17 Burst results for "Jimmy Lee Jackson"

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on On One with Angela Rye

On One with Angela Rye

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on On One with Angela Rye

"Requires some level of storytelling. And part of what happens is we don't tell the story right and so we remember wrong and if we remember wrong, we don't act right in the present. John Lewis was a man of the movement, not just an island until himself. I listen to when they say an icon. But if you talked I'm sure probably Pfleger or my brothers and sisters in the in the Ethiopian church in a Coptic Church. Icons of different than idols because icons look back at you. But as you look into is of the icon, you see yourself at what you ought to be doing. You don't just lift them up. You don't separate the icon from the lodge of meaning and from their work so less for moment remember. John Lewis was not down there on that bridge by John Lewis a cell he he was invited to Selma that had been a thirty year movement and Selma The Dallas County voters lead. That's remember that Snake Winnie and and part of that was also James Bengals Alabama voting project before we saw bloody Sunday. Let us remember. That, there was a Catholic body. In Selma wife people. who had been working for years with the Dallas County Botas the that I'm movement has always been bi. Racial. This is not new what we're saying the date, what we may be seeing more of it because social media, but it's always been that way less remember that that. Sal. Mata Montgomery. I began as the result of death. The death of Jimmy Lee Jackson who was killed like James Fraud by George floor by a cop. And then the death of James Reid served a UNITARIAN minister who actually ended up bringing in more people from around the country. We have to remember that, and then we need to remember that they began in a church. And when they got to Montgomery, they heard a sermon. But it probably I think in some ways. King most? Drink that was his most common for clothes and that's the wanted most people listened to. But that nineteen sixty, five salmon at the steps of the Alabama State House where Dr King laid out why there's always going to be such a fight over voting rights and what he said was. The aristocracy in this country. Always sold division. When poor black folk and poor white folks have the power to come together. And Vote for the beloved community at the ended about Gumri bus boycott an excuse me the. Much dot king as a person of faith laid out of vision of these two powerful bodies come together same folk that had been used in the civil war that had been used out through his he told the story what happened in the eighteen hundreds on ninety dollars, eighteen hundreds, and during the reconstruction how this Jim Crow Ism just sit this this racism what sewn deliberately to keep black and white poor people. From forming unions. And he said this is what this is.

John Lewis Selma Mata Montgomery Pfleger James Bengals Dr King Jimmy Lee Jackson James Reid Dallas County Dallas County Botas Gumri Coptic Church Alabama State House James Fraud Alabama Jim Crow
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on WTOP

"Effort was unsuccessful. But Sanders is hoping that this time is the charm. I'm pushing. Of folk by that by the name Bridge to freedom. Some people have suggested renaming the bridge in honor of Congressman John Lewis, while others say it should be named in honor of Amelia Boynton or Jimmy Lee Jackson all key figures in the voting rights movement. That is a TV reporter George McDonald, students, teachers and now some 2000 alumni are joining forces to call for a name change at Washington and Lee University. The Washington Post says they object to the glorification of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, the school's president, has called for a special meeting of the faculty next week to consider a motion to change the name. The lawyer for several of Jeffrey Epstein's accusers is now weighing in following the arrest of Epstein's close friend, Gullane Maxwell for her alleged role in the sex trafficking and abuse of minor girls. Brad Edwards is urging Britain's Prince Andrew to tell authorities what he knows. He has been a longtime friend of Dylan Maxwell was a very close friend of Jeffrey Epstein. He clearly made observations heard things saw things. And engaged in the enough with people to where if you have nothing to hide, or if you know information comes share it. If you don't it certainly makes you look a certain way and that way is not. Prince Andrew has been pictured with one of Epstein's victims. He denies any involvement. This October. NASA astronaut Kate Robbins Rubens rather and two Russian cosmonauts will launch to the international space Station from Kazakhstan. Back in May, NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Jenkins successfully launch to the station from the US aboard the space X endeavor. Rubens previously spent six months on the station between July and October of 2016. Coming up where D C ranks for black homeownership. I'm Jeff Play ball. It's 12 24. Okay show of hands. Who's put on a few pounds during locked down with all the junk food in the newsroom? Chocolate became a food group for me. Hi. It's Rita Kessler E m P 1 80 Help me avoid the quarantine. 15. I'm actually £20 down and counting and still going strong. The best part. I didn't have to leave my house to do it. Remote phone calls with my coach and food delivery have made it easy to be successful while being socially distant, virtually Or in person MP 1 80 had options that worked for me and that work with you to call now 855801 80 Plus I'm down to clothing sizes and people are really starting to notice the difference..

Jeffrey Epstein Kate Robbins Rubens Prince Andrew Gullane Maxwell Robert E. Lee NASA Washington Post Jimmy Lee Jackson Lee University Sanders Brad Edwards Amelia Boynton Rita Kessler E John Lewis Congressman Doug Hurley Kazakhstan Washington
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:37 min | 11 months ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Great deal of comfort with working with mark meadows who has said obviously he is leaving Congress this will give him a new platform to continue to serve the country and for that the president is incredibly thankful now going out Mick Mulvaney is no longer in the position but here's a guy who's been an absolute workhorse for this administration resulted number position he was the acting director of the CFPB that's a consumer financial protection bureau he was also the director of the OMB the office of management and budget as the fifty fifth anniversary of the civil rights clash known as Bloody Sunday approaches townspeople in Alabama wants to remind the world that the road to Selma began in a place called Marion in nineteen sixty five in what has become a footnote to history young black man by the name of Jimmy Lee Jackson was fatally shot at a protest in Merion it was that killing that sent hundreds of people to Selma for March at the Edmund Pettus bridge two weeks later in sports North Carolina Tar Heels lost to the Duke blue devils last night on W. B. T. eighty nine to seventy six in a game that was much closer than the score would indicate next up is the ACC tournament North Carolina place Pittsburgh on Tuesday here on WBT do because a bind doesn't play until Thursday locally in the south Atlantic queens beat Catawba to advance to the tournament finals in hockey the checkers lost to the Utica comets three to two last night in NASCAR chase Elliott won the pole for today's Phoenix fan shield five hundred at W. B. T. we believe the local I. Mike down WBTW.

Merion Phoenix NASCAR Pittsburgh North Carolina W. B. T. Elliott hockey Duke blue devils Edmund Pettus bridge mark meadows Jimmy Lee Jackson Marion Selma Alabama OMB CFPB acting director Mick Mulvaney
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 11 months ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Funerals were held for Jimmy Lee Jackson it was an open casket memorial service at brown chapel Amy and some which nearly three thousand people showed up for and one at the church in Merion where he'd been a deacon after the Merion service the procession half a mile long walk for miles to the herd cemetery with Jimmy Lee Jackson was and then that is similar and after I don't know whether you Brandon is empty dad and everything someone went and sat graver since the old yeah when they do that one good enough in the day they sat two months this was an idea here well it's been he plus years since I've been here now looking at this thing we're standing at jubilee Jackson's grave just a little ways outside of Marion and we're looking at the bullet holes in the headstone we've come here today with Chuck figure in sixty five figure work in some of for Dr king's organization the southern Christian leadership conference I don't think I see new bullet holes maybe that means decided to leave it alone I don't know it was shocking when I first saw it you were seen in the video footage of the funeral here no but I was in it we were here for the funeral as a matter of fact that was the last time that I was asked margarine are taking the figures jobs during the summer campaign was to stick close to doctor king it was a cold a bodyguard but that was essentially the deal the day of Jackson's funeral it was drizzling rain footage but it looks like it was just the most ominous stay for a funeral yeah and we Marshall this is this for a long stretch yeah it is from town we came all well here in the rain Lhasa I think umbrellas protected Dr king from snipers more than I did or anybody else because Mister Lawson roles in Iran it's interesting and something we talked a lot about standing here in front of him a Jack's greatest pride of place talk about it the contrast and comparison between Jimmy Lee's death and reads to Bob white man's death gets more attention news racism part of a highway yes no quarrel with that that's not the whole story there's an important to Jimmy Jackson's death wish and maybe didn't realize as much till much later Jimmy Jackson's death catalyzed the black community in this part of the state okay it was a big deal here okay didn't get it international whatever but Dick catalytic effect on the black community here was very important to devil's ability and hit it created a force that he was able to mobilize and direct you to the March figures talking about James bevel the charismatic field organizer of the SCLC who is directing the operations and some bubbles response to Jackson's death wasn't some large demonstration needed to happen he found a Bible verse somewhere.

Jimmy Lee Jackson brown chapel Amy
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Non voters on February eighteenth nineteen sixty five ad good advocates for the voting rights of disenfranchised African Americans ordered a rare night time March in the small town of Merion Alabama part of the state's black belt to protest the jailing of James orange prosecutors charge orange with contributing to the delinquency of minors after re enlisted students in voter registration drives Alabama state troopers responded to the protest by beating peaceful demonstrators and Billy clubs and sending terrified marchers fleeing into the night some sought refuge in police violence at a nearby restaurant Max cafe state troopers followed them into the establishment however in one of the strippers James Bonner Fowler fatally shot an unarmed twenty six year old black voting rights worker Jimmy Lee Jackson insisting the Jackson and reach for a gun Fowler claim self defense I witnesses told a very different story is in the Jackson was try to protect his mother from police violence in the fall or shot him deliberately and without provocation Jackson languished in a hospital for eight days before dying from his wound Alabama officials issued a warrant for his arrest for the assault on a police officer they did not arrest and died or discipline follower or even releases name to the public dollar remained on the state police force and a year later he shot and killed another on our black band is in Johnson junior during an altercation at the alabaster city jail state officials say police officials were quick to purge both killings about ballers personnel file that fired him in nineteen sixty eight for assaulting his white police supervisor in two thousand seven as part of federal state effort to reopen cold cases in the civil rights era Alabama prosecutors indicted the seventy three year old Fowler for murder two weeks before trial was set to begin in twenty ten dollar pleaded guilty to manslaughter and serve five months of a six month sentence Ali died in twenty fifteen fifty years after killing Jimmy Lee Jackson Americans were dying for the vote more than one hundred and seventy five years after the nation's founding because the framers made a consequential mistake when they drafted the constitution and the bill of rights the constitution's first ten amendments they failed to enshrine in these pivotal documents of our democracy the right to vote and just for matter even only white men but for any American among many enumerated rights at the government cannot abridge the right to vote remained conspicuously absent and remains so to this day all subsequent amendments protecting the voting rights of racial minorities women and young people the fifteenth amendment out race the nineteenth amendment out sex twenty sixth amendment on age our frame negatively stipulating not what the states must do to ensure people's voting rights in America in America's Democratic Republic but what they cannot do Jimmy let Lee Jackson died one could plausibly argue because the political leaders who drafted these amendments perpetuated the framers mistake of failing to establish an affirmative right to vote Jackson died because white supremacists who controlled southern governments and circumvented the fifteenth amendment's prohibition against denying the right to vote quote on account of race color or condition of previous servitude they did so through patently discriminatory almost seemingly race neutral restrictions such as poll taxes and literacy tests as the pioneers of modern democracy the founders understood that the right to vote grounds all other rights hours Americans to become participants in government and rather than mere petitioners but it was there mission of writing voting rights the trigger to war over America's embattled vote the continues to rage in the halls of Congress and the court rooms of federal judges yet as in merry in Alabama it has spilled into the streets to with life and death at stake in the ongoing struggle for people's right to consent in their governing opposition of voting rights for all Americans is revolved around three critical issues despite the revolutionary rallying cry of no taxation without representation for most of U. S. history the American political leadership has considered suffrage not a natural right but a privilege bestowed by government on a political community restricted by considerations of wealth sex race residence literal literacy criminal conviction and citizenship the notion of privileged access to the mode survives into our own time albeit in subtler forms than in the past as the early Republic proponents of a limited vote have waved the banner of voter fraud in earlier times to justify the disenfranchisement of supposedly corruptible people such as the property property list workers women racial minorities or immigrants today it is the allegations of such forms of alleged election fraud is voter impersonation repeat voting voting by non citizens are balloting in the name of dead people that are used to justify restrictive measures like motor photo ID laws are draconian purges of registration rolls numerous studies have documented that such voter fraud is vanishingly small in recent elections the outcry continues as loudly as ever disputes over the vote had been intensely partisan with principal justifications for voting restrictions function as thinly masked attempts to favor one party over another the end of reconstruction through the early twentieth century for example it was the lonely white Democratic Party the benefited politically from suppressing the African American vote in recent years the partisan calculations of reversed as African Americans have become the most reliable of democratic voters and Republicans have.

twenty fifteen fifty years seventy five years seventy three year twenty ten dollar twenty six year five months eight days six month two weeks
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

"In the Trump era, the news moves faster than the NPR. APR politics podcast is there to keep you informed every time there's a major political story, we get our best correspondence together to sort through the noise, the NPR politics, podcast, what you need to know right after it happens. to funerals were held for Jimmy Lee Jackson. It was an open casket memorial service at Brown chapel, AME and Salma, which nearly three thousand people showed up for in one at the church in Marian where he'd been a deacon after the Marian service of procession half a mile long walk four miles to the heard cemetery for Jimmy Lee Jackson was buried at been Madison Metairie. And after I don't know whether you'd rather this they have to and everything someone went the graver, Tim sell Amin old would they They happen? go to marry him around Monroe. That wasn't good enough humid day. They shot his two stone mouses. Poison Ivy here. Well, it's been. Three plus years. And so been here. And I'm looking at this thing we're standing Jimmy Jackson's grave, just a little ways outside of Marian. And we're looking at the bullet holes headstone we've come here today with Chuck Fager, and sixty five figure worked in some of Dr king's organization, the southern Christian leadership conference, don't think see new bullet holes. Maybe that means people decided to leave it alone..

Jimmy Lee Jackson NPR Chuck Fager Amin Madison Metairie Brown chapel Dr king Salma Tim Monroe two stone
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

14:46 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

"When the state trooper who shot. Jimmy Lee Jackson was charged with his murder in two thousand seven a woman named Mary Cosby Moore was a circuit clerk at the Perry County courthouse in Marian thirty miles north west of Selma. I think that's what my interests really grew looking at the case and follow in the case. And then end in all the court documents, because in that case all the documents have to come through the clerk's office and the discovery of it was just fascinating like so many people in town, more out of personal attachment to the case, even though she's only seven years old and nine hundred sixty five her family and Jimmy Lee Jackson's family knew each other. Well, her grandfather was closed with, Jimmy Lee's, grandfather, cage early, and their mothers were also friends. It's a matter of fact. Ms Valda was the first person that started my mom in chickens. She gave my mom to chickens. And my mom that never dealt with chickens before. And so she gave it to chickens among start raising chickens, of course, we got so attached to chickens that. I don't think any of them ever got on the dinner table, but we did eggs. Moran was like this smaller than some more familial. Everybody seemed to know everybody and Jimmy Lee Jackson was one of there's and while the voting rights campaign, and Marian would often later be lumped in with the broader movement in summer Marian had its own local movement participated in the movement in Birmingham. Right down the street from where the fat holes is in the dull that's Walton may Kenny who had grown up in Marion, but who left for a few years to attend college in Birmingham. So I came home and I was unable to register to vote advantage in Birmingham. But when I got home, I still at no thought, though, to vote here in Marian, we have put you off off day after day after day, but stealing we'll go up to the courthouse to, to the registrar this connect the next day come back the next day. And then finally, when they did let you come in, they will give you a stack of papers about a half inch the questions to answer. How many pin is in this jar and you have a joyful opinions? They'll ask you something about some dead president on back in the eighteen hundreds of fifteen hundred besiege just poisoning that the question and you could not answer them these so-called literacy tests, which weren't. Fully banned until nineteen seventy could also include sections, that required perspective voters to read aloud, then interpret, then transcribe long passages of legal lease from the Alabama constitution. An torius. Lee noxious in long winded document, was crafted in one thousand nine hundred one with the explicit mandate to quote establish white supremacy in this state in quote that same constitution, by the way, is still the basic governing document of the state of Alabama. But it became my job some of to try to teach people how to pay statistic even though we couldn't pay I will say of the local leader of the voting rights movement in Marian was Albert Turner. Like Walter may Kenny Turner was a recent college graduate, who's fed up with the lack of racial progress in his hometown, Turner died in the year two thousand but here he is from a filmed interview in nineteen seventy nine and I insisted that I tried and always thought I was pretty good student myself. And it was kind of a flat to me that these dumb is, who was raised. Ause was saying to me that I can pass a test de will give it. And they can all right. Down names by the beginning of nineteen sixty five Turner and other local leaders have been trying to register black voters for a few years, but they've managed to register only seventy five people, but it's more national voting rights organizations came to Selma and January. Some of them began fanning out into neighboring communities, including Marian. And when they did the energy, there changed the foot is Monday in February nineteen sixty five was our full restoration day. And of course, we call this d day. We hid intended that we.

Jimmy Lee Jackson Albert Turner Marian Jimmy Lee Selma Birmingham Perry County courthouse Alabama Mary Cosby Moore Ms Valda murder Moran Ause president Marion Walton Kenny Walter seven years
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Throughline

"Hey, amanda. Ab Louis, and this is through line from NPR today on the show chip Brantley and Andrew Beck. Grace are joining us, they're the hosts of NPR's podcast, white lies chip. And Andrew, thank you so much for coming to studios. Talk to us. Thanks for having us here. Really appreciate it. Love the show. So are you guys host this great new series from NPR called white lies and it investigates, a cold case from more than fifty years ago? Right. So catch us up what's the series about so Whitelaw's is about the unsolved unresolved murder of a man named James rebe, who was a unitarian minister who came down to some Alabama in March of nineteen sixty five to support the voting rights campaign going on in Selma? And he was actually while he was in Alabama. He was attacked on the streets and SAMA died, a couple of days later in Birmingham and his murders, essentially gone unsolved, the last fifty four years races, obviously front and center in this story is. So I wonder how did that factor into how you thought about telling it, you know, you're both white reporters, did you feel like you're, you're whiteness, granted you or denied you any access in talking to people definitely helped with access? For sure. I mean, I think being too white GAAS from Alabama who looked the way we look. And also, you can kind of talk the talk helped open doors to, to get people to talk to us, who I think otherwise would not have. And so we try to use that chart vantage, while also understanding that being aware of that the whole time, we were, we were doing this. Yeah, I want to actually dig into that a little bit more possible. Because our show. What running I think about a lot is how stories from history like the one year telling matter today. What are they manatee so listening to the show? I often thought about I have my own ideas about this, but I want to hear what you think about why the story reason why story that you chose. Tell matters today. I think white people think of the civil rights movement and have black history, white people often think of it as black history. It has nothing to do with white people that this is not American history, but we do these things in February. We talk about the civil rights movement. We talking about Martin Luther King. This is not connected, who we are as a people, and I think. White southerners who have long interrogated, our own families roles in our own culpability in, in the in the sense of the past, we, we have felt that that is an insufficient way to talk about where we are as a nation right now. And so, I think as white people going down to look at the murder of this white man by other white people and a community of white people who protected, it actually makes a certain kind of sense that why journalists would be would be asking questions about the story, even though, of course, the context of this is the struggle for black voting rights. So I think we've been we've been trying to triangulate our way around to really lean into the, to the strengths we have as white southerners, telling the story, but also being very aware that this is not a story of our own liberation. In fact, it's the story of our own guilt, and our own sort of responsibility to the past. It's a great series for everyone listening. Check it out. But now we're going to pivot a little because today you're bringing us a little bit of a different story, right? Yeah. So that story of, of James read, and how James re gets to someone the first place is all because of this. Called Bloody Sunday that happened in early March of nineteen sixty five when these peaceful demonstrators decided they were going to walk to Montgomery to protest the lack of voting rights, and they were met at the foot of the Edmund Pettus bridge in Selma. They were met by a group of state troopers who beat these peaceful protesters, John Lewis and has aliens were at the front of the line. These, these kind of iconic images of these peaceful protesters being beaten by all these shares troopers, many of the mounted on horseback, shooting, tear gas into the crowd that event is what prompted James rebe to calm down to Selma, along with many, many other white Unitarians and other clergymen and, and women who decided to, to lend their support to the movement will all of that only happens because in February nineteen sixty five a man named Jimmy Lee Jackson is shot in Marian by state trooper during a night March. And that murder of Jimmy Lee Jackson is what prompts the folks in the SEAL L and the, the student on violent coordinating committee to decide to do the March to Montgomery in the first place, so buddy. Sunday does not happen without Jamie. Lee Jackson's death the previous month and Jimmy Jackson's death. I mean, did that get the same sort of national tension, that Reeve's death got? No, not at all. In fact, there was very little made outside of the local community Marion, and Selma about Jimmy Lee Jackson staff. So, you know, you do a compare and contrast when Jim ribbed is the president since flowers to his wife down in the hospital in Birmingham. Makes receives dozens of phone calls with his staff and with others. And then since a jet to fly Jim ribs, widow back to Boston, then a week later, invokes Jim Reeves death when he introduces the Voting Rights Act before both houses of congress when Jimmy Lee Jackson Dodd just a few weeks before no phone calls. No roses, no airplane. No mentioned in the process, one small story in the press. But none of the national outrage that Jim Reeves death draws from around the country. And so it took the. The death of a white man, essentially to kind of draw that national attention to this bigger issue. Yeah. I think I mean, it's it is a testament to the way that white lives matter, more than black lives in nineteen sixty five and I think the case could be made. This is still a massive problem today. And that's what makes the black lives matters movement, such a resonant.

Selma Jimmy Lee Jackson James rebe murder Alabama NPR Jim Reeves Birmingham Jimmy Jackson Andrew Beck Jimmy Lee Jackson Dodd Montgomery Lee Jackson amanda Grace Ab Louis Martin Luther King
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. Imagine a street corner in a small city. It's evening. The streetlights have just come on and three men have just finished dinner journalists chip Brantley picks it up from there. This is nineteen sixty five. These men are strangers here northern men and a segregated southern city. White men standing in front of a black restaurant three men and a decision to make. Would've been no way for them to know, what will happen next. We'll change everything that it will lead to the murder of one of these three men and radically alter the lives of the other to the murder of James read. A white unitarian minister would lead to outrage across the country. President Lyndon Johnson would invoke his death. When he introduced the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five for more than fifty years ribs, murder would go unsolved to NPR. Journalists have changed that Andrew bet. Grace and chip Brantley have spent the last four years reporting on this case, the NPR podcast. That follows their reporting is called white lies, and it's out today and chip and Andy join me now in the studio to talk about it. Thanks for coming in guys problems. All right. So this man Jim rebe was attacked on a street corner in some Alabama. It is nineteen sixty five and there is a whole lot happening around the country and around him at the time, right? The voting rights campaign is in full swing. There's lots of civil rights groups down in Selma in around Selma. And in February sixty five a young black civil rights working. Jimmy Lee Jackson is shot and killed by Alabama state trooper a couple of weeks later, they organized a protest March across the Pettus bridge from someone Gumri at Bloody Sunday, Jim leave like millions of Americans sees this footage of by Sunday. And it's just outraged. And so he decides to come like clergy from all over the country. So Jim Roope comes on Tuesday March nights he's attacked there. And some and he dies a couple of days later in his death. Just provokes national outrage, the president invokes his desk, we introduces veterans act later that year, there's a trial for three men. They are acquitted by an all white jury December nineteen sixty five and really after that the story of what happened. The Jim rebe goes cold for really more than fifty years, but of all the murders that happened during the civil rights movement, particularly the murders of black Americans in the south. Why? Why focus on this, man? This particular white man, he has a great question. I mean, there are hundreds of these murders in I would imagine hundreds that we don't even know anything about especially those African Americans. I think what was interesting about this particular case, and it wasn't really our intention to do this dive on it. But once we got into the story a little bit. We realized that Jimmy Lee Jackson's death was nothing to this country at the time that it happened. It was Jim Reeves death galvanize the nation. It was this idea that a white man was killed that meant so much that Johnson invoked that people around the country protested and the reception of the importance of the death of a white man over a black man said a lot about race at that time. And also we would come to find out later a lot about Harry's authorites in this country today, and it was kind of shocking to us that with all the attention that these these really high profile murders that happened around the voting rights campaign. The Jimmy Lee Jackson's murder was solved in a way to hundred five when the state trooper shot him was held to account. But in Jim Reeves case, there's never been that accountability. And one of our characters. To plan. If we've got an over the years and American woman in Selma. We all talked about this a lot in the process of our reporting. It was same as though his would have been saw with and all of it would have come to life because he was a white man hot. Wow. Did that's about that? We could solve Jimmy's. But we can't saw read. I mean, why wasn't it easy to solve? Why why wasn't there? Also, a lot of public pressure to get it done. Yeah. So it was a busy street where we was attacked lots of witnesses lets people saw during the trial the defense. Trying basically presented to arguments one. These guys aren't the guys who did it. They have alibis into that. The movement itself that Reeves companions at night either. Let rebe die or how to hand in killing him because they needed a white mortar. Well, yeah. And they wanted to such an extent that when we started showing up in some to report the story fifty years later we heard versions of the story over and over and over again, maybe all the details weren't exactly the same. But this vague idea that he hadn't really been killed by these guys was. Really prominent in our reporting, in fact, one of the people we talked to a man named Billy boozer date. They killed a man on the way to booming him. I just will al- always will believe it. Okay. So through these seven episodes, you end up coming to startling revelations about this case. But there's another question that we have to ask here you answered earlier about why this particular white man was worth this story. Why are you to also white men? Why are you the wants to tell it? That's question. Any of us grew up in Alabama. And one of the remarkable things for us. When we first started reporting, this story is that the story about the murder of Jim read, which is a huge deal at the time was something we'd never heard about. And what we found was that this community was really just protecting its own. And if it really familiar to us that kind of silence that kind of lie to sort of protect something that was precious to you. And and frankly, we had the luxury of not talking about race growing up. We grew up in a place whose default strategy when it came to talking about race with silence. And we just felt like once we got into the story. We had an obligation to do it to chips point. I think we internalize that ability to not have to talk about race when we were younger, and I think as we grew older and started thinking about what it means to be an American especially white American. He seemed very important to us to wrestle with these injustices in the past often think of black history and the civil rights movement is a black stories about in four black people. But there is another force in that story, and it's white people. So we especially as white southerners. I have a responsibility to try to understand these stories and unpack them so you guys ended up setting the record straight on what happened the night that. Jim Roope was attacked is that truth enough. I mean, what difference does that revelation make? Yeah. I mean, we've we've thought a lot about the work of other journalists many of them white southerners as well who have done the same kind of work over the years. We actually talked to him in John Fleming. Who's a reporter who was instrumental actually probably the reporter who got the Jimmy Lee Jackson case reopened in two thousand five who talks a lot about the purpose of this kind of. Work having that outing of all the wrongs that were done is just it's usually important as a starting point for rebuilding your society. And we've never really had that before. In a click cleansing that was still neat. I mean, the truth is for some people the truth will never be enough. But this country has never had a proper truth and reconciliation moment about race. And we've heard someone very famous race. Bryan. Stevenson, say this idea which truth and reconciliation are sequential. So to have reconciliation we have to I have the truth. Andrew Bak, grace inch. Brantley are the hosts of NPR's new podcast. It is called white lies. It is out today. Thank you so much for talking with us come. This is NPR news. New Jersey is among several states, Wayne the legalization of.

Jimmy Lee Jackson murder Jim Reeves chip Brantley Alabama Jim rebe NPR Jim Roope President Lyndon Johnson Selma Jim Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Andrew bet Bryan James
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Non voters. On February eighteenth nineteen sixty five ad advocates for the voting rights have disenfranchised African Americans or a rare nighttime March in the small town of Marian Alabama part of the states black belt to protest the jailing of James orange. Prosecutors in charge orange with contributing to the delinquency of minors after he enlisted students in voter, registration drives. Alabama state troopers responded to the protests by beating peaceful demonstrators Billy clubs and sending terrified marchers. Fleeing into the night some sought refuge in police violence in a nearby restaurant. Max cafe state troopers followed them into the establishment. However in one of those troopers, James Bonnard Fowler fatally, shot an unarmed. Six year old black voting rights worker. Jimmy Lee Jackson insisted on the Jackson had reached for a gun Fowler claimed self defense eyewitnesses told a very different story. They said the Jackson was tried to protect his mother from police violence in the Fowler shot him deliberately. Without provocation. All Jackson languished in a hospital for eight days before dying from his wound. Alabama officials issued a warrant for his arrest for the assault of police officer. They did not arrest indict or disciplined Fowler or even releases name to the public Fowler remained on the state police force and a year later he shot and killed another unarmed black band as Johnson junior during an altercation at the alabaster city jail. State officials say police officials were quick to purge both killing some followers personnel. File but fired him in nineteen sixty eight for assaulting his white police supervisor in two thousand seven as part of federal state effort to reopen cold cases in the civil rights era. Alabama prosecutors indicted the Seventy-three-year-old Fowler for murder two weeks before trial was set to begin in twenty ten dollar pleaded guilty to manslaughter and serve five months of a six month sentence. Holler died in two thousand fifteen fifty years after killing Jimmy Lee Jackson. Americans were dying for the vote more than one hundred and seventy five years after the nation's founding because the framers made a consequential mistake when they drafted the constitution and the Bill of rights, the constitution's first ten amendments, they failed to enshrine in these pivotal documents of our democracy, the right to vote just for manner, even only white man, but for any American. Among many enumerated rights that the government cannot abridge the right to vote remained conspicuously absent or remain. So to this day all subsequent amendments protecting the voting rights racial minorities, women and young people the fifteenth amendment on race the nineteenth amendment on sex twenty sixth amendment on age are frame negatively, stipulating not what the states must do to ensure people's voting rights in America in America's Democratic Republic. But what they cannot do Jimmy Lee Jackson died. One could plausibly argue because the political leaders who drafted these amendments perpetuated, the framers mistake of failing to establish an affirmative right to vote Jackson died because white supremacists who controlled southern governments and circumvented the fifteenth amendment's prohibition against denying the right to vote quote on account of race color or condition to previous servitude. They did so through patently discriminatory, although seemingly race-neutral neutral restrictions such as poll taxes and literacy tests. As the pioneers of modern democracy. The founders understood that the right to vote grounds all other rights empowers Americans to become participants in government rather than mere petitioners. But it was their omission of voting rights, the trigger a war over America's embattled vote, the continues to rage in the halls of congress and in the courtrooms of federal judges yet as in Marion Alabama, it has spilled into the streets to with life and death at stake in the ongoing struggle for people's right to consent in their governing opposition to voting rights for all Americans is revolved around three critical issues despite the revolutionary rallying cry of no taxation without representation for most of US history. The American political leadership has considered suffrage a natural, right, but a privilege bestowed by government on a political community restricted by considerations of wealth. Sex race, residents literal literacy, criminal conviction and citizenship. The notion of privileged access to the votes survives into our own time albeit in subtler forms than in the past since the early Republic proponents of a limited vote have waived the batter of voter fraud in earlier times to justify the disenfranchisement of supposedly corruptible people such as the proper property lists workers women racial minorities or immigrants today. It is the allegations of such forms of alleged election fraud is voter impersonation repeat voting voting by non-citizens or balloting in the name of dead people that are used to justify restrictive measures like voter photo ID laws or draconian purges of registration rolls numerous studies have documented that such voter fraud is vanishingly small and recent elections. The outcry continues as loudly as ever. Disputes over the vote had been intensely partisan with principal justifications for voting restrictions functioning as thinly masked attempts to favor. One party over another from the end of reconstruction through the early twentieth century, for example, it was the lily white Democratic Party that benefited politically from suppressing the African American vote in recent years, the partisan calculations have reversed is African Americans have become the most reliable of democratic voters and Republicans.

Jimmy Lee Jackson James Bonnard Fowler Alabama Marian Alabama James orange Democratic Party America Billy clubs fraud supervisor Holler principal Democratic Republic Marion Alabama US assault
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Non voters. On February eighteenth nineteen sixty five ad advocates for the voting rights have disenfranchised African Americans ordered a rare nighttime March in the small town of Marian Alabama part of the states black belt to protest the jailing of James orange. Prosecutors charge orange with contributing to the delinquency of minors after he enlisted students in voter registration drives. Alabama state troopers responded to the protests by beating peaceful demonstrators Billy clubs and sending terrified marchers. Fleeing into the night some sought refuge police violence in a nearby restaurant. Max's cafe state troopers followed them into the establishment. However in one of those troopers, James Bonnard Fowler fatally, shot an unarmed. Twenty six year old black voting rights worker. Jimmy Lee Jackson insisted on the Jackson had reached for a gun Fowler claimed self defense eyewitnesses told a very different story. They said the Jackson was trying to protect his mother from police violence in the Fowler shot him deliberately with. Without provocation. Jackson languished in a hospital for eight days before dying from his wound. Alabama officials issued a warrant for his arrest for the assault of a police officer. They did not arrest indict or disciplined Fowler or even releases name to the public dollar remained on the state police force and a year later he shot and killed another unarmed black band, Nathan Johnson junior during an altercation at the alabaster city jail. State officials say police officials were quick to purge both killing some followers personnel. File that fired him in nineteen sixty eight for assaulting has white police supervisor in two thousand seven as part of federal state effort to reopen cold cases in the civil rights era. Alabama prosecutors indicted the Seventy-three-year-old Fowler for murder two weeks before trial is set to begin in two thousand ten dollar pleaded guilty to manslaughter and served five months of a six month sentence. Ahler died in two thousand fifteen fifty years after killing Jimmy Lee Jackson. Americans were dying for the vote more than one hundred and seventy five years after the nation's founding because the framers made a consequential mistake when they drafted the constitution and the Bill of rights, the constitution's first ten amendments they failed to enshrine in these pivotal documents of our democracy, the right to vote just for manner, even only white men, but for any American. Among many enumerated rights that the government cannot abridge the right to vote remained conspicuously absent or remain. So to this day all subsequent amendments protecting the voting rights of racial minorities, women and young people the fifteenth amendment on race the nineteenth amendment on sex twenty sixth amendment on age are frame negatively, stipulating not what the states must do to ensure people's voting rights in America in America's Democratic Republic. But what they cannot do Jimmy Lee Jackson died. One could plausibly argue because the political leaders drafted these amendments perpetuated, the framers mistake of failing to establish an affirmative right to vote Jackson died because white supremacists who controlled southern governments and circumvented the fifteenth amendment's prohibition against denying the right to vote quote on account of race color or condition of previous servitude. They did so through patently discriminatory, although seemingly race neutral restrictions such as poll taxes and literacy tests. As the pioneers of modern democracy. The founders understood that the right to vote grounds all other rights empowers Americans to become participants in government rather than mere petitioners. But it was their all mission averting voting rights, the triggered a war over America's embattled vote, the continues to rage in the halls of congress and in the courtrooms of federal judges yet as in Marion Alabama, it has spilled into the streets to with life and death at stake in the ongoing struggle for people's right to consent in their governing opposition voting rights for all Americans is revolved around three critical issues despite the revolutionary rallying cry of no taxation without representation for most of US history. The American political leadership has considered suffrage natural, right, but a privilege bestowed by government on a political community restricted by considerations of wealth. Sex race, residents literal literacy, criminal conviction and citizenship. The notion of privileged access to the votes survives into our own time albeit and subtler forms than in the past since the early Republic proponents of a limited vote wave the banner of voter fraud in earlier times to justify the disenfranchisement of supposedly corruptible people such as the proper property lists workers women racial minorities or immigrants today. It is the allegations of such forms of alleged election fraud is voter impersonation repeat voting voting by non-citizens or balloting in the name of dead people that are used to justify restrictive measures like voter photo ID laws or draconian purges of registration rolls numerous studies have documented that such voter fraud is vanishingly small in recent elections. The outcry continues as loudly as ever. Disputes over the vote had been intensely partisan with principal justifications for voting restrictions functioning as thinly masked attempts to favor. One party over another from the end of reconstruction through the early twentieth century, for example, it was the lily white Democratic Party that benefited politically from suppressing the African American vote in recent years, the partisan calculations have reversed is African Americans have become the most reliable of democratic voters and Republicans have.

Jimmy Lee Jackson James Bonnard Fowler Alabama America Marian Alabama James orange Democratic Party Billy clubs fraud Max supervisor principal Democratic Republic Ahler Nathan Johnson
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Got to two o'clock tomorrow. I'll let it again to tomorrow. The sell it. And he's let these people go about their business. Let me go by my business to otherwise we're going to see criminal penalties against them. Look here. Don't go to play sicker. Stay with us. It's too much for their bozeman on news and talk thirteen eighty w okay? Call us at four zero four eight nine two two seven on news and talk thirteen eighty WPA. Okay. Breaking news sports weather. Lies in the WGN newsroom. Newstalk thirteen eighty. Good afternoon Atlanta right now, it's forty four degrees in Bankhead. I'm a major coober it. Here's what's happening in Alabama thousands of people came together to celebrate the anniversary of the Selma bridge crossing this weekend and New Jersey Democrat Senator and presidential candidate. Cory Booker spoke about one man who lost his life on that historic day was Jimmy Lee Jackson, life and death and the underlying conditions of our society in this country that sparked the ignition point for the March that we come here to recognize each year on the first weekend of March people gathered to commemorate the historic event in Washington. President Trump vows to cooperate with the House Judiciary committee. Besides that Democrats are on the wrong path cooperate all the time with everybody. It's a political hoax. The judiciary panel is requesting a massive amount of documents from the Trump administration and associates of the president Democrats say death, the documents relate to possible abuse of power and obstruction of Justice and the Russian investigation on the west side of the eighteen.

House Judiciary committee President Trump Cory Booker WGN Jimmy Lee Jackson bozeman Newstalk Selma bridge Bankhead Alabama Atlanta New Jersey Senator Washington forty four degrees thirteen eighty w
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Kings arrest quickly made national headlines and the evening news, helping to reinvigorate the protests and generate momentum behind the voting rights Bill in congress to delegations, lawmakers visited king in the Selma jail and pledged their support for the new legislation. Meanwhile, Clark's violence continued Ascoli in mid February Clark in his deputies attacked a group of more than one hundred sixty students when they protested in Selm trying to avoid press. Coverage Clark's men forced the teenagers to March several miles outside of the city using nightsticks and cattle prods on those who couldn't keep up the pace just eight days later. Jim Clark stood alongside the state troopers in Marian where they shot Jimmy Lee Jackson, the young deacon at Zein's chapel Methodist church Jackson's death at the end of February prompted SEAL organizers to launch their new demonstration quickly. They made plans for the mass March from Selma to the state capitol building in Montgomery, just over fifty miles east. They were set to depart on. Sunday, March seventh four days after Jackson's funeral. But as Sunday drew closer disagreements among the organizers began to mount despite their cooperation, thus far in Selma snick in the SEC increasingly found themselves at odds over strategy both in Alabama and throughout the movement, many snake organizers were concerned that Martin Luther King's presence at the March would distract from the local campaign that they had been building stick finally declined to participate telling its members that they were free to March as individuals, but that snick would not help organize the protests on the Friday before the March the man at the center of these tensions wasn't even in Selma. Instead Martin Luther King was meeting with president Lyndon. Johnson Johnson privately assured king that he supported new voting rights legislation. But he refused to commit to a timetable for the Bill king. Now worry that the March might make Johnson reluctant to move forward at all with the March less than twenty four hours away. King huddled with SEC. Organizers in Atlanta and. Thus the idea of postponing he wavered back and forth eventually deciding to sleep on it. He would make his decision at the last possible moment WHEN Sunday morning came he told his aides to cancel the demonstration. They heard to try and call it off. But more than six hundred people had already gathered ready to take the journey. King was still in Atlanta. But rather than trying to send the crowd home the leaders chose to make their move then and a little after two pm on Sunday the March or set out to buy two on their way out of town. Slowly, they approached the Edmund Pettus bridge as they crossed over the Alabama river the marcher sawn army blue helmeted state troopers blocking the road about two hundred yards past the end of the bridge some were astride horses. The pawn the ground restlessly Jim Clark, and his deputies were there to hundreds of armed men, and they looked ready for a fight the martyr's made it over the bridge and then stopped about fifteen yards. Shy of the human barricade. They were ordered to disperse given two minutes to turn around and retrace their steps. A rubbery snap of troopers putting on their gas masks one after the other hung in the air. The marchers waited preparing to kneel in prayer rather than to give in. But even before the two minutes were up the troopers charged. They plowed into the line of marcher swinging their nightsticks wildly a crowd of white onlookers packed into the nearby parking lot to witness the events cheered each blow. Melia Boynton fell after being struck in the head a trooper stood over her screaming striking again, and again until she was unconscious, and then hitting her some more than the tear gas canisters popped battered marchers choked and vomited as staggered back across the bridge, the mounted officers chased them into town and rode through the streets attacking any black body unlucky enough to be in their way. It was in the words of those who saw an inhuman display violence, and it would. Give me broadcast the rest of the world..

Martin Luther King Jim Clark Selma Edmund Pettus bridge Selma snick Jimmy Lee Jackson Atlanta SEC Johnson Johnson Selm Zein's chapel Methodist church Melia Boynton Alabama river Alabama Montgomery SEAL president Lyndon
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:30 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Al Sharpton on news talk thirteen eighty W A. Okay. Proven. Your whole. Shotgun monday. Let's go back to Maryland to Minyang was given us a historic perspective. Thank you again for letting me speak for anyone who's interested in what the definitions of fascism on are. There was an article written in two thousand three by in large. Brit teaching call the fourteen characteristics of fascism and many of those are being practiced in the United States. And there is I think they key party that started a few years ago really around the time that Mr Obama was elected they came out of the woodwork when the Obama suddenly was president. And there are people connected officially with white nationalist with the KKK. But there are a lot of people who aren't members of these organizations, but who thinks the same way and are connected by a kind of thin web across the country. So if you go back to history, the Spanish, the Portuguese, the Dutch, the French the British, and of course, Hitler Hitler was World War Two and one of the great ironies of our situation is that millions of Americans sacrificed to beat Hitler, and his fascism, and now many of those same grandchildren of the folk who did that fighting many of whom were killed fighting for the United States as a democracy. Ended up. Falling for Trump. Who is a fascist, and we don't want to say it. We just keep beating around it. But if we don't wake up, I am very much afraid of are becoming in a sense. The next Germany. So I appreciate your letting me talk about this. Because I am like so many people agonized over what's happening, and you go back to Charleston and the innocent black people who were murdered in that church there. And now the synagogue and Jewish people Americans who are decent need to wake up make sure their voting but also to call their congressmen who are currently in office and raise Cain about what's happening to us. If we just sit around and do nothing, I am very very worried about where we're headed. Thank you, raise excellent points. Thank you for your call. I think that your appeal to like you said decent people because when we get past all of the hoopla is a matter of decency. What kind of people sit by and. And watch this in one week to people just shot 'cause they're black eleven people mowed down in a house of worship caused the Jewish. I mean, just like the nine in in two thousand and fifteen in Charleston mother manual church. If you can't be saved gone to a house of fate. And. Seniors one lady at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh on Saturday. Reportedly ninety seven years. Oh, she talked about Hitler Mignon. She's a vibe the holocaust and ends up dying of gunshot wounds from a bigot. An anti Semite here. It does not get any more grotesque than that. As go to Cleveland to James w James. How you doing my teacher? All right. How you doing? Jane you ever heard from it a long time. I've not. Yeah. This is a guy that told you how many all in the soap bubble levels in. I had to go. I had to go into couple of five to go underground for a walk starting to get funny. Phone calls. Anybody's permission to say what to say we need to pass amendments. I'm a person of change in the personal solving problems. First of all, I'll let proclaim mother's day African American most. I'm already in the process started here in Cleveland, African female African Americans be mother's day. Recommend one book. Behold, a horse once before the show have a tape called worst war. Okay, now to the real deal. They're doing exactly what they're supposed to his shot. The people in Charleston. They shut the Jewish synagogue up doing your following orders. We have a president in office right now. Just one hundred percent behind that. It is fighting. This is just got up the fall. I agree with I concur with her one hundred percent they are quietly secretly, especially in new world order. We all know, we all see it. And they're getting away with it. I mean shopping problem we're talking about the problems book. Getting away with the the situation is what the problem really is. So I'm doing things on underground like proclaiming African Americans have to measure day on mother's day. That's something. They can't fight. We need to be a long Trayvon Jordan this shooting people at random trying to turn back to the Jim crow days. I told a lot of young guys I say, you know, what they finally found generation where they can put us back in slavery. What do you mean by their all you care about you? Do you do meet and and web? Well, how do you have no concept of multinational corporations have no concept? Apparently, they don't even glued to those phones. Looking at all this is going to have any political process going. We are in trouble. So my thing is I'm gonna get off the air, but we need to get ready serious about. This thing we discussed the problems a lot. Which is we need to have some solutions like asking merchants females day is going to be mother's day. From now, I'm proclaiming. Minutes will be passed. No bills to be passed. I don't need anybody's permission to claim day. God gave me. So thank you for your call. Jane, Brown and North Carolina Sirius XM one twenty six Brown. Yeah. How you doing? I'm doing. Well, I just want to you know, we're talking about our young generation. I have to pause I like to get a clause Costa ball. Yes. I generation they been folders. They have the is close. But you know, what we as parents? We we response. I just as much responsible for as they are you go read a statement. We have been confronted with every conceivable obstacle to taking that most important wall. Black American can take today is the walk kills the ballot box. And you know what? I put a few words in myself. But really this is Martin Luther King. Yep. Thought and his statement that he made in his book why we can't wait back in nineteen sixty three. And the sad part about it is that the same obstacle that our people faced back, Dan, we are facing it now. But look people we don't have to take it. We don't have to take. We know that they if you're living in a state. They are trying to be slicked fall. As I d. Then go get your. That's not going to be difficult. You need to make sure that you are going to vote because Jimmy Lee Jackson. Dhamma? Wherever enjoys me. The people that we don't sell the talk about these three people gave their lives. Dorn the civil rights movement. The have the right to vote. So people less not walk around young people, especially don't walk around listening to people like Kanye west. And all the foolishness foolish thinking people..

Charleston Hitler Hitler president Mr Obama Cleveland United States Jane Al Sharpton Hitler Mignon Maryland Jimmy Lee Jackson Germany Kanye west Minyang Pittsburgh Trump Cain Martin Luther King
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"When you think about it, the Voting Rights Act itself emerged out of decades violence, but particularly that violent scene, I on the Edmund Pettus bridge where nonviolent protesters led by Jose a Williams and John Lewis are crossing the Edmund Pettus bridge as part of a symbolic carrying of Jimmy Lee Jackson's casket, because he was gunned down by Alabama cops for defending his mother against a beating during a voting rights protests. And so there symbolically carrying his casket from Selma two months Gumri to basically put it on the doorstep of governor George Wallace as they crossed the bridge, they didn't even get too far cross the bridge, Alabama state patrol as well as sheriff, Jim Clark and his deputies. Then basically bum rushed the nonviolent protesters. Tear gas going off there being whipped with whips wrapped in barbed wire being trampled by horses that scene played out on, you know, the Tel the television cameras. Are there ABC that evening ABC cut into its movie of the week, judgment at near emberg to yes, to show the footage from Bloody Sunday that that that hell that happened on Edmund Pettus bridge. Then you have a wave of of allies coming into Selma to do the next March. It is held up by federal court order in that moment where it's held up. Some white Alabama's were so mad that there were actually not just black folk there, but white folk there who actually believe that black people had the right to vote. And so they went after a group of ministers and started beating him in one of them..

Edmund Pettus bridge Alabama Selma Jimmy Lee Jackson George Wallace ABC Jim Clark Jose a Williams John Lewis Gumri emberg two months
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Marathon fueling the American spirit Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago now Clearly as you note witnesses potential, defendants in, the like in many cases, dead, this is a. Test. Of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated. And The. Justice department in, the, last ten, years it's efforts led to five, successful prosecutions glue that of, Edgar Ray Killen involved in the murders of the three. Civil rights workers in the Mississippi who died in prison this past year, that. Of course was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise, our actor things that presumably. Can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a, lot of cases out there of course we're talking like, you said, about a sixty, three year, old case in in that particular case only know, one person that could, be prosecuted, all the. Law enforcement people are. Gone and, again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem and, Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know the people. That covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So the so this evidence continuing and again the the pickings, as you might expect are so much slim but nonetheless, have been, some cases Mitch, factor there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated. Press last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors audibly determined, that the statute of limitations let, them without. Any charges they could pursue in, a federal court Be FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation, of the emit immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm, not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about. Here and it was interesting that prosecutors determined that. The statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court if I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had. Already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all, you do have, Caroline like, I said Brian Dunham and. She. Was never tried okay so that would be a? Case you, could bring I I unless we get a confession from her. Or something like that I think, that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they reopened, this investigation I would I would guess, in, that particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting, anything done and well I suppose it makes. Us all feel better the. Something is being, investigated, I must say frankly given the, circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be Particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I, tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are you know where you do have some you know you, you do have some potential I just don't see it here I think. It may be was, a spur of, the moment, decision maybe somebody read Timothy. Tyson's. Which again now questions have been called about what? He but, he found in that book and said oh okay we have. A confession here let's go after, this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it, I, just think that that's the target is not the best target it this late day are there any state investigations, that that go back this far in any. Any part of the country. That that try, to, look at at circumstances that were, improperly handled at the time or is this strictly As far as you? Know a federal effort I. Don't know then he stayed investigations going on, certainly there, are cases going back even further but, you you, have to look at examples, like you, know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's. Being sent back, to Germany to, be tried so you know it does happen. But I can't think of any state investigations go to go, back that far The the circumstances of course of the. The, till, case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after the. Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted, Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall there two are linked together, Dr TRM Howard, we talked about last, time was a prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi well anyway he went on. A national speaking tour only. Three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted. That, it, was going to. Be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. basically said I, want you, to go around the country he was, getting crowds, and cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden, ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a, civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery Alabama, and his host, was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks. Was in the, audience, and three days later Rosa Parks refused to her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only three days before that had been the focus that had been the first event. Montgomerie, to, really focus on that issue so they the the issues you know the till case I think you can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come back and, talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment If you have freedom of speech My concern is sucker minnows talks.

murder Justice department Montgomery Alabama Dr TRM Howard Alabama FBI TRM Howard Mississippi Emmett David Beethoven Martin Luther King Brian Dunham professor of history Edgar Ray Killen Be FBI Rosa Parks Gene Hackman Jimmy Lee Jackson
"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"jimmy lee jackson" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon, show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the dependent institute and professor of history at. The, university of, Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co author, of, TRM Howard doctor. Entrepreneur. And civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of, sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of. Investigating long ago murders that, are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice department in the last ten years it's efforts have led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing. Involved in the, murders of the, three civil rights workers Nimitz sippy, who died in prison this, past year that of course was the subject of the. Movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when, a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the. Killing, of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to. The Selma to Montgomery. March again to the extent, that that that the law still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of, limitations. Is there Now I'm not a lawyer. But no I, don't I don't, believe there is then again there's, also the the other notion, that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise our act, your things that presumably can. Be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot, of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about a, sixty three, year old case and in that particular case I, only know one person, that could, be prosecuted. All the law enforcement people. Are gone, and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem, and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate and my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know. The people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as you, might expect are so much slim but nonetheless been some cases which in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press. Last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors ultimately determined, that the statute of limitations let them without, any charges they could pursue in a federal court The FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there. Were any state crimes that could. Still be prosecuted I. I'm not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was. Interesting that prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had already, been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be. Double jeopardy if there's no federal Charge that that's still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply. To the the civil, rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find this of academic interest. I'm not quite sure whether the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely. Unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably, the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of, reasonably getting anything done and while I suppose. It makes us all feel better something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are. Where you do have some you know you you do have some potential I just don't see it. Here I think it may be was a spur of the moment. Decision maybe somebody read Timothy Tyson's, sport which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in that book and. Said oh okay we have a confession, here, let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think. To think this through I understand why they're doing it, I just think that. That's the target, is, not the best target at this, late day are there any state investigations that they'd go back this far in any any part, of the country that that tried to look. At at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as you, know a a federal effort I don't know of any state. Investigations going on certainly there are cases going back even further but you you have to. Look at examples like you know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's being sent back to Germany to be tried so you know it does happen but? I can't think of any state investigations go to, go back that far The the circumstances of course of the the till case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after. The Montgomery Alabama bus, boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King. Junior to national prominence do you recall there, are two are, linked together, Dr TRM Howard we talked about last time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi way he went. On a national speaking tour only three days after. The jury's acquittal he predicted that, it, was going to be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The NWPP basically said I want you to, go around, the country he was getting crowds and, cities like, Baltimore Madison Square Garden you, know ten, twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil, rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure he. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty seventh, nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Alabama and his host was. Martin Luther King, then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the audience. And three days, later, Rosa Parks refused to up her seat she made quite clear, that the reason, she refused to give up her seat was she was thinking. Of Emmett till well Howard speech only three days before. That had been the focus dad had been the first event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till case I think. You can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery bus boycott and. Of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come, back and talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of TRM Howard. Will reintroduce you to him as.

murder FBI Justice department Alabama Montgomery Alabama Dr Martin Luther King Montgomery professor of history Howard Emmett David Beethoven Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Jim Bohannon Dr TRM Howard Mississippi Jimmy Lee Jackson TRM Howard Nimitz sippy