12 Burst results for "Jim Wonderman"

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The other thank you for those two questions and let me go to supervisor so many adjustments yeah Michael I I think listen to Jim Wunderman so the notion of a economic recovery bond and then listening to the conversation harkening back to the prop fifty seven which was fifteen billion dollar bond back in the year two thousand and four reminds me of the fact that there aren't any perfect solutions here so anything that we talk about today will be flawed it will be subject to legitimate criticism but you know internist to Jim's proposal I think after save yourself all right what are the alternatives add eat you know I'm it's a little bit like going to a payday lender nobody goes because they want to nobody goes because they think it's a great idea they go because they're absolutely desperate up against the wall and think that they don't have any other choices if if that's where we end up then people will be looking at a range of not terrific solutions but I do think you have to ask yourself do we want to saddle you know the next generation with it and even greater increment of dat and that's the trade off the chat to discuss when Jim makes the very real and I think legitimate argument at look better we operate the crisis of today and the long term consequences of that crisis so it'll be a it'll be a back and forth and as to the callers question about you know confronting pension debt or debt for other post employment benefits I I think it's real what I you know we you don't have time today to have the discussion about pension liability but whatever your views on public employee pensions you have to figure out how you're gonna pay where's the money going to come from and what he gonna give up to do it I I left the County Board of supervisors years ago to go off to Sacramento for twelve years came back and what had been about a seventy million dollar obligation for ploy health benefits had ballooned to one point eight billion dollars in obligations that now have to be met and that's money when you rack up debt like that that's money you don't have to spend on programs and services for the public in the years ahead and you know similarly with an economic recovery bond if you go down that path you over to crisis today but then that means you have to pay it all back with interest over the coming years and that means less money not more for the things you need and value in the years to come so so many in the Guinness this district supervisor was Sackler county board of supervisors and our next caller is John joining us from San Jose John welcome you're on the air hi thanks for taking my call I just wanted to make a brief comment question and and I I think he was there county supervisor that kind of talk about this earlier and this is regarding taxation and billionaires and I I find ourselves there and we're on a you know we may not get another discussion right they ask me out on this radio and many other people I have another discussion about financial woes and how we're going to put it on you know that the ninety nine percent are are you know the regular middle class and and don what's not being talked about is the billionaires and their responsibility and to give an example I live in Silicon Valley because of the kind that we Valeri at my annual salary I would have to work for five hundred thousand years without paying a single dime to keep making out well that Jeff Bezos has currently so that's the problem that's the elephant in the living room that we don't without doubt that doesn't get talked about so and and and I've actually where I'd like to get him to respond to or someone to respond to me is in Michael you you included today it's about you know the fear of billionaires leading the state if we tax them I don't I don't think we need or we should let the fear drive us I I say we do what's right we tax the billionaires and we you know we deal with what happens let me go to Tracey Gordon on this trip to go to get a senior fellow urban Brookings tax policy center what about the whole notion is there any data trace you chose if you escalate the taxes on billionaires are gonna leave the state yeah that yeah we've done some work on that and basically it's highly sensitive to sort of how you how you catch the question the time period that you look at the data that you look at and so I would say that that the rhetoric is are outpacing that reality in terms of out migration due to taxes and you know it California did pass our taxes on high earners in the Great Recession and it did successfully closed its budget caps and and those extra taxes expired on schedule just like in a bunch of other states we have a report on that as well so you know again I do think everything has to be on the table and tax increases would be in the mix as well as spending reductions tax increases generally take longer than spending reductions because you have to get agreement and craft a package and chat and figure out how you're going to implement it over what time period only go to jail back to Jim Wunderman on this engine actually I'm going to get your response if I may to a tweet here from James this is bay area counties have the unique opportunity to shift the tax burden to higher income corporations and very wealthy individuals how far can we go to shore up social services with a more progressive tax and transfer incidents without risking capital flight well you know we have the most progressive tax system in the country in California we have by far require the highest rate of personal income tax on the wealthy thirteen point seven percent many many many states it zero so that's what we're competing against the bay area council my group which is a business association supported governor brown on proposition thirty when the state had its last fiscal year use this this whole problem you know from the mortgage meltdown we supported it was a temporary seven year temporary measure when the seven years and it California got addicted to the money that was raised in so we voted again in California made it permanent so that's the that's the permanent rate we have seen I understand when we raised it by a couple of points permanently about fifty percent of the revenues that we got from that margin has left the state and so what happened I know anecdotally many many stories of folks who've left were leave more than a hundred eighty days a year so they don't pay tax in California so if we I think it's a big risk you know there is there is a ceiling on these things and I think I think it's very very tempting you don't want to put the burden on the wealthiest it's not inappropriate to want to do that but as I said earlier we have this is a situation where seventy percent of California's general fund comes from the income tax and all of that one percent is paid out fifty percent of that is paid by or more is paid by one percent of the population so how much more do you realistically want to keep on and take the risk that you could take California's strong economy and these are the people who invest in the state who run the businesses of lead the state employed a lot of people we can continue to create you know a place let's that's desirable for companies to start and grow and succeed you know I think at some point it is a it's kind of a fool's errand and I know I think we're in risky state in terms of our business climate already and that's why I think it's so important that we focus on the recovery we don't use this moment to try to solve every problem in society hello it's tempting to want to do what we need to get through this period and it's kind of a time for collaboration rather than finger pointing and you know to me the best way to do this but you know to come together and agree that we're gonna not decimate government we're not gonna put a risky tax measure on the bug on the ballot which is gonna have opposition campaign and could be defeated but rather have a come together out of business and labor and education and the folks who require these services that are social equity community and all come together let's get through this and then maybe we can work on addressing the pension issues maybe we can work on our tax structure and see if there's a better way than have California tax itself it isn't so volatile like this because we keep going through it and then we say Gee what a crazy tax structure we have why did we do this if we were to raise that that if we are to further in that stock a man on the highest earners were just doing more of what got us here in the first hello listeners are saying of course it goes back to proposition thirteen and let me go back you Caroline Coleman if I may Carolyn Coleman again as executive director of the league of California cities there's also a real issue here that I'd like to address if you could Caroline that has to do with the fact that there's real tension between local government between the city's frankly and this and the state in the fed's I mean particularly I want to focus on with you the local governments in the states because the states have more resources in the state so to some extent governing the good point Michael I I but I have an experience I've been around local government and state government federal government for for quite a while and I haven't experienced a time where there wasn't some healthy tension between the different levels of government when I pick up on something a theme that that Jim has put forward I I think well down this crisis we have seen incredible collaboration between the state and federal and local local governments you know we've worked together to manage the public health crisis and I want to underscore Jim's point about as we approach recovery on it certainly is is going to play out and different levels we all know that the recovery that the end of the day is going to happen in our local communities and so the focus there and the need for investments there I think is a priority and that we should have but it's gonna take a collaboration and cooperation public private in amongst the levels of government and I think we're gonna continue to see some tensions where we see it play out every day right now I'm in California between cities that want to reopen counties that don't want to re open the governor who wants to allow certain counties open in other places not not open it's a healthy tension and we're gonna just have to manage we have to manage through that because at the end of the day we've got forty million people in the state who have expectations of our our governments and are also want to be a part of another great dream that we call California okay sure there's sure there's tension I wanted just to push forward on that just a moment because cities are gonna have to balance our budgets and the biggest part of that is the work force I mean there's going to have to be layoffs and we're gonna have to see a hemorrhaging of work force here aren't we sorry to put it simply no much like a state local governments to have to have to balance their budgets and also to the extent they projection falls and and you've already seen it and in a number of communities in the bay area and other parts of the state on to the extent they're running deficits we are going to see layoffs we're going to see for learners are we're gonna see fewer firefighters and police officers to respond emergency calls bankruptcies to municipal bank it it isn't it is a tool that that could be used I think it is a last resort and certainly not the starting place I think that's what makes the ations with the state government over assistance for local governments as well as the federal government so important bankruptcies are not going to lead us to the kind of recovery we need in the state we would be much better off by prioritizing and and making sure that we can reserve or resource is in core functions at the local level so that our our local governments can be partnering with our business community in other sectors to ensure a strong recovery equitable recovery and an accelerated recovery that's the path to health not being you know the the path to health also maybe I think just a million you were suggesting governor Newsom's notion we spend less we collect more and we do it now well that yes that that's right Michael light during difficult budget times whenever people say how do we get out of this how do we you know manage the deficit that we're confronting I've always said you can you can solve any budget crisis in seven words spend less collect more do it now still have those who say oh we can't raise any more revenue and I give Jim credit whether you agree or disagree with his approach is at least acknowledging that we're gonna need to find some additional revenue to make our way through this then you have other folks who say oh we can't take any cuts well guess what the record is not going to be there you can't spend the money you don't have to accept at the federal level and then there's always the tendency to delay because these are hard and painful decisions and you want to put a box and you want to avoid them but the.

supervisor Michael Jim Wunderman
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The circumstances when you're looking at a fifty four billion dollar deficit the state she's gonna say nope that's the very level best we can do and let's hope that we don't suspended that prop ninety eight guarantee but then what comes on top of that is that you know they'll be payments that are due to the thousand school districts around the state come may and June and the the the way the budget will be quote balanced is by saying why don't we defer a couple two three billion to the following fiscal year which starts in July and the obvious question is why our local school districts opposed to manage that and the state's response will be well either usury serves if you have them or borrow the money and the local districts will of course be you know really and that would rock and a hard place on that one and I remember people would say these these deferrals are just again back and it you know you put us in a tough place and the response from the state was always well would you rather was a flat out cut and the answer to that of course was no so you know you end up running the state government is if you're a a renter trying to make the monthly rent and saying to the landlord can I pay you you know in the middle of the month and then that becomes a regular habit month after month because you're never able to catch up until times get better and you've got enough cash on hand to actually be current with the the way you handle it but a two billion three billion that should have been paid in one year will end up being paid the following year that'll balance the books and you know we all shake our heads that it's a gimmick but if it's that or outright cuts most people get tell you I'd rather take the deferral well again we're looking for solutions here and Jim Wunderman has put forward one Jim Wunderman is president and CEO of the bay area council the original business sponsored public policy group in the gym come out very in favor of state economic recovery by let's talk about why you believe that will do the trick great well thanks very much appreciate the comments of the supervisor Smitty and and Caroline Coleman angry with all of that I you know the situation we're in is very predictable when you shut down the economy we've got budgets at the state level and to some degree the local levels since schools are impacted or completely by the state under prop ninety eight this the school situation is completely tied to the economy seventy percent of the state's general fund comes from the income tax personal income tax and about almost twenty percent comes from the sales tax and so you know this is a very predictable situation and following something we couldn't have predicted there covered nineteen shut down and the degree of the costs that are on the table a really too severe for the society to handle at a time when the society really needs the support of the government services that relies on because these impacts out with their private sector impacts of the public sector wants to come they hit hardest on low income and middle income folks and it's it is really very very shy so as supervisors to me and said you can try to call this together the best you can and and your folks will try to do that but it's not realistic that you're able to really do the job and the end of the day you're going to have a severe cuts they can hurt people and I think the schools particularly are it's Richard responding public contraction the the university system which always takes a hard hit in these parts because it has no constitutional protections for your university system is gonna be really hard at folks will say well then we should raise taxes but my goodness during a a time when economic recovery is really the only solution and I think we're really trying hard governor Newsom local governments are trying really hard to focus on what's gonna take to recover the economy not a sure thing by any means you're putting new taxes on business you know I think is just essentials as cutting out government services that people rely on and then hitting another the government sector of the economy and creating more unemployed people including your new new excited teachers who look at the system get their pink slips we should avoid all out an economic recovery Bon Jovi should be I don't think we're going to tax our way out of this I think that's a almost a general consensus of public officials at this point but a general recovery bond will get us into more debt is the argument in the concern here even though may preserve what we have built in the state to a great degree I think I'd like you to dress as if you would yeah I guess certainly look borrowing is not the best thing to do that we share the federal government for doing it and so when the cities and counties and state correctly saying the federal government should come to the rescue what they're really saying is that Cheryl government should borrow more money because it has the authority to do that without people we don't we have a constitutional requirement California that if we're going to borrow against the future we have to have a vote of the people so we would have to have that and it's not something we normally would recommend that these are not normal a situation that we find ourselves in and we aren't we are at a time when we had historic low interest rates the federal funds rate is zero mark you go below zero president right and so the state is in a position to borrow money cheaply it's something that still has to get paid back but to get through this is a temporary situation that we're in as as you pointed out we had a very strong economy in California we've produced surpluses at the same time we've grown a government services and there's no reason to think if we put our heads together that we can't recover that in a few years may take a couple years maybe a few Bucks but the way our state's fiscal situation works is we have to have a balanced budget every year so when we have this self induced shut down of the economy it has a brutal effect on this year's finances hence governor nuisance protection with sixty four billion dollar deficit when we've been enjoying surpluses I think there's an opportunity if you could just go back to close where we where we can continue to have surpluses we can pay off the debt hang on how much are we raising ten fifteen twenty years we can not have these tremendously difficult cuts to government services which are hard to recover from you can't just take government apart and put it back together again it's very very difficult to do that the the employees that you lose go elsewhere the teachers who entered the field go to other feels big they moved to other states and so you know let's have a and you know that this call could nineteen if it did something it brought us together it created a collaboration actually we haven't seen in a long time people are cheering the county health officers and the governor and the mayors of fragmentation actually save lives now we have to put the economy back it's a difficult thing to do we don't know how long it's going to take to do it or what the future is viruses so we're going to work very difficult let's not have that but it's temporary and we will cover yes so let's not let this be the demise of our our our government system nor let it be the cause for a big fight between folks want to raise taxes or some who might celebrate reducing government because you know they don't like paying taxes in the first place this is a chance to let California voters if they were the leadership behind it to come together and say you know this is not something that we want to do frequently but were in a very unique moment here let's come together let's are some money very very cheaply California is a good Hey we're Digg you have a good credit rating let's go out and get through this with this little hysteria as possible and and let's keep moving our state forward we didn't forward let's keep moving forward two more coming up on a break here but I have to just go back to one quick point here they're gonna talk to Tracey Gordon after the break we also invite our listeners in error well let me actually ask listeners what questions you have about your city's finances and what solutions would you support higher taxes or bond measures or cuts you can give us a.

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the Skoll foundation announcing that twenty twenty scroll social entrepreneurs leveraging the power of the collective to address pressing global problems the awards can be viewed at S. K. O. L. L. dot org welcome to form Michael Krasny cities and counties throughout California are weighing difficult financial decisions after two months of the near economic shutdown stay home orders have decimated sales and hospitality tax revenues with officials expecting more losses on the horizon as a corona virus pandemic wears on the services go chronicle reports that San Francisco anticipates a drop of up to one point seven billion dollars in San Jose is looking at a loss of forty five million this year Oakland is preparing for a twenty four million dollar decline local governments have weathered economic downturns before but none like this and already some cities and counties have cut staff services and spending but the worst could be yet to come joining us to talk about financial difficulties local governments are facing an possible viable solutions hi Carolyn Coleman she's executive director of league of California cities and welcome Caroline Coleman good morning to you Kelen Coleman good morning Michael it's good good morning it's a pleasure to join you this morning thank you for having me glad to have you also glad to have him wondering back with us president and CEO of the bay area council regional business sponsored public policy group Jim Wunderman welcome to you good morning thanks always a pleasure and always a pleasure to welcome back Joe Smitty into foreign fifth district supervisor Santa Clara County Board of supervisors good morning shows many Hey good morning Michael and good morning to Tracey Gordon who senior fellow at the urban Brookings tax policy center welcome Tracey Gordon good morning great to be here I hate to have you good to have all of your help you're.

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:09 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Recession and it did successfully closed its budget caps and and those extra taxes expired on schedule just like in a bunch of other states we have a report on that as well so you know again I do think everything has to be on the table and tax increases would be in the mix as well as spending reductions tax increases generally take longer than spending reductions because you have to get agreement and craft a package and that and figure out how you're going to implement it over what time period will only go to jail back to Jim Wunderman on this engine actually I'm going to get your response if I may to a tweet here from James this is bay area counties have the unique opportunity to shift the tax burden to higher income corporations and very wealthy individuals how far can we go to shore up social services with a more progressive tax and transfer incidents without risking capital flight well you know we have the most progressive tax system in the country in California we have by far the choir the highest rate of personal income tax on the wealthy thirteen point seven percent many many many states it zero so that's what we're competing against the bay area council my group which is a business association supported governor brown on proposition thirty when the state had its last fiscal year used as a school problem you know from the mortgage meltdown we supported it was a temporary seven year temporary measure when the seven years and it California got addicted to the money that was raised in so we voted again and California made it permanent so that's the that's the permanent rate we have seen I understand when we raised it by a couple of points permanently about fifty percent of the revenues that we got from that margin has left the state and so what happened I know anecdotally many many stories of folks whose last World League more than a hundred eighty days a year so they don't pay taxes California so if we I think it's a big risk you know there is there is a ceiling on these things and I think I think it's very very tempting you don't want to put the burden on the wealthiest it's not inappropriate to want to do that but as I said earlier we have this is situation where seventy percent of California's general fund comes from the income tax and all of that one percent is paid out fifty percent of that is paid by or more is paid by one percent of the population so how much more do you realistically want to keep on and take the risk that you could take California's strong economy and these are the people who invest in the state who run the business as the lead the state employed a lot of people we can continue to create you know a place let's let's just arable official companies to start and grow and succeed you know I think at some point it is a it's kind of a fool's errand and I know I think we're in risky state in terms of our business climate all right and that's why I think it's so important that we focus on the recovery we don't use this moment to try to solve every problem in society hello it's tempting to want to do what we need to get through this period and it's kind of a time for collaboration rather than finger pointing and you know to me the best way to do it is but you know to come together and agreed that was gonna not decimate government we're not gonna put a risky tax measure on the ballot on the ballot which is gonna have an opposition campaign and could be defeated but rather have a come together of of business and labor and education and the folks who require these services that are social equity community and all come together let's get through this and then maybe we can work on addressing the pension issues maybe we can work on our tax structure and see if there's a better way than have California tax itself it isn't so volatile like this because we keep going through it and then we say Gee what a crazy tax structure we have why did we do this if we were to raise that that if we are to further index that a man on the highest earners were just doing more of what got us here in the first hello listeners are saying of course it goes back to proposition thirteen and let me go back to Caroline Coleman if I may Carolyn Coleman again as executive director of the league of California cities there's also a real issue here that I'd like to address if you could Caroline that has to do with the fact that there's real tension between local government between the city's frankly and this and the state in the fed's I mean particularly I want to focus on with you the local governments in the states because the states have more resources in the state so to some extent governing the good point Michael I admit I haven't experience I've been around local government and state government federal government for for quite a while and I haven't experienced a time where there wasn't some healthy tension between the different levels of government when I pick up on something a theme that that Jim has put forward I I think throughout this crisis we have seen incredible collaboration between the state and federal and local local governments you know we've worked together to manage the public health crisis and I want to underscore Jim's point about as we approach recovery and it certainly is is going to play out at different levels we all know that the recovery that the end of the day is going to happen in our local communities and so the focus there and the need for investments there I think is a priority on that that we should have but it's gonna take a collaboration and cooperation public private in amongst the levels of government and I think we're gonna continue to see some tensions where we see it play out every day right now I'm in California between cities that want to re open counties that don't want to re open the governor who wants to allow certain counties to open in other places not not open it's a healthy tension and we're gonna just have to manage we have to manage through that because at the end of the day we've got forty million people in the state who have expectations of our our governments and are also want to be a part of the great dream that we call California okay sure there's sure there's tension I wanted just to push forward on that just a moment because cities are gonna have to balance our budgets and the biggest part of that is the work force I mean there's gonna have to be layoffs and we're gonna have to see a hemorrhaging of work force here aren't we sorry to put it simply well no much like a state local governments to have to have to balance their budgets and also to the extent they projection falls and and you've already seen it and in a number of communities in the bay area and other parts of the state on to the extent they are running deficits we are going to see layoffs we're going to see for learners are we're gonna see fewer firefighters and police officers to respond emergency calls bankruptcies to municipal bank it is it is it is a tool that could be used I think it is a last resort and certainly not the starting place I think that's what makes the negotiations with the state government over assistance for local governments as well as the federal government so important bankruptcies are not going to lead us to the kind of recovery we need in the state are we would be much better off by prioritizing and and making sure that we can reserve or resource is in core functions at the local level so that our our local governments can be partnering with our business community in other sectors to ensure a strong recovery equitable recovery and an accelerated recovery that's the path to health not being in another the path to health also maybe I think just a million you were suggesting governor Newsom's notion we spend less we collect more and we do it now well that yes that's that's right like a light during difficult budget times whenever people say how do we get out of this how do we you know manage the deficit that we're confronting I've always said you can you can solve any budget crisis in seven words spend less collect more do it now still have those who say oh we can't raise any more revenue and I give Jim credit whether you agree or disagree with his approach is at least acknowledging that we're gonna need to find some additional revenue to make our way through this then you have other folks who say oh we can't take any cuts well guess what the revenue is not good to be there you can't spend the money you don't have to accept at the federal level and then there's always the tendency to delay because these are hard and painful decisions and you want to put up often you want to avoid them but the longer you let it go without confronting it the more the whole just grows and grows and grows so you got to spend less collect more you got to do it now you got to take action and a timely basis because otherwise the damage just grows and grows with every passing month let me read some comments in the coming in and this is Sander who writes some reflecting back on the Great Depression and the leadership in programs of FTIR his social programs produced many public works on art projects that are still appreciated since we don't have national leadership much of this needs to be taken up by governors of private sector and volunteers and here's Johnny rights pensions paid to public retirees is not money flushed down the drain it re enters the economy as retirees buy food and other necessities says the public entity did not pay into the public employees retirement system for years but our political leaders ignore the important factors important fact bad policy which we pay for and yet another listener since I'm sorry but the elephant in the room and this the films with other remarks is not public employee pay but it's prop thirteen which is completely obliterated state revenues and should be abolished and here's a listener says as an East Bay council member of the mid sized town the pandemic is revealed endemic problems that require municipalities to change our business models as businesses have had to change theirs as it pertains to the delivery of services this is likely inevitable even with good times and we must rise to the challenge and the opportunity and let me go to another call or higher do I have your name prince right hi that's correct I on my comment is that I am wondering how local and state budgets are going to make up for the fact that the federal government is not going to put resources in the post office that you're going to allow our ballots to arrive for election good point a question there let me go to you on the streets accord man hi again I have not been following the post office issue but I I do think this provides a window into the sort of question that's been lurking about the right allocation of risk and responsibility among levels of government and you know I think that adage about spend less collect more do it now makes lot of sense for every other recession that we've experienced we haven't experienced a recession like this before you know I think everyone agreed the most important thing to do is to contain the virus and that's going to require some standing now and to try to do what we can to prop up individuals and businesses have been affected there is that you know there's there's a chance that if we recover and if we can keep this this is a life and we will experience this big B. shaped recovery this big person economic activity so you know I I hate it I am very sympathetic to that argument but I do think we have to be open to the ways in which this is a different recession and then and then maybe go back to this question about the federal government having the capacity of our having the capacity to Paris and the state more so than local governments to do the same local governments are really out there providing services collecting revenue on you know on transactions on you know sales on tourism as you mentioned business permits you know all these fees all of these taxes are down and they will continue to be down until we can beat the virus and get the economy going again for supporting a senior fellow at the urban Brookings tax policy sermons back to supervisor submitting enjoys many in fifth district supervisor Santa Clara County Board of supervisors and Joan wondering what you would say to sue who writes even with a democratic super majority in the state legislature we can't get a bill to come to a vote that would eliminate the mortgage interest deduction for second homes nor can we get a gas oil severance tax there are places to look for more income.

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will get in touch on Twitter and Facebook were at KQED forum more email any questions you might have to form at KQED dot org I'm gonna read a couple comments here and then I'm gonna bring Tracey Gordon a discussion which writes there cannot be a meaningful discussion of city county budgets without tackling the elephant in the room the amount of money is for police and fire cost most cities and counties pay in the neighborhood of sixty to seventy percent of their budgets to the salaries pensions and benefits service a pension debt which is just staggering and geniuses about raising taxes on the wealthiest Californians to make up for the shortfall San Francisco alone a seventy five billion there's an error many more throughout California these people need to pay their fair share well let's go to Tracey Gordon Tracey Gordon senior fellow at the urban Brookings tax policy center and Tracey Gardner like to begin by having to respond to engine wonderment has laid out here I don't think of you I think you see a bond is the way of working through this do you well I guess I I don't see it as a solution for local governments per se as does the median said I think all solutions have to be on the table and and you know it does that point comparison is not no borrowing because the governor's may revise already has some implicit borrowing in it including these deferrals and borrowings from special funds that are earmarked for specific purposes the general signage you know as demand one point that you need to get voter approval and I actually lived in California during the so called mini recession in the early two thousands and I think it was an example of actually a good way to borrow is bipartisan there were those commercials you might remember with governor Schwarzenegger and Steve Westly walking across the stage to meet and to agree that prop fifty seven was a good idea it was coupled with prop fifty eight which is basically an agreement to wrap up the credit card I never do this again so that's that's the issue that would have to be overcome for any kind of new borrowing but as I said I think the bipartisan nature of it that specific source of revenue that was earmarked those are all good things that were missing in other states that where either they were not able to successfully but I just but also you know going back to the conversation started saying that I don't think we should take the heat off the federal government either a lot of the eight that's been passed so far in it is a lot of eighty two point five trillion dollars in the span of three weeks it has helped quite a bit it's also been your March more for that public health crisis and for the fiscal crisis that state and local governments are expected to face and so there are proposals now circulating heroes active smart act all kinds of accidents that would appropriate more flexible relief for state and local governments both and I think that's really important now you wonder why the federal government isn't stepping up here in terms of the borrowing or for that matter disseminating the money to the cities and really providing more local governments then it's then it's doing everything depend is on really the economic recovery everything depends on that's exactly right and we were plagued by uncertainty forgive me for using that but the federal you you mentioned something else I I think I'd like to get on the table here federal government is treated this as a public health crisis should they have treated it as a fiscal crisis you know in the beginning I think that the old old days of March twenty twenty as I saw someone for do it today people sought this would be a short term public health crisis inside the emphasis was on getting P. P. E. into the hands of first responders helping local governments in particular respond to the need to suddenly disinfect everything and step up expenditures on public health and public safety so you're referred to the coronavirus relief fund in the carriage act that was specifically for funds that were for fighting the virus that weren't in the budgets are already considered that were incurred between March and December of twenty twenty each issue within local government is it typically takes time for an economic crisis to work its way through their budgets taxes especially the income tax on the property tax are inherently backward looking and so the fiscal effects are really can be concentrated in fiscal twenty one inch they are scrambling right now to deal with as you just heard economic asteroid that hit them in the remaining months of fiscal twenty each that yes some of that is mechanical because of the delays in income tax filing those income tax revenues might come back later in July but to the extent people are losing their jobs losing hours on their jobs personal income taxes will be depressed to the extent that people are staying home regardless of what anyone in government says about it being time to get back to business you know the data showed the people started staying home before the edicts came down from the from the government and they'll likely continue to stay home afterwards so you know a lot of the forecast from Goldman Sachs of the Congressional Budget Office expect consumer spending to be dampened for quite a time and unemployment to be elevated through the end of next year Tracy Gordon a senior fellow with the urban Brookings tax policy center and let me go to a college we do yoga we begin with you good morning you're on the air thanks Michael and thanks for the guests for being there I guess my past two points that I wanted to kind of ask about one is borrowing specifically from the future and getting that voter approval might be difficult in our current political climate his name was also wondering how that would be done in a day and then the second part of it seeing this kind of crap that as an opportunity for state and municipal governments just not kicking it they can down the road in terms of pension funding because it feels like that's always the biggest part of obligations from and signs and whenever we get into a recession the other thank you for those two questions and let me go to supervisor so many adjustments yeah Michael I I think listen to Jim Wunderman so the notion of a economic recovery bond and then listening to the conversation harkening back to the prop fifty seven which was fifteen billion dollar bond back in the year two thousand and four reminds me of the fact that there aren't any perfect solutions here so anything that we talk about today will be flawed it will be subject to legitimate criticism but you know internist to Jim's proposal I think after yourself all right what are the alternatives and eat you know I'm it's a little bit like going to a payday lender nobody goes because they want to nobody goes because they think it's a great idea they go because they're absolutely desperate up against the wall and think that they don't have any other choices if if that's where we end up then people will be looking at a range of not terrific solutions but I do think you have to ask yourself do we want to saddle you know the next generation which is it and even greater increment of death and that's the trade off the chat to discuss when Jim makes the very real and I think legitimate argument at look better we operate the crisis of today and the long term consequences of that crisis so it'll be a it'll be a back and forth and as to the callers question about you know confronting pension debt or debt for other post employment benefits I I think it's real what I you know we you don't have time today to have the discussion about pension liability but whatever your views on public employee pensions you have to figure out how you're gonna pay where's the money going to come from and what he gonna give up to do it I I left the County Board of supervisors years ago to go off to Sacramento for twelve years came back and what had been about a seventy million dollar obligation for ploidy health benefits had ballooned to one point eight billion dollars in obligations that now have to be met and that's money when you rack up debt like that that's money you don't have to spend on programs and services for the public in the years ahead and you know certainly with an economic recovery bond if you go down that path you over the crisis today but then that means you have to pay it all back with interest over the coming years and that means less money not more for the things you need in value in the years to come so so many in the Guinness this district supervisor was Sackler County Board of supervisors and our next caller is John joining us from San Jose John welcome you're on the air hi thanks for taking my call I just wanted to make a brief comment question and I I think he was their town used to providers here that kind of talk about this earlier and it's regarding taxation and billionaires and I I find ourselves here and we're on a you know we may not get another discussion I say happening out on this radio and many other people I have another discussion about financial woes and how we're gonna put it on you know that the ninety nine percent are are you know the regular middle class and and don what's not being talked about is the billionaires and their responsibility and to give an example I live in Silicon Valley and give them a commonality celery at my annual salary I would have to work for five hundred thousand years without paying a single dime to teammate now well that just made us at currently so that's the problem that's the elephant in the living room that we don't win dot dot dot doesn't seem to get talked about so and and and exactly where I'd like him to respond to or someone to respond to me is and Michael you you included today about you know the fear of billionaire is leading the state if we tax them I don't I don't think we need are we should let the fear drive us I I say we do what's right we tax the billionaires and we we you know we deal with what happens let me go to Tracey Gordon on this trip to go to get a senior fellow urban Brookings tax policy center what about the whole notion is there any data trace you chose if you escalate the taxes on billionaires are gonna leave the state yeah that yeah and we've done some work on that and basically it's highly sensitive to sort of how you how you catch the question the time period that you look at the data that you look at and so I would say that that the rhetoric I started out he's saying that reality in terms of out migration due to taxes and you know it California did pass our taxes on high earners in the Great.

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"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The minimum so you know what people would hope was the floor will now become the ceiling as to the circumstances when you're looking at a fifty four billion dollar deficit the stage is gonna say nope that's the very level best we can do and let's hope that we don't suspended that prop ninety eight guarantee but then what comes on top of that is a you know they'll be payments that are due to the thousand school districts around the state come may and June and the the the way the budget will be quote balanced is by saying why don't we defer a couple two three billion to the following fiscal year which starts in July and the obvious questions we'll have our local school districts opposed to manage that and the state's response will be well either usury serves if you have them or borrow the money and the local districts will of course be you know really in a twin rocket art place on that one and I remember people would say these these deferrals are just again back and it you know you put us in a tough place and the response from the state was always well would you rather with the flat out cut and the answer that of course was no so you know you end up running the state government is if you're a a renter trying to make the monthly rent and saying to the landlord can I pay you you know in the middle of the month a and then that becomes a regular habit month after month because you're never able to catch up until that time to get better and you've got enough cash on hand to actually be current with the the way you handle it but a two billion three billion that should have been paid in one year will end up being paid the following year that'll balance the books and you know we all shake our heads that it's a gimmick but if it's that or outright cuts most people get tell you I'd rather take the deferral well again we're looking for solutions here and Jim Wunderman has put forward one Jim Wunderman is president and CEO of the bay area council the original business sponsored public policy group in the gym come out very much in favor of state economic recovery by let's talk about why you believe that will do the trick great well thanks very much appreciate the comments of the supervisor Smitty internet and Caroline Coleman angry with all of that I you know the situation we're in is very predictable when you shut down the economy we've got budgets at the state level and to some degree the local levels since schools are impacted or completely by the state under prop ninety eight this the school situation is completely tied to the economy seventy percent of the state's general fund comes from the income tax or personal income tax and about almost twenty percent comes from the sales tax and so you know this is a very predictable situation and following something we couldn't have predicted there covered nineteen shut down and the degree of the costs that are on the table a relief too severe for the society to handle at a time when the society really needs the support of the government services that relies on because these impacts out with their private sector impacts of the public sector wants to come they hit hardest on low income and middle income folks and it's it's really a very very try so as supervisors to me and said you can try to cobble these together best you can and and your folks will try to do that but it's not realistic that you're able to really do the job and the end of the day you're going to have a severe cuts they're gonna hurt people and I think the schools particularly R. or its record responding public contraction the the university system which always takes a hard hit in these cars because it has no constitutional protections for your university system's going to be really hard that folks will say well then we should raise taxes but my goodness during a a time when economic recovery is really the only solution and I think we're really trying hard governor Newsom local governments are trying really hard to focus on what's gonna take to recover the economy not a sure thing by any means you're putting new taxes on business you know I think is just essentials as cutting out government services that people rely on and then hitting another the government sector of the economy and creating more unemployed people including your new new excited teachers who look at the system get their pink slips we should avoid all at an economic recovery Bon Jovi city I don't think we're going to tax our way out of this I think that's almost a general consensus of public officials at this point but a general covering bond will get us into more debt is the argument in the concern here even though we may preserve what we have built in the state to a great degree I think I'd like you to dress as if you would yeah I guess certainly look borrowing is not the best thing to do a little bit we cheer the federal government for doing it and so when the cities and towns and state are correctly saying the federal government should come to the rescue what they're really saying is that Cheryl government should borrow more money because it has the authority to do that with people we don't we have a constitutional requirement California that if we're going to borrow against the future we have to have a vote of the people so we would have to have that and it's not something we normally would recommend that these are not normal our situation we find ourselves in and we aren't we are at a time when we had historic low interest rates a federal funds rate is zero mark you go below zero president right and so the state is in a position to borrow money cheaply it's something that still has to get paid back but to get through this is a temporary situation that we're in as as you pointed out we had a very strong economy in California we produce surpluses at the same time we've grown a government services and there's no reason to think if we put our heads together that we can't recover that in a few years may take a couple years maybe a few but but the way our state's fiscal situation works is we have to have a balanced budget every year so when we have this self induced shut down of the economy it has a brutal effect on this year's finances hence governor nuisance protection with sixty four billion dollar our deficit when we've been enjoying surpluses I think there's an opportunity if you can just go back to close where we were we can continue to have surpluses we can pay off the debt hang on how much are we raising ten fifteen twenty years we can not have these tremendously difficult cuts to government services which are hard to recover from you can't just take government apart and put it back together again it's very very difficult to do that the the employees that you lose go elsewhere the teachers who entered the field go to other feels they they moved to other states and so you know let's have a and this cold nineteen if it did something it brought us together it created a collaboration actually we haven't seen in a long time people are cheering the county health officers and the governor and the mayor's office for having taken action that save lives now we have to put the economy back it's a difficult thing to do we don't know how long it's going to take to do it or what the future of the viruses so we're going to we're not very difficult let's not have that but it's temporary and we will look colorful yes so let's not let this be the demise of our our our government system nor let it be the calls for a big fight between folks want to raise taxes or some who might celebrate reducing government because you know they don't like paying taxes in the first place this is a chancellor California voters if they were the leadership behind it to come together and say you know this is not something that we want to do frequently but were in a very unique moment here let's come together let's borrow some money very very cheaply California good Hey we're Digg you have a good credit rating let's go out and get through this with this little hysteria as possible and and let's keep moving our state forward we've been moving forward let's keep moving forward two more coming up on a break here but I have to just go back to one quick point here they're gonna talk to Tracey Gordon after the break we also invite our listeners in there well let me actually ask listeners what questions you have about your city's finances and what solutions would you support higher taxes or bond measures or cuts you can give us a call now and I invite.

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:43 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Near economic shutdown stay home orders have decimated sales and hospitality tax revenues with officials expecting more losses on the horizon as a corona virus pandemic wears on the services go chronicle reports that San Francisco anticipates a drop of up to one point seven billion dollars in San Jose is looking at a loss of forty five million this year Oakland is preparing for a twenty four million dollar decline local governments have weathered economic downturns before but none like this and already some cities and counties have cut staff services and spending but the worst could be yet to come joining us to talk about financial difficulties local governments are facing an possible viable solutions hi Carolyn Coleman she's executive director of league of California cities and welcome Carol Coleman good morning to you Kelen Coleman good morning Michael it's good good morning it's a pleasure to join you this morning thank you for having me glad to have you also glad to have him wondering back with us president and CEO of the bay area council regional business sponsored public policy group Jim Wunderman welcome to you good morning thanks always a pleasure and always a pleasure to welcome back Joe Smitty into foreign fifty strict supervisor Santa Clara County Board of supervisors good morning shows many Hey good morning Michael and good morning to Tracey Gordon who senior fellow at the urban Brookings tax policy center welcome Tracey Gordon good morning great to be here I hate to have you good to have all of your help you're all safely quarantined and healthy and let me begin if I may with you Carolyn Coleman because in the league of southern California cities has actually put out an estimate of the seven billion dollars short shortfall just for the next two years and if you couple that with the fact that cities right now we're facing about a projected budget deficit of fifty four point three billion dollars that's twice the rainy day fund it looks pretty grim and I just wanted to get that out there because we're going to look for solutions in this hour and hope we can come up with the you find expertise in the others but nine of the ten cities I believe in terms of state funding have profound revenue shortfalls and have emergency consider do in need of it was a result of the pandemic let's just talk about where money is going to be coming from because there's a lot of concern right now that governesses budget just doesn't go far enough and I'd like to get your take on that immediately Michael Christian Christian the question and you've certainly outlined the the the Graham fax facing so many and really all of our cities in California today clearly the the scale of this this crisis has been unprecedented the government response at all levels has also been an unprecedented but that has come at a at a cost with the economic destruction ours I heard someone recently described it as a self induced coma on our economy so that we could protect our public health has come at a price and by our estimate about seven million dollars in revenue shortfalls port cities across the state is what is what we project in in the next couple of years clearly the state also is facing its challenges with the fifty four million dollar deficit that the governor outlined last last week however we we do believe that there are options for the for the state to vied direct and flexible assistance to our cities to help them be cover seems to be the strong partnership they need to be I'm in recovery I'm very very quickly and and simply we have to request at the at the local level we're asking for revenue to help fill the seven billion short short all from the state and we are also asking for direct and flexible assistance from the federal government and we're encouraging both of those levels of government and not to leave stones unturned when it comes to investing in our cities who have been such a crucial partner in the recovery without that relief Michael our cities and you've already reported on the San Francisco short all as well as a San Jose shortfall B. as cities prepare their budgets for the coming year you'll begin to see more of the stories stories reflecting shortfalls and they seem potential cuts in and some of that the service is frankly that are core to our quality of life in our recovery in the state our police services will be affected fire services will be affected and we we certainly can't afford for that to happen as we head into the fire season cities are also projecting cuts to their land use planning staffs at a time where we as a state has a priority S. production in housing and so there's this planning functions become key to solving that priority for the state we also know that cities are prepared to have to cut on public works and to delay capital projects all of these are so key to not only it recovery in our community but also ensuring that folks have good jobs which are also going to be a session port part of our recovery show yes we are we have reached out to the state and we have reached out to the federal government to help our cities are not only recover from the pandemic's impact on their budgets but also so that cities and other parts of our economy as they open up can do so safely and in the in a strong manner we're hearing from Caroline Coleman executive director as a leaker California cities in Caroline didn't mention public safety and libraries and parks I mean there's just so much that comes under this purview that's at stake here and you're asking and hoping I guess from the state and from the fence that money will come through there was only about a hundred fifty billion they came through in the care sector but that was one only to six cities yes really appreciated the the Congress and the president on an acting Zacks that's a hundred fifty billion dollars to our states and some local governments nationwide specifically for California it sent about fifteen billion dollars to our state there is a nine nine to ten billion that went directly to the stage and the remainder was allocated by law to the six largest cities in our state that's a meaningful amount of money it will certainly help reduce the fiscal impact of the expenses associated with the response article in nineteen but there are four hundred eighty two cities in in our fine state who have been focused and working hard and incurring expenses to help manage the response and so we are asking eight and the governor to use a portion of the shares act funding that it receives that nine to ten billion dollars to set that aside for those jurisdictions that did not receive one directly we appreciate the governor did including using a revised four hundred fifty million dollars the state's allocation appears that funding for those smaller jurisdictions we have yet to see the details on how that would be allocated but given that there are four hundred and and seventy six cities who who need this funding I'm not sure how far will get with that but it's certainly a good start and we look forward to having more conversations with the governor's office and the legislature about the needs of our cities then again Caroline Coleman is executive director league of California cities is going to be a lot of loss of revenue some cities will lose more because of sales tax than they will because of property tax property tax course only comes twice a year in cities will have to pretty much in many instances have to recover to a greater degree because of the loss of sales taxes or hotel taxes occupancy taxes but let me go to Joe's million jobs many in long time veteran of city local state government now fifth district supervisor in Santa Clara County Board of supervisors and Joe as you come in for example on the fact that you were back years ago talking about prop thirteen fighting prop thirteen we're not necessarily going to be river to overhaul things and change prop thirteen we can't count on in other words fixing the whole tax system and many people are gonna say in after tax to get out of this or you just have to cut services tremendously and I'm wondering what your thoughts are in terms of how you get that balance and how we're looking toward the future in the crystal ball here yeah I think at the state level in particular Michael where I served for a dozen years in the state legislature you can be pretty sure that it's going to be and all of the above kind of approach to managing that challenge and I think you see that in the governor's recently announced may revise the proposed budget that follows up on the initial budget proposal in January it's a a state effort to say well let's find a little more revenue let's find some places to cut let's count on the federal government to send us some more money let's drive down those rainy day funds that are there and then you know let's see if there is some gimmicks quite frankly that can be used to manage the difference but it's you know any one of those approaches is not gonna be enough you're not going to find enough new revenue you're not gonna be able to cut your way out of it you're not going to be able to give make your way out of it you're gonna I I think you're going to expect to see all of that happening at the state level and then as Caroline said you know those with a local level predicted the county we rely to a great degree on what the federal government state government are prepared to do since so many of the programs that we provide at the county level I'm talking about you know health and welfare these are the state and federal programs and if the findings forthcoming will be able to do our best but if not not so I I think you can expect to see folks scrambling for a combination of a quote solutions and they just got a couple together as best they can the thing I think is particularly intriguing though Michael is eat you know we've we've been blessed with the a decade of good good to great economy here in California around the country which means you've got a whole generation of elected officials over the course of the past decade we've never had any experience managing a budget deficit you know I I had the challenge of being in the legislature when we had the sort of mini recession of the early two thousands and then the Great Recession of two thousand and eight and it's hard work it's painful and I don't mean hard for the members I mean it's just it's just hard because your job is to distribute the pain and and you can't feel good about that on a on a daily basis they're going to be people in your office who are going to be telling you just how great the hurt will be in the communities that they represent and it's real and you know they say we've got a generation now of elected officials of both the state and local level who've known only good times and this is going to be a real rude awakening and a challenge frankly when folks have to figure out how to equitably share the pain and see if they can't generates new revenues in ways that are acceptable to the public so your point is well taken I made about all these office holders now without experience vis a vis budget deficits and I want to get back to something you just said a moment ago Joe you do you use or gimmicks schools and teachers are gonna be hit very hard by this is simply no way around it and you could defer payments actually to schools when you click add following fiscal years yeah and I remember this it to governor has proposed this and you know I I kind of smiled ruefully to that idea I remember that one it's you know if you've got billions that the state owes to me the first thing I'll happen Michael is the the so called proposition ninety eight guarantee which is the minimum funding guarantee for schools in California will be pushed out to.

San Francisco San Jose Oakland
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the listeners and members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM in San Francisco and eighty nine point three FM in Sacramento it's a twenty two it's morning edition on KQED I'm Ted Goldberg Tesla says it's ready to ramp up production at its electric car plant in Fremont that's after high profile fight between Alameda county health officials and CEO Ilan musk over the region's ongoing sheltered home orders but it's key committees Dan brekkie reports the fallout from that battle is not over during a test flight earnings call last month Evelyne mosque left little doubt how he felt about shelter at home orders imposed during the corona virus pandemic which was not democratic this is what freedom must later sued Alameda county over its shelter orders which shut down the company's Fremont plant then last week he defied the orders and reopen the plant health officials later told the company it could ramp up activity there in preparation for a full restart we certainly wouldn't advise anybody to violate regulations and we did in this case that's Jim Wunderman CEO of the bay area council a group representing hundreds of businesses in the region he says is the bay area's largest manufacturer Tesla is unique the rules that apply to small businesses still barred from operating in the bay area might not apply to what he calls an iconic automaker we love our booksellers and we revere our florists they don't have the leverage that Tesla has with ten thousand employees and the kind of financial value and impact that a plant like that happens but Robert rice a former secretary of labor and a professor of public policy at UC Berkeley says Tesla's re opening sets a terrible precedent in which every business owner in a very awkward and difficult position because if you have enough wealth and power you have political clout and you can define orders and you can get what you want rice said he believes Tesla and musk should face some state sanction for defining the county health orders who is calling the.

secretary professor of public policy Jim Wunderman Evelyne mosque KQED business owner Berkeley San Francisco Robert rice CEO Alameda county Dan brekkie Ilan musk Fremont Ted Goldberg Tesla Sacramento
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the listeners and members of KQ weedy good morning the time is six twenty two it's morning edition on KQED I'm Ted Goldberg health officials are concerned that is California begins to loosen shelter home rules nursing homes and assisted living facilities could see increased outbreaks of covert nineteen state data show more than fourteen hundred people in California have died in these facilities I spoke with KQED science reporter Molly Peterson about what's being done to prevent more deaths in them where have these outbreaks being bad in the bay area well in nursing homes in San Francisco there was an early outbreak at Laguna Honda and that got a lot of attention because the cow he runs that facility but other facilities since then including central gardens in the city have had many more cases Alameda county have a lot of high profile nursing home outbreaks including a gateway care and rehab center that's where the district attorney for Alameda county is investigating a lot of death but also there been problems of assisted living to remember they're not health care facilities like the nursing homes and there's a lot more of them so there were seventy four cases of covert nineteen among residents at one place the chateau in Contra Costa though not many deaths there so far and in San Mateo county which has two thirds of the population of Contra Costa they've had seventy five percent more cases of coated in those assisted living facilities when you ran down a sobering list of locations what we know about how it got this way well first there's more touching there's more interaction between nurses at a skilled nursing facility or nursing home and the patients because they're there for medical reasons and are more fragile people without symptoms of course can be spread the corona virus and talking to health departments they're concerned that there's transmission among the staff workers may take public transit and it because they might move among two or three jobs they might move among several facilities it's worth mentioning too that the state suspended some rules around staffing early both in nursing homes and assisted living like they temporarily got rid of some new staff training requirements and they relaxed rules for background checks you just highlighted the fact that healthcare workers may be unknowingly spreading the virus in these facilities and that there's been a weakening of training standards so what are regulators doing to help control the spread in these facilities well the people doing the most to help control the spread right now our health departments and they aren't the regulators so counties are advising facilities with groups called strike teams and task forces that basically means they're advising them on infection control skilled nursing facilities are overseen by the California department of public health and a bunch of federal regulations through the centers for Medicaid and Medicare services assisted living facilities are not considered health care facilities and they're overseen by the department of social services but right now nobody is getting in trouble for things that might be deficiencies or violations of standards because the goal is to try the regulators say is to try to engage and talk to these facilities that they are not physically visiting remember regulators and inspectors are not generally going to these facilities nor are the local advocates the ombudsman's office if we're not getting that kind of oversight it must make it very difficult to get a real picture of what's going on inside these facilities what is the status of testing in these kinds of places one way that we that the state says we're trying to find out what's going on in these facilities is they've got a team of people calling the facilities every day whether or not the facilities pick up has never been entirely clear as far as testing which everyone says is really really important testing isn't required yet testing is not required in these facilities so how can we get a real understanding of how many people are infected if there are no requirements well that's one of the main questions that people are are raising as there's this increasing national push vice president Mike pence said he thought that everyone in a skilled nursing facility should be tested there's two reasons testing isn't mandated yet one tests were exceptionally hard to come by for a long time and to some officials wanted to make sure the tests are useful if you're gonna put people through that like if you give someone a test you can recommend that workers stay home if they're positive or you can move covert positive patients together and move them away from covert negative ones the only places requiring testing right now San Francisco mandates testing Alameda county is recommending testing for workers and patients whether they have symptoms are not a big part of the discussion to is who to pay for it the industry's advocating for more federal aid and more publicly funded tests that's KQED science reporter Molly Peterson thank you Molly you're welcome support for KQED science is provided by the National Science Foundation the S. D. Bechtel junior foundation and love it as family foundation Tesla says it's ready to ramp up production and its electric car plant in Fremont that's after a high profile fight between Alameda county health officials and CEO Ilan musk over the region's ongoing shelter home waters but its key can be used in breaking reports the fallout from the battle is not over during a test flight earnings call last month Evelyne mosque left little doubt how he felt about shelter at home orders imposed during the corona virus pandemic which was not democratic this is what we do musk later sued Alameda county over its shelter orders which shut down the company's Fremont plant then last week he defied the orders and reopen the plant health officials later told the company it could ramp up activity there in preparation for a full restart we certainly wouldn't advise anybody to violate regulations and we did in this case that's Jim Wunderman CEO of the bay area council a group representing hundreds of businesses in the region he says is the bay area's largest manufacturer Tesla is unique the rules that apply to small businesses still barred from operating in the bay area might not apply to what he calls an iconic automaker we love our booksellers and we revere our florists they don't have the leverage that Tesla has with ten thousand employees and the kind of financial value and impact that a plant like that happens but Robert rice a former secretary of labor and a professor of public policy at UC Berkeley says Tesla's re opening sets a terrible precedent that puts every business owner in a very awkward and difficult position because if you have enough wealth and power you have political clout and you can define orders and you can get what you want rice said he believes Tesla and musk should face some state sanction for defying the county health orders who is calling the shots here I think that's really the issue public health authorities or a very wealthy billionaire businessman who is there basically to maximize shareholder value and its own well Alameda county health officials say the next phase of business re openings there could occur as early as this week I'm Dan brekkie KQED news and we've got more KQED dot org I'm Ted Goldberg time coming up on six twenty nine let's check in with John McConnell for another look at highway.

California Ted Goldberg
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Forty two good evening and welcome back to KQED's live special coverage of the corona virus outbreak I'm Scott Shafer along with marina Lagos and joining us now Joe symmetry and president of the Santa Clara County Board of supervisors he's also chair of the county's health and hospital committee supervisors meeting thanks so much for joining us thank you Scott and just to be clear I gave up my president's gavel just a couple months ago but I do still care the health and hospital committee happy to be with you all right thank you so much for that correction also joining us Jim Wunderman president and CEO of the bay area council Jim Wunderman good evening to you too thanks as well supervisor of Simeon we heard late this afternoon we learned of two more deaths from corona virus both adult men in Santa Clara county one is in his eighties the other in his fifties that brings the total in your county to for your company is really been a hot spot for coronavirus and I'm wondering if the county considered going even further or maybe faster than the other five counties in terms of what they did today well I think we've been pushing the envelope from the very beginning of the crisis or if the crisis emerged one of the challenges that I think it's important that both public officials and public health officials keep making this point one of the challenges is that we get new information every day the circumstances change every day sometimes literally our tower and so I think it's helpful important when we're talking with our constituents that we begin almost every conversation by saying look this is the novel coronavirus this is a new virus we're gonna learn more with every passing day and the circumstances are going to change and that means we're going to have to change the best advice available on a daily basis if not even more frequently you know it's just last Tuesday our public health officer reporting to our board of supervisors said you know don't think we should be recommending school closures well three days later the decision was made by the county superintendents schools on the thirty plus school superintendents to close the schools they had new information circumstances changed and I think people can understand and respond to the changing information and direction if they realize it's because we're learning more with every day and the circumstances are changing every day but that's going to keep happening Scott resend so I hope as you communicate with your listeners will say Hey new information new circumstances that means we have to adjust accordingly yeah we're trying to keep up with it all with a provider I know I know you from your time up in Sacramento obviously we've seen a pretty robust response from this governor but I'm curious what you're looking for in terms of state support that either has been given or is that you would still like to see the legislature and the governor do to support the local officials well you you asked about today but let me just first essay on a federal level reci yeah I think when you know we can put this challenge behind us that there there's going to be there certainly needs to be a really thorough discussion about where where the test kits because the way you slow the virus is by people isolate themselves the way you persuade people to isolate themselves is by being able to tell them you have the virus and you need to isolate yourself absent the test kits that couldn't be done wasn't done so lots of folks is the mayor mentioned who had the virus are out and about and now we're stuck with this more draconian approach because the cases are multiplying and we've got to save everyone we don't know if you're carrying the virus but it we need err on the side of caution so isolated yourself in your own shelter in place at the state level you know some of this is clearly healthcare help some of it is a little more bureaucratic than that I think you'll call just four days ago now the governor issued an executive order that is designed to help government keep doing all of its work in a way that is consistent with the challenges of an emergency can we how do we keep social distance and honor the the obligation to stay apart from one another well we're supposed to be holding public meetings and doing the public's business well we now have some tools that allow us to do that in terms of the simple things like teleconferencing but they literally weren't allowed until I just a matter of a few days ago six Jim Wunderman as somebody who works with the business community in the bay area what are you hearing in terms of you know their concerns as these closures take a fact and people are off the streets and in their homes well first let me say you know we're I think as a community please with the political leadership express today bye bye are you Marissa and and supervisors Smitty and his colleagues around the bay area in the six counties it's good if you know the superior council we like to see the region acting in unison that's kind mission accomplished it's really important it's done that way because people move from county to county so the fact that they work together is really important so we're we generally hearing very very favorable comments and willingness to be compliant to be helpful to come up with ideas to share resources you know so that we can get ahead of this because this is just it's all about our common interest you know based on the question of such mayor breed I don't know what people will feel like you three days or week but for starters you know given the magnitude of what's being asked you know so far you know I think it's it's positive I think businesses are very worried and rightfully so about the lengths of time that this is going to go on and the potential economic impacts and business macro and micro economic impacts of the distant have because you know it's not very easy to shut down the business and it could be hard to get one going again and a notice goes a couple months down the road your loss of employees loss of financial support you're just the ability to create a business continuity to to continue your bankruptcies things like that could have a really devastating impact on the longer term economy I know everybody's worried about that so I think it's incumbent on government at every level to attend to that and make sure that the businesses and their employees will be impacted by this or being served to the greatest extent possible you know to to to minimize the blow and make sure that we're ready to rebound so Jim we've been hearing a lot at the federal level about this debate over you know sick time and went to required and when the government should step in we have I think a lot from our generous policies here in California and different counties can you just talk about what you're hearing from employers about how they're trying to grapple with this at a time when your point the the revenue streams are so uncertain what kind of help are they asking for what are they looking for well one of the things I I got a lot of calls today for businesses wanting to know whether they were exempt or not and so there is a a list but if it could be considered a little dragon spots you know I I overheard conversations with folks calling somebody asking are we exempt or not so I I think you could be helpful just for maybe have some kind of a hotline businesses to call and ask that question if it comes up so that they don't have to speculate about it I I think that you know there's no one size fits all to this and businesses have their own cultures they have their own financial positions bigger businesses are probably in a better position to weather through this and smaller ones you really have to worry about the small businesses including completely shut down and no total loss of revenue employees will many employers will go somewhere else and I you know I again I think it's it's very very important to attend to those and you know one of the one of the possibilities would be to have you know this the federal reserve has programs to lend to financial institutions in times like this there's also a program that would enable them to lend directly to businesses and it seems like you know something that we should pursue so that companies could get help immediately to see through these times not necessarily have to lay people off be able to fulfill sick pay paid leave requirements and so forth so unfortunately there's no one size fits all for this California does have a much more put their progressive approach to this and the rest of the country now which may hang up or some of the efforts in Washington DC to come up with with the package hopefully they'll be able to do it they need to do it supervisor so many and we heard governor Newsom yesterday say that the state was going to prioritize the most vulnerable including of course our seniors and the homeless and I'm wondering what are you hearing from your constituents who are living paycheck to paycheck or perhaps even living on the streets what do you hear well what one of the things first to just go back to some of the questions or issues that Jim was raising I do think it you know it's it's tough frankly if you don't actually see the entire seven page public health order that the six counties have issued to know whether you are an essential business or not whether your activities are deemed essential activities or not I would just encourage your listeners if they really you know need to detail and many of them will go ahead and just you know go online and Google your county name whether it's on a meter contract because terror Moran or San Francisco or San Mateo Santa Clara county Google your county name corona virus and public health and I'm you know sure that in everyone of those counties the public health order will come up and there are literally three or four pages defining what's a an essential business what's an essential activity and you know some of the more obvious but some of them are not yeah you may be surprised to know that a hardware store is deemed an essential business not that surprising when you stop and think about it by the same token not surprising that obviously healthcare providers are deemed essential but your gym or health club is not so that you know the list is long and specific in the information is there online for folks who need access to it and I need access to it right now what I am hearing from folks is but we're starting to get more and more questions from the larger community about financial impact because people are beginning to understand what the impact can be and I as Jim alluded you know it's not just big businesses or even small businesses it's individual folks who you know won't view this as or won't have the benefit of this being a couple weeks off with pay they'll they'll view it as a lost paycheck with severe and immediate financial consequences and so when things were already taking calls on and pulling together information about is you know how do you respond what is available for some folks who are never confronted anything like this because it is unprecedented it you literally have to say something simple and basic as you know you're entitled to apply for unemployment and that that takes a moment for someone who's never been in the system before to sort of say yeah of course yes we have as you know thousands of way too many folks who are homeless and hard for them to shelter in place when there is no shelter that being said as we manage our shelter system in Santa Clara county and I'm sure the other counties have the same challenges then we need to make sure that we're operating those shelters in a way that doesn't feed the contagion of the virus that that in fact efforts are limited so these are public health challenges we're confronting already and you know they're going to be with us for a while I do think it you know hopeful important for people to understand the mayor only alluded to this look there's a finite number of hospital beds in the bay area there's a finite number of intensive care units there's a finite number of healthcare professionals doctors and nurses and if the virus overwhelms the system that's gonna have extraordinarily harsh consequences and mean not just serious healthcare consequences but loss of life so the time is now to flatten that curve to stop the multiplying and that's why you're seeing such a significant expectation of all of us who have now been told shelter in place you got a flat and that curve to make sure we don't overwhelm our hospitals the hospital beds and healthcare professionals all right thank you thank you were gonna leave it right there Santa Clara county supervisor Joe Smitty and Jim Wunderman president CEO of the bay area council German thank you both so much good luck thank you Martha thank you Scott thank and now we're going to bring Amanda freed she is normally chief of policy and communications for the San Francisco treasurer's office but she and her family decided to take a sabbatical this year they were in Italy and hill last Friday when they came back and they are now self quarantining in Los Angeles and they have been on lockdown for two weeks before coming back to the country Amanda thank you for taking a few minutes away from your current team thanks for having me I I have a little bit of time on my that so I'm curious you know you have you you work in city government you were in Italy as this thing unfolded we were in communication the whole time what are you seeing now when that you're back in the states both in terms of what we're doing right here and what lessons you learned from Italy that you think you know that maybe the stator locals need to go further sure so I mean I was just looking back at some of the time lines and you know two weeks ago I was still pretty happy go lucky others aspirants there these cases like what we're not worry don't worry about it and and things escalated so quickly and just last week I was you know kind of engaging with a lot of former colleagues and in.

KQED outbreak Scott Shafer Lagos Joe symmetry president Santa Clara County Board
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Business now with cloud recording and commuter mode so people can collaborate from anywhere GoToMeeting dot com partly to mostly cloudy that partly to mostly cloudy in the bay area today highs in the sixties to the lower eighties live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi Singh after weeks of closed door hearings impeachment inquiry in the U. S. house goes public tomorrow Adam Schiff the democratic intelligence committee chairman leading the probe is warning is colleagues against trying to out the whistle blower whose complaints sparked investigation to president trump and he says no one will be allowed to use the venue to air unsubstantiated claims the public will first hear directly from three top diplomats Avery's concerns of the president allegedly sought to secure a political favor from Ukraine by holding a military aid U. S. ally needed to fend off Russian aggression trump denies he did anything wrong former president Jimmy Carter spokesperson says a ninety five year old is out of surgery and there are no complications he was admitted to Emory University hospital yesterday were doctors work to relieve pressure on his brain from bleeding that resulted from Carter's recent falls in Germany police believe they have foiled a terrorism plot we have more from NPR's rob Smith Frank for prosecutors say one hundred and seventy police officers search three apartments in the nearby city of Offenbach and detained three men the main suspect is a twenty four year old German the Macedonian origin who required materials to manufacture explosives and we tried to buy firearms online police seize very six posts of substances in devices at the man's apartment the other two suspects are Turkish citizens age twenty one and twenty two NPR's Robert Schmitz reporting this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian white thousands of Kaiser Permanente a mental health clinicians have postponed a statewide strike because of the unexpected death of Kaiser CEO Bernard Tyson Tyson was the first African American CEO of the Oakland based health giant KQ Edie's April Dembowski reports Tyson's father was a minister and a carpenter his mother had type two diabetes and spent a lot of time in the hospital Tyson often went with her and decided he wanted to run his own hospital one day Hey for thirty two years Tyson worked in leadership roles at Kaiser the last six and CEO you understood about how to make a better society and how healthcare and that Jim Wunderman runs the bay area council business group Tyson was a close friend use only he was moving uses one of her most profound interest in people I've ever known Tyson played an active role in shaping the affordable Care Act and other health policy reforms but he also had to defend his company against labor disputes congresswoman Barbara Lee says she was supposed to talk to Tyson about one of them the day he died part of our discussion was going to be about you some solutions to some of the issues now with regard to mental health workers four thousand because our therapists were scheduled to go on strike this week but called it off after Tyson's death my background a psychiatric social work and I understand very deeply the issue of parity as it relates to mental health workers.

ninety five year thirty two years twenty four year one day
"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"jim wunderman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Louise Schiavone the first public hearings of the impeachment inquiry into president trump kick off tomorrow led by the house intelligence committee NPR's winter Johnson tells us that lawmakers and staff counsel from both parties will have the opportunity to question witnesses starting with the ambassador to Ukraine US ambassador to Ukraine build Taylor will be the lead off witness on Wednesday house investigators will also questioned the Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian affairs George can't the inquiry will continue to focus on whether president trump used military aid as leverage to press the leader of Ukraine to investigate a political rival Turkey's president says the European Union should watch it's attitude or could face a flood of Islamic state prisoners heading toward Europe NPR's Peter Kenyon says the remarks come as the Turkish president prepares for meetings in Washington after the E. U. sanction Turkey for its drilling activities in the eastern Mediterranean everyone replied that Europe should be careful dealing with a country that holds millions of refugees saying Turkey could release them and send them on their way to Europe on great has demanded with little success that other countries take back their citizens who left to join Islamic state fighters the first major snowstorm of the year has had upstate New York more than ten inches of fallen in buffalo closing schools are making roads hazardous wallstreet the Dow up eighteen this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian what thousands of Kaiser Permanente a mental health clinicians have postponed a statewide strike because of the unexpected death of company C. E. O. Bernard Tyson Tyson was the first African American CEO of the Oakland based company KQED April Dembowski reports Tyson's father was a minister and a carpenter his mother had type two diabetes and spent a lot of time in the hospital Tyson often went with her and decided he wanted to run his own hospital one day for thirty two years Tyson worked in leadership roles at Kaiser the last six and C. E. L. you understood about how to make a better society and how how you're in particular contribute to that Jim Wunderman runs the bay area council business group Tyson was a close friend use only he was moving uses one of the most profound interest in people I've ever known Tyson played an active role in shaping the affordable Care Act and other health policy reforms but he also had to defend his company against labor disputes congresswoman Barbara Lee says she was supposed to talk to Tyson about one of them the day he died part of our discussion was going to be about you some solutions to some of the issues now with regard to mental health workers four thousand because our therapists were scheduled to go on strike this week but called it off after Tyson's death my background a psychiatric social work and I understand very deeply the issue of parity as it relates to mental health workers leave and head of the union both said Tyson was committed to achieving a quality for therapists at Kaiser I mean pulled in dusky KQED news there's more at KQED news dot org I'm Brian want and support today comes from Stanford healthcare were patients and physicians turn when health care matters most Democrats say president trump abused his power when he asked for a probe into a political rival now key players involved in Ukraine affair will offer public testimony for all of America to here the president is not above the law they've got nothing well that was a phone call that was perfect join NPR for special coverage of the public hearings of the house impeachment inquiry into the president from NPR news it starts tomorrow morning at seven AM on KQED how was Leonardo da Vinci so innovative for both art and science Nova travels to Florence to explore the impact of Leonardo's art on his science and his science on his art the coding da Vinci premieres tomorrow night.

Louise Schiavone trump president thirty two years ten inches one day