35 Burst results for "Jim Taylor"

NFL Hall of Fame running back Paul Hornung dies at 84

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

NFL Hall of Fame running back Paul Hornung dies at 84

"Warning when the Heisman is Notre Dame's quarterback in nineteen fifty six and was eventually moved to halfback under Packers coach Vince Lombardi the nineteen sixty one NFL MVP won four championships with Green Bay horning team with bruising fullback Jim Taylor from one of the NFL's greatest backfields warning led the NFL in scoring from nineteen fifty nine to nineteen sixty one and finished with seven hundred sixty points on sixty two touchdowns fifty six field goals and one hundred ninety extra points he was suspended for nineteen sixty three by commissioner Pete Rozelle for betting on NFL games and associating with undesirable persons warning went on to play three more seasons I'm Dave Ferrie

NFL Packers Vince Lombardi Jim Taylor Pete Rozelle Dave Ferrie
Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

The Electorette Podcast

05:13 min | 7 months ago

Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode I have a conversation with representatives, Sylvia Garcia of Texas twenty ninth congressional. District. Discussed Biden's agenda for the Latino community and what we can expect from Bein Harris Administration including their plans to address income and healthcare disparities and the disproportionate impact of Kobe purpose. Of course, also addresses those criticisms of the campaign around whether their outreach to the Latino community is enough. So here is my conversation with representative Sylvia Garcia. Purpose Garcia. Welcome to the PODCAST. Well. Thank you for having me. If I I want to talk about the Biden Campaign I. Guess these are criticisms not doing enough to connect with the Latino community, and if you think that that assessment is fair or do you think that there's more work to do there? Were you know I think people are just so excited about the Joe Vying Kamala Harris. Ticket that everybody wants some light right there now in their neighborhood at knocking at their door, I mean, they're that excited about this ticket that I think there's some folks who who just feel like until they go come to their neighborhood, it's just not happening but but I know I serve on the National Latino. Council. For by now early supporter I know that from day one joe by his been reaching out to Latinos but I know that we can always do better. Anything that we could do to make sure that we reach more. Latino voters. Not Just in Florida not just in Texas not just in California. New York Arizona. New Mexico but everywhere across the country because if you look at any state these days we have Latinos everywhere we have them in Hawaii. We have him in Alaska. So I think what matters is knowing that that he has started his spanish-language press he started making sure that we we air as much as possible. Eh, he's gotten. The Latino Leadership Councils now in several states, I know I'm working on building up in in Texas because he wants to make sure that he touches the Latino community in especially also is Dr. Biden I think Dr Binding early on recognized Latino vote was and more importantly how important Bill Latino vote was that I know that she had a virtual event with with the would we call the commoditised synagogue Nestle. Which is Debbie Powell from Florida. Veronica, grammar from from Texas and myself were all three Judiciary Committee and people here called on ESCO mothers did judiciary it stock and Jill heard about it and wanted to do an event with us and we did, and now we're going to launch a commodity to commodity campaign to make sure that we impress all our voters that we got to vote until one mother to another. To remind work in our own mother network to make sure that we come out and vote to make sure that we make the change that's needed at the White House. So I'm excited. So one of the things I've found really impressive about Biden's response to that specific criticism is that he wasn't defensive and I think you know right before he visited Florida reporter asked him about. Whether there wasn't enough outreach to the Latino community and buying said something like you know I'm going to work like the devil to make sure that I listen and their vote. So he was open to the idea that there was room for improvement and I think both by an Harris are both consistent in responding without being defensive you know and they bring people to the table. There's a lot of work to do and I think we can always do better and I can tell you Scott along with surrogate were willing to do that. He's he's got a lot of people on the ground. Excited to do that. I mean I can tell you a story Saturday I. Don't do too many in person events, but they wanted me to go to a phone bank and I was assured that were social distance everybody's a math. And I went and the minute I walked in it was about Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe. Any they know the job blindness running. They're excited because. It hurts them to see a White House that is about hurting people for us in. Texas. It's about what we've seen him doing at the border, but it's also seeing that they're not getting more help and more relief on for everybody on unemployment. It's also about what he's doing to Medicare and social security because that hurts our relief does on our lead us. So people know and they know the to make the change that we need they're going to have to get there in those phones. And? Of, course, the member of Congress I've First Ladies First. So that became their chance. Soviet Joe and I told him I said well, it's not just a joe as it Soviet Joe more contests. So I left him with at Madeira. Very excited. You're making calls and Were Spanish language of phone calls to low propensity Latino voters in Harris County

Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe Dr. Biden Sylvia Garcia Texas Scott National Latino Latino Leadership Councils Florida Bein Harris Administration White House Harris County Jim Taylor Skinner Kamala Harris Harris Alaska Congress Representative Veronica Debbie Powell Arizona
Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

The Electorette Podcast

05:25 min | 7 months ago

Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Mayor Stephanie, Rawlings Bleak Mayor Rawlings Blake served as the forty ninth mayor of Baltimore as she joins me to discuss Biden's agenda for the black community. Now, if you haven't taken a look at Biden's agenda for the black community, you WanNa hear this conversation we discuss this plans to close disparities in homeownership rates within the black community his plans to help close the wealth gap the expansion of the affordable care act and has extensive criminal justice reform plans including employing the Department of Justice to address police accountability, decriminalizing the use of canvas and the automatic expunge -ment of all cannabis use convictions. So. Here's my conversation with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake Mayor Rawlings Blake. Welcome to the PODCAST. So I WANNA talk about Biden's agenda for the black community because I was reading through that and I don't think in my lifetime that I've seen or proposal that's this extensive and targeted towards the black community and I wanted to be fair. So I looked through some other past presidential platforms and a lot of them aren't really archived. You know how he crafted this or you know, did he have help from outside organization or WHO's influencing him on this? The vice principal former Vice President Biden has a theory broad group of. Individuals who have been advising him and who care a lot about making sure that the the Democratic Party is right by a black people as well as he does right by black people when he is very hopefully elected NFC among about. Today's that's right. It's like fifty days or something I think with just kind of makes me nervous nervous excited both at the same time. And he's got economists that have been advising him as well as advocates and I think when you take a look at the plan many aspects of the plan, you see their their fingerprints on it that this is not for show. This is not something that is decorative on a on a website. This is something then can be implemented and we'll have a real impact on our community. Absolutely. Right. I agree with that and when I was just looking at the wording and some of the things that he hits on. Pretty. Deep right in an isn't something I would expect it to see us on the democratic side. You wouldn't see it on the Republican side even on the Democratic side, you know five or ten years ago. So that's something. Yeah. I WANNA go really deeply into every policy proposal, but there are few that I want to hit on some pressings. Building Wealth no health care and criminal justice reform. But. I WANNA start with building wealth because one of the things that he proposes is doubling the funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative which doubling that to three billion dollars to assist small businesses and targeting specifically people of Color. You don't WanNa talk about the fact that you know that that's great but you know black people I think in the group of people of Color by people are thinker are usually at the bottom in terms of getting capital access to capital for building small businesses because there are other bias and other limitations that we face, we try to start small business you know. So have you actually address that those unique barriers to black people getting capital in starting small businesses? The first thing you do to address the barrier is acknowledged I can't tell you optus pointed I've been to hear our current president deny ignore the disparities that exist or by people in our country as when you start off ahead in the game and you have someone's willing to name it. And to a work to address it in also wanted to bring to your attention. It's not just the the the money for small businesses Biden Harris. Focused on African American women business owners specifically because as you know a, we are the majority of the businesses offices that are being created in the NBA minority community are African American women see address s like I said at first by identifying them and second step by step I I know there's going to need to be mentors are business mentors that are working to help these these small businesses achieve and when you have an administration that is sensitive, you'll be able to do what was done under the Obama Administration where there was a lot of support event to two businesses. You know a lot of those sports have been ripped up by the current administration so A. Definitely identifying the issues and pudding supports in place to close some of those gaps are the essential you're right. So we have to recover from the damage has been done from the current administration, but then you know things like this policies like this have to account for the fact that we're pandemic. I'm a lot of the businesses that by people have owned have probably been hit in hurt quite. A bit. So that's another place to start. Definitely I. Mean I think one of the things you you will hear a line that I've heard a lot. It's not. We're not trying to go back to where we were. You know this is about ripping up be You know the race face inequities that impact the black community across the board and making sure that we are not ignoring you. Know, the problems you've seen,

Black Community Biden Harris Stephanie Rawlings Rawlings Blake Democratic Party Jim Taylor Skinner Baltimore Department Of Justice Cannabis Optus Broad Group NBA Obama Administration NFC Vice President Principal President Trump
Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

The Electorette Podcast

05:03 min | 8 months ago

Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, of Delaware. She joins me to discuss women's equality and the importance of empowering other women and in the context of commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteen limit. We'll talk about how we can learn from our past and create inclusive movements that lift up all women. Representative Front. Rochester. Made History herself and her two thousand sixteen election to Congress as the first black woman and the first woman of color to be elected to represent the seat. She was also a member of Vice President Biden's victory vetting committee, and we discussed that process as well as the strengths that Kamala, Harris brings to the ticket. Lastly, we talk about what moved her to run for office herself and it's truly a moving powerful story and I'm so. Thankful that she shared it. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with representative Lisa Want Rochester, or a Flint Rochester. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much and I'm so excited to be here in. This is what I think about the ratification of the nineteenth amendment and women's Equality Day now that passage was so crucial to what women have today and where we are today, but I can't help but imagine where we might be today had that movement. been more inclusive you know. Yeah Yeah I think about that because we have record number of women running for Congress record number of women in Congress, right I wondered like what can we do now? As we move forward to make sure that that we don't repeat those mistakes you know Jen I. think that's a perfect place to start because I think by looking at the past if you if you learn from it you can grow. It's interesting. I've heard people talk about this centennial as not necessarily a celebration but more of a commemoration in and it was a feat in to itself. I mean when you think about the effort and the the marches and the efforts that folks may particularly women at that time. But we also think about the fact that for women many women of color that the opportunity to vote really didn't come. into the sixties and so you think about as you said, what what could we have achieved head we been more unified then and you can think about that and dwell on it, and then say what are the lessons learned and I think the fact I got elected in twenty sixteen I came in at the same time is Donald Trump and I had never run for anything in my entire life and. You know it was a Delaware had never elected a woman. Delaware had never elected a person of color to Congress. We only have one seat and so at the time that I decided to run I had served in state government had run our urban league here I had lived around the world and raise my children but it was really the unexpected tragic death of my husband who went on a business trip ruptured his Achilles Tendon, after playing a game of basketball before work meeting and then blood clots went to his heart and lungs and it just it just shook me to the. Core, and I had to find my purpose still on his planet and you know wasn't until like a year later I was I felt like I was numb just kind of going through the motions and I, started noticing other people that were you know having challenges like in my own city of Wilmington there was a lot of they were talking about the the the gun violence and then I saw a dad and three kids in a supermarket in front of me, and he had to put a bunch of grapes because they were nine dollars in that lake. Shook me out of my own. My own sadness and I think you know Donald Trump capitalized going people's anger or sadness or you know the challenges they were facing an inspired native run not knowing who was going to be president or what I was going to be facing and I think after he won and we had the women's March I think that was a watershed moment because it showed the possibility I mean the diversity of the crowd from you know black and Latino Latina in a trans in Muslim and Jewish like it was everybody there together and people haven't led up since then and so I went in two thousand sixteen by Twenty Eighteen Emily's list an organization that helps women candidates which helped me. They saw a thousand percent increase in women's interest to run for office. So I do think we can learn from the past. I. Think. We can still commemorate and celebrate but we gotta take that and turn it into action and that's what's happening right now, and that's what gets me excited about this hundredth anniversary is that it's not just about Jay, let's celebrate this moment it is about how do we do the work and how do we? How do we change the course of history and and in people's lives? So yeah, it's an exciting time

Lisa Blunt Rochester Congress Representative Delaware Donald Trump Kamala Jim Taylor Skinner Vice President Biden Lisa Want Rochester Flint Rochester Achilles Tendon Jen I. Basketball JAY Wilmington President Trump Harris
Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

The Electorette Podcast

05:47 min | 8 months ago

Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode, have a conversation with the hogue, the president of Nero Pro, choice America, and he joins me to discuss her new book. The lie that binds it's really an incredible book and it chronicles how abortion rights of all from being a non-partisan backburner issue to a central 'cause champion by conservatives in the radical, right. This is really one of those books that I have to read twice. It's that informative. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Elise. Hogue. leasehold welcome to the cast. Thank you so much. You're. So before we jump into your book, I want us to talk about something because I recently learned that you were from Texas and that really my inches because I'm also from the South I'm from Memphis Tennessee, and I was reading one of your interviews where you'd said that you wanted to leave Texas because Uber afraid that you'd be bored and that was something like totally relate to. Manila it was sort of. Knew that there was a being rolled out there and I wanted to. It be challenged in You don't both my own horizons, but also different people different people think and act and. I am so privileged grateful to have been able to do that. You know I have to admit, and you may relate to this as being from a have A. Of defensiveness when it comes to people bashing Texas, they're such amazing people. They're they're such amazing within their and during such good work, and you can't judge inspired leaders. You have to judge us by Jordan Molly ivins in grammar yards and Janice Joplin for goodness. Sake. Now. There's just and that's true everywhere where there's adversity, there are amazing women trying to make a better future to Tennessee. It's true taxes in needs recognized. That is absolutely true. I FEEL DEFENSIVE ABOUT MEMPHIS TO MEMPHIS. Amazing. You know have Bill Street. Yeah. There's some things that I wanted to get to and that's where I connected with you because I was like, yes, I understand that needs to escape. But yet you know having these strong ties to my hometown It's. US You know and I always say at in calm from a reproductive rights background at came to it, and part of that is my experience in Texas in watching Texans in particularly poor people in taxes in rural people in Texas I'm being the canaries in coalmines of these rearrested policies that use reproductive oppression disenfranchise. So I really love this book because I've read some bit of this history in different books over time, and you just put it together into end. So well, right and I. I think one of the things about the Republican. Party. That happens I think we have these debates in the media when people talk about it as we just accept the Republican. Party. As is right without kind of thinking about how they got here or the illogic of their kind of overarching philosophy because a lot of it doesn't really make sense. Right. But you know when you read your book, the Republican Party today is not the way that it used to be like it's not recognisable from. Prior, to nineteen seventy right you at one Haley. How they kind of cobbled together this coalition of these disaffected smaller groups. You know these Democrats, who weren't happy with the passage of the Civil Rights Act and know some religious groups. So what were some of these initial groups in that coalition? Awkward it was a little bit. The opposite, right that every every political party has factions. There's no question about it, but you know as as the sort of book opens, you do see Jerry Falwell senior, who, subsequently passed and Paul and at small set a really fundamental as they call themselves dominion. It S, which means they believe God gave digging into white men over systems, elliptical, economic social systems, and. Our. Country, whereas before they had to do very much Mansi in short all the sudden is rich move mad. The Women's Liberation Movement is really challenging total control over power systems in the country and they mobilized to political action fighting school desegregation and. It's a long long story. You see throughout the book is that. An establishment GOP, which you still have any conservatives who still had social liberals in fiscal conservatives, they were not finding enough to hang together in related. People who hadn't been voting band goals were building over ten. Maybe we should add up and there was crew rate and they got more and more halt on a constituency within their electoral coalition that increasingly represented a small small action in the country in their views and they. Title, they were making deals with the devil and they. You know what? If anything can prince is that the artifice around abortion which seemed great to that at the time and I'm sure we'll discuss. Because one place where were toweling. Stream minority and they knew they didn't have public pain on their side. So it was a constant balancing act and what ended up happening is these radicals increasingly over to the party with each subsequent election, and trump is the ultimate manifestation of that.

Texas Memphis Tennessee Republican Party Hogue Jim Taylor Skinner Jordan Molly Ivins Elise Manila Nero Pro Janice Joplin Hogue. President Trump Jerry Falwell America GOP Haley Women's Liberation Movement Coalmines
Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

The Electorette Podcast

04:32 min | 9 months ago

Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Wendy Osafo when he is a political commentator and a professor of education at Johns. Hopkins. University, she also served on the Obama Administration's anti-poverty initiative when he joins me to talk about everything from the current political climate to the recent black lives matter protests. We also discussed recent polling of the twenty twenty presidential election, and of course, many many failings of the trump administration. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Wendy Assefa. Welcome to the broadcast. Thank you for having me. I really wanted to talk to you about this moment in history because I saw a tweet, the other day that really got my attention I think it was from Congresswoman Anna Presley and she said that the civil rights movement didn't in it didn't end and that we're living right now it's ongoing and I think that that's pretty you know accurate what's happening in the streets with black lives matter protests you know what do you think this moment actually means I think this moment right now is a defining moment in our country. And our nation I think that what we have to realize is that without cameras, this has been the backdrop of the lives of black people for years is just so happens that the death of George Floyd was videotaped but this has happened so many times in enough is enough I was told people you know I'm so happy that black lives matter has become a battle cry that people more aware about now in twenty twenty but I remember marching when black lives matters started before was even Hashtag with the death of Trayvon Martin it was the death and killing trayvon Martin that. Ignited the hash black lives matter and so I say all that to say, you know the civil rights movement was a time that we look to as a historic time society and we came through that as a nation but it hasn't ended because just evolved in different ways, and that's what people have to understand and I'm just so excited to see different faces, different races, different backgrounds really fighting now because it's going to take our nation to come together as one in order for us to end systemic racism. Now you're absolutely right it has evolved right? That's the perfect word. For it and when I think about you know what you just said marching when Trayvon Martin was murdered a movement was kind of in its infancy. But what I think is really interesting now is the reaction from conservatives now that people are marching around the world for black lives matter they their reactions were really extreme Ryan, I mean it's like splashed holy water on them like what do you think that they think black lives matter actually means what does it mean to them? You hear people saying like not in my town you're not gonNA bring black lives matter into Maya. Town. Yeah I think is really interesting in the way I. Answer. This question may actually be controversial I think that they are very clear what black lives matter means I think they are very clear but black lives matter stands for, but they don't want to accept what black lives matters means because if they do that means that they are accepting that this country's inherently racist and that's the truth and as uncomfortable truth we are saying black lives matter because black lives are the ones that are under attack were saying black lives matter because the statistics show that black and Brown children in schools are treated differently. That's why we're seeing black. Lives matter but you see it's not just black lives. Matter is black lives matter because black lives have been treated as less than for so many years in this country. So I think that conservatives are fully aware of what this means I think that is willful ignorance for them to say, no black lives with not only to accept that is not the Hashtag that the issue is the premise of the Hashtag doesn't issue and I think that when we're having these conversations with people, these are people who are elected Congress people they're pretty smart. You know they're pretty erudite nature, and so you know these are the same. Individuals who say because they're conservatives that a baby's life matters at the beginning of Jess station. You don't have to come out of the womb for your life to matter but soon as your created your life matters and therefore they're against abortion. So if they're able to understand that a baby's life matters at the beginning of creation than I'm pretty sure that they're competent enough to understand that black lives matter because black lives are the ones under

Jim Taylor Skinner Trayvon Martin Wendy Assefa Wendy Osafo Obama Administration Professor Of Education George Floyd Anna Presley Jess Station Ryan Congress
Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

The Electorette Podcast

05:57 min | 9 months ago

Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate I'm this episode? A have a conversation with Andrea Freeman. She's a professor at the University of Hawaii and author of the book skimmed. Skimmed, this book, which chronicles allies of America's first reviving set of identical quadruplets, the false sisters, the quadruple tra, born in nineteen, forty, six to any faults of Bratcher woman who had lost her ability to hear in seek as child. Pulling the birth of her quadruplets, the white doctor who delivered them saw an opportunity he sold the to use the sisters for marketing purposes to the highest bidding formula company. There was an exploitative relationship that fall quadruplets for the rest of their lives. GIVES US A book about Race Poverty Exploitation and food policy. Answer and I opened our conversation with her, describing the story of Anti foles and the birth of her quadruplets Foltz was a block and Cherokee woman she lived in reads Phil North Carolina and was married to a tenant farmer. Everybody called P. to his twenty years older than her. She lost the ability to hear and speak in childhood, and she had six kids already when she learned that she was going to have triplets, so because of the high risk of the multiple she went early to the hospital spent a few weeks there, and on the night of their birth she found out there was another little girl hiding behind her sisters, and she had the first recorded. Recorded surviving identical black quadruplets, and so the girls who were very adorable, became instant celebrities. There was reporting about them all over the country. Universal Studios sent a camera person the New York. Times reported it and suddenly Andy May, who was not used to the spotlight became famous. Yes, she had the unfortunate luck of having a really terrible doctor. Right to just put simply he was unethical. In every possible way to premises, was Dr Kleiner, yeah Dr Fred Cleaner he loved to speak vocally about his support of Hitler. He maintained segregated waiting rooms, and he took advantage of the fact that he delivered the quadruplets to begin experimenting on them on the day of their birth. He had theories about the healing powers of vitamin C, and he injected them all with. A fairly large dose on the day they were born then he decided that he would name the girls. Even though anime had picked out her own set of names, and he gave them all the first name Mary, and then the names of his wife, sister, aunt and great aunt, the next thing he did was auction the girls off to the highest bidding Formula Company to Become Their Corporate Godfather. So what was anti doing all of the time? Did she have any say as to what he was doing, so I know about the naming things with the naming she was. was trying to think of names and I think she was going over names with our sister or someone on our family, and they couldn't decide, so he took it upon himself to come up with a name. The name Mary like you mentioned, but all the other decisions are being made. Did he even consult with her I? Know this was nineteen forty-six, so she probably felt that with this white doctor, you know she was black and Cherokee the. She didn't have a lot of choices. Exactly so there's race and class wrapped up in there and no doubt gender and. You know every kind of oppressive element there is that he basically felt that he could do whatever he wanted, and she didn't have the power to stop him, and also her her abilities, and you know she could not speak or here, and he just completely took advantage of her. So do you know about the deal? He made with the with the Formula Company in relation to I mean. was there any justification as to why formula was needed? Because she actually breast feed, she could, but in those days it was not encouraged. Really for anybody is not like now, but especially for. Black Women and poor black woman. There would be no expectation that she would do that, so it's just one of the distinctions so like back then pet milk, the milk which you would, you talked earlier and formula. They were one in the same, okay, so. You talked about this earlier. This was basically just sugar and milk, so it wasn't very healthy. No, it wasn't very. It should have been given to two babies I. Mean Right, yeah, so so the deal that he cut with a formula company. It basically change the trajectory of their lives, so not only was marketing deal, but they were kind of entangled in this for their entire lives. There was something about him, not only did. He cut a deal with the companies, but there's something about the land. They had a house built on land that I think he owned yeah the way that he had the deal made, and he had his sister-in-law, who was also the first woman to ever be a state chief justice. She was the trustee of this deal and he organized it. It so that he and his family would benefit so pet milk purchased some land from his father in law, but the land was just you know Barron and hilly and impossible to actually get anything out of but he had a house built on that land with a nursery with a very large window, and then put an ad in the newspaper, so people could come and pay to look at the girls on the weekends, very reminiscent of human zoos and then he had pet milk pay for nurses, and the nurses were his nurses, and through them he was able to maintain access to the girls throughout their childhood and continue his experiments

Formula Company Jim Taylor Skinner University Of Hawaii Andrea Freeman Cherokee America Bratcher Professor Universal Studios Mary Andy May Foltz Barron Dr Kleiner Trustee Phil North Carolina Hitler
Kathy Hochul, Lt Governor of New York State

The Electorette Podcast

07:10 min | 11 months ago

Kathy Hochul, Lt Governor of New York State

"I'm Jim. Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. A have a conversation with Lieutenant Governor. Kathy focal of New York, state. Lieutenant, Governor huckle joins me. To Discuss New York response to the coronavirus outbreak, specifically the recovery in rebuilding process. We discussed. The unique ways plumbing have been impacted by Kobe nineteen and what can be done to help women recover, so please enjoy my conversation with Lieutenant Governor Kathy Cocoa. Thank you. Bradley back look I enjoyed our conversation last time. We're going to have this great. Yes, I just into welcome back. The last time you spoke of course that was of course before the pandemic and I know that you hit the ground running. You've been connecting with constituents and you've been working really hard to get the state New York state back on its feet. So I just WanNa know you know. How are you doing? Thank you for asking and I am doing fine. My normal life would've been going from my home. In the western part of New York Buffalo catching as three a M wakeup call and getting out of flight, five to go, New York City, and then maybe try out to Long Island for. For a few hours, and then up to our state capital, and maybe you know, cover the whole state by midnight, so to made parsley in his less travel and wars, zooming moving around the state is what I'm doing, so I have been able to actually touch. More constituencies speak to more elected officials I host meetings with physicist WBZ conference statewide yesterday that I would not have been able to probably pull off with the other schedule half, and so you whether it's talking to chambers women on businesses, faith based community I'm out there just talking about what our objectives are in. In terms of meeting the healthcare crisis, but now we're in the more desirable phase, which is talking about how reopened in a smart way based on the metric, so it is all consuming, but still very fascinating and We're GONNA come out of this with much more knowledge, understanding appreciation for people from all walks of life that were sort of quietly behind the scenes, and never got the recognition they deserve, and I also think this gives us an opportunity to state to really redefine ourselves and launched into the future, and sees on some of the best practices that have emerged out of. Of this crisis. Yeah, I'm glad you're doing well, and you've been working really hard to move the state into the next phase of a lockdown. Honestly I have to say it does make me a bit nervous. Given what's at stake? States begin to reopen too soon. So as are you in right now new. York state depends on the corner of the state of Western. New York upstate to just much that moved into phase to my way of buffalo buffets too early next week. Face to opens up a lot more of the businesses that he will been anxious to go to hair salons and. Retail with many limitations May. There's no nails being done his facials. It is just get a quick haircut with someone who's wearing literally a face shield and has had tested the taken test for Kobe before. They could. Even I'll serve you, so we have very tight restrictions to deal with just what you're talking about. The fear that people are going to have about. Emerging from his deep slumber. Being people have been doing everything they could to sacrifice, but to keep themselves and their families safe, and now they want. They have to be able to trust us in government that followed the doctors who followed the experts, and then we on the metrics that we feel it's safer to go out taking the same precautions we've talking about for. For three months now and so that's why we have the ability to open up slowly. We're not. We're not talking about restaurants. We'll be theaters or larger gatherings, just slowly opening up society and the economy, but nationally we passed this really grim milestone. We have now over a hundred thousand deaths from Colbert nineteen. You know it's still very scary to me on the. The other hand lots of businesses, especially small businesses. They're really hurting financially. There seems to always be this pushing pull. You know we're state. You're caught between which takes priority. Yes, and we are priority all throughout. This has been public health. We wouldn't be talking about reopening. Despite understanding deeply how extraordinarily painful this is for our small businesses and all the employers and I. I come out of a small business family I know the suffering that goes on, and you put your livestream into a low shopper, little of business and almost sign. You don't know if you're GONNA. Make it to the next month or not, so so what we've always said. Public Health comes I mean we can always bring back our economy. He'll be painful tough. Excruciating for our state, revenues are states in your body, sixty five billion dollar whole over the next couple of years already, so we're GONNA have to make some tough decisions, probably some cuts, but if people aren't alive, not protecting public health than what are we therefore so that is what has driven US early talking about reopening. Because we've seen the numbers decline really quite well now, it took a long time to reach the plateau. And if you follow along in New York state has a very transparent way to see what's going on at four dot ny dot. Gov You can really see our hostels ation rate, and it's really going downhill. The number of people use as down number of new cases. Way Down and we didn't see that we wouldn't be talking about reopening if we had stronger broader social safety nets. Nets here in the US what would be ideal in terms of a reopening schedule right in I'm thinking about New Zealand. You know I knew there are comedy is a lot smaller than ours you know, but they had a really strict walked down early on. You know, accommodate suffer bid. They're able to really crush the curve really quickly, so I guess the question is, how would we? We operate if our social safety nets were such that you know, we didn't have to worry as much about the economy, you know what would are reopening process. Look like well probably operate very differently, and what troubles me the most is that women have been hit so hard by this wing. Women were women than men are filing for unemployment. They're. They're not in the industries that are. Are being called back the earliest like construction manufacturing, those are very male, dominated field, so women will be going without their paycheck, and you longer period of time, and on the other hand, those who are working are in the most at risk jobs made therein the ones. They're the ones that are out there on the front line, a seventy eight percent of healthcare workers, the nurses and People that are working in the cafeterias and the Kitchens and and places where they exposed. Those are all women, and so women are really. Really caught in a bad squeeze here at this pandemic either unemployed, and if you're single head of household, you're having trouble. Put Food on the table. A hope and your unemployment checks come in, but let him have been anomaly delayed because of the overwhelming. The system or you're out there exposing yourself every day because you need that paycheck you going and working in a kitchen making someone's. Someone's food that they can pick up curbside and positive. Free back the virus your house, so the Connie's important, and it'd be nice if people knew that they didn't have to risk themselves. We also have to keep some basics functions going and we. We need people to still going to the grocery stores and sell our food and go into the pharmacies of make sure we have prescription. Prescription so those tend to be women, which is just a fascinating study, and whether or not society properly recognizes and appreciation to end compensates women the way they should.

New York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Coco Governor Huckle United States New York City York Kobe Taylor Skinner Long Island WBZ Physicist Bradley New Zealand Connie Colbert
Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:59 min | 11 months ago

Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Fatima. Goss graves the president and CEO of the national. Women's law center. She joins to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, and how the pandemic will uniquely affect women women who are of course on the frontlines as essential workers. We also discuss the childcare crisis, and we talk about a recent report published by the National Women's Law Center I'm the investment needed to adequately fund the country's childcare knees? So here's my conversation with Pajama. Gos- graves. Screens welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you. So we are about. Three months. I think into pandemic now. That sounds surreal to say. But you know. The economic fallout has been really swift. It's been head-spinning. There have been millions of people out of work. You know overnight. But we're just starting to parse through which groups specifically will be the hardest economically when I was specifically talk about women. Can you give me a quick summary of what the picture looks like for women right now economically. Crisis like the line we are in is gonNA always reveal inequalities that exist before one of the things that we know is bad about one in three women who are working are considered essential worker is in. That's in part because women are disproportionately in the healthcare system, both as nurses doctors in also in nursing homes sped. It is also because women work in retail and in manufacturing jobs like at Amazon, so they are disproportionately. Cashier is in big stores that have stayed open in on the front lines. You'll see them on the street doing things like delivering nail, and and so as a result, it's about one in three of women who are working right now are are right now front line. In working without hazard, pay working without protective equipment to ensure that they can work with safety and at the same time when we look at who lost their jobs quickly that women disproportionately have lost their jobs over the last two months in. That's especially to black and Brown women. And part of the reason that is again is job segregation. It's where women worked. So women make up a disproportionate number of people who work in restaurants that had to close in close quickly proportionate number of people who work as. Housekeepers in hotels who who work in small retail who work as domestic workers in and we're talking about jobs where people aren't working in sitting on a huge safety net to begin with these are all jobs that were already in the lowest paid fields. and. Were women were working in many many states just for seven twenty five an hour, trying to scrape by enough. So wait, you have. Is that about forty percent of the people who were working in those jobs about forty percent women who were working in those fields were already basically working fulltime making poverty wages. For the ten domecq incident you if you're picturing frontline workers. If you're lucky, enough and I'm probably have lucky in quotes. You can't see me on a podcast to work. And deep in sharp unemployment at the same time, women are more likely to be caregivers, and Co or sole breadwinners, and we're in a time where that care crisis that we have right now around people who have either been forced to work in this period outside the home or who have been working from home, but also parenting in home. Schooling is largely being ignored. As states race to reopen without a plan, a big part of the problem with having no plan as you haven't figured out. What are people going to do about having to go back to work without schools without summer camps without child-care? Exactly, that's a huge piece because when you look at the stories about people who are rushing to get out in these states that have open or starting to open early. Early you know what are the pictures of their of people who are sitting in restaurants and bars, and who are the people were on the front lines serving them primarily women and those women have children at home in their responsible for child care, and they don't. They don't have the childcare safety net there to help them. I was GONNA. Say I can tell you we're going to say on the. Interstate period, but Came in I, don't care and safety net. Yeah but one of the numbers you mentioned. It's one third of the essential workers are women right now? The positions that have been deemed to be essential one those are women well. It's one in three women who work are essential workers who it's in the in in some ways, it's an even larger percentage, so it's not that women are spread in so many many different occupations, one third of them are actually frontline workers right now. I think we have this image in her head that there's some tiny percentage of people who are out there on the front lines and. Everyone else is not for women. That's very much. Not The case may are on the frontlines right now in really large proportions, and those are just the ones that were talking about who are working frontline out there right now. We're not even talking about the many people who are also working from home. Everyone struggling with care crisis

National Women's Law Center President And Ceo Jim Taylor Skinner Fatima Goss Amazon Brown
Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:12 min | 11 months ago

Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with page Gardner. The founder and president of the voter participation center the Voter Participation Center has helped over four point. Six million voters register and get to the polls and page card was a pioneer and identifying key voting bloc. She was one of the first to recognize unmarried. Women as a key political population one with significant and impactful political power. He's Gardner and I discussed what's called the marriage gap. That's the gap between unmarried women and married women in relation to their registration habits and voting behaviors. We also discussed this in the context of the corona virus outbreak. Given that unmarried women generally have less financial stability when compared to married women so without further. Ado here's my conversation with page partner Gardiner. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much great to be here so I was looking at your numbers. And since two thousand and three voter participation center you've helped around four and a half million voters registered to vote and get to the polls which is a massive amount of people millions and millions of people. And that's that's really incredibly impressive. But I'm just curious you know two thousand three. It feels like a lifetime ago and it wasn't but it feels like a lifetime ago and I don't think that voter suppression or voter issues for mainstream. Then what encouraged you to get into those costs to become interested in you know registering voters? So it's interesting that you bring that up. We have helped over point. Six million people applied to be registered to vote and hundreds of millions of people. Turn out but just sort of tripping down memory lane in two thousand I looked at the election of Gore versus Bush and noticed the difference between married and unmarried women in terms of how they voted and their share of the electorate and unmarried women. Married women voted very very differently with unmarried women voting for Gore in married women voting for Bush and I wondered about that and the share of the electorate of unmarried women was really really small in terms of their strength in numbers in terms of the voting eligible population. So that leads to lots and lots of research and the key question was was this sort of a just an observation or was there causality in marital status in other words does marital status determine whether or not you register and whether or not you vote. And after years of research and looking at things like articles from Census Bureau scholars to doing our own research it turns out that marital status along with age and race are key determinants of whether or not you register and whether or not you vote so then. The question became if unmarried. Women are unregistered and higher numbers than they should be. How do you reach them? So then what we did at the voter. Participation Center was pioneer mail based voter registration targeting particular demographic all across the country and that was really a revolutionary. We created for the first time the first list of unregistered people in this country. Because as you know no state keeps a list of its unregistered citizens so we had to create a list of unregistered unmarried women. Nail THEM VOTER REGISTRATION APPLICATION. And then make sure that voter registration application got sent to the appropriate elections official. We did that after a number of years. And then it turned out that this process was successful with other underrepresented demographics persons of Color and young people. So that is how our program's evolved to include what we call the rising American electric which is unmarried women persons of Color and young people who are now sixty four percent of the entire voting eligible population in the country today. More than a hundred and fifty million people yet. They're underrepresented in terms of their registration rates. And they do not vote and they are not as large as share in. The electorate would suggest that they could be while. That's incredible actually had no idea that before voter participation that there was no way or no one was tracking unregistered voters. And now I'm curious. How did you do that? How did you track now? Who was not registered? Well after many many years and what we have done is refined a system where we match a voter file from state to a list of commercial data and then we delete the names of people or addresses that do not appear on the voter file and then we go through about twenty five other steps to insure the quality of the data. And after having done that we then mail out a voter registration application form that then. The person fills out and sends back to the appropriate election. Official

Voter Participation Center Founder And President Gardner Jim Taylor Skinner Official Participation Center Gore Bush Census Bureau Partner Gardiner
How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 min | 1 year ago

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

Rachel Barco Barco New York Jay Inslee Governor Cuomo Gretchen Governor Cuomo New York University School Of Jim Taylor Skinner Washington Vice Dean New Jersey Oklahoma President Trump Whitmer Professor
Bassey Ikpi, Author of "I'm Telling the Truth, but I'm Lying: Essays"

The Electorette Podcast

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Bassey Ikpi, Author of "I'm Telling the Truth, but I'm Lying: Essays"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Bossy. Igby author of the New Book of Essays Titled. And telling the truth. But I'm lying. It's a memoir in essay form that guides the reader through what it's like to live with bipolar disorder and anxiety and this is one of the most arresting beautiful collections of essays. Ever ride in a really really long time. As soon as this collection of essays was published. It quickly became a New York Times bestseller and it went into. Its second printing the day that it was released so I was really honored to have the opportunity to have this conversation with Bossy. Igby we open our conversation with my describing my reaction to the book and my deep emotional connection to it. So here's my conversation with Bossy. Igby start by describing my relationship to your book and I don't remember exactly how I became aware of your both and if someone recommended it to me or I read something typically a have these books that I read for work or for the podcast and I have another category of books that I just kind of reach for pleasure and so your book fell into that latter category. I was just going to read it through the holidays and you know just kind of enjoying myself so when I started reading it I wasn't prepared. You know I I was taking back in. My first thought was who wrote this and at the time. I didn't know that it was a bestseller right. I was truly stunned. That the head and the and the vulnerability you have when you talk about your experiences with bipolar disorder anxiety and then I became this really annoying person and I just started carrying the book around in my purse. So whenever somebody would invite me out for you know for drinks or for Coffee. I pull the copy of the book out from my purse and I'd say. Have you read this book because it's really incredible because there were just so many people in my life that I thought would benefit from reading it would grow and we'd get some some meaning from it right? Oh that's so cool. It's okay I'm always interested in knowing how people find it because I'm never sure if it's just like the interviews or I don't know how any of this stuff works so hearing that is really amazing. Thank you know the thing that stands out to me. Most is the language right the poetic language right. Because you're a poet right more or less more or less more or less right and I read somewhere. It was probably an interview with you that this book was not the book that you started out writing. This was the book that you originally intended to write that you thought he'd write something like a self help book this kind of a kind of a typical piece of nonfiction. And I have to tell you. I'm so glad that you did not write that book and that you wrote this when you talk about what the evolution for. You was like getting from that first book to what you eventually published. What was that evolution for you like? I have friends who who say that. I've been trying or wanting or speaking about writing this particular book for as long as they've known me like going back ten fifteen plus years and It's true that is a conversation I've had but when I was given the opportunity presented with the opportunity to write a book in Two Thousand Sixteen I went through one of the worst depressive episodes of my life and what I realized now looking back is that I have been in this spectrum of of depression or a mixed episode describing the book for almost a decade if not more and I was only a little bit better meaning not as depressed and when I got to two thousand sixteen. The year I turned forty everything. Hit me like a train and I realized that I was in the space where I didn't want to try anymore. I was exhausted with it. In dumb I spiralled in this way that I was a hundred percent not one hundred percent. I'm still here but I at say a large percent like eighty percents certain that I didn't want to be in this world anymore and I started slowly preparing my friends and my family and my therapist for the possibility that I wouldn't be here by the time my birthday came around or even a little bit afterwards and one of the things that I wanted to do was to have always wanted to do as a writer is to write a book and I was also thinking very practically in that. This is revenue for my for my child and my my family. My siblings this is you know this is something that they can collect on In my mind I had this. I'm not really worth a lot right now. But if I'm dead and I have a book then all this stuff is going to be perfect. The new rational irrational Is what I refer to it as but I didn't want to write that book. I wanted to write something different. I wanted it to be a super soul Sunday type of motivational kind of this is what I've learned in going through all of this. Is that these little lessons. I've taken from it and I hope that it helps somebody else then. I struggled to write that book because it was false. But it's a book that we sold When I eventually got an agent so I felt like I had to write that book but I struggled so hard and I was very fortunate to have the editor at Harpercollins. Aaron wicks who saw that. I was struggling and had said to me when we had our initial interview before I decided to sign the contract that she wanted me to be sure. I was ready to go there. And when you when you WANNA book contract when you want anything like Asu Xiaobo that whatever you know what I mean like sign me. I'm going to do that but I didn't know what she meant until about a year into the process and I'm struggling writing all the stuff that I don't like that I don't connect to. I'm I'm having this real conflict with the things that were going on in my in my life in my mind and I remember I was in New York for a couple of weeks to just rights. I figured I needed a change of scenery. Something had to give and I met with her and I was really honest with her. No no what happened before that was that I wrote like a war I it was the first thing I wrote in this new thing I was I I wanted to To free myself. I wanted to see if if I got it out of my system if I wrote these different ways and wrote it the way that it was coming to me in in different points of views and in different perspectives and different tenses. And really playing. With the Genera of non-fiction. If I got that out of my system maybe the other book would show up and then on top of that I was also like I said in two thousand sixteen writing these notes and letters to my friends and family Explaining to them how difficult it has been my entire life to exist in this way And I was trying to show them that that I done the best that I could invade more importantly they had done the best they could because this is all the things that I was contending with that they didn't even know about. So how could they have possibly known but now I'm telling them right? Those are two separate projects so when I decided that I was having trouble writing the book because there was something else that needed to be written I went to my to my editor with with with like a war with the one that eventually became to Hootie and with The one that's That's the really long one in the middle that's broken up into. I don't know anything's called hangs titles so much but the one that's broken down into like time. Increments I wrote those three and I presented the to her and she was like do this. Whatever this is forget what we were doing before right. Whatever you feel I can. I will figure it out as far as you know punctuation The way that the words come out whether or not the diction needs to be fixed like just write it and figure it out and once she gave me the freedom that permission it just it was I just I just took it and ran and this book combined with those letters and notes. South riding to my friends and family. All of that came together. This is what this is. What happened is a very long answer.

Editor Jim Taylor Skinner Anxiety New York Times Bipolar Disorder New York Aaron Wicks Writer Harpercollins
Melissa Mark-Viverito Discusses Stop & Frisk Policies

The Electorette Podcast

08:07 min | 1 year ago

Melissa Mark-Viverito Discusses Stop & Frisk Policies

"I'm Jim Taylor. Skinner in this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Melissa Mark Viverito. She's the former speaker of the New York City Council and prior to that. She was a council member in New York. During Michael Bloomberg's tenure as mayor currently Melissa Mark Viverito is running for Congress. In New York's Fifteenth Congressional district. But she's really concerned about what she saw during her tenure as a city council member around Bloomberg Stop and Frisk Policy. She joins me to talk about what it was like on the ground for folks that community of happened when she spoke out against harmful policies like stop and Frisk. So here's my conversation with Melissa Mark Viverito Melissa Mark viverito welcome. Thank you so much for the invitation. No thanks for joining me on such short notice. You were New York City Council member doing Bloomberg's mayorship and I think he was mayor. From what two thousand to two thousand thirteen. Yeah you became speaker after that but but you were on the Council City Council while he was mayor enduring the stop and Frisk policy so you know it really well yes. I was in office for a second and third term and this issue of stop and Frisk was something that those of us. The progressive members in the city council really were pushing hard against and it's a tremendous policy racist policy that many of the communities that we represented were deeply impacted by it so there is a consistency in. And there's a interviews that I gave and statements that I've made in testimony provided over time talking about the detrimental effects than end encouraging the the administration at the time to reconsider and unfortunately a lot of nuts. All in-depth ears. He has so I just want to just jump right in and talk about the elephant in the room because he's running for president now. I think I am assuming. He's going to be on the debate stage tonight you know. He's rising in the polls right and I think that's baffled a lot of people but I think there's a couple of groups of people there people who were in New York City at the time and who like yourself are really familiar with the policy and you know have always had problems with it then. People were kind of like marginally aware knew. It was bad but didn't necessarily live through it and then are there are people who have no clue about what stop and Frisk is and I think that's why he may be doing so well in the polls right now I mean. Look he is trying to buy this election. Inundating flooding social media mainstream media with ad buys where he's trying to recreate who he is and what his legacy is. And that's troubling right. This is what the problem is a great inequity in our country but we have the ability for money to overpower debate democratic processes. And that is the issue at hand right here. We are those of us that fought back not only on stop-and-frisk but many other policies of boobs legacy at administration's you know he's going out and being able to cast a wide net. Because of the wealth study has to really repaint himself in reposition positioned himself as some sort of a progressive. You know a success story. And that's for those of us that live this reality and fought against it. It's very troubling trends. So you know. I think it's incumbent upon that fought back to really alert others about what life was like in New York City under these racist policies and so it really is a symbol. I think Lemberg candidacy. A symbol of what is wrong with our country at the moment the vast inequity accumulation of wealth in the hands of a few the ability for that community wealth to not have an impact on our policy our debate or discussion. You can't get more anti-democratic than that but I'm just curious. Because the thing is is that he's doing well in a demographic that you wouldn't expect like he's doing well amongst black black constituents right. In comparison to some of the other candidates I think depending on the poll he may be second or third behind Biden or behind sanders. I just don't have an explanation as to why that is other than what you said. His money is using his money to kind of blanket. The airwaves and people are unfamiliar with this policy of his many policies that hurt black and brown communities agreed. And I think that that's what it is is that he is able to put a message out there through his. I is that really does run counter to what we were living on the ground now. Granted part of the conversation. That's been happening with. Stop and Frisk is is. Oh you know. We were taking guns off the street and making our community safer. Who's GONNA disagree with that? If that's the message that you're getting at the reality is no. That is not true. That is not what happened. He did fund nationally. Some of these antigun violence efforts but on the ground implementing policy that we're creating great divisions with communities of Color and police that was giving a lot of hesitation criminalizing a whole generation of young and the communities in which they resided and data something easily overcome. We are still living the consequences of those policy so when we talk about someone who was to be the president of the United States that wants to represent This great diversity that exists in this country when someone has presented policies. That have really been hurtful to us. And you know it's it's not something that the akin brace and that I don't think it's genuine when he's talking about. Oh well in you every considered and I've come to understand that this was hurtful. Well there were those of us. Eight ten twelve years fighting you by demonstrating the data. That would prove that. Basically disproved what you were saying and yet you turn your tossed so that does not really bode. Well someone who wants to be a president for all right and being inclusive president so. I think that this is really troubling. And that's why it's important for us to really present the real the real record in and let me be very clear. I think that Bloomberg's candidate C. Has just as much to do with the Warren in a sanders on the policies. That date present as much as it is about trump and You know the issue of the inequity that exists of making sure that people are paying their fair share of making sure corporations are paying their taxes of making sure. The wealthy are paying more. Those are policies that clearly Bloomberg has against. He's been vocal around that and he basically expressed in so many terms that he does not want to see a warrant or a sanders in office because of the economic policies that they embrace so. Let's I don't want people to forget that right is not just about trump. This is also about economic policies that he is not supportive of which are policies that are demanding a more equity in our system. So that's important as well. So can you tell us a little bit about what was happening on the ground because I was slushing an interview the other day of someone who was a teenager during that time and he was talking about the anxiety and the fear that people felt just walking home from school and not knowing where you're going to be thrown against the wall or not you know what was it like on the ground so my district of increase for the precincts that had one of the top five stop and Frisk Centre city? It was a common conversation whenever we were in. The communities family members were concerned about their loved ones about their children about their grandchildren. Stories that you hear about children being stopped six. Seven eight ten times Just for being of color in. It's just it's it's just really deplorable right to think about the long term consequences of those young people. That's their experience with the police department. That's their experience with criminal justice. That's what we all deserve safe communities and you can just whole cloth right criminalize whole community or segments of our population

Melissa Mark Viverito Melissa Bloomberg New York City New York City Council President Trump Sanders Michael Bloomberg Council City Council Frisk Centre Frisk Jim Taylor Skinner Congress United States Biden Warren
Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

The Electorette Podcast

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

"I'm Jim Taylor. Skinner in this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with professor reproductive. Rights Advocate Carol. Joffe about her new book. Obstacle course the everyday struggle to get an abortion in America. We opened our conversation by discussing. How legislation has failed to protect access to abortion because it overlooks the everyday obstacles. That make it nearly impossible from any women to obtain an abortion legislatively. I confess to being very cynical. I seriously I don't think that even I mean. Look the country's deeply deeply divided about abortion those who are pro choice. See these restrictions as inhibiting often in a very cruel way women's ability to get an abortion. Those who are against abortion say. Yeah that's the point. We we are putting these things in precisely so we don't believe in abortion so therefore These restrictions are good because they make it harder to get an abortion. They they make it easier to close down clinics so all is to say that. I'm I mean in terms of the legislative process I don't think that anything we say in our book will sway. Those who who are opposed to abortion could put an antiabortion restrictions. What my co author David Cone and I are hoping is that those who are pro-choice but do not do abortion work or study or advocacy twenty four seven like many of the People. We discuss in our book. will come to understand how onerous restrictions are and hopefully will will move to remove those legislators out of office so who who are doing this as people who are pro choice when. I look for someone to vote into office right just to put. It simply feels like this people when they speak to us and you know. They're saying vote for me when they talk about abortion they talk about Roe v Wade and it doesn't spread from there they don't really talk about all of the little restrictions that have gone into place which makes exercising your right to an abortion nearly impossible for a lot of women. I mean legislatively one of the things that you point out in the book is that you know Central v Wade past have been about what to- hundred restrictions by now probably probably more like thirteen hundred? Yeah I feel like none of our politicians are really focusing on those. Are you know they have a blind spot? They're only looking at Roe v Wade. We have the protective weighed. Yes no if certainly make sense and and You know what I would say in response to that is of course. It's important to protect Roe. V Wade and there's a lot to be very nervous about at this very moment about row but what researching and writing this book show to me. Is that many women already live in post real world. In other words if roe is overturned what presumably will happen is it will be turned back to the states. That means they'll be a lot of traveling from what we now. Call hostile states to quote haven states. But that's already happening. I mean one thing that really surprised me and I've studied abortion more than thirty five years. one thing. That really surprised me was just extent of the travel of efforts at took to just get to a clinic for so many women. The really important thing about your book when I was reading it. You outline the stories of a lot of women. I think the first person you highlight is a fifteen year old teenager right and her parents were kind of in and out of the picture. And when you think about the fact that in some states you have to have parental consent right and you think about the thousands of dollars at it takes to get an abortion and this particular person ended up in one of those e call fake clinic. What do they call them? A clinic crisis pregnancy center. You just talk us through that scenario of what that might have been like for her fifteen year old teenager while she was a extrordinary. We did not interview her personally. We we found her story she had written it up So I can't speak to her personally but she. She had extraordinary. Extraordinarily determination was like for her to go to the center. She lives in the state where she had to make a separate trip to the clinic. Twenty four hours before the abortion. She got to the clinic. She realized something was wrong. It was a fake clinic. These crisis pregnancy centers and there's thousands of them there. There are more crisis. Pregnancy centers in the United States. Now than there are abortion providing facilities and in a number of states. They get they get public funding. You know one of the most of the many things in this world to be enraged about one of the most enraging things is for example in the state of Texas. Money is taken away from family planning centres not even abortion. I mean you may be sure does not give money to abortion clinics but to family planning programs contraceptive programs and gives them to these religiously sponsored crisis pregnancy centers that outright. Lie To women they either tell them they're ultrasound is so far along that Can't pass get an abortion? Or sometimes they tell them they're ultrasound shows actually earlier stage in pregnancy than they actually are so these women won't rush and by the time they get to a clinic They'll be too late. Another feature of them is that they have been very aggressive about buying property. Is nearest possible to legitimate abortion facilities and it's often very very confusing to patients. I mean this this case that we talked about in the book we call her Collier. It's very common especially for example in in a case that we do discuss the park crisis. Pregnancy center had a parking lot right next to a clinic. People from the fake clinic would stand outside would wave women in who of course stopped that they were being waived into the real clinic. So yeah this is one of many many problems that women face when they try to get an abortion. When I read this story I I. It was just incredible to me. I was so angry. And just the Paul the links go to to to to lie to women and you know into teenagers who are going through something. That's really really hard. So and in that case with Talia this clinic you can remind me or tell me if I'm correct or not. This clinic was right next door very close to it and it looked very much like the real clinic and the name was very similar. That's right and when you go into these places they're they're you know they're wearing lab coats and make you think that their doctors that's right and just it's just unfathomable to me the link to go through none of the I think you hit the right word on the head. It's unfathomable that these fake clinics Goto but it also Jennifer I would also say it's unfathomable the lengths women not just teenagers but women in general have to go through to get their abortions and they do. Yeah they do right. That gets to one of my next questions do we do. We have any data on. The percentage is the percentage of cases where obstacles collectively were. They've been successful right in a woman knocking abortion we done. That's a great question. We don't have good data on specifically women who were dissuaded or allied to at a crisis pregnancy center. My colleagues here at UCSF in the answer program have come up with a estimate that about four thousand women a year Who Show up at clinics are turned away because they arrived too late in in just station. Your listeners should understand that all abortion facilities are not uniform some go only through the first trimester of pregnancy some go to eighteen weeks Some states a number of states have banned abortions after twenty weeks there's only three or four clinics and the United States that will perform abortions after twenty four weeks and that's usually for Fetal anomalies or the woman herself is is very ill. I mean those are not the only people who get abortions there. But that's the bulk of the cases so It's a very cruel vicious cycle Europe. Poor woman you find out you're pregnant you try you look around you. Try to find a clinic. You make an appointment you try to find someone who will drive you there. You try to arrange childcare for your children. Sixty percent of abortion patients are our parents You arrange to take time off from work so all you have to put all these things into place. What we found out is simply getting a getting a reliable ride to a clinic if you don't have your own car or even if you do some clinics a use sedation which means you are not able to drive yourself home afterwards. Anyway but the time you get all these pieces in place and you show up to the clinic you may be past that clinics limit

ROE Wade United States Professor America Jim Taylor Skinner Joffe Ucsf David Cone Texas Collier Talia Jennifer I Paul
BONUS: State of the Race | 2020 Primary Analysis with Emily Tisch Sussman

The Electorette Podcast

09:35 min | 1 year ago

BONUS: State of the Race | 2020 Primary Analysis with Emily Tisch Sussman

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with democratic political strategists Emily Tisch sussman and she's a correspondent on MSNBC and CNN. And she's also the host of the popular political podcast primary playlists. She actually interviewed Hillary Clinton and last week. And I'm totally jealous anyway. Emily join me for quick state of the race analysis including a post debate analysis of the first democratic debate following the Iowa Cacus the Iowa caucus the Seattle with a surprising in ever changing results. Yes that Iowa Caucus we also talk about Tuesday's New Hampshire primary and and what's going to happen beyond that. So here's my conversation with Emily Tisch Sussman to sussman. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me you know I just realize is yesterday that we're entering the second week of February. It's very new and I need a vacation. I need my summer vacation like yesterday. He because I was thinking through last week Monday was the Caucus Iowa caucus which was chaotic. To say the least following that I think Tuesday was the wildest Steve The union I've ever witnessed my entire life than once they I think was the acquittal Thursday. We had a bit of a break and Friday. I think was the tenth. Democratic debate was at the tenth or the eleventh. Yeah something around that. I am extremely pregnant right now and like the joke that this thing could force me into labor like shocking into into Labor like stopped being funny this week because there were many although the thing that ultimately ended up doing it was when I was worried that Jerry Harris wasn't going to share bat was ultimate. Well you made it. You made it especially to the caucus. So what was your take. What's your take on the Iowa caucus from last week in the state that we're in right now because honestly i? I'm still a bit confused. It is crazy. I mean I've been saying I was at I was at in Iowa for the caucus in two thousand sixteen and was truly leash shocked by the process and the fact that I felt like so many people got left out because they didn't just couldn't have the time or the transportation to be able to show up and participate -ticipant net Last week one of the things that almost shocks me into Labor is that I interviewed Hillary Clinton and she said the process was undemocratic which is actually the farthest this I've ever heard anybody go in describing it and I think that how everybody pretty much feels that way like one of the things that I worry about in the long term as if November is the long-term though when weeks or as long as last week November can feel like long term one of the things that I worry about is that even if trump is loses uses. The electoral college loses the election. He won't step down and he'll question the results of the election and I don't think that that the results also the Iowa caucus if we even have results right now. We finally do and Democratic candidates questioning the results of it. I don't think it helps set a precedent for us to be able to have a peaceful transfer of power if there should be one November. No because you're exactly right because immediately wants to come out about the Iowa Caucus. He jumped on twitter to cast doubt on the whole process. Do you remember that. Said something like old Democrats are in disarray or something. I O caucuses a mess. and He's already casting doubt down on the process. Probably looking for is what's going to happen in November exactly. It's a way to be able to do so doubt from the beginning so that he can essentially control control the outcome because if he controls the entire frame of the narrative which isn't that he's very good at doing then he can get everybody reacts to it so we're no longer just starting from creating our our own framework of like what would normally be considered truth. We're only reacting back and forth to what he says. I'm glad you said that because I've been thinking about that too and I kind of mentioned that every now and again but I still kind of like a conspiratorial list when I talk about the fact that he may not stepped down. He's been hinting at this. Like he tweets out trump twenty twenty four trump eight trump. We know twenty thirty two. I mean he won't be alive that long but I mean but there's always exactly but anyway anyway so you know it's it's it's actually a possibility that we would have to struggle to get him out of office even if he did lose the electoral college in November. I mean it's something that seems totally crazy but these are crazy times and we are not dealing with somebody who is truly grounded in reality when you are only driven by by our own narcissism and and. Apparently the rules don't apply. I feel like everything's on the table. I think one of the biggest impacts of his presidency is that we don't know how to follow up with questions so we we see we've seen this time and time again although there's no longer White House briefings but but it started from day one right from the beginning with Sean. Spicer talking about the crowd. The size of the inauguration that journalists would say well that's wrong. Here's the evidence and whether it's the president or the surrogates would say well no. I'm just sticking to my point. How many times can journalists follow up and say you're factually incorrect? It's right in front of you before they have to just move on right. Exactly I mean I try to follow up on the the lies in that seat of the new address. I mean like Nancy Pelosi the only thing she could have was tearing up the and and let me tell you why I actually think that was so brilliant is the next day. The only conversation was about Nancy Pelosi. Tearing up trump ended up tweeting more about Pelosi tearing bring up the speech than the content of his own speech. Yeah so the Iowa Caucus you know. I think that we have the results. Although I did see something this morning that said that the the Sanders Bernie Sanders was asking for a partial re canvassing of Iowa. And I'm not really sure what that process is but I guess just in short. I don't think that this completely close is an honestly I mean. I don't wanNA sound like trump. I'm not sure how much we can even trust the actual numbers. I'm just not sure I mean. How much do they trust that I mean at this point? What what they have are going back to the paper recordings of tallying up counting? Who is in the room counting? Who moved I mean they're they're combing back through it. I think the thing that has been frustrating to me about the coverage of Iowa is that it's not winner. Take all so who quote wins. Sounds actually doesn't really matter that much it's how many delegates you get out of it. The the reason we care about who wins is because they get a lot out of momentum out of it they they are now seen as electable they can you know bank on fundraising on momentum all of that but that was essentially all negated because of the disaster the function of the caucus So the fact that he and Buddha judge are neck and neck within one delegate in the grand scheme of things one delegate it is likely not GonNa make the biggest difference it feels like they should just move onto the next contest. You know practically it doesn't make a difference but you're right. It does make a difference in terms of momentum and I think that Buddha judge has probably benefited the most from being that close to sanders right. I think that the final count was Buddha. Judge was one delegate ahead of seeing. What's so essentially? You could say claim that he's the winner the winner of the Iowa Caucus which you know as far as like optics are concerned earned. That's really good for him and not the best sanders given given like if you look at the entire context of the primary the news. That's falling Bernie Sanders this week right He had an interview with Chuck. Todd or he talked about you know. He decided that he wasn't going to release his medical records. Right and then James Carville didn't interview where he also also questioned whether it was a smart move for America to select Bernie Sanders as their nominee. Right I mean so I think that Bernie Sanders Sanders needed that push more than Buddha judge at this moment. Well yes I mean I think they both I think they both benefited from it. A lot because sanders entire argument has been Ed. I am electable because I will turn out new voters. I will expand the electorate. I will bring out people who don't normally vote and because because the turn out is actually less than two thousand eight and a little bit above where it was in two thousand sixteen. That argument looks like it fell a little bit flat that it may not be true wasn't like there was this surge of new people coming in Buda judge I think benefits from it. I actually think they both benefit equally. I don't think it really matters who at this point is named like the quote winner. Because I think the whole thing just looks like maths to be honest with you and I think it's why people care about New Hampshire so much but I think that the reason that that Buddha judge got a big bump from it is really the Buddha Judge Biden narrative that it's such a huge contrast where Biden's made argument was electability pretty And the fact that booth judge performed so much better than Biden defying define where people thought that he would have been even in the the last couple of polls before that it seemed like he had fallen maybe to third or fourth so the fact that he did so much better I think was the big exciting narrative for him happy. You know. Reporters don't really want to report on something that if it seems like it's supposed to happen it happens like not that exciting but if it seems like it's not supposed to happen search then it's amazing. I mean I think unfortunately the candidate that really got raised in all of this is the fact that Warren came in third. She in this race this she came in third. She will probably come in first or second in New Hampshire. So let's talk about her that way.

Iowa Caucus Iowa Bernie Sanders Sanders Bernie Sanders Emily Tisch Sussman New Hampshire Hillary Clinton Buddha Nancy Pelosi Jim Taylor Skinner Sanders Biden Jerry Harris Seattle Msnbc Donald Trump Twitter CNN President Trump
Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

The Electorette Podcast

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of disappeared from or is obscure in historical record is because of what really was kind of intersectional mindset an intersectional outlook in her activism. What I mean by that is that Eastman Smith involved herself in multiple movements in many of the major social movements of the twentieth century and believed that they were all all linked together and worked throughout her career to try to link them together all under one kind of vast emancipatory rubric? She she believed saved and she she recognized that there you know there were. There were commonalities. Among various forms of oppression and she she tried tried to kind of straddle multiple movements and bring them together in order to combat. You know all of those common sources of oppression and inequality At once so she spent a lot of time talking about socialism anti imperialism and also you know maternity and maternal ism with feminists earnest's. She spent a lot of time talking about feminism and pacifism with Socialists and with revolutionaries and one of the outcomes outcomes of this was that Eastman always seemed to be kind of straddling so many different movements at once that her voice often it seemed insurgent or challenging from within each individual movement. Many of her colleagues felt that they weren't sure where she stood because she was trying to straddle so many different movements at once because when she talked to save feminists about socialism. It seemed like a challenge from within. Yes in and so. This cut complicated her status and her stature within the the movements that she was affiliated with within the movements that that she she built her life on at the same time as her radicalism and her activism challenged her standing in the more mainstream same political and social environments where she was radical so she was already challenging to more mainstream views but because of that she you know she needed needed stronger a stronger sense of belonging I think clearer sense of standing within the protest movements the leftist movements that she collectively saw as her political home. And so what happened was she. You know kind of fell through the planks of history. She fell to the planks of historical. Memory she we didn't have clear consistent connections with organizations With a single organization right or a single 'cause she didn't have clear and consistent alliances this is or relationships to various mentors. who were recognized the things that that signal stature and make someone intelligible and make someone visible double in historical memory? She kind of challenged complicated at every turn and precisely because she you know tried to connect them All to a larger vision of change that they all shared and so in some ways it was kind of I think a tragic irony that her her inclusive vision seem to divide people and seem to divide people's loyalties but in other ways it's also kind of a fascinating story of how we tell stories as how and why we remember people that I think has a lot to tell us about our current intersectional environment for forming coalitions to pursue the same social change that she and others have been pursuing for a century. You know in counting so is it over simplistic to say that. She was possibly a victim of her own own prolificacy like she was so prolific involved in so many movements that she wasn't known for single thing or was it that and making some hostility because she was seen as kind kind of an insurgent and lots of these movements. I wouldn't say hostility but I would say that you know. She challenged people. She challenged. Organizational hierarchies and in leadership at you know in various organizations and so there were some leaders She had quite a run in with Alice. Paul for example Particularly after the vote was one John when the militant wing of the women's movement the National Women's Party was starting to figure out. Okay what comes next. It was in that period before the rise of the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment nineteen twenty-three that they were you know searching for okay. What's our next approach and Eastman wanted a very intersectional kind of transnational feminist movement and Paul wanted a much more focused targeted women's campaign? Just much like the you know. The suffrage movement that they had just successfully completed pleaded so for some leaders. There was that you know that sense that they were being challenged from a colleague For others it was the fact that you're kind of intersectional perspective active As well as her movement to the left after the Russian revolution seemed to radical and seemed to push the organizations that she was associated with in more radical directions than many of the progressive leaders in those organizations were comfortable. That's unfortunate you know. She reminds me of reading her story. And you know kind of the motion all day of it. And the Ark of her life. She reminds me of not Elizabeth Rankin but there. I can't believe I can't remember a name. The very first woman who ran for president. who was ooh Toria woodhall awesome? She's scared the crap out of people what it's just something about her demeanor. It's hard to tell from a book you know but just something about it. Just kind of reminds me of that similar kind of radical woman radical feminist. Get around that time. And you know crystal was just unafraid. she was so bold and she. She asserted her freedom. She really you know she. She claimed a freedom and claimed a world that even while she was trying to create it so she was an in kind of a kind of a real sense woman ahead of herself or ahead of her time. You know I know. That's kind of a cliche as historians. You know we're we're not really supposed to say that What struck me about her early on? You know what would I I think stuck with me From my graduate school days till almost twenty years later when I finally you know sat down to to try to write the book was the sense of a woman who was just calling ahead of herself and you know and in envisioning and reaching four And you know and actively demanding and trying to live live in a world that was much closer to mine than it was to hers. And you know I found that's just so compelling it's visionary I think she was a gripping person go find her story gripping because of that right she had some really really progressive stances and you know you mentioned a few feminism and she was also I think a socialist. She called herself a socialist right. Yes and she was four reproductive rights. Yes very much. So why was she branded. I WanNa go through the historical arch- of her life a bit later. But why does she branded the most dangerous woman in America. Well I need most of those claims about who came in her. Most radical or revolutionary period after the Russian revolution revolution in nineteen seventeen. She and her brother Maxi sman much better known than she is a radical writer and editor of the Masses magazine. The two of them together published the Liberator magazine which started in Nineteen Eighteen Shortly after the Russian revolution and it was called the Journal of Revolutionary Progress and it became very quickly the kind of center of reporting and information about revolutionary movements worldwide in connection with that period in her politics. Um which I can explain to you a little bit how. She kinda volved into that radicalism from her more progressive earlier activism in connection with that. She took very forthright arthritis very bold. Very outspoken stances in favor of the Bolsheviks and herself traveled to communist Hungary and she was the first the American reporter to do that and reported very enthusiastically at least initially about her hopes that the a similar revolution would come to the United States and would indeed sweep the world would become a global revolutionary movement. And of course this you know this kind of radicalism. She was not alone in it particularly on the left after the Russian revolution many colleagues from a number of different movements also celebrated revolution however You know it still was. That was not a mainstream extreme view. You know even on the left it was not a mainstream view was a radical view and It was very threatening to people especially in the the body of a woman and the voice voice of someone who was so afraid to speak about it. And the voice of someone who had such stature in more mainstream political political movements and more mainstream political

Crystal Eastman Eastman Smith Jim Taylor Skinner Amy. Aaronson Amy Eareckson Journal Of Revolutionary Progr Writer And Editor Aclu Paul Hungary Liberator Magazine Elizabeth Rankin United States Co Founder America President. National Women's Party Reporter Maxi
Remembering Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison

WBZ Afternoon News

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison

"Was the nineteen ninety a Nobel Prize laureate in literature and the first black woman to be awarded the prize author Toni Morrison has died she was awarded the presidential medal of freedom in two thousand twelve and CBS to Jim Taylor tells us Orson approach the issue of race from a unique perspective may be surprised to learn that Toni Morrison who brought so many heartbreaking books about the black experience in America grew up in Ohio surrounded by whites most of my writing about the black topic the black families by community is part of my life but a lot of it was in query I never lived in a black neighborhood still her novels had much to say about the complexities of race and gender she also became the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize for literature and when president Obama awarded her the presidential medal of freedom he noted talking Morrison's prose brings us that kind of moral and emotional intensity that few writers ever attempt Jim Taylor CBS news in all Morrison published eleven novels and taught creative writing and literature twenty Morrison

Toni Morrison CBS Jim Taylor America Ohio Nobel Prize Barack Obama Orson President Trump
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Jim Taylor R Kelly is in jail again this time it's because he cannot pay his child support. What kind of what the hell? Dead who's trying to a relationship with you. How many kids need a related? What is your relationship? Our Kelly and Gayle king on CBS this morning. She's also interviewing a couple of women who live with Kelly, and they defend him. Both of you all believe you're in love with him. Yes. Absolutely. Of course should be concerned. Now, America's first female pilots flying combat says she was sexually assaulted by a superior officer. And now Arizona Senator Martha mcsally is talking about it on CBS this morning. To talk about it. But it isn't about me. I wanted to give it perspective of why I am advocating so strongly for a women in the military. And why I'm advocating that the command chain has to step up and do their job issuing an apology. So the Senator he is expected to officially enter the race for the White House by this time next month, New York Times reporting the presidential plans for Joe Biden, we are learning more about the Trump administration's effort to make asylum seekers, wait in Mexico. It explicitly targets Spanish speakers and people from Latin America more from CBS's Bill Rakoff, the White House launched the program in January, and what appears to be a major change in how the US handles the cases of immigrants seeking asylum reports say the guidance was found in administration memos that included structures about various groups of immigrants were not to be sent back to Mexico. They include pregnant women LGBT migrants and people who suffer medical issues, it is being described as a first judge allowing a fetus to sue live CBS's, Peter King. A probate judge in Madison County Alabama has ruled in favor of a man was then sixteen year old girlfriend ended her pregnancy at six weeks. He calls baby row a person. It says the father can see what abortion clinic ended drugmaker with the fetus as a co plaintiff. The woman's father tells the Washington Post the families distraught. The couple is no longer together. Abortion rights groups are worried about future implications. One antiabortion group says baby row was robbed of life. Jim you're walking the dog. Taking a risk new study shows broken bones from falls while dog walking or on the rise among older Americans. Emergency room visits for dog walking injuries and adults aged sixty five and older more than ten percents in the last decade if fractures among the most common injuries. S&p futures ahead of the markets opening down point and a half. This is CBS news..

Jim Taylor R Kelly CBS Gayle king Senator Martha mcsally White House Mexico Arizona Joe Biden Madison County Alabama Senator Trump administration Washington Post Bill Rakoff America New York Times Latin America Peter King US officer
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"I'm Jim Taylor government shutdown longest in US history now and the president again threatening congress. They can't do it. If at some point, they just can't do it. This is a fifteen minute meeting. If they can't do it. I will declare a national emergency congress is closed this weekend. CBS's Paula Reed. Declaring a recess. House speaker Nancy Pelosi again put the blame on the president. It's the need 'less crisis. That is inflicting pain on the American people. The president has spent the last several days highlighting what he sees as the security and humanitarian crisis on the southern border. But a new CBS news poll shows that a majority of Americans believes the border situation is a problem not a crisis and seventy one percent of them are worried about the impact the shutdown will have on the economy. I'm Peter King. Thousands of space and defense workers are off the job on Florida's. Space coast, the humming bird food pantry and Titusville is but getting more deliveries. We are intimidated that more people are going to need the pancake founder, Regina Stanford is trying to get this message to those furloughed workers. If you need help come reach out and ask for help. We are learning more about the twenty one year old man in custody in connection with the kidnapping of thirteen year old Jamie clause in the murderer of her parents CBS's Adriana Diaz is in Wisconsin, Sarah says the kidnapping was premeditated. He says the suspect tried to cover his tracks shaving his head. So he wouldn't leave any hair behind at the crime scene. But the motive remains a mystery he says, the suspect did know Jamie or her parents, but he's still specifically targeted her. The suspect appears.

CBS president Jamie kidnapping Jim Taylor US Nancy Pelosi Adriana Diaz Paula Reed Titusville Peter King Regina Stanford Florida founder Wisconsin Sarah seventy one percent twenty one year
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"ZipRecruiter. I'm Jim Taylor surprise arrests in connection with the fatal shooting of seven year old jasmine Barnes and Houston. One suspect charged with capital murder. Another man being held in custody. Both are black. And that is a surprise several independent. Witnesses had said a middle aged white male fired bullets into the Barnes family car. Family. Attorney Lee Merritt says that guy. Just a pedestrian gate. Merits concedes. It's difficult to see how that squares with the arrests of two young black males with the capital felony of capital murder. One of them. Eric lack is being arraigned right now credit to on scene TV for that. Still no walls still no end to the government shutdown CBS's Mola langey at the White House where Democrats and the administration have held another round of unproductive talk president has been all over the place in his demands. And so they're now asking for a formal budget proposal to justify this roughly five point seven billion dollars that he's asking for for the wall that is a figure that the White House does not appear to be budging on the Democrats are basically saying, let's first reopen government. And then we'll talk about the wall. There are so many ways the shutdown is affecting country. Here's CBS's. Sam Litzinger US department of agriculture says it has to delay the release of key crop reports because the partial government shutdown the announcements left, investors and farmers without vital information during an already difficult time for agriculture markets, Oklahoma farmer, Mike Spaulding, we don't have any during.

murder White House CBS jasmine Barnes Jim Taylor Sam Litzinger Eric lack department of agriculture Lee Merritt Houston Mike Spaulding US Oklahoma Attorney president seven billion dollars seven year
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"By ZipRecruiter. I'm Jim Taylor. It's the shutdown blame game president will try to do his best to blame Democrats, but it's flatly absurd. President Trump called for a shutdown. No less than twenty five times. As Democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer. This is President Trump. The Democrats we have a wonderful list of things that we need to keep our country safe. Let's get out. Let's work together. Let's be bipartisan, and let's get it done the shutdown. Hopefully will not last long how long could a partial shutdown. She as news correspondent of keeping the Senate will reconvene later today, if we don't hear about significant progress between congressional leaders in the White House by dinner time tonight. I think we're looking at a situation that probably continues up until and perhaps just beyond New Year's day. Britain's second busiest airport Gatwick. Open today following grown sightings that shut it down for a couple of days one hundred and forty thousand passengers affected. Former British army intelligence officer, Phillip Ingram our interview with BBC news. Gets into the airport area. They have to stop operations if they believe the aircraft could be in danger. A man and woman are now under arrest. The saga of James Mattis is not yet over here. CBS news military correspondent David Martin at the Pentagon still secretary of defense for two more months. And so he's still going to carry out the orders of his commander in chief in the orders are to pull out of Syria immediately. That's a pullout with which the secretary does not agree his resignation coming the day. After the president announced. It supreme court says Justice Ruth, Bader Ginsburg has had surgery to remove a couple of malignant grows from her left. Lung CBS news correspondent, we Jiang court said in a statement that Justice Ginsburg is expected to stay in the hospital for a few more days, but post-surgery there was no evidence of any additional disease and right now, no additional treatment is planned skins birds third bout with cancer since she joined the court in nineteen Ninety-three. The highest charting holiday hit in sixty years..

President Trump Justice Ginsburg president Senate CBS secretary Chuck Schumer Jim Taylor David Martin James Mattis Justice Ruth Phillip Ingram Britain British army cancer White House Syria BBC
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Jim Taylor. As the clock keeps ticking toward a partial government shutdown tonight. On this vote as are two sided congress passes a spending Bill that contains in it the five billion dollars. President Trump is demanding to build a wall on the border now to the Senate solo as we hear from CBS Bill recall senators have been told by GOP leadership to expect a vote on the house Bill sometime around mid day. But that Bill is expected to be dead on arrival. Should it not pass lawmakers would have to try again, they could pass it clean version of the Bill and once again, tried to persuade the White House to go along and hope the house does as well deadline tonight. Midnight Defense Secretary James Mattis is resigning in a very pointed letter telling the president that Mr. Trump deserve someone whose views are better aligned with kiss on FOX White House. John FOX is White House press secretary, Sarah Sanders. Always listens to his thoughts in his opinions and his advice. But at the end of the day, it's the president's decision to make because he was the one that was elected by the American people abrupt resignation the day after President Trump's decision to withdraw American troops from Syria. And now we are learning. The Pentagon is developing plans to withdraw to half of the fourteen thousand American troops in Afghanistan. CBS news military consultant, Jeff MacOS, these two things are not a coincidence. That is a precipitous withdrawal from Syria being announce berry suddenly by the president surprising that only are allow is that coalition, but the Pentagon and now withdrawal of half forces from Kansas. Stan it's the wind knocking out power in Oregon, Washington and affecting air travel on the east coast here. CBS news, weather producer, David Parkinson. These two things are not a Quin. The thing that's gonna make flying tough is absolutely going to be the wind particularly in the morning hours. So the winds going to be strongest in the New York metro area until about ten or eleven AM we could see gusts easily into. The forty fifty mile an hour range flights resuming at London's Gatwick airport this morning, even as mystery drones are still causing some chaos there. Steve berry assistant chief constable in Sussex number of lies enquiry. I'm quite positive.

President Trump Bill president White House CBS John FOX Pentagon Syria FOX White House Jim Taylor James Mattis congress Steve berry press secretary Senate New York Sarah Sanders
"jim taylor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Jim Taylor. The great running back. Packers died today. And. No that that's terrible. And I said this is the full back there could rush for thousand yards which is unheard of today. And he could you do to give fans a little take about how bruising running. He was Jim Jim Taylor. I don't think he knew pain. Okay. He couldn't have because the kind of Hicks that he dished out he punished offenders with the way, he ran. He was the four letter to John Regan's later became with the Redskins because I know because he he delivered the blow Tony that's what he did. I saw cliff with Jerry Kramer was talking about him. And he said he'd be one game. He broke out in the open field, basically had a clear Claire a run in front of him. And he saw the safety over to the right? He ran over to run over the safety. And that's blood and guts blue-collar football. And that's the way Lombardi taught it, you know, here's the thing. Barclay does not have the physical bruising type of mentality. Our type of game that that those kinds of guys hat's what Barclay has is very strong thick legs. His lower body strength is just incredible. And when you combine that with the quickness, and the Jukes, it's really even though he's got the Hampton frame, the most are the strength that he's got is in is in the size, and then the cash, and and that's where you know. He doesn't have the punishing bruising type of running style. You know, like like like Taylor would where he's not gonna hit somebody high and necessarily bowl them over or carry them for five yards. But what he will do when three guys are trying to wrap up. His legs. He will cut a drag of a couple of yards that way, it's a little bit of a different strong powerful running style. Everybody has their little their little kind of video secrecy. And that's what Barclay is. In fact, I would say it away. I just mentioned a couple of minutes ago. That's what Joe was Joe had incredibly thick legs is like tree trunks and Joe had tremendous amount of power below the waist, and so he he was not going to bowl you over with his chest at his torso. But if you tried to grab his legs, you gotta get dragged a couple of feet. I hope buffer for USA gets a quiet week with with Beckham and the rest of the giants practice. Yeah. Well, you know, Tony, I don't like the drama myself. I'm an extra those football guy. I mean, I I gotta start scouting the falcons already this weekend. I mean giants going to go down to Atlanta next weekend. So I might as well get cracking on the on the birds. You know, I mean, what else am I going to do? I don't have a game to go tomorrow. I got to fall. Thanks a lot, man. Great to talk to you. Absolutely. I follow the Tino. He covers the giants. I the one in five Johnson. The next week in the Buckley Atlanta's tomorrow, and we'll get a guy what they can do ten twenty in the PM. We got. Oh, he's telling me toss it c-, which is I was going to do. Anyway. Oh, you dick under control. Tony don't tell you. What?.

Jim Jim Taylor Barclay Tony Atlanta football Jerry Kramer Packers Hicks Joe giants Lombardi Redskins Claire John Regan Johnson USA Jukes falcons Beckham thousand yards
Jim Taylor, first of Vince Lombardi-era Green Bay Packers inducted into Hall of Fame, dies

Chicago's Business Authority Programming

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Jim Taylor, first of Vince Lombardi-era Green Bay Packers inducted into Hall of Fame, dies

"Today. Packers hall of fame fullback, Jim Taylor. Passed away this morning. He was eighty three years old. Of course, if you go back to the NFL era of over fifty years ago Jim Brown's the man in the backfield in nine seasons. He led the NFL in rushing eight times, but Jim Taylor on some superb. Vince Lombardi Packers teams did have shortened schedules. Back then five straight seasons of

Jim Taylor NFL Jim Brown Vince Lombardi Packers Eighty Three Years Fifty Years
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"I'm Jim Taylor. Controversial confirmation of bread Cavanaugh to the supreme court celebrated campaign style by the president tremendous victory for our nation. Our people. An hour. Constitution Kavanagh's God formation of fatal complete once Republican Susan Collins, let her yes vote be known. She tells CBS face the nation. And it's been overwhelming on both sides. I've heard from people that I haven't heard from many many decades. And I've heard from a lot of protesters said well as people who support my essentially entire spectacle. So big so emotional political analyst, Larry Steinhorn predicts a lasting political effects of a Trump based has been organized and motivated get out to vote potentially. Put a wall up against the Blue Wave or whether women are so motivated by the confirmation of judge cavenaugh that they will go out and large numbers organized get out the vote, and ultimately put a democratic majority and either in the house or the Senate secretary of state Mike Pompeo, wrapping up another trip to North Korea. By most counts, the luncheon date with Kim Jong UN went pretty well. CBS's Errol Barnett secretary Pompeo had a warmer. Welcome by North Korean officials. This time around the back in July when champion Kim Jong effectively stood him up. This time Kim Jong Hoon and secretary Pompeo had a two hour lunch. They appear to be quite cordial. Each other in front of cameras before cameras were then told to leave the room unrest at the highest levels of the Catholic church. Canadian cardinal has written a new three page letter accusing an Italian archbishop who cold on has to resign of mounting political frame job devoid of real foundation cardinal Mark said in his letter that archbishop paddle Maria vegan accusations that the pope was aware of US cardinal Theodore McCarrick misconduct, three years amounted to calumny, Andy. Automation Sabina castle. Franken CBS news round the option was not just in the cage at a mixed martial arts showdown in Las Vegas last night. It was all over the arena CBS combat sports writer Brian Campbell. Was there was a scary Malay? This was a mainly that actually spilled over into press row as various fans were jumping the barricade after pinning. Former champion Conor McGregor to win the fights Bieb normally Gummatov waiting into the audience to fight with someone from MacGregor's corner. And then a couple of Khabib Zawahri's jumped into the cage to tumble McGregor. This is CBS news. To experience relief. From muscle cramps in your legs and feet, use theraworx relief fast acting foam get theraworx relief today in the pain relief file at your local pharmacy or theraworxrelief dot com. State.

Mike Pompeo CBS Kim Jong Kim Jong UN secretary Kim Jong Hoon Susan Collins Conor McGregor Jim Taylor political analyst president US Errol Barnett cardinal Mark Theodore McCarrick Kavanagh Senate Sabina castle
"jim taylor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"CBS news. On the hour sponsored by, Quicken Loans I'm Jim Taylor today we thank you The gift of Senator John Sidney, McCain the United States Senate, chaplain acknowledging the respect in those chambers for Senator John McCain the accolades nearly universal today flags. Flying at half staff and a lot of places. In America until a few hours ago that was not the case at the White House then an apparent reversal of policy CBS's Elaine. Key Connell, President Trump released, a statement on the passing of Senator, McCain late Monday afternoon it reads in part quote, despite our differences on policy and politics I respect Senator John McCain service to our country and in his honor have signed a proclamation to fly. The flag of the United States at half staff until the day, of his, interment in-depth, John McCain, leaves us one final message details from CBS's Steve Futterman John McCain's longtime adviser Rick Davis red McCain's final words to the, American people do not despair of our present difficulties looking didn't mention President Trump by name but. Some of the comments. Seem to folk Focus on, the nation's, current political discourse we weaken our greatness when we confuse, our patriotism with tribal rivalries, McCain statement ended with these words sir well fellow Americans God bless you and God bless America. Steve Futterman CBS news Phoenix out of the blue. Today a trade agreement with Mexico say really good deal for both countries and we look very much forward to it president's administration still. Needs to, negotiate with the, other partner in NAFTA Canada to become, any part of a new trade accord he barely, spoke to fellow gamers the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Florida video game tournament Jacksonville sheriff Mike Williams says he was well armed to. Handguns and extra ammunition into the establishment with him however this point, we believe, he only, fired one, handgun.

Senator John McCain Senator John Sidney President Trump CBS Steve Futterman America United States Senate Senator Mike Williams Quicken president Jim Taylor United States Mexico Key Connell White House Phoenix NAFTA Elaine
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Videoconferencing Jim Taylor the politics of a security clearance and the taking away of a security clearance here's CBS's Tom Foty in Washington President Trump, ordering his security clearance pulled. And with more of the same threatened against other ex-officials bowel critical of. The president former CIA chief John Brennan perhaps the most critical of those ex-officials is not inclined to. Let up I am going to do, whatever I. Can personally to try to. Prevent these abuses and a future and. If it remains going to. Court I will I will do that Brennan now a regular contributor to NBC on it's meet the press program I have been contacted by number of. Lawyers about the basis for a complaint and, injunction to try. To prevent him from doing this in the future Tom Foty, CBS news Washington about the. Revelations White House counsel Don Mcgann spent a lot of time. Testifying, before special counsel Robert Muller and. His investigation the president encouraged him, to testify is happy that he did yeah Is quite secure that there, is nothing, in the testimony that will hurt the president current personal lawyer President Trump Rudy. Giuliani on, NBC if the election were to be held today Democrats could take back the house of representatives Kabeer Connor manager of elections for CBS CBS news, is estimating that Democrats would. Win two hundred twenty two seats and Republicans would win the remaining two. Hundred and thirteen seats if the election were held today US forces will stay in Iraq as long. As needed help stabilize areas previously held, by ISIS. CBS news military consultant retired army major Mike lion to me means. That the US government is. Going to really take a long-term approach about how it wants to make sure ISIS never returned to Iraq and give your Raqi government is much stability. It can possibly can to fight that enemy, more than five thousand US troops are currently based in Iraq some beaches near, New York, City reopening now. After being closed due to.

CBS president President Trump Rudy US Iraq Tom Foty John Brennan NBC Robert Muller Washington Jim Taylor special counsel CIA Don Mcgann White House Mike lion Giuliani Kabeer Connor New York
"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Theraworx relief I'm Jim Taylor the president's caustic reaction to the news continues to be the news about the revelation former White House counsel spent a lot of time testifying before the special counsel cure CBS is Allison key president lashes. Out at, the New York Times over story he says made it seem like the White House counsel, at turned on the. President when, in fact it's just the opposite he tweets this is why the fake news media has become the. Enemy of the people so bad for America he adds some members of the media are. Very angry and actually called to complain apologize Mr.. Trump tweets that Muller and his gang, may Joseph, McCarthy looked, like, baby rigged witch-hunt Alison keys, CBS news Washington, pushing back against the president. Former CIA director John Brennan after being Unser. Ammonia Asli, stripped of his national security clearance, he says you'll fight back asked. On NBC whether that means going to court I am going to do whatever I can personally To try to prevent these abuses in the future and if it remains going to court I will. I will, do that CBS news battleground tracker Democrats have a slight edge in the fight for the, control of the house. Representatives in, two thousand eighteen US forces will stay in Iraq as long as needed Colonel Sean Ryan telling a. News conference in Abu Dhabi they will be helping to stab will stabilize areas previously held. By ISIS CBS news military consultant retired army major. Mike lions to me means that the, US government, is going, to, really take a long-term approach, about how it, wants to make sure ISIS. Never returned to Iraq and give you Iraqi. Government is, much stability it can possibly can, to fight that enemy more.

CBS president White House special counsel Iraq US New York Times Abu Dhabi Jim Taylor Mike lions CIA Colonel Sean Ryan NBC Alison keys America John Brennan Muller Washington director
"jim taylor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Two new children's books. Are, coming out adding pictures to the words of Lennon and McCartney All you need is love features illustrations by. Mark Rosenthal comes out in January the, second book will be announced at a future date Kids, picture book. Based on Beatles songs in. Two thousand fourteen Ringo Starr. Collaborated with an illustrator on an adaptation of octopus. Garden Jim Taylor CBS news. It sounds, good. To me busy news time five. Eleven we head over to the ace hticket. Dot com sports studio and Adam Kaufman good morning sir Good morning to you about forty percent left in the regular season the MLB all-star breaks. Over in the baseball leading Red Sox get back to work in Detroit tonight seven, ten to begin a six game trip David price to take the, mound in search of his eleventh win opposite Matthew Boyd SOX have won seventeen of twenty year. Only four and a half games, back in. The eastern, for that, matter, for the best. Record in the entire all of major league baseball they will face the. Mets subway series in the, Bronx trade deadline less than two weeks away Indians bolstered their bullpen. With all star closer, Brad, hand and reliever Adam Cimber from the Padres Celtics officially resigned Marcus smart four years fifty two million dollars the guard did not, receive any offers elsewhere as a restricted free agent he averaged about ten points five assists and four rebounds as a fourth year pro last year thunder reportedly trading Carmelo Anthony and a protected, two thousand, twenty two. First round pick to the. Hawks for Dennis Schroder and. Mike mascola Anthony will be waived and then likely. Signed with the rockets Scala will be,.

Adam Kaufman Ringo Starr Red Sox Mike mascola Anthony Mark Rosenthal Carmelo Anthony Dennis Schroder SOX Jim Taylor Lennon Matthew Boyd Mets Adam Cimber MLB McCartney Bronx Hawks Padres Detroit Brad
"jim taylor" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Jim taylor police a lock saying oh yeah that that cata goal the chemical what dimmed till police a lock saying to silica used at mcdonald's fry oil against ciller to prevent splashing can be used to massproduce hair follicles now they've only tried it on months but they're saying little work on cable and it will be grow it hair release oh yeah yeah so that uh the experiment resulted in thousands of simultaneous hair follicles being grown so it's not bad for you just grows hair right correct well i'll be that's what that's what they believe now you walk around i definitely had a french fry we haven't we haven't had we haven't had the human tests yet but they he said the the professor a june gifu fukada now yang said that we use oxygen permeable michael jim taylor police a lock saying that the bottom of the culture russell and at were great so i would be ready to our rub dim till police a lock saying no lower that were really grow here so i mean it does explained donald trump below bit anyway the good weekend to be in times square to i know uh uh sometimes you know you feel like these i don't really want to be in new york city it's obama arms but a naked people are going to be taking over time of square this weekend soviet good time to show up this weekend well as an art project this week air shirts other weekends is not an art project home dozens of men and women clad only at elaborate body paint see that's kinda i mean covering everything a put paid time square saturday of the first ever polar bear paint party man does that sound fun doesn't it doesn't it drinking eddie golds nonprofit human connection arts.

mcdonald professor Jim taylor yang michael jim taylor donald trump new york obama
"jim taylor" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"To see an abundance of sunshine turning warmer for the afternoon hours with a high saturday of 61 degrees i'm accuweather meteorologist danielle knittle verse hughes chris plante to new york times goes the mind of donald trump as is pretty crazy stuff they're nuts people close to him estimate that mr trump spends at least four hours a day and sometimes twice that in front of a television sometimes with the volume muted every news executive has the television on in front of them all day long to keep tabs on what's going on out there listen to chris plante mornings at nine following first news with kevin miller on news radio one or two point nine karn reporter's notebook i'm jim taylor the carnage at sandy hook elementary school in newtown connecticut five years ago today shocked even a country numbed by the regularity of school shootings twenty first graders six of their educators killed in cold blood we listened in disbelief as first reports of a shooting at the school became every parent's worst nightmare several children said to be shot and killed and then twenty of them massacred as they huddled in their first great classroom in the aftermath of the sandy hook shootings district's have moved to bolster security especially to elementary schools which traditionally have not had police assigned to them those who keep tabs on such things say mass shootings are not more frequent but they are more deadly in just the five years since the sandy hook shooting shocked americans and renewed national debate about the role of firearms and meant all illness four more of the deadliest mass shootings in modern us history have taken place two of them.

chris plante new york times donald trump executive kevin miller reporter jim taylor sandy hook elementary school connecticut accuweather danielle knittle five years 61 degrees four hours
"jim taylor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Report i'm jim taylor massachusetts congressman set maltin says he will not join his colleagues in moments of silence on the floor and him more he says is just an excuse for in action he is praying though he says for congress to have the courage to do more about gun laws wbz's bernice core pools cut up with molten and it's this report simply do your job at allow of vote on these on these bill that's congressman multan's message to speaker paul ryan just have a debate that's our job is blaming the republican leadership for getting in the way of tougher gun laws like reading universal background checks for gun buyers when nine out of ten americans believe we ought to have universal background checks for guns then let's have a vote on that in congress maltin says he's working on a bipartisan bill that would prevent terrorists from buying guns but he says even that is struggling to move forward we can respect the second amendment and still have common sense measures to prevent gun violence in boston bernie scorpio's wbz newsradio 1030 and congressman joe kennedy says enough is enough he agrees with molten it's time for action on gun control how come but he could act as a lone shooter inder five class people in a minute dummy it is horrifying and at a certain point i think we have to ask ourselves up at the fiery if you're the type of rick we are women a quick neighbors fellow american at by saying if you go to a free concert you have to be aware of the fact that that might happen the white house says this is not the time to talk about gun control earlier president trump tweeted quote my warmest condolences to the victims and families wbz news time 503 traffic and weather together and it's nicole davis with the subaru retailers of new england allwheel drive traffic.

congressman congress multan paul ryan second amendment bernie scorpio joe kennedy rick white house trump nicole davis jim taylor massachusetts maltin boston president
"jim taylor" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm jim taylor skinner in this is the electorate today i have a conversation with rebecca walter pozzo sees a legal analyst his provided legal and political commentary on cnn and msnbc she's also written for the atlantic the pacific standard and politico we talk about several of our articles today including of books she coauthored james carville titles forty more years democrats will rule the next generation it was published in two thousand nine but many of the observations she made are still valid without about threats to civil rights and to lgbtq riots in relation to the supreme court also talk about the fact that rebecca has been blocked by truck on twitter she tweeted something about russia he blocked her and then she sued so without further ado here is rebecca walter puzo rebecca welcome to the podcast thank you so much for having me on jan sarah one of several people who is saying trump for blocking them on twitter so what was the tweet what got you blocked a wealth or president as as he is wont to do matorral friends to how he won the white house and i just quoted him and said to be fair you didn't win the white house russia want it for you right some period after that ira i discovered i've been blocked and i'm i'm pretty sure that was the tweet earlier there is a not not much time in between and and that guy had enough thousands of like senator he tweets that i'm fairly confident that's that's what got me block but that's actually pretty interesting because that means you have quite a bit of social capital i would not be blocked by the president right so how did the lawsuit come about.

jim taylor skinner rebecca walter pozzo analyst cnn civil rights rebecca russia twitter senator president james carville rebecca walter puzo
"jim taylor" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"I'm jim taylor postpone again a boat on the republican health care bill because the boats are not there and in part because senator john mccain is not there surgery recovery in arizona cbs's nancy cortas all wrapped guard aired allow people current turn about they have them could could i it gives a gop governor who have a big problem for medicaid carpet in the dail more time to talk to their republican senator say it anyway a break founder arm there's a lot of opposition out there in the country villa delicate police well republicans senator susan collins says it's not just mccain's vote that's needed either bear foued aid ted tan republican saturdary who have serious concerns about this bell collins on cnn that meeting with russians in trump tower the emails preceding it within the trump family and trump campaign democratic senator mark warner take the president his son has not been forthcoming about this meaning at first he said it was about russian adoptions at first there was indication that was just four people it was actually many more people we don't know what transpired in that meeting warner on cbs's face the nation just how bad are those flood water source i've ever seen in my life i've been here for four there is now two thousand eight was kinda like this but not as high as bad as this is in burlington wisconsin floodwaters beginning to recede there that's what people living north of chicago or waiting and hoping for is well the desk planes river cresting at a record twelve point two feet senator dick durban during flooddamaged communities in lake county and warning local officials don't tell people the federal government has the right to.

dick durban flooddamaged wisconsin burlington senator susan collins founder gop jim taylor federal government lake county senator john mccain chicago president senator mark warner cnn senator nancy cortas cbs arizona two feet
"jim taylor" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"jim taylor" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"I'm jim taylor mozell iraq's second largest city retaken from isis today raunch allow dean is a fellow at the brookings institute the liberation open the school claiming he knocked up the recapturing unprepared keep up the endo isis control of territory mideast expert phyllis venice at the institute for policy studies says retaking mozell is only one part of a much larger puzzle represents a huge political defeat for the leadership it doesn't represent an end to their capacity to wreak havoc conditions are the worst for fighting fire very hot very humid and the cia bahrain the firefighters are facing in some areas is quite steep public information officer for the alamo fire santa barbara county california kirk storm this is michael coley yanni reporter for kco white she devaluation orders are in place at least two hundred people have already been forced to leave their homes at the red cross evacuation center in santa maria ryan column tells us six people stay there friday night were open for the duration of the fire the majority of the most threatened homes are in the heart of the fire now many of these people have already been evacuated and will be coming back to their homes anytime soon about a thousand firefighters on the scene and more are on the way drift 48 hours after president trump had a conversation with president putin about north korea among other things you an ambassador nikki haley says this about that although very telling us to weather china works with us which we are hoping that well and on wall now in the next couple eyeballs whether that's going to build a case whether russia's gonna stand with north korea and aol and just oppose us for the sake of opposing us our weather every vitals going to say once and for all to north korea stop this is reckless the'responsible and we're not gonna take it anymore haley on cbs's face the nation during a conversation the russian president denying meddling in the us election here secretary of state rex tillerson can did this we did not expect an answer other than the.

jim taylor secretary of state us aol santa maria michael coley california santa barbara county cia phyllis venice brookings institute iraq president cbs russia nikki haley north korea president putin trump reporter officer dean 48 hours