27 Burst results for "Jira"

Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

Risky Business

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

"So it is a case management platform it's a web APP. It's typically deployed into a security operation center and it just helps you keep track of all of the activities that people working on. So this is like highs management software essentially for specifically for talk is that right? Exactly, it's case management for security operations. Okay. What sort of things do you use the software to do like about doing real deep deep dives on incidents because a lot of the time when we think of like response software, we think forensic. So whatever this isn't really that isn't no this is. An ailing people to collaborate better and a K pot of that. We noticed that often the way the white people do security operations using generic ticketing systems, and there are pine to us. They require extensive customization to do anything close to. What we would be regarded as best practice and You know the the data entry is often a complaint pine I'm so we've aimed to make an experience that's really easy to use and is already set up to security operations. I can sorry this is really designed to replace like Jira in the sock. Yes. We we do often generic atheist platforms and yet this is a big step up from that. Okay. In what sense right? So if I upgrade from a generic ticketing platform and I get myself side on what is getting me that those platforms I'm can't give me so. We have a built in workflow that is based off the computer security incident handling God from this. In fact, we steal all of our best moves from the computer security instant handling God. It's the best advice. We could find a way not to tell people how to do their job we just by us, but best practice as out as out benchmark Yep. So you steal the workflows and create some yeah krantz. Can Software? I haven't spoken to anyone about this but I think you know imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and I think would probably be glad to know that someone out there is hitting their advice. Yeah. Well, I mean I think they put out this advice so that people like you will do things like this. Can you give us an example of like A typical sort of incident that's commonly handled through this platform and what the collaboration component looks like. Right? Because I'm thinking what sort of collaboration do you really need outside the Salk? Why? Why do you need a you know an actual platform to handle that So what we've is that many of our customers not only have internal tailfin if it's small internal team, I'm thinking they might have managed service provider that that gives them out of our support and depending on the nitrogen incident if something escalates and and there's people involved and there's conjecture about insider threats or other sensitive data coming out of the system, you don't necessarily want all of that data to be available to everyone who's who's collaborating, but you still need to have a tight look you need to be able to collaborate without much hassle so. We've we've used I access control to enable collaboration. Okay. So this is this allows for the discussion of sensitive incidence because quite often. In the case of a major incident, people will spin up their own slack. That's sort of the way that the. Slack specific to that incident but this is more for the work. Day. Incidence. The incidents of all shapes and sizes and can I say I very careful using slack for incident response it does still local copies of your information on every device that is logging into that channel. So that is why to make sure your sensitive response dieters scattered around many many. It's a good way to make sure your sensitive daughter is in as many places as humanly. Possible. Exactly, and certainly, those baynes among some instances of wears slack has slack as a useful vector for an attacker if you WANNA move laterally. Maybe. Having a rummage through someone's slack files is probably a good way to start getting ideas about. Passwords or other things you could connect to yeah. Yeah. Yes I think slack for incident response is you know it's a default it's a default option people use because it's it's easy and it's got a nice user experience. So the question we ask you what if you could take over the rig of a case management platform which sounds very serious. But make it as easy to use as something like slack. Do you actually have a chat function in the in the platform? Not really a chat function. It looks a little more like like using a conversation in twitter old Lincoln it's more like a threat in that sense. Yeah. That makes a Lotta sense right? So it's Malaysia DMZ but everything would be cataloged logged and it's it's it's sort of like sounds a little bit more serious than slack but a little less serious than. Help me out. Then what? Out To. Throw too many vandals under the bus. But there there is some some shockers out there just just stuff like. Why are you recording notes in notepad? All will case management system is is kind of awful. I only use it once a day from force to.

Lincoln Salk Twitter Baynes Malaysia
"jira" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"jira" Discussed on a16z

"The first voice you'll hear. Is David's followed by Rahul. Somebody who thinks of himself as a power user, I always felt like ask just really never allowed me to climb up that learning curve to being a power user, there was a whole sort of first generation of SAS tools that really would hallmark their benefits of Jesus us. It's really simple hours think back to Mike trump excel versus you will. Excel is easy to use, but allows you to be a power user if you want to be. I would argue that actually companies like. SALESFORCE and last year Jira catering to power users. It's just that's the complexity in the configure ability was so strong that the companies almost lost sight. Of the facts that it should be enjoyable to us I think what's changed recently is the ability to then also package it into consumer fashion, the challenge with tools like salesforce in jared as well as really any of the piece of enterprise, software, or more, generally any piece of power user software. Is that they often end up looking in elegance and becoming visually cluttered. You're totally right that salesforce in Jira are very considerable, but in fact, most companies they deployed salesforce ended up hiring a third party or hiring specialized persons company just to administer because bigger ball, and I don't think anybody ever use. salesforce recalled enjoyed tea. Is that lends itself to the conversation around design, and for those that don't know superhuman is often driven through two mechanisms. One is called a command pal. Command Line that POPs up wherever you are in empty lots of keyboard shortcuts, so what gave you the confidence to build a pro sumer application that really encouraged or forced people through their onboard to become our users. I? Did you know that was going to work and I? Do you think about usability in light of that? Those who know me well, no, I started a PhD in computer science. I spent a lot of time thinking about human computer interaction, and this idea of ease of use, and I came to the conclusion that as a whole industry. We had played way too hard into learn ability and ease of use, and we were really doing our customers of the service. We are assuming that not as intelligent as they actually are. And, so we aggressively pushing the other direction what we worry about is. Can it do all the things that you wanted to do when you're a power user? All you really really fast. And we'll solve the problem of you becoming a power user through other techniques. I had this belief having grown up as a developer at keyboard shortcuts with way to go, but I knew that he pull generally..

SALESFORCE Jira David Mike trump developer jared
"jira" Discussed on a16z

a16z

04:42 min | 4 months ago

"jira" Discussed on a16z

"The first voice you'll hear. Is David's followed by Rahul. Somebody who thinks of himself as a power user, I always felt like ask just really never allowed me to climb up that learning curve to being a power user, there was a whole sort of first generation of SAS tools that really would hallmark their benefits of Jesus us. It's really simple hours think back to Mike trump excel versus you will. Excel is easy to use, but allows you to be a power user if you want to be. I would argue that actually companies like. SALESFORCE and last year Jira catering to power users. It's just that's the complexity in the configure ability was so strong that the companies almost lost sight. Of the facts that it should be enjoyable to us I think what's changed recently is the ability to then also package it into consumer fashion, the challenge with tools like salesforce in jared as well as really any of the piece of enterprise, software, or more, generally any piece of power user software. Is that they often end up looking in elegance and becoming visually cluttered. You're totally right that salesforce in Jira are very considerable, but in fact, most companies they deployed salesforce ended up hiring a third party or hiring specialized persons company just to administer because bigger ball, and I don't think anybody ever use. salesforce recalled enjoyed tea. Is that lends itself to the conversation around design, and for those that don't know superhuman is often driven through two mechanisms. One is called a command pal. Command Line that POPs up wherever you are in empty lots of keyboard shortcuts, so what gave you the confidence to build a pro sumer application that really encouraged or forced people through their onboard to become our users. I? Did you know that was going to work and I? Do you think about usability in light of that? Those who know me well, no, I started a PhD in computer science. I spent a lot of time thinking about human computer interaction, and this idea of ease of use, and I came to the conclusion that as a whole industry. We had played way too hard into learn ability and ease of use, and we were really doing our customers of the service. We are assuming that not as intelligent as they actually are. And, so we aggressively pushing the other direction what we worry about is..

SALESFORCE Jira David Mike trump jared
Jason Fried - Running the Tailwind Business on Basecamp

Full Stack Radio

04:42 min | 4 months ago

Jason Fried - Running the Tailwind Business on Basecamp

"The first thing that I'd be curious to know which. Is kind of ten generally related. But when I came to the workshop that you guys, base came, I was sort of surprised that the way that you presented the tool. It was not. The way it had sort of been pitched to me over the years like I. Always Thought of Basecamp is like a client team. Communication Project Management Tool which I think is absolutely how it started, and that was the problem. You're song for yourself in the beginning but watching you kind of walk through the product at the workshop seemed much more like a like a remote company hub than it did like project management to like it seemed like you. This is the company. Is this online? Portal where everything happens, and you used it for a lot of stuff that just was not what I had in the picture of my in the picture in my mind about what basecamp was supposed to be. I'm so I, a little bit curious to like. How you sort of tell the story of like the evolution of base camp from solving the initial problem that you had which I think was much more around communicating with clients and how that got to where you are today which I feel very different product, even though it can be used to solve a lot of the same problems. Yes so. In my opinion, running a company and managing projects the same thing. Company is a collection of projects. It's a collection of people All work needs to be organized into orderly needs to be predictable. All those things and I think it needs to be in one place need is a strong word, but okay. I use it like it kind of needs to be one place otherwise like stuff is everywhere. Everyone knows what that's like. And that's in fact why we built base camp originally because back in two thousand and four when we built, we built it in two thousand three. We were running projects for clients and stuff was everywhere like. had stuff in my email David stuff in his email. Ryan had stuff in his email. I use the calendar thing they use account like stuff was everywhere. The client feedback was maybe in in my inbox and not David David couldn't see what I talked to the client about so stuff's everywhere in this happens today to not with us, but like project management in general scattered across tools. Some people use this tool in some people use that tool and some. Some people use slack for communication. They used your for project, management or task. Whatever? Task Management or they use Asana or they use both Asana and Jira the engineering team uses Jira the other people use. This is no way to run things because it's a mess still. So. We've we've always decided to build what we need and back? When we launched Basecamp, we were a client services firm, so it was primarily around communicating communicating with clients, keeping feedback on the record, and making sure everybody internally knew what was going on, and we had one central stored. Shared, basically center of truth for everybody involved in a project, and that's still true today. We just don't work with clients anymore. We work with ourselves, but so the spirit of the product is the same, but the execution has definitely changed based on. You know a little bit around our needs, which is kind of how we've always built things, which is what do we need? What do we know and we put something out there and we try to find other people or other companies like us was similar in similar situations who are looking for something that we were also looking for? And so while the client features based, can today are probably better than they've ever been? We don't use them as much US occasionally, but we them as much as we used sort of the h q piece of. The the remote hub part of it. Yeah, awesome I think it's kind of I came away from that workshop. Thinking like basecamp seems like the ultimate tool for remote teams, but at the time the positioning wasn't really is focused on remote at the at the time, but now with all the coronavirus coronavirus covid nineteen stuff happening I noticed that you guys did make some changes to the marketing copy and stuff to really sort of double down on like Hey, we're all going to remote. We've been doing this for years. Believe us. This is the best tool to run it. How's that been working out? What's it's interesting because. We've been doing this basecamp thing for seventeen years now basic almost seventeen years, and we still struggle to explain what it is, and from year to year. We've explained it differently. And sometimes it takes something to jolt you into. A certain degree of clarity that maybe you didn't have before and as you saw the workshop. Because you're an outsider, you came into see. We were presenting, and you see it with fresh eyes. I can't see with fresh. Eyes are. Still, based on my two thousand four is in two thousand twelve is, and all these different is like I think we have a good sense of what the product is, but it's hard in some ways to explain what it is because it does a lot of different things, and it doesn't mean a very unique way,

David David Ryan
The Prestige Nolan

Filmspotting

06:32 min | 5 months ago

The Prestige Nolan

"From Chicago. This is film spotting. I'm Adam are and I'm Josh Larsen. Every magic trick consists of three parts first. Paul is cool. The pledge magician shows you sound olery columns bird or May that was Michael Cain right. We're done with the trip. That was Michael. Cain with some of the opening narration from Christopher Nolan's The prestige we revisit the directors fifth feature as part of our Nolan who've review this week in addition to that we're going to recommend to new films that recently came to the od the vast of night and the painter and the thief that more. Are you watching closely ahead on film spotting? Welcome to film spotting. Josh in an alternate timeline. We'd be spending this post Memorial Day weekend show singing the praises most likely of fast and furious nine. Oh Yeah I'm sure I'm sure we'd both be huge fans I haven't been keeping up with. What would have been released because it mostly depresses me. So this is to me after nine atom as the as the real fans would call it. Don't let Debbie here that that was supposed to come out because she'd probably forced me into a fast and furious marathon at home in memory of it instead. Of course we are talking about films new. Vod We're going to do a little golden brick spotting in this episode. Indeed there are two new films that meet the criteria for our golden brick or D- that's are overlooked or under unforeseen film of the year. Honor that we give to a mostly newer at least new to US filmmaker. We've both seen the new documentary the painter and the thief and I'm also going to recommend the vast of night that's a low budget sci-fi thriller that comes to Amazon Prime this weekend. Of course we're also pinning all our hopes of summer movie season on the theoretically opening tenant the latest from Christopher Nolan. Somehow the word theoretically there just seems so appropriate when talking about Christopher Nolan Anyway. That is still scheduled as of this recording anyway to come to theaters on July seventeenth seven. Seventeen chosen for being a gallon. Drome like the title of the film. Josh I'm sure that you knew that and we can trust. Christopher Nolan is GonNa try to be Oh so clever. Right yes now. A surprise. Our Own Nolan who've review which has revisiting all of Nolan's films is currently scheduled to wrap up in time for that July seventeen release otherwise all of this preparations going to be for naught. Joshua we need ten to get to the big screen in the meantime. We're going to get to his two thousand six film. The Prestige perform this feat in a manner and never before seen by yourselves or any other audience anywhere in the world. Odeon SELECTA is trees topnotch. You'd celebrate a real magician. Tries to weaver something you got something other. Magicians will scratch their heads over spoke. You have such a tweet as you're gonNA remember me for what happened. Just mentioned triggered overseen. I need to know how he does it. He has no. It's real every great. Magic trick consists of three acts. The first act is called the pledge every Great Christopher Nolan movie consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called the pledge. The filmmaker shows you something ordinary with his fifth feature set in late nineteenth century London. It's two rival. Magicians Hugh Jackman sophisticated. Showman. Robert in Jira and Christian Bale's committed professional Alfred. Borden the filmmaker shows you these characters. Perhaps he asks you to watch them to see if they are indeed real on altered normal but of course they probably aren't. The second is called the turn. The filmmaker takes these characters and makes them part of something. Extraordinary are period piece becomes gothic science fiction a meditation on the moral limits of science in pursuit of knowledge the consequences of obsession. Now you're looking for the secret but you won't find it because of course you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You WANNA BE FOOLED. But you wouldn't clap yet because one of our magicians finally winning isn't enough. Our minds have to be blown. That's why every magic trick has a third act. The hardest part the part we call the prestige fairly early. In the film. Bordon's life Sarah played by Rebecca Hall reveals. He's going to be a father. He shows her the trick. That's going to put food on their table. A bullet catch which he performs for her to prove. It's safe like any of us. Observing great trick. She wants to know the secret and insist. She can't comfortably allow him to do it unless she understands the mechanics of it he relents she replies disappointedly once. You know it's so obvious Josh. Any rewatch of the prestige requires that you know the twist and equipped with that knowledge. It does all seem well pretty obvious like Sarah did that Lee disappointed or even more impressed with Nolan sleight of hand. I am really glad you asked this question because it helped me clarify a little bit. It helped me locate one of the reasons. Why and I'll stay at say at the front here. This is still topped here. Nolan for me really love this film. I think it's incredibly strong. But your question. Help me locate one of the reasons why. I might have liked it a little bit less this time around. And it's not so simple as knowing the twists or knowing the surprises because confession. I don't think I watched the prestigious since two thousand six and I had mostly forgotten how everything unfolded now. Yeah the hints and clues pieced together in advance in a way that I did not in. Oh six but it's different from not knowing anything so I was still pretty much in the dark as this movie began. So it's not just that I knew the answers. It's and I'm not sure it disappoints even in terms of its reveals but in comparison is something like as before we started recording. You had mentioned the six cents so comparison to something like that which we did revisit just last year And is another case where it it hugely depends on its reveals. Its twists turns. It surprises

Christopher Nolan Josh Larsen Michael Cain Nolan Sleight Adam United States Sarah Chicago Paul Amazon Hugh Jackman Odeon Selecta Debbie Joshua Weaver Borden London Christian Bale Robert
The Churchill Fire

Casefile True Crime

10:05 min | 6 months ago

The Churchill Fire

"Formally known as Hazelwood Churchill was purpose built to accommodate workers involved in the construction and maintenance of the Hazelwood power station in nineteen sixty five to ten was renamed in posthumous owner of Foam British. Promised us so Winston Churchill and grew into a commuter suburb for those working in neighbouring areas. Like Hey did one. Hundred and sixty kilometers southeast of Mobin. Churchill phages a commercial centre for its several thousand locals with Wad pock land separating residential areas industrial estates dense tree plantations and national park and dig- Ridges of farmland frame the township which is home to the Seaney Colli highland and two golden tail nine locally is the beat cigar after Winston Churchill's trademark smoking habit at one thirty two PM on Sunday February. Seven two thousand nine triple zero. Emergency services received a call regarding a wildfire just sawed Churchill. The blaze was full. Columbia south east of town near the intersection of Glenn Donald Road and Jealous Outlet to unsealed stretches of winding roadway that cut through the rural outskirts. It had emerged from the bottom of a natural basin the Bennetts creek catchment which consisted of blue gum. Eucalypt and upon plantations surrounded by hazardous surface fuels such as shrubs wag grass and blackberry bushes. Three minutes after the coal a pilot flying firefighting aircraft ten kilometers from Churchill. Saw Did a column of doc smoke hundreds of feet high rausing from the fires location within ten minutes the flames troubled roughly one Columba and were in the vicinity of forests managed by Timber Company. Hancock Victorian plantations the plantations surveillance planes. Which were Riva's seeing the entirety of the latrobe valley that day would deserted to Churchill to carry out reconnaissance work despite being in its early stages. The fires behavior was noted. As extreme by the Tom. First responders arrived the blaze had spread rapidly and was burning on both sides of jealousy outlet spot. Fires Begin igniting a rounded straining resources and impacting efforts to tackle the central inferno directly requests? Were made for more tankers and dare support however de intense hate was causing water to evaporate before it even hit the ground. The focus then shifted to warning surrounding communities of the urgent threat. Road blocks were established. Durant the file as emergency services personnel visited nearby residences to raise the alarm but two pm the fire had been raging for those often Allah and remained out of control despite the arrival of additional firefighting crews. It continued to move in southeasterly direction through the Broad Valley of benefits. Craig ECRU observed the fire cresting to reach along. Jira lying North Road and by the fifty minute mark. It had traveled about seven kilometers. More spot. Fires were reported and by three PM. The blaze had burned through a plan plantation and to damage the communications our efforts to protect assets continued as emergency relief centres were established in nearby townships at three twenty pm. The fire had destroyed. Its first time. Stead at the intersection of Thomson and to Jira Lying. North roads but five fifteen pm it was approaching the slopes of men tasr e ten kilometers juice out east of Churchill and spotting to the mountains east side as emergency crews tackled they surrounding spot fires. The apex of being funar raged on woods. Elliott that day a strategy is bureau of Meteorology had predicted a severe wind. Change that would hit land between six and eight. Pm shortly before. Four o'clock there. Prediction was amended to the window of five thirty and seven. Pm The planning officer responsible for the Churchill Fire Unaware of the amendment told the Incident Management Team to expect at the midpoint of seven when they change arrived and now earlier than anticipated at sent seventy kilometer and now a gusts through the region that suddenly shifted the fire in a northeasterly direction. The winds posed a significant threat to way across and forced them to land as fifteen kilometer. Long uncontrolled flank of. Phya developed that ran from the origin. Point Nature Chill through to the east side of Tozzi as it progressed fullwood burning debris rained down and ignited the surrounding vegetation almost instantly. It was accompanied by an east bleeding rush of what noise described by witnesses as the sand of immense pressure. Lucca that of a jet engine. Following this hurricane like wind change the file was at. Its most dangerous threatening multiple townships as well as the one wrong state forest residents working fervently to defend their himes when now blinded by an Ol- encompassing blackness composed of Smokin Dash. All of a sudden the in band firestorm had peed through the dock. Luckily Sunrise Churchill Resident Greg. We stated on you. The fire front was coming. You could hear it. You could smell it. You could feel the hate coming up out of the valley. The flames were right there. And where the heart of the trees and to that again. Three hundred Fateha plus there were big swirling vortexes is just a big swirling masses of flames that would burst and explode out of the treetops' shortly after six PM. Three water tankers belonging to volunteer. Fire Service the country fire authority were involved. In a series of Burn I've is wherein their crews were forced to take shelter where possible as the firing trapped them the boon either hit with quote great ferocity firefight at Graham Chesterton recall blackwood say MBA's thought the full was locked out coming from everywhere. The became very smokey and everything started to burn rapidly. That was spot FIS on the ground. All the rant me and the trees dotted burning at that stage aghast. I had about ten to fifteen seconds until I would have to make a move. Within those seconds the conditions deteriorated so rapidly. That are realized that wasn't safe too late truck. At that time a did not night where rule Marc crew members. Were on the decision to make a May Day call us said something along. The lines of we are completely surrounded by fire Tabun. I've lasted an estimated ten minutes firefighting crews elsewhere listened. Says their colleagues frantically broadcast may calls. I've Aradio but were unable to approach the scene due to the level of danger or they could do was respond. There is nothing we can do for you incredibly. None of the firefighter discord in the burn. Iva lost their lives the via finally slowed at eight PM. And by the following day of Sunday February I it was mostly brought to a whole l. Dive burning continued in heavily feud areas the Churchill fire named after its point of origin was not a visually listed under control until eleven days later on February nineteen more than six hundred firefighting personnel battled the blaze supported by one hundred and five vehicles and appliances in total. It had burned more than twenty five thousand eight hundred and sixty one heck Dez and destroyed one hundred forty five times elsewhere. Four hundred separate bushfires had devastated the Victorian landscape with the most destructive and deadly being the king like into Marysville FIS in the sites northeast collectively the fires had released eighty thousand kilowatts of. Hey the equivalent of five hundred atomic bombs. One hundred and seventy three. Papal had perished and four hundred and fourteen were left injured more than two thousand times and ten thousand kilometers of fence. Lon had been raised and an estimated one million animals were killed. Buerry seven two thousand nine became the deadliest bushfire. Catastrophe in Victoria's history and was henceforth referred to as black Saturday

Hazelwood Churchill Churchill Sunrise Churchill Hazelwood Power Station Glenn Donald Road Mobin Bennetts Creek Catchment Columba Seaney Colli Bureau Of Meteorology Wad Pock Dig- Ridges Craig Ecru Broad Valley Timber Company Durant DEZ Victoria
"jira" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

11:56 min | 10 months ago

"jira" Discussed on The CyberWire

"This type of vulnerability. Short circuit's log into centrally. Let's the attacker abuse trusted relationships between applications and the servers that are hosting. That's Jen Miller. Osborne she's deputy the director of threat. Intelligence for Unit Forty two at Palo Alto networks. The research were discussing today is titled Server Side Request. Forgery exposes data of Technology Technology Industrial and media organizations so an attacker king craft the the url at the server sending a request to the application in Bacon. Force it to look wherever they want within an environment basically so they're able to almost have basically have full access to internal environment especially cloud investments are especially dangerous for this because of the way they are structured with the Meta data. Api and essentially what this ends up allowing an attacker to do is ease internal resources sources which typically don't take requests from outside. The internal environment are now accessible because attackers able to already be in that internal environment mm-hmm and they can query those The internal things directly. It's almost like the the internal. API now becomes accessible from directly from the Internet. which is exactly what you don't want to have with any sort of? API at all. But that's what this is. Boehner ability allows to happen. Is that kind of connection between the attacker. The internal resources and the vulnerability is is because of A bug somewhere along the lines. Yup It's just a web application vulnerability and it's relatively common an in a number of API's because it's it's just taking advantage of trusted relationships which are common especially inside an environment where the architecture architecture wordy assuming that those internal devices were protected essentially and they were not things could not come at them from the Internet. So there's vulnerability allows that to be that seat that's protection to be removed. Basically now all of a sudden these internal devices someone can actually querying data from even though they're exploiting what is usually an advantage pige to speed things up within a network And they're abusing those trusted relationships for malicious purposes. So something those architect intending to be good for the system MM performance in the application performance but unfortunately it is also something that can be exploited by attackers which you see a lot of types of attacks rights. It's not supply chain attack but it's exploiting the same kind of thing. There are suing trust relationships where they can use them to get access to data they would normally get access to and and so this sort of thing is used for getting data out of a system as opposed to for example running code. Yes this is more more for taking data out whether able to query they can get code depending on how it is stored so they're accessing whatever is with the particular Taylor Meta data. API At that time which can be anything from network configurations credentials and even Source Code so it is possible depending on the Meta data that within a particular API that the attackers could get accompanies or some sort of application source code. They can get all the internal network configurations nations can get all sorts of credentials which basically gives them access to do whatever they want they know the network looks like and they know how legitimate credentials. So it's a nightmare nightmare scenario for any any defender. Now one of the things you outlined in the research here is that there's an issue with URL's not being properly sanitized. Can you walk us through. What's going on there again? It's a bit of abusing the The trust relationships so the the systems are assuming that the that the requests that's going to be coming from this trusted 'em point is going to be valid valid basically. It's not going to be malicious. But the problem is when an attacker gets in they are then able to abuse at trust relationship and redirect direct the response so clearing for state are looking for some sort of internal data like never configuration Credentials instead of that that reply being set back to the actual server that made it internally which is what the system thinks this happening the attackers actually able to redirect it to go to wherever they want basically they can redirect that data from its intended internal where should have gone the redirected to something they're controlling instead and that's how they'll get access access to the data you can see there's it's actually easier to see visually we haven't example in the blog. We can see where they add the reader to it. So how prevalent is this in the scanning that you did helbig assure we're talking about here. So we found seven thousand instances that seemed to be exposed and vulnerable to this we did not go any further than scanning them to double check. That was unfortunate. I mean seven thousand is a lot and they were spread across a number number of different public clouds and there are patches available. Yes this is something that could be taken care of it actually. It's not even so much of a patch. It's it's the shifting by the cloud providers themselves to not allow the sort of http. You are L.. Redirect in that particular instance. But there's also a separate Apache itself but I guess the one of the lessons here's that There's a lot of systems systems go unpunished. For a variety of reasons and their systems that sometimes get set off a better than forgotten about or not properly maintained and they just kind of sit it on the Internet for a long period of time and in some cases the organizations don't even have them listed as assets anymore. which is one of the reasons we try to do? This vis sorts of research and then went if we can actually identify people we let them know so they can remediate it if nothing else we try to make sure we can get the data out there just so hopefully this People that may not have patched it instance in a while to kind of go take a look and see what's going on and see if they need to upgrade one of the things for this we noted as you're actually isn't vulnerable to this because it blocks S S R F requests and. We're seeing more of the cloud providers also moving to that same protection. They're not allowing that to happen environment at all. So let me just get really basic with you here in in walk through it together. I mean if I was was a bad guy out there trying to take advantage of this and I'm doing my own scans and I'm finding systems that are potentially vulnerable. You know assistant pops up. That is vulnerable. I think it's interesting. I'd like to get inside What do I do next to Holloway? Execute my my evil plans. You need to start trying to send crafted did you are too vulnerable devices to see if they work. It's relatives it's one of those things where it's relatively automated in a sense. Where word has a specific pattern? So if identified that it's vulnerable than they can actually start trying to exploit that vulnerability which is not particularly difficult to exploit unfortunately so in terms of protecting yourself against this. What are your recommendations upgrade? If you're on one of the cloud providers in that shifted this and apply a patch this is really one where S R F just needs to not be allowed in those environments events. And if you are going to allow this sort of vulnerability you really need you. Make sure you have other protections in place to keep this from being exploited as we noted before once the attackers have this sort of access. They basically premature on your network and and they would be presumably running under the radar here. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't I guess they wouldn't be calling a lot of attention to themselves honestly depend on the attacker. Some of them can be surprisingly noisy once they get inside it systems because they're assuming there's not going to be a lot of logging or things on an endpoint for detection. I see. Yeah one of the interesting things. He's not I noted in your research here in terms of your list of remediation and best practices. Was this idea of having a zero trust network which you kind of touched on earlier. That one of the reasons that this works is that there's this sense that once something's going on within you know within the castle walls inside the moat that it's it's it's generally early trusted but if you have zero trust network that might be a way to help prevent this. Yes and that's something we as a company have been pushing for a number of years. Is that drew. Trust where realistically in This Day and age you can't assume any of the devices on your network are not compromised is so you need to kind of operate in the sort of mindset where you assume at any point in time that something can be compromised so you have the extra protections in place where you don't we're gonNA millions like this can't work because none of the systems are trusted. You can't exploit any sort of trust relationship now one of the things that you point out in your research here in fact in in the title You suggest that they're going after some specific industries technology industrial media organizations What in particular makes them vulnerable to? This is just how they were set up in this particular case. I don't know if it's whether the attackers were targetting that or that's just who happened to the vulnerable to this particular vulnerability if that makes us. Yeah so if you're you're in a particular type of business there's a particular way that you're likely to set up things things and that aligns with this vulnerability I suppose. Yeah this was more just it just kind of happenstance more so than than any targeting. So what are the take homes here. What do you want people to To take away from this research that you're sharing. They need to go check their cloud. Instances soon see if they are vulnerable to this And even keep in mind. Just's the problems that trusted relationships within a network can bring and uh-huh maybe reconsidered their protection strategy or at least maybe they'll have more informed position on how they should make that decision if they need to do any architect eating hopefully people that have these instances where they haven't patched in a while we'll go and check their own and then they'll go co-patron upgraded found to be vulnerable to it. Yeah we're really just hoping by getting this out there that we can help with protections because it is essentially Ashley that's Jen Miller Osborne from Palo Alto networks unit forty to the research we were discussing today is titled Server Side Died Request. Forgery exposes data of Technology Industrial and media organizations. We'll have a link in the show notes thanks to juniper networks for sponsoring our show you can learn more at juniper dot net slash security or connect with them on twitter or facebook and thanks to unveil for their sponsorship. You can find out how they're closing the last gap and data security at N Vail Dot Com the cyber rewire research Saturday as proudly produced in Maryland out of the startup studios of data tribe. Where they're co- building the next generation of cybersecurity teams and technology are amazing? Cyber wire team is Elliott Peltzman Karoo precaut- Stefan Missouri. Kelsey bond. Tim No Dr Joe. Kerrigan Herald -Tario Ben Yellen win. Nick Valenki Bennett. Mo- Chris Russell John Patrick Jennifer Ivan Heater. Kilby and I'm Dave Bittner. Thanks for listening.

Palo Alto Forgery Jen Miller Osborne Jen Miller Technology Technology Industri director juniper networks Elliott Peltzman Karoo Mo- Chris Russell John Patrick Boehner Maryland N Vail Dot Com Nick Valenki Bennett Ben Yellen Kelsey bond
Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

Amanpour

09:07 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

"Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in New York where world leaders speaking at the United Nations General Assembly President Donald Trump's speech was heavily focused focused on his domestic reelection agenda lashing out at what he called a permanent political class he railed against China and Iran too and later though he seem to relax at a meeting with his closest European soulmate the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson but both face major crises at home controversies as the call into question their commitment to the rule of law and democracy itself here in the United States the latest scandal to engulf the president his phone call to the Ukrainian leader and request to investigate his political opponent the former vice president Joe Biden and he is now facing renewed calls for impeachment here's what the president had had to say as he arrived at the UN. It's a witch hunt. I'm leading in the polls. They have no idea how they stopped me the only way they can try through impeachment humint. This has never happened to President before. There's never been a thing like this before. It's nonsense and when you see the call when you see the readout of the call which I assume whom you'll see at some point you'll understand. That call was perfect. It couldn't have been nicer and even the Ukrainian government put out a statement. That was perfect call. There was no pressure. Put on them whatsoever. So of course we are waiting for a transcript that call but as for Boris Johnson before he took to the podium the Supreme Court at home home issued a momentous decision that is controversial five weeks suspension of parliament was in fact unlawful and it's another in a string of severe blows that he suffered since becoming prime minister and vowing to push brexit through do or died. Yes obviously this is a voted that oh we will respect and we respect the judicial process so I have to say I strongly disagree with what the justices found I didn't think that right but we will go ahead and Paul comeback and parliament is coming back tomorrow so democracy. Chrissy and rule of law are in focus on both sides of the pond today with me now to discuss share our oh he's the former French ambassador to the United States and also to the United Nations and Jane Harman. She's president and CEO the Wilson Center and she also served nine terms as a member of Congress. Well let us get to the heart of the matter I started by saying both these issues that we've highlighted do in fact speak directly to the commitment of our leaders to the rule of Lauren democracy. Let me ask you first because the president of the United States is in the crosshairs right now well they both fit it was interesting to hear Boris Johnson and just say that he will respect the decision. I think the alternative is to go to jail in Britain. It's very clear what the role of that court is. and I think that means that he may lose his majority because what will happen unless he can pull a no brexit deal together which he doesn't seem to be able to do you may have to extend the deadline is that Farrage Farraj brexit tears will bail from the Conservative Party and I I don't know where the future leadership of what about the president of the United States. I mean here now. There's increased pressure on Nancy Pelosi who stood back from this idea of getting in meshed in an impeachment but this huge amount of pressure on her now right here is ah of course the rule of law should prevail here. I think it's important to see what the whistle blower wrote and I think it will either leak or be given to Congress soon and then we'll we'll have more information. I think a partisan impeachment is a very sad result of this. Should it come to that. I saw the movie in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight against Bill Clinton. what happens is the president gets stronger. This will feed his sense of grievance. You just showed a a piece where he said that hat and and it will keep us divided instead if we wait and get more information and there is a bipartisan way forward. I think that will be much healthier for the country and for the rule Jira aerobic. I WanNa ask you also about well. Let me ask you I actually about the UK Parliament and the You you K- Supreme Court that has determined that it was unlawful and unconstitutional. What Boris Johnson did I know you're looking at it also in a lens of Brexit. How what do you make of the rule of law aspect of it? I think it would be embarrassing. Ears debt for a lot of citizens especially you know the people walk close to the the populist wave that we are facing it could appear as a new attempt by the establishment to block brexit and so I do think whatever my personal feelings towards Brexit of course I would prefer the UK to remain in European Union. I think that the UK has to leave you. You you know fifty. Two percent of the of the British voted for it you know in France we add a referendum in two hundred five here about the EU Constitution Institution fifty five percent of the French said no and eventually it went through the parliament and today the populist are still saying you stole the vote of the French so I I really again. We have to respect the rule of law but we have also to understand that there is a sort of tension between what the citizens want expressed express their anger and decision of the judge really interested to hear you both you on the on the on the Donald trump situation that an impeachment might in fact strengthen him and you're Democrat so I'm saying it in that regard and actually produce a backlash and you're saying that even the Supreme Court ruling might produce a backlash. That's interesting. I mean Boston well. I think there is an alternative. I I think Nancy Pelosi suggested last week that the the procedure of the office of Legal Counsel at the Justice Department that prevents sitting President President from being indicted might be overturned by legislation and if courts consider. Let's come back to court whether Donald Trump pass committed crimes. I think that would be better than a partisan impeachment. What worries me about this is that there will be democratic. Support in the Senate a Dick Durbin has just come out in favor of impeachment and there is growing a consensus in the Democratic Caucus in the house so I think she probably has to move well. I'm a hearing actually that CNN sources are confirming that Speaker Pelosi is going to start an announce the process towards impeachment the formal the process which everyone knows is is basically the beginning of impeachment but what happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight was not pretty the better movies to the Democratic Ready President Bill Clinton and Republican stampede to impeach him. several counts were adopted in the house but in the Senate he was not convicted it and what happened was he got stronger and the driving force got weaker. the better movie was in the early seventies when I was a young council in the Senate the Nixon impeachment which was bipartisan bill call in then a freshman in the house later a Republican senator and then Secretary of defense had the courage to join the Democrats crats and the whole inquiry was much more low key in serious and after that the Democratic Senate leaders are the Senate leaders Republican Senate leaders came to Richard Nixon and said you will be convicted and he resigned and that was an orderly process based on whatever were were the facts at the time so I'm hoping that if it comes to this and impeachment is very sad thing to happen but if it comes to this and there certainly are a lot of allegations out there that it will be bipartisan and it we'll be done in a manner that gets the respect of not just our country but the world I mean so far. There is no indication at all that they'll be bipartisanship because the Republican Party has become the trump party in terms of all intensive for people who are leaving running against trying to run against the three of them Gerardo. I would like to play you a couple of soundbites because I want to ask you about the credibility of some of the reasons that president trump is giving for having tried to talk to the Ukrainian president. I'm I going to play the one that that he said earlier the conference talking about a congratulatory they treat message to the Ukrainian president. It's just play that conversation I had was is largely. Congratulatory was largely corruption. All of the corruption fixing play was largely the fact that we don't want our people like the vice. President Biden is done creating big corrupt already in the Ukraine

President Trump Donald Trump Boris Johnson United States President President Vice President Brexit Speaker Pelosi President And Ceo Supreme Court Senate Joe Biden Congress Prime Minister Republican Party Christiane Amanpour United Nations General Assembl Uk Parliament UN United Nations
Product Mindset With Jessica Hall

Developer Tea

12:33 min | 1 year ago

Product Mindset With Jessica Hall

"I think people are way too attached. Languages languages come and go every three to four years. people are re architect ing making changes. I A lot of people are are committing their organizations to a path without knowing how hard it's going to be changed as opposed to saying this is where we're solving wing for today with tomorrow at mind we think we know that things might shifted change over time because everybody has had to re architect and in in many cases multiple times that was the voice of Jessica. Hall the A CO author of the book the Product Mindset today is the second part of my interview with Jessica. You didn't listen to the first part encourage you to go back and listen to that before you dive into today's is episode. My name is Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to develop not in my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity. Perspective can purpose pissing your careers. Let's get straight into part two of my interview with Jessica Hall. I'd love for you to kind of explain further about how how I might know more practically dive into a product mindset. What are some ways some things that I do today that maybe I'm not going to do in in two or three years and instead. I'm going to be doing something else. What are those things that you see a Mo- more developers participating in the future. Yes in the product lines. Mindset has three principles that kind of underlie all things it starts with a fundamentally before principles building for outcomes outcomes that we're not just here to build code. We're here to build businesses to help. Businesses serve customers and to grow the end to continue to innovate that it's not just about the Kobe right but what does that code create. What is that code enable. What value does it deliver and the first principle is minimize typed value. Which is the idea that you know when you are working working in your I d e when you're writing things in Jira. When you're planning meetings when you're doing sticky notes drawing diagrams that's activity the value exists in the hands of your customers value exists when they can work with the prototype or use a productive feature in production or staging That's value exists in their hands where they can do something. So how do you as fast as possible. Put something to their hands. How how do you reject the notion that it has to be complete as to be fully implemented have every bell and whistle it has to have feature parity plus everything else. What is the smallest all set of things that you can do that solve the problem for somebody? PUT IT in their hands. How do you kind of slice across and say I'm going to deliver the ability for you to to look at this for you to manipulate it in for you to get some sort of result on just this thin stripe things and that from there. I can see people gosh should be really. I you know I really want to be able to do this thing great. Let me build that thing. You know. It doesn't account for this thing awesome. I'll get on that next but that first principles really the idea idea that we have to deliver that small sliver that small piece of the feature not everything and I think it goes back to school where you have this ocean of completeness and I don't want an incomplete. That's like that's bad. I can't simplify these things down. I can't cut it down. Just take a piece but taking a piece allows you to reduce waste to increase learning to start generating interest. Perhaps general revenue much sooner so the question you to ask yourself. Else is our minimizing time value when you go to plan your releases. Are you thinking about in every release in every sprint whatever you know analogy use news. How fast are we delivering value to. Our customers are waiting too long before we giving them things. Do we have things that are clogging up the pipeline that if we could streamline them we did you get things out faster which means we can learn faster. How do why isn't it in junior developer. Maybe think about implementing something that might get it done a little bit quicker a little bit simpler as opposed to something that maybe Nouri ability to scale but honey. We Ain't scaling yet. We don't even have ten customers so or win. The team goes to do release planning to say okay. Let's break this down and make sure we have something that we can release that we can deliver value to our our customers in that. We can learn and we're open in. We value without learning the NEX principle is solved for neat so the idea is that AH product needs to solve a need. When is that need. Why does this thing is exists. What do we do for people you know. Kenya explain you're at a bar with someone you just met like why your product matters and you know. What is the need? A needs is our best to find a by state like I can't do any better than him so I'm GonNa have to use his you know. It's you know it's a problem you know. Oh The doing laundry is a pain in the butt and you probably don't enjoy doing laundry your number two. I know that that I know the extent that it takes time and effort if I don't do you know if I don't get it done. That aren't where until you you can. You can put a price on that pain. that you're trying to fix your trying to fix it. You're trying to improve it somehow. You're hacking something together your laundry scheduler. You're you're using. You're trying different services and things in nothing's quite working and you're in the last. You're willing to invest in a solution. That's a neat neat. That's something I I can. I know I haven't if someone has a problem. They don't identify. They don't feel they don't connect act with they haven't figured that out yet good luck trying to cells kind of have to admit that they know it's a problem. They know it hurts. They're trying stuff suffer not finding the right thing. They're willing to make an investment in the new thing that's where you WanNa play and so that's kind of where it helping understand the customer and having spent some time. No one's asking you to do detailed research. Maybe read some of the research that your team is put together. Maybe look at some of the data. Maybe listen to an interview. There's something really powerful about connecting with other humans. the last one is accelerate age the so that comes in a couple different ways you know back in the day. You still only be able to release once a month now. We have good better tooling. better processes better ways to be able to deploy more often being willing to invest in that. I'm reading. This book called accelerate about the science of devops. It is is not an easy by any stretch like I can only go do a couple of pages at a time because it's so dense but it's also antastic in making the case through were very rigorous data heavy process of why to make that investment but it's not just the technology piece of that end getting your organization to invest in technology not the decision making you know a lot of people complain that priorities change at my answers will yeah they should because has everything around the spill change companies change markets change regulations change so why shouldn't priorities change its priorities changing such assigned. FLAKA organization who doesn't know what they're doing at their if they are changing without reason they're changing. They have been measured. They're changing aging because you know somebody right has shiny object syndrome that bad and he usually people call me because because somebody's got shiny objects in Rome. That's not not uncommon big but if they're changing because there is something has changed in the world and we need to respond to it. That's thank goodness right. Yeah thank goodness that retained because if we don't somebody else will get their first and we may not be here so changing priorities isn't necessarily a bad thing. I need people to kind of think that when priorities changing question where that's coming from rather than say oh my gosh product. Doesn't you know what's going on. Our leadership. Team doesn't know what's going on. Don't blindly execute yourself to the bottom of the ocean. Yeah this is a this is a problem right because if you if you look at what what do you mean when you say change. There's multiple things going on. You're you are in your environment and you may be doing something in that environment but if the environment changes around you then there's it's essentially indistinguishable able whether you changed or the environment changed right in other words. You can keep on doing the same thing but that doesn't mean that doing doing the same thing is going to result in the same outcome. This is very It's obviously true right because you can say okay well. Masika a silly example. This is unrealistic. Let's say that I'm awake. Now I might as well just continue staying awake and I'm not GonNa Sleep when when when the when night falls because I'm awake and I don't WanNa change that's crazy right because we're talking about a different scale of of changing and to to maintain homeostasis for your body. You need to sleep right so in a way. If you don't want to change you you should sleep right so if let's say that the other scale that we're measuring on is growth company is growing. You know say they're. They're growing their revenue. year of year at one hundred percent. I don't know some unrealistic number and they they don't WanNa change well. What is it that they don't want to change. Do they want to continue growing their revenue or do they not want to change something else and allow their revenue to sink right. That's so so so I think we we want to maintain our behaviors but we forget that our behaviors are not the entire story that the environment is changing around us and so you're not the same person that you were before. You're not the same company that you were before and certainly the things that you did before or not. GonNa have the same effect as they a- as they had previously yeah ain't that painted a but it makes it hard right. How do you know what to do. I will gosh it's really hard to say now. I I'm reminded of Pixar Stringer hits day very deliberately brought brought in that Bradburn who got like fired by budget studios and said. We believe you will challenge us. You will shake it up. You will not allow us to go into complacency with toy story seventeen or something and so he he was the you know the person's shake it up any took. Everybody wanted to shake things up in the whole company. Put the one team and they may day incredible and so. It's hard to to do that in You know it's it's rough. If you want to continue to see those numbers go up. You WanNa continue doing something. That makes you feel safe insecure that you know you can do that noble when it all feels like it. Smooth food is coming. I mean I hate to be the doomsday device but something is on the horizon. We've never I don't think again. I'm going to get this wrong but I think the number is that fifty seven or seventy five percent of fortune one hundred will turn over the next two years that didn't happen twenty years ago but it happened today the end you've got choices to make somebody who's GonNa income for you or you. Comfort yourself tied to keep pushing it forward and and that's that's scary and that's hard and your company evolves. Maybe some of the same people they write for it anymore.

Jessica Hall Jonathan Cottrell Kenya Rome Junior Developer Nouri Pixar Bradburn Budget Studios Seventy Five Percent One Hundred Percent Twenty Years Three Years Four Years Two Years
Algeria and Argentina Certified Malaria-Free By WHO

UN News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Algeria and Argentina Certified Malaria-Free By WHO

"More countries are officially free, from one of the world's leading killers malaria, the U N health agency WHO an instant Wednesday that the disease is no longer prison to in geria- and Argentina. WHO guidelines say that the country can be said to be malaria free, if it can prove that it has interrupted transmission of the disease for at least three consecutive years. In Argentina's case malaria was last reported in twenty ten in JIRA. The disease last surfaced in twenty thirteen the moment follows years of improved surveillance, free diagnosis and treatment, and both countries that has allowed for every last case of malaria, to be rapidly identified and treated WHO said in a statement. Malaria, is contracted through the bite of an infected mosquito. It's estimated to have claimed more than four hundred thousand lives in twenty seventeen

Malaria Argentina Geria U N
Algerians protest over entrenched autocracy

FT World Weekly

03:13 min | 1 year ago

Algerians protest over entrenched autocracy

"Today. We're looking at the situation in ALgeria where mass demonstrations have broken out calling for the eighty two year old President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to leave office. It's all a bit reminiscent of the demonstrations that broke out almost a decade ago in neighboring Tunisia and that sparked the so-called Arab spring. So what's likely to happen? Now joining me the studios are Middle East editor Andrew England. And then the lines are correspondent have a salad who's covering the protests. Andrew festival as I mentioned ALgeria in a way, it's been an anomaly because it didn't get sucked into the last round of mass protests across the region, why this peculiar history, and why is it happening? Now, do you think if we go back to two thousand eleven the were protests in JIRA, but the government acted proactively to put them down. They lifted the state of emergency in February two thousand eleven they reduced cuts in subsidies and they worked quickly to. As the population. And so you difficult the scale that you got in other countries in Libya in Egypt and engineers, you say now protests have continued in now, Jerry, but they've been very localized. And they'd be very specific sort of local problems, a water problem electricity jobs that kind of thing the difference with this is on a mask L. It's nationwide. People are saying it's bigger than they've ever seen out to your bigger than in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight when they have big protests, and it's all around one thing. And that one thing is the prison beautifully is seeking a fifth term. And it's not necessarily about him personally is more the question. The system is pushing him to stand for a fifth term when he's basically an ailing will chair bound president who's not even in the country. The moment we believe in Geneva getting medical treatment. So it's the whole notion is is the sense that Algerians being insulted by the ruling system saying, yes, we're going to push this eighty two year old onto for a fifth term, and that just seems to have been a step too far out here. And so we're seeing Jerry from all walks of life as I said take to the streets in towns cities. Across the country and really mobilized sort of a national sentiment against this, and beautifully ker has handed in his nomination papers. Someone did it for him because he's not in the country on Sunday, and the protests have continued so essentially against the system against the notion that somehow juries would accept having a president who's eighty two years old hasn't been seen in public for a longtime ready speaks at all in public and is in Seville. Yeah. But one of the reasons one of the theories as I understand it. Why Algieria was largely exempt lost time from the mass turmoil. Was that they had their own tragic civil war beforehand, two hundred thousand people died, and so was that also a reason why people are very wary of any outbreak of unrest because they've seen how tragically wrong it can go in the pause. I think our Jaren leaders have used that. And they've used that pasta. And as you say, you know, what happened in the nine hundred ninety s when they had an election in one thousand nine thousand one which was won by Islamists which the miniature then coun. Counselled which then triggered basically, a civil war that is fresh in the older generations minds, I think it's questionable how much role that played in two thousand eleven I mean, people that I've been speaking to tell me in two thousand eleven and it was called the angry poor working classes took to the streets. And it didn't have that national scope which we're seeing today.

Jerry President Trump Algeria Tunisia Abdelaziz Bouteflika Jaren Libya Andrew England Editor Geneva Algieria Egypt Seville Eighty Two Year Eighty Two Years
"jira" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"jira" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"In Chicago CBS to reporter Vince JIRA, solely says youth. Authorities paid a visit to Kelly at his condo inside of Trump Tower acting on a tip that was originally called into the state's attorney's office from out of state saying that two women were here with the singer. And that they were being held against their will police were able to speak to the singer into each of the women both of the women said that they were okay. And. That they weren't in any danger Kelly has been under fire since the recent airing of surviving are Kelly a lifetime documentary. He is denying all allegations of misconduct. An attack on a Lansing woman has landed a Michigan man behind bars for life car Leah's Klay robbed the woman's house early in the day when she wasn't at home. He went back that evening when she was he kidnapped sexually assaulted strangled. Her then center on fire she survived but has permanent injuries. Klay pleaded guilty to all the charges in sentencing. Klay, federal judge Virginia KENDALL noted his lengthy criminal history and the level of terror. He inflicted on his victims. He also attempted to take a prison caseworker hostage when he was detained at the Metropolitan Correctional Center, John Coleman, NewsRadio on one or five point nine FM. A man from buck town will appear in court today accused of robbing several pawnshops at gunpoint. Investigators caught thirty eight year old Norbert at yesterday as he was trying to sell stolen goods at another pawn shop, he's charged. With three felony counts of armed robbery with a firearm. Police say wet rob three pawnshops, then sell the stolen jewelry, rob heart. Newsradio on one zero five point nine FM. Police in Schaumburg investigating a smash and grab burglary at a target store. It happened Thursday night. Forty five minutes before the store in the twelve hundred block of east Higgins who set to close. Police say a man distracted an electron employees while two others broke into cases housing apple products. They took off with twenty five ipads and.

Klay Kelly Trump Tower Vince JIRA Metropolitan Correctional Cent rob heart reporter Lansing Chicago CBS buck town Higgins attorney Norbert Leah Virginia KENDALL apple John Coleman burglary
Amazon, US and Google discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:15 min | 2 years ago

Amazon, US and Google discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Amazon has launched whisper mode for English speakers. In the US whisper mode can be turned on and settings or by telling the echo to turn it on, and we'll cause the device to respond to whispered commands in a lower tone. So we will now take to referring to her in a whisper on the show, Google announced the launch of compose actions on g meal for g. suite the feature. Let's you add attachments or other content from applications like dropbox box, ignite and JIRA, right within the g mail, interface users will need to add

Amazon United States Google
We break down what 5G will really be like (The 3:59, Ep. 475)

The 3:59

04:09 min | 2 years ago

We break down what 5G will really be like (The 3:59, Ep. 475)

"Welcomes drift. Roger Chan, I'm Joanie sauce. We kicked off a new package on five g. today in our leadoff story takes a look at what five g. will actually feel like one launches and this is my story. I, I took care to basically type poke holes at all the hype around five g. basically don't expected to change your life right away. Coverage is going to be spotty or non existent. Your phones might run out of batteries really fat or run a power really fast. They're my problem with content getting onto five. JIRA game kicked back down for four g. basically all the problems we saw when we transitioned LT probably see with five. Jeez, sounds amazing. Right? Eventually. So yeah, look, this is the excitement over five g. I think justified in terms of what it can do for us over the long term when this actually gets built out and as a bit more mature. But the sore is really on reminder that with all the hype like early on, that things aren't going to go smoothly as everyone says, it will what's for win will reach that point of maturity that pseudo maturity like prematurely, but not like clunky doesn't actually work. I would say twenty twenty s probably the the better timeframe t mobile has said that they they're promising nationwide network by twenty twenty nationwide by twenty twenty. And that'll that that'll definitely get a couple of faster if they can buy with sprint eighteen Reisen probably be not that far behind. And then most of the Asian countries have started building out or will build up most of their networks at that point. So. I think that's the point where like you can start to actually get excited g. Okay. Next up our own even Shanklin had a nice breakdown on how Google uses computational photography to Busey ability of the single camera on the pixel three, for instance, uses to make better portrait photos takes a budget, exterior shots and combines them for a better low light photos night shot and got some because super high rez is basically making up for the lack of an optical zoom lens uses data to kind of fill in the blanks. So Kusaba is this enough Joan to convince you that only one cameras, all you need on a phone. You know how I like a multiple cameras on phones that Samsung four-camera four shooting, but I think that sounds great. I mean, it sounds really cool the ability to do all these fans now is the computational photographer. You what also enables the stuff like the wide selfie mode and like the. The thing that will fix when you are blinking in the middle of your photo. So the white selfie mode, they actually will have a second camera on the front. That is a wide selfish Cam. So that's not that's not competent. You can't really use data for that before in terms of fixing things. Succinct blemishes. Yeah, that's what that probably what Google's Bagga trick soul about. Lastly, Joan you were covering. Noth- looks earnings last night and if there was some concern that those can be a blip or well, yeah. Last quarter. With earnings, always about expectations of anything. The only thing that people ever care about enough Lexus, how many subscribers did you add? Three months ago. Netflix said we had a subscribers just not as many as we said. We want and everyone freaked out. So last night people are really worried that maybe this was Netflix standing on the brink of downturn, especially because other companies and technology haven't been doing so great, but Netflix said, you know, he's up, you have this. We actually like, did a lot better than that. And so everyone freaked out. But yeah. Interesting that that they're seeing that success given the sheer number of streaming services that are launching now like, yeah, Netflix is just for the core. The no one really gives up, right. I mean, people always say, if you're going to have a streaming service, the mindset that consumers have is like you're going to have maybe y'all, two, maybe three, and one of them's going to be not lex, very, go for full coverage on CNN and Joni. Solomon thatch listening.

Netflix Google Twenty Twenty Joan Roger Chan Joanie Sauce Samsung Reisen Blemishes CNN Noth Shanklin LEX Kusaba Busey Joni Five G Three Months
"jira" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on KQED Radio

"United states kept its ban on flavored cigarettes and indonesia instead started sending flavored cigars that's how trade disputes are supposed to get resolved the appeals process is like the supreme court of the wto but under the trump administration the united states is threatening that part of the process all one hundred sixty four countries were part of the wto they have to agree on who the appellate judges are roberto as the vado is the current head of the world trade organization he says there are supposed to be seven judges there are currently four and the us is blocking all other countries from nominating replacements so we don't even begin to look at the names with don't even receive the names of the candidates that is unprecedented as the beta says two more judges are on their way out and the wto needs three to hear a case when it goes to two then at that point in time the appeals processes effectively paralyzed as the beato says countries have to want to settle disputes to avoid trade wars if we don't all tried to observe the disciplines and the results of the disputes then this system doesn't function and by the way the united states has brought more cases to the wto than any other country in the world and it's one almost all of them for npr news i'm sarah gonzalez support for planet money comes from atlassian provider of collaboration software for organizations of all sizes through products like jira software confluence trello and stride teams can plan track and communicate more at atlassian dot com.

wto united states indonesia roberto npr sarah gonzalez atlassian jira
"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The club case the judge is determined that the united states had violated in international trade agreement there was some secret settlement but the united states kept its ban on flavored cigarettes and indonesia instead started sending flavored cigars that's how trade disputes are supposed to get resolved the appeals process is like the supreme court of the wto but under the trump administration the united states is threatening that part of the process all one hundred sixty four countries were part of the wto they have to agree on who the appellate judges are roberto as the vado is the current head of the world trade organization he says there are supposed to be seven judges there are currently four and the us is blocking all other countries from nominating replacements so we don't even begin to look at the names we don't even receive the names of the candidates that is unprecedented as the beta says two more judges are on their way out and the wto needs three to hear a case when it goes to two then at that point in time the appeals process is effectively paralyzed as the says countries have to want to settle disputes to avoid trade wars if we don't all tried to observe the disciplines and the results of the disputes then the system doesn't function and by the way the united states has brought more cases to the wto than any other country in the world and it's one almost all of them for npr news i'm sarah gonzalez support for planet money comes from atlassian provider of collaboration software for organizations of all sizes through products like jira software confluence trello and stride teams can plan track and communicate more at atlassian dot.

united states wto indonesia roberto npr sarah gonzalez atlassian jira
"jira" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Gray only on the blaze radio network pat gray is here on the blaze radio network triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three couple of days ago we played this really refreshing ad for governor in kansas from patrick shera just to remind you of what that was here's portion of the there's a new day ahead for cans a new era of growth forged by a new conservative leader patrick coop jim this is your typical campaign ad and i talked to these seniors because well seniors vote where i walk with my sleeves rolled this guy down to earth i laugh is i play a board game with my family read a book to these little kids and overused political buzzwords like sustainability community and future now that your typical campaign ad but i am not your typical candidate i'm a lot like you i've never held office i've ever even run for office today i believe political experience is the worst kind of experience and that's why i strongly support term limits to get rid of career politicians in both parties you know you know politicians have made politics a production and i've never known a production actually sold problems that we face today winded production in politics ever alleviate the pain the kansas families are facing today it's a great ad all right patrick jira joins us now on the blaze pat welcome to the blaze hey good to be here i'm ably fan we'll thank you you definitely got our attention with with that ad who conceive that was that was that done in a brainstorming session did you have a just a really good.

pat gray kansas patrick shera patrick jira patrick coop
"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is why i'm certainly he spent most of his time trying to type trying to get away from the background noise from his his son and his sister and his sister susie who played the bagpipes so it was a good refuge for him and he sat here over the sign of jira desperately trying to get the manuscript finished he was beginning to think that he was going to die i'm on the road which runs pretty much the whole length of jira and it was on this road that george wells cobb broke down as he was leaving the island for the last time is companions went to get a repack it and the writer was left with his son richard who well remembers that cold dark january afternoon in nineteen forty nine i do recall i was sitting in the backseat with him and breaking down on this this loan contract between bond hill and lesser and we're just sitting there as you can imagine a of doc often noon in in winter to in january and he would to while away the time he would tell me little stories i think you had been given a suite of some sort and they always sat and waited for them to come and fix the vehicle mix a car and we went on down to survey i think he's spent the night there i regard the west coast and juror is my spiritual home just living there as a little boy was so wonderful all i can say is that my ashes we'll go through when when the time comes not sometime soon i hope but quarterback reckon will finally get it's june one day that was james shah what katherine amazing isn't it to hear the story behind.

susie writer richard katherine george wells cobb james shah one day
"jira" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on 100 PM

"I know that sounds completely weird but i've always been kind of like how does how do you do it when i was doing physics in college i used to hang out with the business people because i was kind of how do you do the business that i was like i wanted to hear the process and they thought i was crazy but i guess it kind of came full circle now that i think about it today you are head of product at two fi correct so what is to be so to fee is a product i started really only few months ago i have for some time now wanted to create a product managers product let's how he used to describe it it was a ridiculous thing but the goal then was i wanted a product that helps you do product management but an intern made you a better product manager just for having used it i used everything from a hod trello to jira pivotal every product out there very great for project management and so my original idea for to fee i think before even i had i was thinking of the name defy was i saw that a lot of companies just didn't understand how to experiment and what to do with experimentation and so i started there and so i did a lot of customer development and ended up with a very disappointing result and the result of this customer development was go out and meeting with people in starbucks all over the anywhere they were i went i sit up meeting after meeting all types of company all types of product person nuder product old the product everyone had this need was it was very clear from my interviews they also be experimenting more they all needed help.

intern product manager starbucks head of product
"jira" Discussed on Start the Week

Start the Week

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Start the Week

"There's a there's a brilliant phrase for in hebrew i'm not i'm not a conservative jira reform do or secular gee what i am is dot lush which means which stands for data chevelle it means used to be orthodox it is category mean design thing you haven't left it's you've left an institutional expression but it's in you is the way i feel about christie i haven't left christianity how could i i may be on the edge of it i may be offended by much of it but it but it's deep in me at gave me my songs in my stories you're you're manifestly still of that we should we should come with disobedience would you mentioned your first i is now completed film what was it about the experience of writing fictional characters including this character of ronit who's a something of an outcast the helps you understand something about your faith that the lived experience your childhood couldn't help you unstamped oh it's do you know what it's still very hard onto that question something a bit mysterious for me about what it was that happened in the writing that book but the book is about these two women who somehow in some way are two parts of myself so there's esty who stayed within the community who is left and they had had a relationship when they were young women and then they meet again older i must say that the film is wonderful so sds played by rachel mcadams and rene is played by rachel vice and they just extrordinary performances i think they really got at the heart of this question of why stay why leave for me there was a moment it felt like the point when you turn your brain off just as your jumping off the high board in the swimming pool you know that's everything.

christie ronit rachel mcadams rene rachel vice
"jira" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on 100 PM

"It sounds like we're saying we're not gonna put estimates around anything we're just gonna like do it as we can which would be very scary which is why the idea of time boxing it and holding people accountable and scrum seems appealing but in reality it's we don't need to go through that exercise because the time that it takes the time that it takes and we've already ironed out a lot of the kinks to get it working and flowing as well as we possibly could that's why we're just we're working on this until we're working on the next thing and we know that we've got good flow exactly i know when i when i joined i thought wow this is crazy how do you live like this but now it's super efficient and having a team that that communicates along the way really supports that structure so do you use trello then for ticket tracking you have a manual board how does it all we use jira yet used your yeah and we are in the condon configuration yes correct sarah cool okay what is the day or a week in the life of you look like in your current role okay so it could be so many different things but the things that i do in a given day it could be scheduling usability tests conducting these abilities has distilling those insights presenting it to multiple teams it could be road mapping for the next month the next year it could be road mapping feature specifically and all the communication work in alignment that even gets you to that point which is the harder part of that it's not just putting items onto a timeframe or calendar view interviewing customers.

jira condon sarah
"jira" Discussed on Equity

Equity

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Equity

"So there's general there's a general general proclivity towards trying things that are easy to try and then when i commit to it it's not a long term commitment and it makes the battered option really easy that's what ended beautifully jira which is why thousands if not millions of developers and technology users adopted it and i think that's what dropbox done now they use it in the enterprise for their daytoday filesharing or they use it in the personal lives so i think that distinction between enterprise and consumer seems a bit artificial is the bottoms up growed that they have which i think they've done well there's been a lot of comparisons to atlassian amongst vc's i've talked to you i mean everyone saying you know they it reminds them of them are they're hoping it will be like them because lassen is done pretty well in in the stock market but the reason there is that that focus on whether it's consumer enterprise is because the stock market when they're looking at multiples they have little formulas they like to plug in so it works differently then then the way visas value at these companies and they really are caught up with these labels nls in figuring out what bucket to to group this into but ultimately i mean it seems like at least the bankers are pretty optimistic about how the public will receive this in seems like dropbox may waited for the perfect moment where it will finally be valued at that private market valuation and yes vc's more specifically they will tell you it doesn't matter because it definitely doesn't matter for the early employee's and the investors early investors i mean no matter what they're making a ton of money off of this as a huge huge huge win for them i mean sequoia owns almost a quarter of this company like a ten billion dollar company that means they're getting almost two and a half billion dollars when shares it remains the same price or could go up there last sorry what was what was their last hit.

vc dropbox sequoia lassen ten billion dollar billion dollars
"jira" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on KOMO

"A study by the restaurant consultants jira conceal shows that about one point two billion ham and cheese sandwiches were sold last year while one point four billion burgers or eaten over the same period wall street this morning it looks like futures are just a bit lower down thirty nine s and p down three nasdaq futures way down again about thirty it's now five twenty two saudi crown prince mohammad bin salman met with president trump at the white house yesterday talk about his rapidly changing country abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran reports are still a long road ahead for that nation women's boxing class in of all places saudi arabia good but here's these women it's about physical mental personal power the last thing i expected to see saudi women box hitting a bag or hitting pads or punching something makes you feel empowered and strong throw your left bring it back to your face paula ronnie is the first and only female boxing and kickboxing trainer in the kingdom of saudi arabia a true revolutionary what do you say to americans who just have this stereotype about saudi about saudi women about saudi arabia and the society think terror oil there's so much more tool as an to saudi and tidy arabia saudi arabia is changing fast the future king of saudi arabia crown prince mohammad bin salman nbs says everyone calls him right now he's on a tour of the western world the thirty two year old image plastered across vehicles and billboards visiting the queen at buckingham palace it's a great honor to have the crown prince saudi arabia's been a very great friend meeting with president trump at the white house it's a massive pr push to install what he calls moderate islam that is open to the world for decades here women have not been allowed to drive and women couldn't travel without permission of a male guardian or even show their hair and public back at the gym after her workout running puts on her long abaya and her headscarf still required dress for saudi women in public is actually finished colorful it is she tells us those bright colors for unheard of just a decade ago there is so much tradition in this country and that tradition is so powerful and yet if anyone can break down the walls that still exist here hala and her sluggers just might have a shot.

white house paula ronnie saudi arabia salman nbs buckingham palace hala president chief foreign correspondent terry moran saudi thirty two year
"jira" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Tv great point nonni the goto let's say we got we'll get to the phones back in just a second i want to say something before i forget next week and i don't know why this bothers me maybe because mac my youngest son has been the last two days we were driving the car go into basketball practice going to whatever and he is pointing out invasive species of from kudzu of foliage tell me the things that we we shouldn't have and then he begins to tell me how someone has is considering bringing in some bug that is supposed to slow down kudzu and i'm like when do we learn our lesson when do we stop bringing he and things that are supposed to stop something else and he tells me about another story where they brought in some sort of snake a predator they're supposed to go after this kind of mice that were brought in that nothing eats so even though theoretically was supposed to be a predator they just kind of pass by each other at the shift change and nobody bothered to find anything more about the well it sounded like a great idea i'm hammer i'm sure her back in and maybe the habits of one of them changed when they stayed here say alive but when do we stop allowing these things that come in so then i run across the story at the washington examiner where it's by anna jira tally we're in the dc area airports customs officials now you're gonna like how this sounds now you've been you've been internationally before profiling.

washington examiner mac basketball anna jira two days
"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"jira" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The human genome through open products like jira trillo and stride at last in his committed unleashing team potential it's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep and i'm rachel martin this morning we are following the aftermath of the school shooting that left seventeen people dead in south florida we will have much more on that elsewhere in the program but for now we turn our attention to national security and politics midterm elections are happening this fall and according to our nation's top intelligence leaders that election will be vulnerable to russian interference just like the presidential election in 2016 here's director of national intelligence dan coats there should be no doubt that russia perceive that its past efforts as successful in views the two thousand eighteen u s midterm elections as a potential target for russian influence operations that was the director of national intelligence speaking to a senate committee on worldwide threats this we nick our next guest was the director of national intelligence during the 2016 election he served under the obama administration general james clapper joins us in our studios here in washington general thanks so much for being with us when you hear them director coats as well as the other leaders of the intelligence community outlined the threats to our election by the russians and say as they did that there is not a whole lot of government efforts underway right now to stop future interference what goes through your mind world course conju worked we lived through oh those of us who were in the government the when the russians were doing what they were doing in the runup to the 2016 election and uh i was very gratified in fact proud of uh the uniformity among that panel and particularly uh dni dan coats uh for saying what he said because you think he has not been as forthright as he should have no no not on the contrary at just the reinforce what uh what those of us renner in those similar positions in the last administration were saying of the russians were uh very successful in other immediate first objective which routes is so discord a discontented doubt about our system and they succeeded to a further well and we said then that they were going to continue to do it do that which they will do in a 2018 elections so i was very gratified that at an open hearing like this with all six.

steve inskeep rachel martin south florida director obama administration james clapper npr russia senate washington
"jira" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Acquired

"Innovate their way out of this and so what they decide to do is something that was fairly novel at the time but not a hundred percent novel they decide to just sell the software on the internet so rather than having people sell it anybody can just common sign up and and it's in the cloud it's it's sassan and that's not you're like i said it's sorta leading edge but sales forces around at this point the concept of zaz exists the hosted on their website and you can buy jira from it lasts in on the internet and this is a little bit of a flash forward to two later in the show but i was looking through the s one and the terms sas only appears four times in their us one and it i think three or maybe all four of the four times it refers to external partners so it's interesting to sort of think about at last and doesn't view themselves as a sas company or at least they don't refer to themselves that way in their their communication to investors as sort of trying to figure out what is that is it that they feel that they pioneered the category so they don't need to say that they're part of the category or is that that they wanna you know sort of look at their numbers differently than a quote unquote typical sas company will look at numbers or is it you know they also have this booming on premise business where they're installing stuff on servers for companies that they they predated the modern era of sas in many ways they did they did but do so my hypothesis on this is.

jira sas hundred percent
"jira" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"jira" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The process of troubleshooting bugs can be tedious and inefficient four developers especially as they push more and more co two production the unlucky developer assigned to bug duty make it bombarded with air alerts and spend hours figuring out which airs to address first they might have to deal with logs to piece together what happened or even spin time reaching out to other engineers on their team for help bugs snag improves the task of troubleshooting errors by making it more enjoyable and less timeconsuming for example when an error occurs your team can get notified via slack see the diagnostic information on the error and identify the developer who committed the code bug snags integration with jira and other collaboration tools makes it easy to assign and track bugs as their fixed we have a special offer for software engineering daily listeners try all features free for sixty days at bug snagged dot com slash s e daily development teams can now iterative faster and improve software quality to get started go to www dot bugs snack dot com slash s e daily get up and running in three minutes airbnb lift and shop a fi all use bugs knack 2 monitor application errors try all features free for sixty days at bug snagged dot com slash s e daily thank you bugs neck for being a sponsor software engineering daily much agreemean boom boom boom boom boom find it funny that like so for example i use a mack as an added i look into the lead of the border what is it called that what's the thing that tells you what to running the activity growth yeah exactly activity monitor dog activity monitor and i'm looking at what is taking up all my cebu cycles in my memory and it's all were irs end electron apps and i'm sometimes wang like wire my on a mac again.

developer jira collaboration tools irs airbnb sixty days three minutes