17 Burst results for "Jim Lindsey"

"jim lindsey" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

05:12 min | 8 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on Why It Matters

"It matters listeners. So we're at a mid point in our season working fast and furious on new episodes but in the meantime. Did you know that. The council has other podcasts. You might be interested in. One of them is called the president's inbox. It's the council's interview. Show hosted each week by our director of studies. Jim lindsey well this week. We're going to run a full episode of. Tpi on our feet so that you can check it out yourself and to tell you more about it. Here is jim himself. Hey jim gabrielle. I'm really excited to finally have the president's inbox on our wyatt matters airwaves so for those who aren't already familiar. Can you tell us just a bit about you. Know your show. What is the show about. Happy to gabrielle. Is great to be joining you on wyatt matters you doing great work. I love to listen the presence. Inboxes an interview podcast. Each week i sit down for about thirty minutes with an expert to discuss a major foreign policy challenge facing the united states. My guess included former government officials activists authors and historians both from the united states and broad. Our goal in the show is to have an engaging conversation a big topic and to give our listeners insights into the opportunities dangers in trade offs. That confront policymakers while i'm really excited to play an episode. So can you just tell us a little bit about the one. Everyone is to hear the episode. That listeners are about to hear features conversation. I had back in august with rose godmother about the future of nuclear arms control. We sat down and discussed how much the nuclear arms control debate is change in recent years. In how the biden administration to respond to a whole new set of issues now many people listening to us. may know that the only bilateral agreement that exists between the united states in russia is the new start treaty. That's the one that washington and moscow renewed for a final five years back in february. Is that's happening. Both the united states. In russia in the midst major nuclear weapons modernization programs developments on the technological fronta blurring the lines between conventional and nuclear weapons in china's expanding its nuclear arsenal turning. What had been a bilateral rivalry into a trilateral. So lots to talk about great well. I'm super excited to hear it. And thank you so much for stopping by lending us your episode. Happy to join gabrielle. And i hope listeners. Enjoy the episode. Thanks jim.

Jim lindsey jim gabrielle wyatt united states biden administration gabrielle jim russia moscow washington china
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:29 min | 8 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see a for podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is rethinking. Us defense strategy with me to discuss whether in how the united states should revise its defense strategy to face. its current challenges is albert colby. Bridges co-founder in principle of the marathon initiative which seeks to reveal the united states for an era of great power competition from two thousand eighteen to two thousand nineteen. He was the director of the defense program at the center for new american security before that bridge served as deputy assistant secretary defense strategy enforced development where he led the develop enroll out of the two thousand eighteen national defense strategy. His new book. The strategy of denial american defense in age of great power conflict is out today bridge. Congratulations on the publication of your book and welcome back to the presence inbox. many thanks jim. Great to be back on. Now you open the book by posing a question quote you here. What is the best defense strategy for the united states. That's obviously a critical question. And whenever we talk about strategy a strategy has to fit the circumstances it's designed to meet so let's begin our conversation there. How do you see the current strategic situation of the united states. Thanks jim i mean. I think it's pretty mismatched. If not are less. I would say. I mean fundamentally we in a way. Continue to act as if it's the one thousand nine hundred the two thousands where we have a sort of global engagement strategy and certainly a heavy forward defence strategy in the three kind of key theaters around eurasian particular asia europe and the middle east. But the reality is that we're very far from the union polar moment. I think it pretty evident a decade ago. That that moment was fading with the rise of china in particular. But now we see a really dramatic mismatch. And i think it's well past time in fact it's almost becoming. I'd say it's an emergency honestly without exaggeration to right size and rightly orient our defense strategy to avoid frustration and i think potentially disaster. I wanna pursue that because there's a lot there but perhaps you could sort of go at it and bite size chunks first thing that jumps out at me. Is that when you wrote your book. Your subtitle mentions great power conflict now. What i'm used to hearing is the term great-power competition and there's a bit of difference between conflict in competition..

united states jim lindsey albert colby Bridges co center for new american securi council on foreign relations jim middle east asia europe china
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a a for a podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council and or relations. This week's topic is china's wolf warrior. Diplomacy with me discussed the growing assertiveness of china's diplomacy in recent years is peter martin peters reporter for bloomberg news. He has previously been based in beijing where he wrote extensively on. Us china relations and reported from china's borders with north korea. Incheon jaw is new book which came out in june is china's civilian army the making a wolf warrior diplomacy peter graduation on the publication of your book. And thanks for speaking with me. Thanks so much for having me on the show a pr have to say in. Reading china civilian army. I was struck with your description of chinese diplomat's. I'm used to reading about american foreign policy. In the politics of american foreign policy where diplomats in the united states are often derided as pinstriped. T- sipping cookie pushers china's diplomats have earned the label wolf warriors. Which conjures up quite a different image. So how did china's diplomats come by that nickname. Yes so the wolf relabel has been around since about twenty seventeen and it actually comes from a movie wolf worry it to which was kind of a rambo like action movie which depicted these chinese heroes. Battling for bad guys. On the continent of africa annan's i guess that movie came to represent is new strident assertive moment. That china was having at the start of the trump presidency and of the pain general and as chinese diplomats around the world started to act in a similarly kind of combative sensitive strident way about label was applied to them and and really they kind of became symbols of this new asserted strident approach. That china was taking across the world. Okay the word that just jumped out at me. Peter strident so. Can you give us a couple of examples of this wolf. Warrior strident diplomacy inaction. Yeah so i mean. Chinese diplomats have walked out of international meetings. They shouted at foreign counterparts..

china jim lindsey council and or relations peter martin peters united states bloomberg news Incheon north korea beijing africa Peter
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox and see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is ethiopia's civil war. With being discussed the fighting in northern ethiopia between federal government forces in regional tigray enforces is michelle gavin. Michelle is senior fellow for africa studies at the council. She was previously managing director of the center from two thousand eleven to two thousand fourteen. She was us ambassador botswana where she served concurrently as the us representative to the southern african development community before that michelle was a special assistant to president barack obama in the senior director for africa on the staff of the national security council michelle. Thanks you being here. Thanks so much for having michelle. Afghanistan is dominated news. As we're speaking so i think a lot of people haven't heard or followed what's been happening in ethiopia. Maybe we could just start by laying out for us. How things currently stand in ethiopia. Sure well unfortunately the situation ethiopia has really gone from bad to worse so fighting that began last november between the two gray enforces in the state of tigray in ethiopia and federal government forces very quickly brought in additional armed groups that would be military of country of eritrea. But also some emperor militia what we have now are even more actors even more armed groups involved in the fighting and we have a geographics sort of expansion of the conflict beyond the borders of tigray itself into a far and amhara states that border on tigray so essentially you have more armed elements in the mix fighting over a larger swath of territory the humanitarian crisis. Which is captured so much of the world's attention persists and in some ways has gotten worse as the sort of chokepoints for bringing food and other types of assistance to people in need have essentially narrowed down to one. There is one way that we're getting humanitarian assistance to tigray and it's not getting in fast enough with talk about how we got to the stage later. We can talk about where we're likely to go. Potential for diplomatic mediation the rest. But i'm trying to understand why the fighting broke out in the first place. Now ethiopia's the country of roughly one hundred ten million people. I have seen estimates that ethiopia has as many as ninety different ethnic groups tigray estate in northern part of ethiopia tigrayans constitute about five percent of the ethiopian population. How is we ended up in a situation which such a small group of people is in a battle with the central government. Well you have to step back in ethiopian history. A bit history is going to be love history on the presence. Inbox great stuff..

ethiopia michelle tigray jim lindsey michelle gavin council on foreign relations africa united states southern african development c amhara national security council botswana barack obama eritrea Afghanistan central government
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:43 min | 9 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's. Inbox is see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is the biden administrations democracy strategy with me to discuss. President biden's vowed to put democracy at the forefront of us. Foreign policy is france's. E brown francis is a senior fellow in co director of the democracy conflict in governance program at the carnegie endowment for international peace. She previously served as director for democracy in fragile states on the staff of the national security council in the obama in trump administration's she also served in the us agency for international development's office of transition initiatives last month foreign affairs. Dot com published. Francis has co-authored article. Washington's democracy dilemma crafting a democracy strategy in age of great power politics francis. Thanks for joining me. Terrific debate here. Jim thanks so much. Let's begin by talking about what it is. The president biden has said he is going to do in terms of democracy promotion defense. In how it compares with that of his predecessor. Donald trump so president biden has been really forthright. As you mentioned. Jim saying that his administration will be focused on democracy as a central plank of their agenda. And i think. I can speak for my co author of the article. You mentioned tom carruthers and myself and saying that we welcome that. This is a really positive development in our view because democracy has been on the decline globally particularly over the last fifteen years. We can talk more about why and then in particular the trump administration did not help the trump administration certainly did not make the us a poster child for democracy around the globe so we welcome that focus on global democracy from the biden administration. And what our article is really spelling out. Is that with that. High level focus now comes getting down to brass tacks. How does that actually turn into a foreign policy. Agenda will fridges. I'm glad that you sit up front that you approve of what. President biden is proposing to do simply. Because it doesn't leave me having to guess where you come down on the issue. But i want to address at the front. The skepticism that many people have about putting democracy at the front of american foreign policy seems to meaning that there are at least two schools of criticism. One is what. I might call the effectiveness argument that the united states talks about democracy promotion but that are historical record actually is in very good that other than helping midwife democracies in germany japan after world war two. Most of the rest of our efforts did not prove to be successful in many ways for example the invasion of iraq made things much much worse the other criticism might be categorized as their propriety. Objection that is. It's not our business to tell other people or other countries how they should run their internal affairs. How do you respond as someone who believes in the need to promote democracy to those objections. Yeah so those objections. Jim are certainly well taken. And i think there's a lot there. So i on the effectiveness argument. The biden administration has been very clear. They're not looking for a reduction version of the bush forty three administrations democracy promotion agenda and was the so called freedom agenda precisely. Yeah so secretary of state..

President biden biden jim lindsey brown francis international development's of tom carruthers carnegie endowment for interna biden administration council on foreign relations us Jim national security council Donald trump Francis france francis obama Washington germany japan
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

05:15 min | 10 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a cf for podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is the future of arms control with me discussed the efforts to regulate if not eliminate nuclear weapons. Is rose gottemoeller. Rose is the pain. Distinguished lecture at stanford university's freeman spoil the institute for international studies in center for international security in cooperation from two thousand sixteen to two thousand nineteen. She was deputy secretary general of nato before that she served for nearly five years is the under secretary for arms control international security at the us state department in two thousand nine and two thousand ten. She was the chief. Negotiator of the new strategic arms reduction treaty. Better known as new. Start with russia. That experience is something. She relates in her recently published memoir negotiating new star treaty. Which was released. this past. May rose thank you very much for talking with me. It's my pleasure. Jim narrows i wanna talk about the new start treaty. But in a moment. I to begin with the big question which is really the one about the future of arms control. We've both been around for a while. We came of age in error in which a lot of nuclear agreements were negotiated. The big import months obviously the superpower treaties between first united states and soviet union than united states in russia but over years a number of those treaties have been terminated. The us withdrew from the abm treaty. Back in two thousand in one recently pulled out of the intermediate nuclear forces treaty also left. The sky should which is not specifically a nuclear weapons treaty. Have we come to the end of the age of arms control. I don't think so jim. I think it's important to pay attention to what. Us national security interests are and if they are served by a nuclear arms control treaty. Then we should continue to negotiate them. I do want to stress. Sat the new start treaty which continues enforces one where the russians are continuing to comply with the treaty. Very well but that is the key question if our counterpart countries are not complying with the treaty if they are violating the treaty then seizes to serve you as national security interests. And that's exactly what happened. In the case of the imf treaty for example that the russians had begun violating the treaty with a new a new missile. So it was important. I think for the united states to take some steps. But that's always for me. That's always the ruler that you check. Does it serve. Us national security interests and is the other party complying with the treaty. So let's talk about the new start treaty. Then rose could you. Just i walk us through. What the treaty does in what it succeeded..

jim lindsey rose gottemoeller institute for international st us state department united states Jim narrows council on foreign relations stanford university russia nato soviet union jim imf
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

03:06 min | 10 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is protests in cuba with me discussed the historic protests. That swept across cuba on july eleven or paul angelo and carmen sec- policy fellow for latin. America studies here at the council. He is a graduate of the us naval academy he served in the. Us navy in is now a commander select in the us naval reserve. Carmen is journalists based in miami. She hasn't reporting for. Nbc news dot com nbc latino for almost a decade. She covers cuba and latin american. More broadly as well as you as politics in latino vote pauling carmen. Thanks for joining me. Today it's great to be here. Thanks for having this jim. Pleasure to be here with carm- carmen want to begin with you. If i may. I not just a moment ago that earlier this month we had historic protests. All across cuba. Could you give us a sense of where things stand now. Several weeks later right now. People are not protesting any longer. There is still a police presence on the streets not as strong as it was immediately action of protests there almost six hundred people. That are still detained. Some reportedly being held incommunicado as Some allegations of minors having been detained so people who are fifteen sixteen seventeen years old jamaica anything in the fec carman that people are not going back out on the streets. I think right now blur afraid to go back out on the streets. I think people are focused on the detentions who has been detained. Who has received a summary trial and sentenced to maybe a year in prison. I think that's the focus i think. The protests were so unexpected. That people are still kind of regrouping analyzing what happens taking a step back and seeing how they can move forward but there's definitely fear ought to go out in the streets against protests. Paul me bring you in here right now. Maybe you could help us understand the scope of the riots but just as important why you think they happened now sunday. July eleventh was an unprecedented historic bank cuba in something that historians will be talking about for decades in much. The same way that we talk about the mariel boatlift Nineteen ninety four and it was unprecedented display of displeasure on an island. Where such have historically been taboo and met with repression were discontent is often expressed whispers. I'd say that the recent protest movement is unique particularly given its pervasive. That wasn't a protest. That was isolated. Just once you're province but people took to the streets all over the country when the protest. I started the humanitarian. Climate was very much front of mind. This particular moment initiated in matanzas scenario country facing major forged medical supplies in also area of the country were cohen infection. Rate is about three times. The national average videos started circulating on social media depicting the overcrowding of hospitals overwhelmed medical staff the hashtag sos contest starting trending on social media and was the initial impetus for people to come out to the streets and start making demands of their corn..

cuba jim lindsey paul angelo carmen sec pauling carmen us us naval academy council on foreign relations Nbc news Carmen nbc carmen navy fec miami jim jamaica Paul matanzas
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if afar podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is greeting the biden foreign policy today. Mark six months. Since joe biden was inaugurated as president with me to assess how administration's foreign policy is faring. So far is daniel. Dresden dana's professor of international politics the fletcher school of law and diplomacy at tufts university. A nonresident fellow at the brookings institution in a contributor to the washington post. He has written widely in well in too many journals and newspapers to recount. He has if. I have a number right eight books to his name. The most recent being taught during chief what donald trump teaches about the modern presidency and you may have caught him occasionally on morning south dan. Thanks join me. Thanks for having me as noted in the introduction today mark six months since joe biden took the oath of office which if my math is right means that one eighth of the biden presidency or at least his first term is in the books. How would you assess the biden presidency. So far dan given your college professor used to grading people of a college professor. I'm gonna. It's so tempting to give easy out and say i'm going to give him an incomplete because it's only six months but if if we assume that the the term ended now i think i would give him a solid b. Plus part of that is because biden in some ways. This is gonna sound weird but biden came into the office with expectations about as low as humanly possible. Which is you know if you remember he. He was inaugurated. there was no one. At the inauguration there was a pandemic ravaging the country. The country was still recovering from the immediate events of january six on not to mention the four years of trump administration. Chaos i think we could would be the right word to use in terms of foreign policy and so the question is given all of that..

biden jim lindsey Dresden dana fletcher school of law joe biden council on foreign relations tufts university the washington post donald trump daniel united states Mark dan
"jim lindsey" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"And that was the agency they used to recruit people so I left round form. And yet they let me go they showed they should be the door for the Five years of growth with jack Yeah it was like. I don't wanna get too personal that it was like okay. I grew my brand like a six hundred thousand cases in the southern comfort. Guy lost three hundred thousand cases and he got promoted got fired. It's like. I don't think we're basing this on results so anyway but it all worked out at the end and i still have a lot of good friends of brow form and i still get a pension from them. And i'm i'm drink woodford last night so you know there's no hard feelings not a lot of good memories when you Win on so what things. About maker's mark and bill samuels is that he's famous for like having this personality tests for people that would come. Did you take the personality town. You had to take the personality tests. I mean that was like the door opener right. The oliver groups sent you the personality tests. It's a two pager right and it lists maybe fifty or a hundred forget different thanks aggressive passive Gregarious patient non patient. You know different things and you would check which ones you were. You know anything right. You decide if that's you. Check it if it's not you don't check it and you send it in. It's called the predictive index. And they had done it back in the fifties and measured four different Personality traits. So i won it was. You're a factor. Measured your Your your billy to start up to think through things they drop you off in the woods. they come back a month later in your subsistence farming. You've had a you know you. Dan up in your hip fish. And you know the shelter and you're doing the whole thing right if you're a low a you're still sitting there waiting for somebody to tell you what to do right. So here's how much of a self starter. How aware are you to get things done. Your be factor was her gregarious. See factor was your patients In your d factor was structure in detail. And so what they try to do as match up people to the right The right personality traits. So if you hiring account you want somebody to be very structured very detail ranted. Try email care if they're have good. People skills are not. You're sitting in a room all day right so he would try to match those things up so you initially had to pass that before you could even get in the door And it wasn't that hard. I mean i was going for a sales job right so it was like i'm aggressive. Yeah i'm going. Yeah i'm you know it's i but it was So i pass that interviewed with the the our group and and then Eventually got hired i i. It was a a thorough process. I mean he interviewed me. He had Jim lindsey interview me with doe anderson Several of the people he was close to daniels at the time had interview with add up the parties at his house and he wanna see how i interacted with people He had my wife come out..

Jim lindsey doe anderson three hundred thousand cases fifty six hundred thousand cases Five years last night a hundred fifties a month later bill samuels jack woodford daniels four Personality traits two Several of the
"jim lindsey" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on WJR 760

"Boeing CEO Dennis Muhlenberg has stepped down after a tumultuous year in which the company faced a series of setbacks including delays in the numerous issues with the seven thirty seven MAX airplane and its starcraft spacecraft Stearman C. E. O. good Calhoun David Calhoun will take over as CEO effective January thirteenth Boeing said in a press release that its board of directors decided to change in leadership was necessary to restore confidence Boeing seven thirty seven Max which was designed to be the company's primary commercial aircraft had been grounded worldwide since a March nineteen two aircraft fatal crashes there a spacecraft and the company's building the ferry NASA astronauts to the international space station also malfunction last week during its first ever space trip the un crude test flight was intended to be the final major test before is ready to fly humans the starliner is years behind schedule the impeachment saga continues as the sun and waits for the house passed articles of impeachment against the president but they have not deliver them to the Senate speaking to fox news Sunday Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Jim Lindsey Graham says he doesn't believe the Senate will call former top administration officials to testify at president drums impeachment trial if you call these witnesses who work for the president after he's invoked executive privilege if you deny him his day in court then you're abusing the constitutional rights of Donald Trump as president and you putting the entire presidency at risk I can't imagine any senator doing this to the presidency online you can build a package deliveries are a sign of the times but they also pose a new security problem W. J. R.'s gene for will explains it's a crime has become all too common today people stealing packages that have been left on porches prosecutors say thirty sexual chase Basham of Belleville has been charged with stealing packages from at least eight porches in Van Buren township all on the same day they say the faster Kurt between one and two in the afternoon back on December eighteenth and involve packages ranging in value from two hundred dollars up to one thousand dollars he was arraigned yesterday and sixteen Chargers and he's due back in court January second Jean thought will WJR news who stole the surfing center home surveillance cameras showed a man ripping off a tropical theme set of decoration from the front lawn of an Allen park home including three flamingos palm trees and Santa on water skis all but disappeared in under one minute on Wall Street this morning stocks continue on their upward trend the Dow was up a hundred and six the S. and P. is ahead for can wriggle ski W. J. R. news back to Chris run wake in two minutes the.

Kurt Chris Allen park WJR Van Buren Basham executive Senate Judiciary Committee fox Stearman C. E. O. MAX Santa Jean Chargers Dennis Muhlenberg Belleville W. J. R. senator Donald Trump
"jim lindsey" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Clap on planters back. Saying that Trump is now encouraging Russia meddle in the twenty twenty lection. Yeah. Yeah. We also have Senate Republicans racing to distance themselves from the president suggestion, that would accept information. He said, he'd look at it what he said. Jim Lindsey Graham, the close ally of Trump's called the president's comments wrong said he spoke to Trump on Thursday. They'll be today about it. Reiterated that he should call the F B I a foreign government tries to offer information on an opponent. Basically, what I told him is this? You don't need to call the FBI 'cause somebody says they want to help your campaign, you need to call the FBI when somebody's trying to provide something of value to you that you think is inappropriate. He added that when it goes down the road of I've got dirt on your opponent. That's a bright line. The answer is no. Well, why not? Somebody explained to me why you wouldn't take dirt on your opponent, just because it came from I don't know the UK. Hillary's going, that's what I'm asking. So here's what Trump actually said, Taybe, see when they asked him if some if a foreign entity came along with dirt on your opponent. What would you do? Hey says, I think you might want to listen. There's nothing wrong with listening. It's not interference. They have information. I think I take it if I thought there was something wrong. I'd go maybe to the FBI. Mitt Romney who's a high profile break with Trump. Several of them said, accepting information from foreign government would be unthinkable on thinkable. It would be totally inappropriate says, and it would strike at the heart of our democracy. We're not in a democracy, but don't tell mitt he's, he's having too much fun as well. The president should do a foreign government offers research on the Ponant Corey booger. No, Cory Gardner, Republican Colorado, one of the most vulnerable Republicans reelection shot back, just say, no, well, why would you say no. Let me ask you this folks. Hypothetical. You find out the Trump had somebody killed, but it comes from a foreign government. You don't you just say, no, so they come to you. And they say we got information on Trump on here, but it's information that he's committed a serious crime. You even want to listen to it. Of course you listen to it. Then you decide what to do with Dave, you're up next day. What's up? Hanging in there. Dave. Ratio. This coders say something can't find their own personal scooter trendy. Well, that's true. You can't I would assume you can. But I would think if you here's what I would do with the scooters. It's a motorized vehicle. You need to have a license or a licensed, tag or something. And you need to you need to buy the law with with anything else. So then they could enforce it when they can't do it now. If you own it. Responsibly. Well, yeah because they could take it away from you. Yeah. Interesting. Well that yeah that. Yeah. I think that that'd be a whole different thing. Got a name. I ride a moped anymore. Only. Okay. Only. Folks, got a DUI do you have to have a licensed? I guess you don't have to have a license to drive one because that's why they're ride mopeds because he got a DUI. But you got to have a licensed tag on earning. I did believe you do. Okay. And you probably the way a helmet or something. So, yes. All right. Well know the difference is is that. Yes. Well, the scooters I will just tell you and this is not homeboy. There's just fan there too fast for their own good. They do go fashion. I thought they would it was fun. But the I can see how somebody who's not very coordinated whatever. Big problem, with it, now, me, I e drunk. Yeah. Me, I'm an old pro. So I had no problem. I can see how people would we'll be back, stay with this information,.

Trump Republicans Jim Lindsey Graham FBI president Dave Cory Gardner Mitt Romney Russia UK Senate Hillary Colorado Corey booger Taybe
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations, this week's topic is Brexit. With me this week to discuss the decision to extend the deadline for Britain to leave the European Union to October thirty first two thousand in nineteen. That is Halloween is my go-to person all things avenue with the United Kingdom. And that Sebastian Mallaby Sebastian is the Paul able or senior fellow for international economics at CFR in contributing calmness for the Washington Post is an expert on the intersection of economics international relations, and the author of the man who knew the life and times of Alan Greenspan, a terrific book that I really recommend that you read, and I will note that as Sebastian I are talking there may be a little bit of interference in line for which we apologise anyway Sebastian thanks for joining me today. Jim. Let's get right to it Sebastian. I got a big question. I'll put it simply what's going on. It is a big question, and it's become so fluid and complex that it's a great place to start. You know, the deadline for the UK to leave. The European Union was initially set much twenty nights. Then it was extended until April the twelfth no just last night as we speak meaning Wednesday evening. The European Union had a long discussion among the twenty seven members were not quitting to decide. What to do with the way with twenty eighth member Britain, and they extended the deadline for sorting at Brexit until Halloween that is type of the study fest. Best effects tension. And so if by some miracle Britain decide how it wants to leave or if it wants to leave before octopus Eddie fast, it can do. So, but it has now sort of said lease of nice until uptick with anyone. How this flex tension is supposed to work, but let's back up a second. And let's talk about how we got to worry or right now, why is it that the house of Commons couldn't come to agreement on a way to leave the EU by the March twenty nine deadline or the extension to April twelve after all prime minister may insisted that Brexit means Brexit. I think the core issue is that in Britain, rather like in chunks or continental Europe, centrist, politics fragmenting, and that makes it difficult to achieve consensus, particularly when you were running off against the hard realities, negotiating partner in Brussels. They went back. So what I mean by that is that you have two main parties in Britain, the conservative party, which is Theresa May's participated -ly governing party, and they are split internally between sort of moderate wing that supported prime minister. Maze compromise, Brexit and. And a move purist. You could say hardline wing, which regarded as an insufficiently clean break between Britain and the European Union, and those hardliners refused on three off gangs in three different votes to support the compromise Brexit, so we didn't a conservative it was impossible to actually unite the party to American listeners that may sound routine because in congress, and particularly in the Senate, you don't expect much Ponti unity, but in British parliamentary prototypes, it's Heidi unusual to have that sort of internal repented in with an appointee. Then on the other side of the political divide in Britain. You've got David not many members of the party would be happy ideologically to negotiate over Brexit with Theresa May's government, and to reach a sort of set you tweaked version of compromise and to theoretically to vote that through, but the issue is that the neighbor Ponti as an institution, you know, really wants to get into power with that for once another election, therefore doesn't. Want to support a deal which may not object to too much on principle? But rather than supporting dealer and getting to resume through this crisis. They would rather discomfit the prime minister and triggering Eddie and action in which they would they would aspire to to win. Yes.

Britain European Union Sebastian Mallaby Sebastian Brexit prime minister Jim Lindsey Theresa May Eddie United States United Kingdom president Alan Greenspan Washington Post Ponti UK director senior fellow
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges face in the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations, this week's topic is Nigeria Africa's most populous country and its largest economy. With me this week to discuss Nigeria and the recent Nigerian presidential election is John Campbell. Can't think of finer person to have a disgust Nigeria with me, John is the Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy. Studies here at the council. John before joining the council was a career foreign service officer among his post, he was US ambassador to Nigeria. John is also the co author along with Matthew page of Nigeria what everyone needs to know. John. Thanks joining me today. It's good to be with you. Join let's begin with the headlines, which is that Nigeria had a presidential election over the weekend. The incumbent President Mr Bahari won reelection lay layout for his what happened in this election. Which is I understand it wasn't held on. It was supposed to be held. It was not the election was postponed for one week, Mustang, simply because of difficulty in delivering the election materials was there a lot of advanced. Notice that the election was going to be postponed. There was five hours five in other words in Nigeria. People normally go to their home village to vote. So that a great many voters had already gone home before the elections were postponed..

Nigeria John Campbell John president Jim Lindsey Mr Bahari Ralph Bunche Africa United States senior fellow director officer Matthew five hours one week
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox a see for a podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is the I treat. With me this week to discuss President Trump's decision to draw the United States from the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty where the IMF treaty is Laurie Esposito Murray. Laureus Adjunct Senior fellow here at C afar, and she's had a distinguished career in the defense area. She previously held the distinguished national security chair at the US naval academy during the Clinton administration. Lori was special advisor to the president on chemical weapons convention where she helped oversee the bipartisan approval of the treaty. She is also the former assistant director for multilateral affairs of the US arms control and disarmament agency at the US State Department, and she was once a staffer to Senator Nancy Kassebaum Republican of Kansas in the United States Senate at the time the Senate, provided it's advising consent to the IMF treaty Laurie. Thanks for joining me today. Well, thank you. Thank you for that introduction, and a very happy to be joining on this, very important topic. Well, Laura, they say it's always best to be. Begin at the beginning. So let's do a scene setter. What exactly is the IMF treaty, and what is governed treaty is considered an historic treaty because it was the first treaty to eliminate an entire class of nuclear weapons. And that's what are considered intermediate range nuclear weapons from five hundred to five thousand kilometers or three hundred thirty four hundred miles it eliminated these ground based systems both cruise missiles and ballistic missiles, and it actually eliminated them in terms of both conventional and nuclear capable warheads. And so it just wipe this entire system out resulted in over twenty five hundred reductions of these systems that were in Europe and much the start process old with its extensive affiliation. And being the first reduction treaty actually launched the strategic arms reduction process that has led to these massive reductions in strategic weapons that have happened. Nineteen eighty six. So I take it. There are a couple of important takeaways. Their number one, this is a treaty governs what the United States and the Soviet Union at the time now Russia can do which basically not have these intermediate range nuclear missiles, number two. We're talking about ground-based missiles, the treaty doesn't apply to either air-launched or see launched missiles in number three for the United States and Russia it applies to missiles, regardless of whether they're carrying nuclear or conventional warheads. Right. Exactly. So why is it that President Trump has announced that the United States is going to withdraw from this storm treaty that Ronald Reagan negotiated. Well, the death of the tree is actually in a slow roll during the George W Bush administration the Russians actually spoke to members of the president's cabinet about their problems with this. I n f treaty and at that time that concerns were that China..

United States President Trump president United States Senate IMF assistant director Senator Nancy Kassebaum Republ Laurie Esposito Murray Jim Lindsey US naval academy Adjunct Senior fellow US State Department director Russia Ronald Reagan George W Bush Europe
"jim lindsey" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on Conversations

"Just just Ashir remoteness of where we are. And yet, and it's physical. It's it's big ails big big physical law. Or camera sixty three keillor's you're you're working, and you're you're very big protein and. The. Really enjoy working with girls. They've got the applies. It's just a it's it's a tough Astor to ask him girls panels coming up to ten o'clock. He had a cook early on called sues tell me about her what kind of sense of humor. Did she have snows year? She she's great. We went to characters of these comfort. I remember on the first of all on pretty big on practical jugs on. Yeah. Stirs up save. You can get in. But I guess as cheeky personnel kid, but so's your mom. I I record a big big black polythene on the way back to cabin. And she was washing up when often came into this Nike and threw it on the grand next toured hyping just tester it'll spas, and she just looked down. She kept washing up and said, wait that's not only on you should stay cable. I bet the cook must be really important part of of making teamwork Reaser. So having a having a good cook not having one and one that can just make things up. Just just a bit of Roddy the square, and anyone can cook stike part, and that really said separates the professional the rest poisons definitely draft him off. What if you think back to those early days as you say, you're just twenty three when he started running your own team's what kind of boss where all all Pac naysayer or economic Oreos heartless air or in a war. But but that comes with experience or always failing experienced said before is pretty under educated back then and still in some, but or record that you personal skills. Did you have a bit of a temper did? Yeah. Alls big on planning or how lot of Lori issues from from from kid Thome and. And if things were gonna while really struggled, and and that's that's every up. They're going to get you whether it pay the animals people or whatever. And so yeah, applaud good staff at the start. And that it was because of you that staff start not took me Baldry laws. Thought by me names on these these kind of you know, they're not not the right people point on people in this Nadan and all those big on on Ron near altering. But i'll. Awesome. I'll get going on with some really good mental Thome Archer and Jim Lindsey Ari Lord three big mantles morning, and and of of corn down some causes since then and were actually look back now realize it was more felt and and become really good friends at all of them since it's had to change that sort of stuff about yourself. How did you do that? How did you go about being a different work on every is there? It's not easy. It's your think here hard. It is to China yourself when and and then you think is someone else we never going to do that..

Thome Archer keillor Astor Roddy Ashir Nike Pac China Lori Nadan Jim Lindsey Ari Ron
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"This isn't how the right views things, and this is creating a real division. It's why Howard Schultz candidacy will probably hand the election of Donald Trump's on. Thank you Howard. But also it would be quite instructive to America. Because I do think there are people who. Are traditionally on the left or traditionally Democrats who say gosh, they're really getting everything backwards here. I I don't I don't want to live in a world where victimhood is something to aspire to navy and so his candidacy, I think will show that Fisher in the democrat party the trouble for him. Is that the people who think that I think are just gonna vote for Trump? I don't think that they're gonna vote for Howard Schultz. It's it's that issue the the sort of I'm a fiscal conservative. But a social liberal that we were talking about yesterday, the actual people who want that very narrow appeal or pretty small, but the people who are traditionally Democrats, they consider themselves progressive. They don't care about sexual issues. They don't they haven't really thought through pro-life. They what whatever they just they they wanna be reasonable. They see the the left right now spiraling down, and you know, things happen slowly. And then they happen all at once. And I. Think we're seeing the all at once part of that. Now, you had overtime the cash identity politics multiculturalism. Okay. Now, this is certain privileges or bad. Okay. Do to and now we're spiraling down into this. Subjective ISM, this idea that we have to invent our own pain. We have to invent or own realities, you even had then Anthony Kennedy when he was on the supreme court say that people have a right to define reality. But of course, nobody has the right to define reality. You're entitled to your opinions. But it's might be incorrect. You don't get to define it. And you certainly don't get to define it for everybody else. We're seeing that all at once. And it it leads us into grievance. Studies. This is a phenomenon it's happened to colleges where they're not studying history philosophy English. Whatever math they're studying, ethnicity and gender studies. Studies studies studies, and it's really just idiot. It's not a traditional academic discipline. And it becomes more and more ridiculous. My guests coming up Peterberg ocean. And Jim Lindsey submitted. A number of academic papers to peer reviewed academic journals and seven of them have been accepted. I think another seven of them were accepted, but not published or revise and resubmit or whatever the actually even more than that only. A few of them were rejected before I think, it was actually a conservative journalist pointed out that these were probably fake, and they exposed a major flaw in the academy a major flaw in our grievance culture. We will get to them and just one second. But first, let's introduce a new sponsor and thank our new sponsor for keeping the lights on in the show on the air. Valentine's Day is fast approaching. So you need to know about halo. You need to check out a product called indulgences dot store. Indulgences not dot com dot store..

Howard Schultz Donald Trump Anthony Kennedy dot Fisher America democrat party Peterberg ocean Jim Lindsey Valentine one second
"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

06:49 min | 3 years ago

"jim lindsey" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox. He see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations, this week's topic is congress in American foreign policy. With me this week to discuss Congress's role informed policies. Chris tuttle? Chris title is managing director here at the council until December. He served as the policy director for the Senate Foreign Relations committee under the chairmanship of Senator. Bob corker before that Chris was director of CFR's Washington program and oversaw the council's independent task force, bro. Graham, he has also worked at the State Department, and as chief of staff and senior policy adviser to then congressman Mark green of Wisconsin. Chris thanks joining me here today. Thanks, Jim great to be back and thanks for having me on. Well, it's great to have you here. And I I wanna tap your expertise about how things get done on the hill when it comes to foreign policy. But maybe the best place to start is with the job title, you held which was policy director at the Senate Foreign Relations committee, the F R C is is acronym. Goes he's sort of explain what you're. Day to day job. Look like, sure. So the policy director is really bifurcated job. I it is a foreign policy job. It's requires certain level of expertise. It requires a knowledge of what the boss needs in order to make good decisions. But secondarily, and probably actually more importantly, it's a management job the center formulations committee on the majority side had a staff of over twenty people. A lot of subject matter experts and a lot of people who really have deep deep deep knowledge of their particular regions or functional areas. So a big chunk of what I was doing day to day was making sure that we were managing that policy. Staff in order to provide the best possible advice for Senator corker so on the Senate relations committee, you have a majority staff currently Republican in a minority staff how much the interact daily the staffs. Interact pretty much all the time. The offices are actually right next to one another and uneven day, not only do you run into these people in the hallway, but you often are in long negotiating sessions. And even in in good times. There are good personal relationships that develop sitting in a room for hour after hour week after week you actually develop some pretty good solid personal relationships with these people and that actually helps to make compromise more attainable. So thinking about that to what degree is bipartisanship still alive on Capitol Hill. Read a lot talking about how bipartisanship has dies moved into this more polarized age yet certainly on foreign policy. There were instances of Democrats Republicans coming together on issues most notably on legislation to impose sanctions on Russia for its interference in US election. So I mean to what extent when you're interacting majority minority is it throwing bricks at each other versus cooperate in a bipartisanship really is in many ways still alive and well on Capitol Hill. There are lots of issues that you never see never read about in the newspaper. Never see on the talk shows where Republicans and Democrats are working together daily. It's the most prominent issues that are often the dishes on which we are most portal polarized. That you hear about a lot of the logjams has far has. Bipartisanship, not being present. But even in the foreign relations space, we were able to do a number of things, you know, day after day, including the cats Bill where bipartisanship really was the order of the day. The the countering American America's adversaries through sanctions act ended up after weeks of negotiation by our two staffs ended a pass in the Senate ninety eight to and being signed into law. That's a good example of when there are circumstances that come together and sort of the right way. And also a willingness of both sides to move a little bit in the other side's direction to put together a pretty good solid pieces of legislation. So we're else. Do we see tangible examples of bipartisanship on on capitol or in the Senate? You'll see a lot of the behind the scenes day to day interactions on issues that are like I said not as controversial whether it's transportation or infrastructure in. Out of those things. You'll see pretty good cooperation and in the Senate in particular on the nominees front. You'll actually find that both sides wanna make sure that the executive branch is is staffed up, and there are a few nominations out there that are controversial few that are problematic. But if you look at sort of the slate of all the ambassadors, for example, that we put out that we send out to other countries in their confirmations. Now, a lot of those people are going to be career folks are not necessarily political appointees, but even on many of the political appointees, I think that you'll see pretty good bipartisan cooperation in moving people through. You will hear a lot about nominees not moving forward. But those are. Many times some of the most high profile some of the most controversial. And those are the ones you hear most about but under the radar. There is actually a lot of cooperation in making sure that we're putting enough people into the field and enough people in the senior positions at various executive branch departments that the State Department or the department can do its job. I wanna come back to the issue of nominations before. I do that. I wanna talk about the other major relationship, which is between the two ends of Pennsylvania Avenue now. Well, when you were at the Senate Foreign Relations committee for the great bulk of time, you have a Republican president, and you have Republican controlled Senate but off times relations between the two we're pretty rocky. Senator corker on a number of occasions said quite critical things of the president deed. Suggested

Senate Foreign Relations commi Senate director Chris tuttle Senator corker Senate relations committee president Jim Lindsey State Department United States managing director Bob corker executive Congress Senator congressman Mark green CFR