ideology the Islamic shameless ideology is is so important because that's what's going to lead to having less people unless young men from different parts of the world come into a fight and join a groups like al-qaeda or ISIS or Boko haram. Is you know, it's not even young men young. There are videos out the reformed five year old children who are training with live ammunition, some of them actually killing people. So wouldn't I do? I mean, if you've got my dresses that are teaching the gym should die, the west should die Christians should die the infidels should die. Again. That's not all of of Islam. But that is radical Islam, certainly, what do you do do you blow at the my dresses? I mean, how do you win that war when they're raising them to hate? Well, you win that war by making sure those moderate imams, the people the the other ninety eight percents of Islam, you know, making sure that those communities that you don't see that stuff happened in those communities. Here's what happened. You know, you can't talk about Afghanistan without talking about Pakistan, and I was in when I was in Pakistan. You would go to these communities where there was literally no school. There is literally no place to send your children for for about eighty. Five hundred miles, and you can't walk that one way back in the day. And so the only place that apparent had to send their child in order to get some training and education was a majority. And that's why these. Extremists extremist Islam understands that and that's why they put these these madrassas in these far flung communities where there's nothing else. And so it's a hotbed and the parent think, okay. They teach them how to read and write. But also, they could talk them into this this extremist ideology. So the only way you can't you can deal this, and and look deal with this is, and it's it's hard to do is ultimately winning hearts and minds. Right. When you look at when you look at what happened in California at the end of Passover, right? That was somebody that was inspired by the attacks in Christ Church. They didn't know those people. They were inspired even though they were like six thousand eight thousand eight thousand miles away. And that's why this this ideology is so tough because you have to deal with and even you know being being mild tomorrow away. Well, what Trump? Yeah. Are we sending a billion or two or three a year to Pakistan Kate that money be used to make educational facilities where they're not taught to hate and kill? I mean, what is our money spent on you've been there? What what is it being spent on looking? And so during my time there USA in State Department was using it on those on those programs when you look at the province in Afghanistan. There's about four million girls that are in school that wasn't happening eighteen years ago. That's what half of the population was uneducated, you're gonna change that in all those girls, and those parents know that was because of the United States, but you're absolutely right. Sometimes we forget about our soft power at our ability to educate, folks. And what I was in that part of the region people that were at the time in the early two thousand if he were thirty five or older the first time you had ever seen a magazine that had a glossy. The image. Or the first time you had ever listened to rock music was at the American Center. This was a facility that was like an embassy. But you know, it was open to the public people came there. That's how we exported in kind of our culture bright. And that's how people remember this. And so sometimes we forget that there is a great diplomat. Ryan crocker. He was most recently the head of the of the Bush school at Texas AM, and he was my embassador when when I was in Pakistan. He said if we had more pumps and wingtips on the ground you prevent boots on the ground. Meaning when you have strong diplomacy, and you can prevent having to put boots on the ground because the boots are significantly more expensive. I want to get into five the second. But just one last question Afghantistan, if you're the decider you have the button, you can you're the one who makes the call. When do we get out are we there for the next hundred years? I don't know if the next two years what I would do is the United States would call a loyal Jirga. And that Loya Jirga would have all the key. Ethnic groups that are important there at the key local leaders. It would also include include the Taliban to work on a governance structure that actually makes sense for that for that country. So that you have the political leadership in order to to make sure that voice is not filled by dangerous Taliban. Like, I don't think you can have in the entire Taliban come into to the government, but there has to be some form of Taliban reconciliation. There are some that need to be tried for war crimes on their others that can come back into the government. So that's what you have to start with the right political environment in order to bring some stability to that region. And that's what allow us to decrease our footprints. And I would I would continue to use our air force our air forces lethal air force. You know, can't can't be beat and using using that a little bit more in that region would be something that would go a long way, it is congressman will her district. Twenty-three Republican the great state of Texas..

Afghanistan Taliban US Pakistan Texas Congressman Joe pags Qaeda ISIS Iraq congress CIA Afghantistan influenza Loya Jirga Rick
"jirga" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:06 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So I think that they can afford and also the afternoon economies supposed to come up, and you know, the NATO secretary general statement that the they will stay in Afghanistan until very sincere. Fire comes with respect with respect. They're losing faith in the ability of the Ashraf Ghani government to represent an deliver I secure country. If one looks at the most recent US, this is US analysis of the security situation. The office of the special inspector general for Afganistan reconstruction concluded that the Afghan government control of territory has fallen to just fifty six percent of the country's districts. This is a record low and the Afghan national security forces casualties have risen to a record high. I you're losing the wall not really if you compare the this year March April would last March April the figure of casualties much lower on the site and each year in the past in these two months Taliban will secure advances. This is the failed to secure any advance. In fact, they have faced setbacks. So the situation is that in this. If the battlefield is the very well. Well, I don't know how you can sit there and sound so sanguine and so confident look again at the figures nearly four thousand Afghan civilians killed in twenty eight and if we look back over the last five years you've lost killed forty five thousand members of your security forces. That's partly why desertion rates are so very high. You are in no position. It seems to me. To be confident that without continued US support you can hold the line against the Taliban and the Taliban. No that was I think this year realities changing the casualty rate is lower compared to this time last year, then Talibans stamina to fight face to face against the Afghan national security forces is much lower compared to last year. It's politically that the the they are pushed to a higher level, that's because of the US Taliban talks, which naturally boosted their their political position. Battlefield is not matching their political position. Politically, your problem isn't just that the Taliban as you say have this major boost because they're now indirect negotiation communication with senior figures in the American administration. The other political reality is that your president. Ashraf Ghani a man who used to criticize till he gave you a job Ashraf Ghani is deeply unpopular amongst many Afghans. And that is a huge problem for the credibility of your government. I don't think we can claim that will I think the election is just five months away and election will prove that who is popular and who is not popular interesting. You say the election is five months the election should be in may I have gone he should be out of his term of office in may many Afghans believe that if he continues in office beyond may he has no mandate. No legitimacy. Well, we live within a constitutional system. And this court has given a verdict that he can continue until the next election produce, a new president here the words of Hekmat Khalil Kazai. I'm sure you know, well. Former deputy foreign minister, he wrote this in foreign policy magazine, recently, the government of Ashraf Ghani is alienating hidden inside line. The overwhelming majority of senior Afghan politicians because it has not included them in major policymaking decisions. It has failed to improve security and economic conditions and the security conditions have worsened that is the view of a very senior. And it has to be said a man who was loyal to the government for time official. Well, if one person's view matters, then until a few months ago, as you said, I was a stunt critic of president Ronnie, but then I realized that his doors open and he's committed to inclusivity. Well, if I may mean to sound rude, but he bought you off with a job. No, I didn't need that. That's since I needed a role to play in the peace process. And thanks. He gave me because pieces priority for me. And this is very close to my heart and to the heart of all Afghans. So I'm the main player within the whole peace process. And that's that's a that's an honor for me that he is given the principle of inclusivity. He has applied inclusivity. That's why his door open. If he's serious about inclusivity, and you've used that words many times in this interview as a means to get to a better future for Afghanistan. Why after may when his initial term runs out does he not leave power and allow a national unity administration to be created in the interim before new presidential elections. That is an interim government that could be truly inclusive. There is new word mentioned in the constitution about in government. It's extra constitution. He has to abide by the verdict of supreme court in supreme court provided interprofession of constitution. Well, here's the words again on quoting to your senior people in your country. Muhammed Honey, fat Mara former national security adviser. He thinks Ghani has no mandate to go on beyond. May. He says we must support a caretaker government which on the twenty first of may should take over because this. Current government will have a mandate that has ended and given his record. We are much better off without Ashraf Ghani. If I am free to have an opinion in his views, electoral, it's campaigning view. And I think it's a against the constitution. What's going to happen next? And I've gone to STAN the peace process if we can call it that is now in limbo. Once again, you were talking about this grand lawyer juggler sort of peace Jirga that you say is going to happen very soon in the next few days, but what can it possibly achieve when the divisions and the conflict in your country is as deep as ever. Well for peace to come. We need development in three layers internationally or international well, which is their regional coordination and cooperation which we are building. But in the most important one is the national consensus and allergic is the best and the most African is mechanism to to build that the national consensus about peace. It is supposed to provide a framework for talks with Taliban. It is also supposed to identify mechanisms of reaching to a sustainable peace in the country. Mr dogs. I nobody seems to buy it inside Afghanistan. I'm thinking of the chief executive of your own government who is supposed to be working in partnership with Ashraf Ghani Abdul Abdullah. He says he's going to boycott the lawyer Jirga he doesn't believe it is going to achieve anything. Same with presidential candidate Shahad, Becky me. He says he's. Gonna boycott it too. So wearing earth is it going to go? Jerry gays about grassroots level leaders leaders coming from districts from villages from provinces and there'd been huge struggle across the country. Everybody trying to get into to become member of the law Jirga. This is going to be the most Representative merger of our history. The biggest ledger forward history own districts, including those that are controlled by Taliban will have representation in the Jirga. They're on their way to arrive in Kabul. Already one third of the members have arrived and the rest the arriving tomorrow. The big bulk is arriving tomorrow for this ledger gays about a national consensus. It's not about top leaders consensus to Bill top leaders consensus there either mechanism such as the Reconsiliation leadership council that is supposed to bring top leaders consensus not ledger. Is national consensus. It's grassroots level. Census listening to you die. I'm tempted to think Afghanistan is a vibrant democracy in rude. Good health. But of course, the the reality is entirely different. Your country's utterly divided. Half of it is in the control of the Taliban. And if one looks at one of the other fundamentals about ghanistan, you remain one of the most corrupt countries on earth, and the Afghan public is very well aware that Ashraf Ghani for all of his promises to root out corruption as overseeing an administration, just as if not more corrupt than the ones that went before, this isn't a vibrant democracy. You're talking about we are building democracy in the middle of war a war that has continued for forty years, and we are building democracy in the middle of huge flow of aid that that that came to the country. And planned, and but we still appreciate that it the international community provided. So the presence may have a lot of questions. But I'm sure my country's future is bright. We have always remained together. United and we will remain together and United and we will find an entire solution soon. Well, of course, the country's not United. It's absurd to claim. It's united. It's deeply divided. That's why we've seen war for the last twenty years. I put it to you that the war will only come to an end when people like you explicitly say, yes, the Taliban is going to have a very significant role in the future of governance in Afghanistan. Are you prepared to say that to me now? Of course, Taliban beside their a militant force their political group. Also, and they have every right to be part of the political system in the future. So you are prepared to say here and now yes foreign forces led by the United States must leave our country. We must give the Taliban a role in the politics of the future of our country. And that is something that you will commit to. I would say that. Yes. The international forces might leave one day when the right time come with respect. That's not good enough. I mean, the the Taliban called you and your government puppet regime. They say you're being propped up by foreign forces, and they say that Afganistan and can only be truly free and find a free political future. When those forces leave well from the day, I have come to high peace council. I have established a culture of respecting each other. So no matter what language Taliban use against us and against government. I will use the language of respect to them. I consider them Afghans. And I welcome them. And I worked for that that they become part of a larger political system because that's their right? However, I would advise them that to get there. There are other ways than war in violence violence may not get them where the negotiation can get can twenty nine hundred nine be the year of peace ref gonna STAN the hopes high hopes that it might be just a short while ago. Can it be? Yes, I have already declared that the December last year in in London, I declared that and I'm still claiming that the significant beginning of the meaningful peace will start this year. We have to end the but Mohammed doubts. I I thank you very much for joining me on HARDtalk. Distribution of.

Taliban Ashraf Ghani Afghanistan US US Taliban Afghan government Jirga president Ashraf Ghani Abdul Abdullah STAN NATO foreign policy magazine allergic United deputy foreign minister Kabul
"jirga" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

"What is audited vending? You from being at your best way Phillips and Bill Belichick put on the masters class in defense. That's what was were. Look you're talking to often guy in. There is no way. I feel like I can be my absolute best or we as offense could be an absolute best. And you eliminate everything we have to offer you can take me away. But to take girly away to take Robert woods away to take C J Anderson way to eliminate golf to even really minimize what John McVeigh has done all year. Like, I wasn't entertained by that I wanted to see them do more, and I didn't get it. Yeah. You know? I think that's just. Wrong word because like you saying it's the Floyd Mayweather argument of he gets into phone booth with another fighter who's a professional at their best. But then he would just undermine everything that you do and take it away from you Pecci out who will two hundred punches around gets into the fight with Lewis. And also, the only twenty and you're like, that's amazing. That's genius. But that's not entertaining. Because it looked you can be geniuses. Still entertain our go watch you can watch. Somebody to physics test is genius is great. It's not entertaining. What we saw with a team that we thought was going to be able to keep pace for pace and get to the finish line. And give us a photo finish. And see what happens and you took that away. And now we're scratching our head. Instead of saying we were so thoroughly entertained, why did that occur? I guess to me Bill Belichick. Other than an athlete is the most compelling person in sports to me his genius. And what he's been able to accomplish over the last twenty years. Other than an athlete is is the. Guy in sport expert on with Jerry. And so and so we just saw him put on his greatest performance that and. You agree to down a Los Angeles Rams team. That had an office was a Jirga. Somebody wrote some stupid piece a couple of weeks ago. The Rams have the greatest run blocking offense of line and NFL feels like really. And so that to me was fascinating to see a genius at work. When no one thought this is supposed to be the week vulnerable patriots team. And they just put a clown suit on a kid that the whole league celebrated like he's the greatest things sliced bread. I think one of the things that really interests me about this is we talk about the defense, and what they were able to -ccomplish against a really good offensive line in a really good offense. And basically shut them down through the entire game. The other thing that amazes me is you know, we hear the cliche defense wins championships complete teams. I mean, there was there was a time. When our on the punter for New England was probably the MVP candidate here. You have a team defensively. Think about this that shut down the Rams to three points, and nobody could figure out should there. Be a defensive MVP should the on the defensive side. We can't even find the got. So by default because Elman was great and I gained there's no question. But. You give three points to a juggernaut offense. And you can't find a defensive MVP you'll or should've been should. But here's what's amazing to me..

Bill Belichick Rams MVP John McVeigh Los Angeles Rams Elman NFL Floyd Mayweather Phillips Jerry patriots Robert woods Pecci Jirga J Anderson Lewis New England twenty years
"jirga" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

The Agostinho Zinga Show

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"jirga" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

"Can still use. The usually the sexism was at. Hey doll. And you're gonna come home with me now that's being toned down. But it still now fully acceptable for somebody to to pull out in the street you go. Hey, can you can eat another pack of chips or something and that scene? Okay. To myself. But you have to kind of accept that. There is something about, you know, I think in general, I don't think I'm not sure how good I'm not sure how constructive is a society for us to finally get a less. Imagine. We get point where everyone kind of accepts that being fat is a norm. And you shouldn't be you should shame in this thing anymore. Is that healthy for anyone like shouldn't it be thing where you know, where sometimes you'd be up with old school, friends or old friends from that used to go out with and here that what to beings are doing so amazing things resentful, and if the embassy Philippine jealous, and you have that kind of tug, tugging, your heart. You're not doing shit, and you go home, and you write an action plan, and you try and follow it. They try and change your things that you're doing and try and make some changes. That's a good thing. Isn't it? It's a good thing to maybe have people in society who are maybe doing a bit bad. And you are so that when you speak some it remind you, oh, if he can do I can do it too. And it might be a good fan too. So deliver society where sometimes people can call you out on something you can change because there I there is the rare occasions. People out there who do have conditions that make the most to gain way or make them. You know, it might be a date with learning with that about science. Sometimes I remember listening to Jirga puck also someone I think my been taught to run the Patrick said that there are studies out. There have shown that women who are overweight during their pregnancy. But lose it before they give birth the child come up their child that their babies can be normal sized. But usually if you stay overweight, even for out your pregnancy, and you give birth of way, it's more likely your child's going to be avoid fucking crazy. These studies have shown so it does happen. There are cases where sometimes you not. Because you've got fat mom, you might be yourself can happen sometimes. But I think it does we do need to live in a world where some people you able to be challenged on something that you can buy laws change because for the most part. I know for me like I put muscle, and I pulled fabulously if I go off my diet, and I go crazy and eat whatever I want to eat. I'm going to gain some pounds at the point that I'm in now, I've gone. I dunno the best power five or so years. At kind of a normal essay, quote unquote, weight range, I was kind of really obese or overweight back in the day a few years ago. So I don't really have any more fat close less than a more. So it would kind of be it'll be in my serve any good. If I did gain weight back by buy new to accommodate the extra pounds have kind of have to keep myself in this particular kind of bracket for the most part, and that helps and general I feel better. Anyway, is something I enjoy to do is something that's a bit challenging a bit of a struggle to do daybreak. Kind of makes me gap in the morning and finicky I'm doing something. It's a grace amazing and structure our need. But I don't know how good it would be for my life of road to kind of have that out have that have one side of my life where con- control and have things in my left. I can't control. I just don't think that would really suit me in that regards as a personality, but see the last bits while they're saying..

Jirga Patrick