21 Burst results for "Jim Jarmusch"

Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

This Week in Photo

06:36 min | 4 months ago

Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

"Back to another episode of this week and photo. I'm your host frederik van johnson today on the show got gerard exupery. He's a veteran new york city based street photographer. That knows more about street photography than than or has forgotten more about it than i probably will ever know about street photography. We're gonna dive into that a little bit as well as what. It's like shooting in and around new york city now and before pandemic all that stuff going to talk about gear all this stuff so gerard. Welcome to the show man. How's it going very well. Glad to be here. Yeah it is good to hear man. I'm excited to chat. So we've got you know. The the john mara of photography. And then this genre of let's call it of photojournalism or that that world of shooting. What's the difference. What's the difference between street photography. And that i think that in journey with photo journalism you tend to think in terms of projects. Not just one image. You know a a series of images that tell a complete story and i think with straight photography. is generally just one image. Okay okay has got to tell the story one at a time. So let let's rewind back to the time to. Let's let's do origin story thing so cue. The flashback so the origin story of girard. Where what was that moment where you knew that. Okay i feel like. I need to be taking pictures of this. This amazing city. I live in well on my planet. We didn't really have photography. And when i came to earth. And i'm sorry all right more and you know it's funny. It's the only thing i've ever wanted to do since As far back as i can remember one of my earliest memories of my father staying his role affleck's in my hand. While i took the first picture took and which was a ship underneath the verrazano bridge and it just stuck in my mind. He passed away about a year after that. And you know. I it just all these feelings about photography and loss. Let's say i don't know all came together. And i just knew that this is the direction i wanted to go. Yeah yeah and it's a good direction. It's the world photography from my standpoint on of you agree with this but it's it's equal parts. Geeky ray is we like the technology and all that stuff and then it psychology you when you're dealing with the public and trying to get the right shot or get the shot or permission to do the shot and the you know the all of this stuff in between psychology science physics wrapped up into the time machine that we call a camera to fast forward to now the president or the recent the recent present. Let's call it like this last this past five five or so years me decade your adventures in and around new york city. The i can't imagine being a street photographer. There for just an extended period of time when i'm there is overload. It's just like what. Do i take pictures of two months. It's too much going on you get analysis paralysis. What would have been some of the standout experiences you've had in city over the past decade or so that you like okay. I got to tell this bar story. Wow pick were got to pick one. I think defining Well this is. It's further back than ten years but sure for for the finding event was i was involved in a robbery and a camera store. And it's a long story but rather traumatic thing. Somebody was killed and and i got roughed up a little bit and it was it was. It wasn't pleasant. But it was. After that i i realized well putting yourself out there making yourself vulnerable and taking pictures strangers asking or you know. I don't think covertly taking pictures of people is for me. It's just not right so if you're going to ask or you're just going to be obvious bat it you've got to put yourself out and up until that point I didn't know what i was expecting to happen but After that i figured well. What's the worst that can happen. I already found out what the worst that can happen. And it really It helped me in. Maybe be taught me to be very aware of my surroundings almost in a comfortable way though. So that okay. Let's not ever forget. I've gone into situations where drug dealers on a corner. And i was taking a picture of this house that was closed and abandoned actually in patterson not beard city paterson new jersey which is really exciting. We've got a water tower waterfall. There you go and a crappy movie was made by. Jim jarmusch bad it. It lasts two years ago and any case so i am standing there taking pictures and You know. I hear this guy walking up to me and it was interesting because there were like three. Get two or three guys on each corner but not the corner i was on the house was and i'm i'm taking pictures and i hit. This guy comes up behind the camera up to my eye. And i can hear him. I'm aware of him and he said. Hey what are you doing. I told them flat out. I'm taking pictures of buildings that have been foreclosed on You know and properties that have been abandoned families that have gone kicked out. And what have you. And he goes off and you know then he goes How much do you think they want that house i should. Oh i don't know but whatever it is going to be pretty cheap

Frederik Van Johnson Gerard Exupery John Mara New York City Geeky Ray Gerard Girard Affleck Paralysis Jim Jarmusch Paterson Patterson New Jersey
Noah Baumbach Digs Into A 'Marriage Story'

The Frame

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Noah Baumbach Digs Into A 'Marriage Story'

"It's the opening scene in the film ahead of a screening of marriage story at the telluride film festival this year and in front of a live audience. I spoke with driver. Just after Martin Scorsese presented him with a career. Honor driver was at telluride for marriage story and another upcoming movie the report in which he plays a US Senate investigator looking into this as use of torture after nine. Eleven driver explain what his relationships are like with directors. He's worked with multiple times and that list includes Jim Jarmusch and marriage story. Filmmaker Noah Baumbach. There's there's something that we are way of working. Our work ethic is similar in that. They don't take it for granted that we're making a movie. The has the potential to reach a plays that as far away and either give language to a culture. That's completely different than ours. And someone's paying a lot of money for us to be here right right now for this amount of time to do this thing that will last forever and labeled the feeling and how powerful that is why why take that for granted why show up and kind of wing it you know or not. Consider what it is. You're saying and that no detail is too who small now. Obviously there's traps and all of that that you can get so worked up in details that you're trying to control everything and don't leave room for you know something. That's more abstract with those people. They're brilliant writers and create a set an environment onset where you're free to You know all those things that hope from from people you're free to get it wrong and you're free to explore and but really don't take it for granted if I was trying to summarize summarize it which is kind of hard. They very much curated the people that they want to work with in front and behind the camera and you feel like as much as everything thing is both has meaning and as meaningless. You don't don't take it for granted and finding people that have your same work ethic gets a rare thing. I think I just repeated myself three times the best show of hands. How many people in telluride for the atom driver double feature marriage story and the report? Wow okay. That's about half a house as quick question without spoiling either film. I WanNa ask you about Dan. Jones and CIA's post nine eleven detention and interrogation program which a lot of people would call torture. They call it extreme rendition of the things. What would you say about that film going into it without giving it away about why? That movie spoke. Oh Q.. And why you thought it was something you wanted to do. I mean the topic is was something that I you know embarrassing. They didn't know anything about and I mean the original report is over six thousand thousand pages. The redacted version is just over five hundred and our script with one hundred thirty. How do you how do you tell that story as economically as possible astle but not without leaving the humanity out of it so that all of those things just an opportunity to potentially bring a topic to light that has been in the dark and that I was inspired by you? Hope there's people like that in a room alone toiling away for six years with no support trying to trying to make a difference and that relationship with something that you've grown up with thinking that you can trust and suddenly you know you have to not only do you feel like you're trying to make a moral judgment for the country but internally as well they all those the reasons why I want to do it you were recently doing. Burn this and I'm wondering when you're doing it play and then going. Lean into film or television. What are the things that you might miss retain as an actor? WHO's doing a show in front of a different audience every night when you're not able oh to replicate that on a film set yeah? It's a totally different thing. It's I working with Mila. For example he likes to do a lot of takes and that actually feels more familiar to working on out of play because the lines of the lines. There's no there's no Improv. This is what it is blocking it out. But the intention can be a million different things and he he structured the day smartly so we have enough time to explore all the possibilities of what it could be not just arbitrarily but I mean sometimes and and then sometimes you have to rebel against him and then just do it the way you WanNa do it just to shock yourself and shock the system and then maybe come up with something better but you know it's like a whole run of a rehearsal truncated into a day. which is I rare with? Someone like Noah and you're also rehearsing you know if you can be as much as you can before you start just being prepared to give yourself time to explore all the options and when you don't do that with a soderbergh then I tend to have regret of like you can't help but go home and imagine I had all these ideas that now but then again. Maybe those were bad ideas that I don't know oh anything. The tribute is a sham. Last question I think there are a lot of things that different people will take away from marriage story one being. If you're thinking about going into family law you might reconsider it. But what was the thing that you treasure about making this film with knowing scarlet again. That could be a long answer that I know I should keep short. I mean this movie is hard to. I feel hard to talk about because it's very personal and it was personal. The people who made a collectively and we talked about it a couple of years before we started making those conversations tens of what it's about or what will retry into are still happening but how love can transition and how that can be violent set not not physically violent but an internal violent thing of you know someone kinetically where you know. It's everything your way. Oh you were in a room together a second nature then suddenly to divorce that from yourself That could be painful but maybe it's just transitioning into something different. I thought that was a beautiful idea. This is not a sham. Adam coming up on the frame the writer and director of marriage story Noah Baumbach on capturing the heartbreak of divorce Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn. Our next guest is filmmaker Noah Bam back he wrote and directed indie darlings like Margot at the wedding and the squid and the okay all his stories often feature realistic and flawed characters and it holds true for his latest film marriage. Story Charlie and Nicole played by Adam driver ever and Scarlett Johansson are a couple struggling with the early stages of their divorce bombeck painstakingly mapped out the process of their separation. And that makes watching watching marriage story. especially if you're married a bit like watching a horror film. Here's how bombeck described the movie when we recently spoke at the Middleburg Film Festival. I've a friend who said the movie gets divorced so you don't have to which I think is a nice message from married couples relatively Glib but I can see it Netflix has another movie. That's planet Middleburg called two popes. Your movie is called Marriage Story. They both seem like obvious. Titles but almost inevitable bowl. Did you play around with other things to call this. I didn't coordinate with Fernando Morass. I I It was it was the working title from the beginning. The the idea that I'd come up with something else but like pseudo you know Phil Collins but something about the movie resisted more more specific or poetic titles things like the squid and the whale. Didn't there was no squid in the whale to be found and so I I kept coming back to it. I liked it as its in. Its simplicity. I want to ask you a little bit. Because Adam drivers said that this was a collaborative process and hobbies. You're the writer the director. But how would you describe the process of putting the story together and before we started filming what you were talking to due. At least you're actors about it from the onset. It was important for me to know who the actors who are some of the actors were in the movie. I wanted To Have Charleena Nicole in my head is inspiration but also because I wanted to bring the actors in to the process a bit I Adam. I've I've been friends with now. When so when I brought him sort of some of these ideas he would say like? Oh these are things I might. He he was interested in playing a theater director. That's you know as I remember it. That's how that came into the movie. You have often had characters who you are very articulate. That could be writers. They could be theater directors that could be. They are very capable expressing themselves and talking about. Maybe maybe what they're feeling or what they're feeling about somebody else. Is that something that you think is a pattern. That you like articulate characters who happen to have particular jobs does one beget the other. I don't know I I don't think about it like that. Quite the artistic the fact that they were artists and and creative and professional partners in this movie was I thought important and also narrative interesting because there was sort of more at stake.

Director Adam Noah Baumbach Telluride Writer Jim Jarmusch Martin Scorsese Charleena Nicole United States Senate Middleburg Film Festival Netflix Noah Noah Bam Investigator CIA Fernando Morass DAN Mila Jones
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"Up to another episode of piecing it together the podcast where we take a look at a new movie and try to figure out what movies inspired it and today on the show we're looking at a really weird one. We're looking at the dead, don't die from director, Jim Jarmusch, if you are a fan of his earlier, works things, like ghost dog and coffee and cigarettes, broken flowers, you kinda know that this movie that was advertised as a big horror, comedies, ambi- comedy is not quite Annabi way. It seems it's definitely more of a very strange independent film, and quite frankly, one, the I loved, and on, really glad to be doing an episode on it with me. Today is new co host. We've got Phil a from the slump lords local hip hop group here in Las Vegas and Phil someone who I knew back when I went to UNLV in so school to get them on the show. I hadn't seen him in quite a while. But, you know, we've always been connected on Facebook and everything ran into a couple times over the years, and it was great to have him on the show. So before we get into that conversation about the dead, don't die. I do want to remind you to make sure you're subscribed piecing together on your podcast app of choice. He also rate in review us on apple podcasts. You can also join our Facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces. And you know what something I was thinking about this morning, actually, I always tell you guys. To follow the social media's and to join the group into rate and review and do all these things. I never asked, you people to share the show. So you know what if you're listening share that Assad? That would be awesome. If you did that. Just click the share button. Whatever social media is. I don't care any one of them. Just click share. I would love it. If you shared this show that would rule, so let's get onto the conversation about the dead, don't die. And of course, we will be getting into spoiler. So go see it. I. All right. So we've got with us Phil.

Phil Facebook Jim Jarmusch director Las Vegas UNLV Assad apple
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And it's rough, it makes it rough, you know, when I started out, I would do split rights financing where I could presell Japan Germany, France, and have enough money to make the film. And then we would sell the film when it was done in those people when they made their money back, then we split, fifty fifty you put up the money, I make the film. You get your money back, then, we're partners, men that would be unhurt of like you'd be laughed out of the building for such an idiotic for Pozzo now. You know. So it's just the monetize ING of everything it's not just films. It's just the whole world. And the way everything is evaluated by money. And that's not new, but it's gotten really it's gotten to a perverse stage. That is referenced in away in, in the dead. Don't die in some of the things hermit Bob. Tom waits says in the end, but it's frustrating, I also like in the film the way that you identify the kind of Narkis habits that we have in our daily life being a resonant feeling for his ambi- to, you know, returning to that thing, their cellphone, they're their vices, the small little things in their life where where does that come from for you. Is is there self reflection in that to certainly? I mean it's, it's an obvious. It's an obvious reference to dawn of the dead or they go to the shopping mall, and they go to the places where they felt comfortable but yeah, it's the. You know, this consumerism of useless, commodities that were sort of brainwashed continued doing is, is unfortunately, probably going to be the downfall of our own survival. And, you know, I don't think of, of the dead, don't die. It wasn't. It's not intended to be a message movie. It's per se. It's a it's a comedy. You know, but there's socio political things woven in, for sure. Because my biggest concern right now for for, for people of the planet creatures of the planet is an ecological crisis. That is happening and everyone's deny not everyone, but in general, where just denying it. So it's kind of disturbing. I mean, look at the weather here, even look at the recent tornados, and the central center of the US or all over the world. It's, it's getting real weird. And we know why science knows why. Why? I, I don't want to spoil anything for lack of a better word, but it is notable to me that the people that survive in this movie are the people kind of living on the fringes of society, are outside of the traditional societal structures. Yeah. It's not a spoiler. The people who survive are very important to me. There are three teenagers that are in a detention center that have already been put sort of separated from the social order, for whatever problems, they had, and they're teenagers, you know, and my heart's really with teenagers, and in general, and then the Tom waits is character hermit Bob. He has chosen to separate himself from any kind of social structure for decades and is living in the woods and appreciating the details of nature. And yeah, he then those four characters if three teenagers they don't, we don't see them on defining somehow, they escape it at least up until the end of the film seems. More than purposeful. But speaking of teenagers, you know, my do you know Greta thune Berg now, she is a sixteen year old. I think she's Danish and or Swedish she is leading. She has Asperger's and she's leading Europe and a lot of the world in, in not denying this climate crisis. And she can like last weekend or so ago very quickly. She mobilized a demonstration of forty thousand people in Copenhagen in a matter of days, but she's like a leader to me, and I really appreciate her and the sunrise movement. That's a lot of young people. I think started in California, but these people men, they, they really have my respect and, and teenagers are really important to me, always, because they are, you know, they're pushed around there in a state of confusion for their own biological sexual. You know, whatever's going on inside them hormonally, and then everyone's telling them to grow up, and you don't know how the world works and all of this, and yet, they're the ones that really define our, our style, our music, our philosophies, really have comes from teenagers. So I you know, respect that to all the the team shadows teens. Yeah. Jim, I end every episode of the show asking filmmakers, what's the last thing that they have seen? You seen anything greatly anything can I saw nothing at Cana just had to do press. Gosh, I don't know. You know, I see about four or five movies week usually that effect so but not mostly not in theaters can be an older film. Well, I'll tell you, I saw recently I saw Claire de knees film highlife, very strange exchange beautiful, though. But the end of found really I couldn't get it out of my head, but I saw quite a few interesting films, this year, that were, you know, not obscure films like Roma and the favorite and I loved shoplifters black klansman death of Stalin. But I would say, oh, also, my friend, along friend, longtime friend fab, five FREDDY made a film grass is greener. Yeah. That was pretty interesting Netflix. Well, I gotta say, I think, oh, I also love at eternity gate novels film about Van Gogh. Yes. Of course, with Willem Dafoe really fantastic. But I gotta say the masterpiece of American cinema in recent years for me is David Lynch's, twin peaks, the return an eighteen hour film. That is ext for me ecstatically incomprehensible. I, I don't know what it means. I just think it was just so strangely beautiful evocative an amazing. I'll tell you, it's story as researching this conversation last night, as reading an interview with you. There was a link to a squirrel song clicked on the link played the song on YouTube. Listen to it all the way through the. Next link was the sequence in twin peaks return, which features the atom bomb explosion set to the Penderecki score, which is the craziest thing. I think I've seen on TV screen, maybe in my entire life. But there, there is a symbiosis may be between your your creativity as well. It's nice to know. But, you know in David Lynch can't even get a film finance? You know, so that when talking about that what we were talking about why don't we just have like the Medici is it wasn't there form like, oh, David Lynch is making a film, give him whatever he wants Terry gilliam's, making him give him whatever he needs. You know, I don't understand. Well. I hope you make thousand more really appreciate coming on Joe. Thank you very much. Thanks again, to rob her villa. And of course, the great, Jim Jarmusch. Please stay tuned to the big picture next week. Amanda Dobbins and I will be back. We'll be talking about men in black international. And also, what may or may not be shaping up to be one of the worst summer movie slates. We can remember, see then..

David Lynch Jim Jarmusch Tom Pozzo Japan Copenhagen Willem Dafoe US Greta thune Berg France Netflix Amanda Dobbins Europe YouTube California Joe Asperger Van Gogh FREDDY Claire de
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:36 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Big Picture

"But what you'll really love about this vehicle can't be listed, or explained in words, it has to be felt on the road, the same way I felt the feeling of love and passion watching rolling thunder revue. So hurry into your local BMW center today and test drive the all new BMW three series for yourself. The all new BMW three series. Don't be driven by technology driving BMW the ultimate driving machine. Thanks again, to rob. Let's go to my conversation with Jim Jarmusch, the legendary filmmaker behind such movies, as mystery train and down by law and the new movie, the dead, don't die, his take on zombie film. Just an honor and a pleasure to be joined by the great Jim Jarmusch Jim, thanks for being. Wow. Thank you. It's my pleasure to be here, Jim. I've been thinking a lot about your films have been rewatching some of your films this week, and I'm curious how you right now. And how you decide what you wanna do next because you've done all different kinds of films at this point in your career. And I'm wondering is it idea I or creative challenge. I that comes for you. Oh man. You know, it's kind of a mystery. I just gather ideas for things weighing advance a keep a little notebook, always with me. You're looking at it right now. Have it always, and I don't I'm not a good planner. I'd it's kind of I have a lot of contradictions like I'm not good at making decisions in daily life. And then while making a film, I love making a million decisions every day, I, I don't know why. But what I do is. I just gather ideas, and then I usually have a, a certain point, I have an I plan for what the next film will be. And. Then after I've collected enough ideas I sit down and start writing. And the writing press is usually pretty fast. And I usually have the central characters the actress I I'm writing for I have them in mind. So, you know, later, I have to see if I can trick them into doing the thing, but I'm imagining often, the central characters is the writing always straight to script. Do you just open up the final draft page and start typing dialogue or is there some sort of outlining process like, what's your what do you do? I don't have a laptop. I don't even have Email. Honestly. Okay. I got it. I got an iphone, I don't. So I write by hand notebook. So I'm working working on the script by hand. I, I like the tactical thing of crossing things out and seeing what was there or where I spilled coffee on the thing or whatever. But it does inform something for me. So, yeah, I do that. And then once I of the script written. I dictated to put it on a computer and then make changes in jesmyn says, I go, but for me a film, Nick Ray said something like, if you're just gonna film, the script why bother and that's not true for everyone like you know Hitchcock made fantastic. -ly formulaic films, but that was their strength. But I don't do that. You know, so the film's always a process at changes as we go for me. I, I write one draft of the script, and then I change it as I start rehearsing getting locations. And really, I say the final draft is the, the final edit of the film, because it keeps changing throughout. Do you put a lot of description about the way that the film will look into your scripts? Or are they primarily there for the actors to understand where the story is going? Well, I never referred to the camera if possible. So I don't talk about where the camera what it seeing. So I tried to find a way to be descriptive and giving. Enough atmosphere without over overly describing things because, you know, the beauty is you then go find locations that may not be what you imagined. You work with production designer who will bring ideas that elevate your own the same with the director photography the costume, designer they all elevate it above what I do alone by myself writing in the middle of the night. You know, so the collaborative thing then lifts the film up, and then the final things in the editing. You know, I'm not I've learned now that the film has to tell you what it wants because for me shooting, a film, while shooting we are gathering material to make into something. We're not making the thing yet, you know. So it's kind of like we're in a big quarry pulling marble out, and then we bring it back, and we're going to sculpt it, and we were gonna make a horse, but really, it says it's a camel. So you got to go, you have to let the film tell you. And I've had really I've wrestled with films where I want that scene. It was really hard to shoot. It was took cost a lot of money in the film keeps saying, we'll take it out and see how I feel. I take it out. The film's much happier. Was there a specific example of that, that you can think, oh, I see in this film, not so much in previous film, only lovers left alive. I had way too many scenes before the two central characters were actually together because they were in different intense year in Detroit. So I had some beautiful scenes, but the film just didn't want them. So that was frustrating, damn you film. It's so funny though. I, I was thinking about the different kinds of films that you make they all obviously have to kind of the essence of your tone, your voice your approach to the world, but especially of late much more into John rea-. He made a documentary, you made the logical films. Do you have in your in your notebook of I? Ideas, a kind of checklist of kind of movie you'd like to challenge yourself to do. Honestly, I don't you know, I I really don't. I sometimes I carry things around. I mean, I was thinking about zombie film, ever since only lovers left alive, which is a, a vampire film, but really, it's a love story disguised as vampire, film or framed by that. So I don't really know. You know, I don't really do that. I'm very non analytical, because I've learned that my strength even while shooting editing writing is, is an intuitive strength. So I protect it from an analysis. Mrs shame that you're talking to me analyzing all your work. Well, I'm not doing a good job of it. So that's probably good and protective. But yeah, I, I can't really you know, it's kind of mysterious, it's like when you when you make a film in you do something. Right. That works. Sometimes you don't really know why. It was. Right. But if you do something wrong, you know why it was wrong, you know, that's why I was tell young artists. I, I can't tell other people how to do anything, that's not my thing. But when they ask advice, I always say your mistakes are super valuable and don't be afraid of them. Don't be afraid to fail. Because that's where you really learn what you wanted to do. And you know so that's very important to me. Do you have a relationship right now to your older films? Do you re watch them? Do you think about what you did? And didn't do. No, no. I have a specific process. I followed always, which is once the film is done, and it's out and I'm not at a festival. I'm not at a screening of my cast and crew. Or whatever, then I go into a theater, where the film is playing and people paid to watch it. I sit in the back like with a hoodie on or whatever. So they don't know him there and I watch your famous main. Yeah. Well, our. My Iggy pop calls it, my flashlight because even on stage. He's hey, man. I can see your flash life, but so I watch it that way. And then that's it. I don't watch it again. And even if I have to say, transfer it to a newer format or whatever I do things like okay in the old days. They were in real. Right. So it say okay I'm gonna look at the reels out of order and don't put the sound on. Or now, I say okay, look at it straight through no sound. Then I'll deal with the sound after. I don't wanna see them again for two reasons. I can't change them. Now. Right. So I'm gonna see something. I coulda trim that, oh, man that cut could have been better. And also, I don't like looking back. You know, I don't it's not healthy for me. I wanna think about what's the next thing because men life is going fast. And I just wanna stay I I'm trying to be in the present, but it's the hardest thing but it's, it's what's coming. Next. That's important to me to focus on. But I, I know people that love watching their old films, and I don't see anything wrong if things very personal thing, but for me, no way I can't do it. Some people think of it is home movies, I guess, an experience of their life that they wanted just tap back into one thing that I really like about what you do in the world in general, is you don't just make homes. You make music you make art photography. There are a lot of different things does film still occupy that centerpiece role in your creative life. We'll films the thing I've spent the most of my life, trying to learn how to do so. And also film is so beautiful to me, because I mean, I'm not I don't make abstract experimental films, which I appreciate, but I make narrative films ride in my way, some critics wouldn't agree, but they do tell stories anyway. So the thing is cinema contains really every other for. Warm, you know, music how it moves cutting writing acting style, composition, everything architecture that it's all in there. So that is so beautiful to me that, that's really my the form. I've spent most of my life, trying to learn music, very different and beautiful, because music's more immediate an film, for me, takes two years easily to make effect the dead, don't die is coming out soon. And I've been working on it for two years now, pretty much straight, whereas music you're in a room thinks starts flowing. You're interacting with another musician or just with yourself in the instrument. It's such a really different thing very satisfied. But I'm a self-proclaimed dilettante because I follow what strimmers rule anyone who knew Jost drummer nosed strimmers rule. No input. No output. He's had that all the time, you know at. Eamon bailey. And that was, you know, it sounds so simple. And I've read a lot of, you know, stuff great artists have written from John cage to, you know, all kinds of people, but really that thing strimmer, you know, Stromer in, you know, he just was very certain that to you have to be a receptor to give things back out. And so I and life is short. And I can't just learn about one thing. So I'm interested in so many subjects, whether it's you know, I don't know I gave a lecture at college some years ago, and then in a supermarket I ran into a guy who was there. And he said, he meant ten years ago, you spoke at new pulse, but you, you only talked about my college mushroom identification. The history of British in Italian motorcycle design, French symbolist poetry, the connection between theoretical physics and Buddhism. And you didn't talk about films at all. And I said out man, I'm sorry. I used to nose really cool. I liked it. But so I follow, you know, all kinds of things that interest me. Yeah. I I've heard you describe yourself as sort of a non-professional filmmaker in the past, and I wonder is that to protect something about the process that you have to it is because the word amateur means that you love a form and the professional means you do it for for money. There's nothing wrong with that. You know, but I try to protect being an amateur. I also heard you say that you were not typically a fan of zombie movies, and I'm wondering why you've made his ambi- movie. Yeah. I'm really not a big samba fan. I'm a film kind of film, geek. So I know a lot about the history of zombie films. But yeah, I'm a more of a vampire guy. But the zombies don't interest me inherent. You know, they're just lifeless inanimate. I don't know. They're just. Lumbering soulless creatures. They're not really that interesting to me. But, you know, is the along conversation about what ours arby's in cinema because really up until Jorge Romero there, something else, and early on these are like voodoo entities. But that's not, you know, George Romero's like post post modern zombie master where the Samis are the result of something humans did that was stupid and messed up something. And they are they are us. You know, they, they come from within a broken social structure. I'm George Romero's films are very socio political in their way. So the psalms are not only us, they're the monsters from within not from without, and they're also the victims, because they didn't ask to be reanimated. So it's very he did something. Very fascinating for me. What he did with zombie. So I'm following the Romero zombie thing in this film. But what attracts me is the frame because genres are Sam Peckinpah said, they're just a frame within which you can make your own thing. Okay. It's a western, so then he can make, you know, some the wild bunch is the western nobody oversaw before. So I, I liked the idea of the frame for the Bs. I liked the idea of its inherent, you know, the inherent metaphor of the Walking Dead or whatever, but I, I hesitate even use those words, the Walking Dead because I've never seen the Walking Dead. And anyone expecting that are film has anything to do with that kind of thing will probably be misled. Yes. It's an interesting moment for movie like this to arrive to, which is this sort of talent of that kind of crazy and it feels like your. Your film is much more bringing it back to a Romero style, which is like this load-bearing metaphor literally, you know, it's meant to represent something. Do you really want to say something socio, politically meaningful, and is that why use use this format? No. Not really. I mean, all tell you what I initially my initial idea for this film, was, I want to I wanted to make a film, with a silly, when, that's not the right word, but kind of ridiculous sense of humor. Closest thing was the film. We made called coffee and cigarettes, and it's little vignettes, but coffee and cigarettes, I had a little pre established structure of just where to put a camera, and an idea of people just talking having coffee and cigarettes, so within that little frame, they could talk about anything. So what I thought was okay. I'll have people kind of hold.

BMW Jim Jarmusch George Romero Romero Sam Peckinpah Detroit director John rea John cage jesmyn arby Eamon bailey Nick Ray Hitchcock Jost Jorge Romero Stromer two years
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Right. A man he was about it. He did about it. Well, I shouldn't have been fucking around anyway. He's always lay back. Nothing. Panics panics. I can't wait for him to come back zombie he'd be cool. Be cool. Everybody'll be waiting to get hit by hipsters going to be way to get bit by Bill Murray. Feel bit me. Let's go ahead and take a look at this trailer for the dead, don't die. We'll be back to tell you how Indies I'm be flick hipsters in designed before. Whether it's good bad with his genius is just another before. This peaceful tone. These streets, something terrifying something horrifying. Is coming. A while. This is really awful. The worst thing I've ever seen. So what do you think? I'm thinking zombies. What, you know, the dead ghouls. Gorgeous. Again. Slush, sheeting som- scout joke. It's really, really creepy. Man. This isn't gonna end. Well. They gravitate towards things that did when they were alive. Say Chardonnay he she did. On these. Tell you this is all going to end badly. Ten point. I'm confident of my ability to defend myself against the day. See. Here's. Posers, some pretty good cuts. He played some vote in Early you. on a little class-a. He was a long time ago. One of the things that they're really trying to push with this movie right here again. For the people who know Jim Jarmusch is work, some of the some of the people that he's worked with before, and some new people that he's working with. Is impressive cast that they have. Absolutely, you know, and that's what they're trying to push. They think nothing sells us more than the cats. Now one post is almost like a post from the seventies, they just put everybody on there by that name. 'cause that's what they're hoping to sell it by. You can see here Selena Gomez, Carol Kane. Close of until two swin. Tom waits. These worked with before Iggy pop. Of course, we'd some we have some big names like Selena Gomez, while we're in mentioned her, but Adam driver and Bill Murray and for the for the film trying to tackle an area that's been. At this point safe to say a little oversaturated now. I mean it must be if you're saying it 'cause I love, man. But everybody, you know, Jim Jim Jim Jarmusch over, you're trying to make zombie film, then everybody's doing everybody wants pyrite there. And, and to see what he does with it is interesting because he does his, he does manage..

Jim Jim Jim Jarmusch Bill Murray Selena Gomez Tom Carol Kane Adam
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"You had to know your place, and that was that, you know, so to adjust slowly, you think in those kinds of rooms and was also a big room with very experienced people. When when I was I like my first year there. I just didn't aware if it I you know, I would try and say things and I thought they were completely stupid. I thought I was gonna fired like ten separate times at very slowly, I started realizing that there were certain things that I did that would just land an I wasn't how I thought of myself, I always thought that I was a character person that I that's what I would bring to room and it is still to some degree, what I bring, but I discovered that is actually really good at story twists. And this was just something that, like, I would never have been able to tell you before I started doing it constantly. And then I just, you know, I just started noticing oh, I'm coming up with a lot of those ideas within a couple years. I've found that like, you know, when I go in now, I'm very clear about what it is that I bring, and I can say, oh, I'm really good with character. But also, when you need that, like access twists, or the AC three tw-. That's often something that I can bring for reasons. I don't know why I have no idea why that something that migraine does. But it's fun to do it felt like it was a muscle that was there that just needed to sort of be worked, and you've got that opportunity on once on a time and weirdly, it seems like you know, despite the years and years, and years of people spend doing this people do have strengths and weaknesses. You know, they really do like there is a thing that you do well, that your boss, does, well that your EP does well that your producer does. Well, and they're so oftentimes, they're completely different, which is why I love him so much interesting. Yeah. What has been your room experience? John is interesting because my actual room experience is really limited just working on working as a writer for Karl Schaefer on Z nation now. And that was the only room experience. I've had before before doing my own show now, you come into Z nation as a writer or. Yeah. And again, I had had done a long path, and my dad, how to make a quick. I mean I started in fine arts was was a painter and a sculptor, and then a fabricator for a decade. And then basically started working my way into into cinema, and with always an eye towards feature filmmaking. And that's all I was inch. And, you know, at the time my mind was going to be like, Jim Jarmusch, right? Mitchell. This is what is the early midnight. So I was trying to get that anyway, I could I went through documentaries, documentaries were fantastic, because I learned so much got my ten thousand hours. But I also was I remember one week where I went from my HBO premiere of the documentary, we did the neck following day was doing a demolition job for ninety dollars a day. Okay. Don't pay. I was fortunate enough around that time, this is early two thousands to get hired on my first episode of directing job. That was by Stephen Bochco on. And why PD Bill and they kept bringing me back and for the final season. I got to be a producer on the show unless, so that was the first I go back to their because that's my first experience with seeing really how television is made especially network television place to learn. Exactly so this form right there. Stephen, of course, who was just an amazing human being and, and truly just a brilliant, guy, very giving guy. But at that time, there was Nick, Wooten a-, Matt olmstead and worked with them. They brought me on another show. They were doing at the time and then Billy Finkelstein was the head writer. And so it was really about seeing how these scripts were created how they would change to the process, how, how punishing twenty two episode season Caen on on even at times how there's going to be ebbs and flows. But in other thing, I realized as a as a from a directing standpoint was how the forty two time. Limit forty two minute time limit of network and broadcast television could reduce. Could reduce TV to almost being.

writer Stephen Bochco producer Stephen migraine Caen Jim Jarmusch HBO Billy Finkelstein Karl Schaefer Mitchell John Matt olmstead Nick Wooten ten thousand hours forty two minute ninety dollars one week
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Stinger TV and Movie Podcast

Stinger TV and Movie Podcast

11:05 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Stinger TV and Movie Podcast

"I feel like we should be way past this psalm. Bijon rea- by now. I don't know what original spin, they could give this, basically just looks to me like a zombie. Movie with some humor, I might see it when I probably see it when it streams, you know, it, it, it looks kind of funny, actually and I really do enjoy Adam driver. So I, I, I am finding that. I am also an atom driver fan, but. Jim jarmusch? Where do I know that name from I don't know that name, so? Oh, I know him. He must like so in the article that we pulled this from it said you ever get really stone in wonder what a Jim Jarmusch zombie flick would look like. So I feel like he's the director he's the director. So an I looked up IMDB, because I know his name, but I don't know what it's from an even looking at his repertoire, like nothing really jumps out at me. But I know that name from something significant, so if I think of it, then you know, we'll come back to it. But you're right. This is basically a zombie comedy is kind of, like, you know, small town cops its Bill Murray, Adam driver khloe, seventy who I don't really like. But I love Bill Murray. I like Adam driver and it's got it's got a pretty good cast, and I watched it and said, I really shouldn't wanna see this and yet I do. I could see that. I kind of feel like the way you said about men in black, like this is the kind of movie that I would just go see it's kind of a mindless thing. You don't expect it to be great, but it's probably going to be funny and you're going to enjoy the actors. And you know, it'll be enjoyable probably, you know what this is. This is an airplane movie for me. Oh, yeah. That's yeah. That's I've totally on an airplane. Yeah. Okay. Gotcha. Yep. All right. That one is coming out June fourteenth and the week after let's talk Disney, June twenty is the release of Toy Story four. So Woody buzz gang. They're back for the fourth time and all I can say is why. Oh my God. Thank you, just just, just why I thought Toy Story was a great movie. And then Toy Story two. I'm like, oh sequel and I love Toy Story two. And then they were going to do toys story three and I thought isn't this played out at Toy Story. Three was just this beautiful wrap up of the trilogy. It was like closing the book on this, this just beautiful story. And I loved it kids liked it. Parents loved it, and I'm like, what the fuck do. We need a fourth one four. Yeah. Seriously? All right. And I know I'm talking about because I feel very passionate about this. But here's what I'm thinking you're paying Tom Hanks to come back and do this movie. Tim, I mean, Tim Allen probably needs work. But I talked Tom Tom Hanks. Like I feel like if, if Tom Hanks said, yes, I'll do it. It's, it's gotta be good. Right. Isn't he stage in his career that he could be like, no, I'm not? I'm not going to do that. No, I don't think I don't think that's true at all. I mean first of all voice, acting and not that it's simple. But it's definitely not as challenging as you're right. You really filming filming a full movie. Live movie. Okay. So I don't think that it's that stressing for him. You know, he's done this for three movies. It's probably not hard for him to get into the character get into the voice. Whatever. You know I just feel like this is a cash grab we've we've had that comment before the synopsis. The I idea of it. I mean, a spark doesn't really wanna be a toy during spark the rest of the toys to convince it that it's important to the little girl. I can't I don't know. You know it's the same regurgitating storyline. I was never like you know, oh my God. I love Toy Story, the, the movies were good. The first one, I loved the other to, like I agree with what you said they were. They were nice wrap-ups. They were good movies. But I couldn't if someone said to me, you know, here's what it is. If people ask me about Star Wars, or X, men or avengers, you know, about this movie or that movie I could mostly. Tell you what happened, and who the characters are, and what the story was and why it was meaningful with this. You know, Toy Story, it's like, well, pretty much every time like the toys got lost and had to find the way back kind of thing. Like it's just, you know, all right? I don't know. Why do we have to do it again? I'm coming at it from a different perspective, because it was probably my son was born in two thousand seven and he was kind of, like prime Toy Story age we grew up with the movies. We watched them. I know them forwards and backwards and sideways. I know these movies so well. And that's why for me watching the trilogy. It was just it was I I've written about it. It was just such a perfect ending. And that's a really good point if I could interrupt for a minute, because that's how I feel about Star Wars movies, and even like Thomas, the tank, engine, and we all have to realize that, you know, when you're listening to other people, critique movies and give their opinions. There's a huge emotional element. Your kid grows up with something. And you've watched that movie three thousand times. It's it makes an impact on you. Well, and I think that's why just going back to Aladdin. I think that's why my take on Aladdin is going to be very different than a lot of other people. Right. Because for some people, they themselves grew up with that movie, and it's kind of sacred to them. Yes. For me. I was like, yeah, I remember seeing that cartoon I think. That's how I was. So my thought on this one is that, you know, I was just at Disney DisneyWorld. I know you were there, not that long ago, we both go kind of frequently and Hollywood studios, one of the parks, there has a huge Toy Story land. Yeah. And the only thing I can think, is, let's keep pushing this out to number one for merchandising and decays -olutely that stuff relevant. Yep. Absolutely. What I will say is. I am usually on the press list to see the Disney movies. I see them I review them. So chances are pretty good that I will go and see it, and I will not be generous, okay? I will give an honest, legit opinion. So looking forward to it. Maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised. All right. Well, now we're completely switching gears to child's play which releases June twenty first, I am not a fan of this movie any of these movies any of the Chucky. No. Just. No, no, no, no, this, this goes back to what you said. Like can we just come up with something original? Exactly. Why do we have to do this? Why, why are we doing this? So with this one. If you don't know the story, I don't do you know the date that the first one came out. No. I feel like I was a teenager. Yeah. Let me see. Let's play. Oh, nineteen Eighty-eight. So, yeah, I, I saw I don't think I must not have seen it in the theater. I don't know if I did it was, it would have been I was a senior in high school that, you know, I never saw any of them, and I saw. And it was scary. And again, I saw the original that's enough but it's very clear from this list. That horror is making a big come. Yes. We're gonna make that same point. Yes. Yes. So. I see Mark Hamill on here. Oh, marquette. He does the voice of Chuckie, which is, honestly, the only it's not gonna make me go see it, honestly. But I am intrigued, you know, I mean Mark Hamill does evil voices so well member when he was on the flash. I loved him when he flesh, he had that he had that part on the flash where he played like somebody's evil father or something. A wait, was that on the flash? That was on the flash. It was the heat not the joker. The jokester the truth, something like that. Yes. Somebody. Yeah. Anyway. He was awesome. He's a possum an evil roles. So I think it'll be great. But this is not something I would see. It's the same old story line. You know, I mean the toys become sentence because of bluetooth. I mean okay. Whatever. Oh is is that it is it bluetooth? Okay. Yeah. Okay. Well, so this movie is out, June twenty-first. And I think it's pretty much. A remake of the original. And if you watch the trailer though, they do a good job of building up suspense, because they don't ever show you Chucky. Right. Right. They don't and I think that's going to be, you know, obviously, it's going to be updated and I-. It'll be CGI, right? I feel like it might be pretty impressive, especially compared to the, the old ones. Yeah. Yeah. I'm a pass on the down though. Yeah. Shown to me, too. All right. Speaking of horror, there's another one. I know now we're coming to July third with a movie called midsummer midsummer spelled. M. S. O. M A R. So it has like a Scandinavian vibrate. Who it the directors Ari Astor, who did, the who directed hereditary, which I did not see. Yeah. My, my husband and daughter saw that there. They'll hated to my family and my husband said it was probably one of the best horror movie seen in a long time, which means I will I, I. I think we had an Paris on. We talked about an earlier. She came on. And I think we talked about horror with an did we? Okay. I think yeah. Maybe that was before. I think last October before Halloween. Yes. And she talked about that movie and said, she grown ass woman had to go home and sleep at the lights on, I don't need something to do that, to me. I really just don't. Right. So this, this story is about a couple vacationing in Sweden. They happened upon a festival like event called midsummer that only takes place, every ninety years and got a clue as this article points out, judging by the trailer shift gets really real really quick. And we wouldn't be surprised if neither of them makes it out alive. I saw it. And I was like, Nope. Yeah. Yeah. This looks scary s fun. It looks good. But scary. But the cast, I mean, Sheedy's in it, did you see that? Oh, William jacks. And Harper recognize no good place and Colin ribbon from banner snatch and will Poulter who I love. So I know that I'm from we'll Poulter was in. We're the millers, okay? You still not seeing that no need. I of so many times, I told you to see that one of the funniest left outlawed movies, anyway. We'll pollsters great. He was also in Bander snatch will Poulter. Okay. Yet.

Toy Story Tom Tom Hanks Disney Jim jarmusch Adam Bill Murray Poulter Mark Hamill director Bijon rea Aladdin IMDB Sweden Tim William jacks Tim Allen millers Sheedy khloe Hollywood studios
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"So yeah, I can't believe it's been fourteen years since Jim Jarmusch and Bill Murray made broken flowers has been now. Oh boy. So that's a wanna feel old for all that long ago. But that was kind of a little movie. And and yeah, Jim Jarmusch. Oh, does something interesting. Right. Interesting when he has his movies plot. You know? Well to to counter that coffee cigarettes is one of my favorite movies of all time. But that's just like greats Bill Murray. Iggy pop Ness, and I just I'm I'm excited when I was gonna shut him in. I'm driving working together in Patterson, which which is the last movie he made, which is lovely island. Cam movie. Yep. Yep. So he's he's like there. Yeah. I think that's the kind of thing that it might be argued that it looks the trailer like a little weirder because he's still Jim Jarmusch. But like that again could be great summer counter program to what is a lot of sequels, and, you know, rehashes of old properties that like maybe this is a year where smaller stuff can really find traction because the bigger stuff is just not like starring people's, you know, emotion. What would you be at can by this time next week? So you're gonna have seen a lot of the stuff you'll be sending a dispatch from there. So what you've seen or unless you just see rocket man and decided to start life all over again. It's like John, and I'm not really anything out. I will have if people wanna more sort of digestible sifting through this imprint form early next week. I'll have a little like blank number of movies to watch a can or whatever. Even if you're not going to festivals just like fun to keep an eye on like, what titles are premiering track of what's what what's the foreign language title. And what's the Americanized? Title and everything can be a challenge for those of us who stay home so back into TV world briefly. I Richard you talked to Anna clunky who is one of the stars veep. She's had this kind of incredible run as the part of the harsh tongue cast of that show. And I assume you and I both grew up with her as a child star, which is fascinating to watch. It's weird. Have that's not part of her narrative anymore like I thought of her so clearly with my girl and now she's just feet while she sat right where you're sitting. But yeah, that's something. It was really interesting. And I and I when you interview people who are adults now in our work, still working in the profession. It can be touchy to ask them about their childhood. You know, and I and I did kind of walk in that direction, and I saw her kind of tense up, and I wasn't going to ask her like what was it like being on set was McCullough was never gonna ask her that here professional, but but to this, but she did, you know answer and the interesting distinction, she made was really about that like her career now as a grownup posts acting school and all that she really views as a different career than than once. She had when she was a kid because she's much more aware of what she wants to do. So she articulates that really well interview, she talks about, you know, the the, you know, the end of veep, which is a big thing for both her and for all of us who've loved that show for many years. So yeah, it was really great to talk to her and I managed to not, you know, ask her which I really wanted to what was what? Well, listen to your conversation with ski, I have the pleasure today of sitting across the table from Anna clump ski who is just about to end her run on veep. One of the biggest comedy hits of new century about that. Yeah. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. No. I know you've wrapped on everything. So your your role in that is done, obviously, you're still promoting. But like how does it? How do you feel right now about the veep? I mean, I just feel profoundly grateful that this all came to pass..

Jim Jarmusch McCullough Bill Murray Anna clump Ness John Richard Anna fourteen years
Elton John, Dexter Fletcher And Jim Jarmusch discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Elton John, Dexter Fletcher And Jim Jarmusch discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The world will get a first look at the new Elton John bio-pic rocket man when it premieres next month at the Cannes film festival Paramount Pictures confirms it's such a screen may sixteenth two weeks before its release in the US Terron Edgerton stars stepping into Elton John's big and flamboyant shoes is directed by Dexter Fletcher. Who's been busy in the bio pic world, he took over the Queen film bohemian rhapsody after director Bryan singer was fired. Rocket man is different however, described as more of a musical bio-pic hybrid and John himself as a producer on the movie. The seventy second annual canned film festival runs may fourteenth through the twenty fifth. Jim Jarmusch zombie comedy the dead. Don't die to

Elton John Dexter Fletcher Jim Jarmusch Paramount Pictures Bryan Singer Terron Edgerton Cannes United States Director Producer Seventy Second Twenty Fifth Two Weeks
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on AP News

"AP digital news network. Steve is is getting another chance to return the Red Wings to glory in Detroit this time as the general manager the Hockey Hall of Famer helped the Red Wings win three Stanley Cup championships during his time in Detroit as a player. His number nineteen jersey hangs in the rafters. He retired in two thousand six and left. Two years later to lead the lightning the Red Wings have been rebuilding. Under Ken, Holland who's run as GM is over after twenty two years Red Wings owner, Chris Illitch said Holland encouraged him to hire is men to replace him. After the Tampa Bay Lightning gave the Red Wings permission to talk to him about the job in March is taking the reins of team that's enduring its worst stretch since the early nineteen eighties. When the team was known locally as the dead wings. The world will get a first look at the new Elton John bio-pic rocket man when it premieres next month at the canned film festival Paramount Pictures confirms set the screen may sixteenth two weeks before its release in the US to renege Tim stars stepping into Elton John's big and flamboyant shoes is directed by Dexter Fletcher. Who's been busy in the bio pic world, he took over the Queen film bohemian rhapsody after director Bryan singer was fired. Rocket man is different however, described as more of a musical biopic hybrid and John himself as a producer on the movie. The seventy second annual Cannes film festival runs may fourteenth through the twenty fifth. Jim Jarmusch is zombie comedy. The dead. Don't die to open the festival. Seniors who are more likely to fall for scam could be looking at future mental health issues. AP's? Jackie Quinn, reports researchers suggesting a link between those elderly people their odds of developing Alzheimer's disease later on researchers at Chicago's rush university studied nearly thousand seniors without signs of brain issues for scam awareness tracking them for about six years things..

Red Wings Elton John Holland Dexter Fletcher AP Detroit Tampa Bay Lightning Jim Jarmusch Hockey Hall Jackie Quinn Steve general manager Cannes Bryan singer Alzheimer's disease Paramount Pictures US Chicago
Summer Movie Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:32 min | 2 years ago

Summer Movie Preview

"The movies of summer twenty nineteen. What is out there? What's going to happen? And I've got to start by saying you think maybe that summer begins on your calendar near the end of June. But not in Hollywood everything in Hollywood begins early because summer is when they make all the money that they can make all year. So officially April twenty six it's the beginning of summer because the movie that opens on that day is called a ventures endgame. This is three hours long. Nobody's gonna care. I predict that not only will this be the biggest box office hit of the summer, but it will be the biggest box office hit of the year. You remember what happened last time all the ventures or at least half of them seem to turn to dust than die mean? Now have those ventures that are left to signing if they can beat the evil fan. He so evil will the adventures be wiped out forever. Look how much money did these movies make I'm saying why would you basically kill the golden goose? This is going to continue in some way, we all know it. So what else is out there? I'm looking at my list. There's a major thing going on now of in terms of taking the Disney slash Pixar animated classics and turning them into live action movies. So we have The Lion King line king. One of the most successful Disney animated movies ever is now being done as a live action movie. You have Donald Glover being Simba. You have James Earl Jones actually being this father and the same scores. They're the same using. And it's directed by John Fabbro who did such a great job with the jungle book doing the same thing that I think we can all feel optimistic about what's going to happen. And then we have Aladdin when we remember the. Animated movie who do we remember the most? We remember Robin Williams doing the voice of the genie. This time doing the voice of the genie and being the genie. We have Will Smith. So big stars in this big kind of thing, they tried it with Dumbo earlier this year, and that didn't quite work the way they wanted to do. But we're talking about lying king and the Ladan so big deal. Now, what terms of old fashioned animation is out there. I don't know if you're like me. But there's a Toy Story four toy stories always been my favorite of those Pixar. There's something about Woody and buzz light year, and you're probably saying to yourself. Well, and Toy Story three didn't it happen. That would he said goodbye, Andy. And he went to college, and it was all over remember. There was little Bonnie Andy gave his toys too. So we're going to have little Bo peep comeback. I think when you look at what goes on in Toy Story, you have that kind of feeling of goodness of field. Goodness, but done with all the magic of Pixar. So if those adventures out there are going to have a run for their box office money. I would say Toy Story. Four is going to be the one that does it. So what else we now have men in black men in black international? You're not gonna see Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones anymore. But this time you have Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson. As new agents who are out there in this men in black universe. Sometimes you say to yourself do I want more of that? And you never know to actually see it. And I can only tell because I haven't seen this movie yet. But it looks like there's chemistry there. Then we have Spiderman far from home. You know, the Spiderman franchise never seems to end either. But we have Tom Holland who played him last time charmingly, I think, but now spider man, Peter Parker. They're taking a European vacation and the villain that they run up against is mysterious. Played by Jake Jilin. All I just think they're still some special sauce in the Spiderman universe, and I expect this one to also be a major hit. Godzilla Godzilla king of the monsters. I see that. And I go how much can they work this poor God's, but you can look at the trailer and see it. I like the idea that aside from viewer for Megan who is in it, Billy Bobby Brown from stranger things is in its she the dynamo. So if God Zillah can basically meet his match betting on little Millie to do something with that Hobbes and Shaw, this is fast and the furious you remember the rock of playing the the law man, and Jason stefon playing the outcast and the rebel these guys. I don't know if this is Hollywood kind of thing, but they tell us that Jason stadium and the rocked wing Johnson. Don't really like each other. And maybe that what the reason we love these characters and show so much because we liked that conflict. I don't know it seems a PR stunt to me, but I'm going to be there because this cars. There's the rock and their Stefa. So you're going to be there to and you know, it, oh and the big deal. Now, everybody has just in the midst of welcoming game of thrones back to their lives. The last season of that. You can't bear to live in a world where you can't see the stark sisters anymore. Well, now, you can dark Phoenix, which is part of the X men universe. Bring Sophie Turner, and she's Jean grey this character that we've seen before. But she's this younger version of her and she split between the good side of her and the dark Phoenix side of her. And to me, these girls are tremendously talented in what they do on game of thrones. And I think we're going to keep seeing them through the years, but her sister her at least game of thrones sister, maisy Williams is in new mutants part of that universe too. But in this case, they're all new characters to do this. They're all gonna be in the X men universe. Doing it. So that's it for the blockbusters that are out there. You've got everything from animation to comic book characters to everything. And that's the stuff that you hear about that your friends are going to talk to you about. But there's gotta be other stuff to part of summer is comedy of. I think we all really have gone through a long winter. And we're saying make us laugh give us something that will just make say, whatever. I can just sit back and not think. So what's there for that? There's a movie called longshot. This is a movie in which Charlotte Theran is playing the secretary of state who is running for president. But falling Manley in love with who staff throw in. Okay. It's like, a beauty and the beasts thing going on here. Seth Rogan is her speechwriter all of her people say what are you doing? You're going to destroy your career. But no, it's love. And if you don't laugh at the combination of Seth Rogan, Charlie staring. There's nothing left for you. And then we have the hustle. The hustle is a movie that used to be called dirty run scoundrels where the old days it was about conman. Now, it's con- women. They're played by Anne Hathaway and rebel Wilson. And they basically go all cross the continent finding rich people whose money they can steal pretty people. Glamour? What's wrong with that? Oh, book smart. This is directed by the actress Olivia Wilde, and it's about girls graduating from high school and saying we spent all our lives with our head in the books. Everybody else is going to parties and having fun. So they're going to do that beanie Feldstein plays one of them. She is the sister of Jonah hill and real life and Jona hill did super bad. This is kind of the women's version of super bad everything in it works, like a charm. You're really going to like that one. Then we have a movie called late night. This is about the TV talk show world and Emma Thompson plays. Probably the only woman on late night TV who hosts her own show, but she's got only men on her writing staff, and then she hires Mindy Kaeling who also wrote the screenplay of this movie, very very funny about what happens when you put women into what basically has been. A male bass they end of doing this. And the combination of Mindy king writing for the great Emma Thompson and watching them perform together is just so you've got to see that one to my favorite kind of thing. The dead. Don't die. You've got to admit that is a great and funny title. It comes from the indie, directing great, Jim Jarmusch. And it's cut people like Bill Murray and Adam driver by zombies. Okay. If Bill Murray is going to go out there and get laughs. Sizing up zombies. I'm going to be there watching him do it. So we have a good chance for laughs horror. I've got to talk about it now because it's not just the Cajun. Oh movie harm movie that makes money any makes people talk and get happy. It's they're everywhere. Now child's play do you? Remember the old child's play movies where you had Chucky. The crazy nut doll that. Always terrified me. Just. This doll who looks kind of little bit weird and freckly, but he has a voice on him like a longshoreman guess who's doing the west now of Chucky Marquel? Mark Hamill, Luke Skywalker. And from what I've seen of it in. It's just been a little bit of it. It's wonderfully malevolent, so I'm going to be there to see that one. Then there's Annabel comes home. Another doll another possess doll also part of the conjuring universe where a viewer for Megan Patrick Wilson. Or the demon knowledge is that tried to make sure that nothing bad can come of this horrible doll Annabelle, but Bill will destroy and I will be there to watch her. Do it then them that follow their certain titles that get me them that follow really gets me? And it's about a snake handling church in Appalachia. No, they there are there colts. And they're almost religious cult where people pray. But they have the snakes, and they hold the life thinks pass them on. And you're thinking, what are you tell me about this like CD movie Har movie will guess who the star of this movie is the freshly minted Oscar winner Ogilby Coleman from the favourite, she's tossing those snakes around so irresistible. I think you're gonna love it. Then there's the Nightingale. See it's does not stop. It's har- everywhere. The night and gas from the director, Jennifer Kent who did a thing a couple of years ago called the baba Duke, which gave millions of people nightmares. And now she's back there following a woman who is chasing a convict got to be hooked. And then midsummer midsummer directed by REI Astor who last year gave us hereditary with Toni Collette, a really scary movie. Now, it's at a nine day Swedish holiday where everybody celebrates. But they'll be no celebrating after this one. So we. Got a lot of stuff out there. That's just going to scare us witless. And I couldn't be happier. All right. When summer comes. We think of all the things I've just talked to you about blockbusters comedy horror action, the rock of everything is there, but every even in a season like this. It's all about money and getting us into our theater, there are those movies that can come out entertain us. And also will hear about them at the end of the year when the Oscar nominations come out and the number one movie on that list, and the one that I haven't seen anything of India's of anyone that saw even anything past the trailer is called once upon a time in Hollywood it is written and directed by Quentin Tarantino its stars in order to Capri, oh as a TV star on the wane in Los Angeles. And Brad Pitt as his stunt double whoever thought of

Hollywood Pixar Megan Patrick Wilson Bill Murray Seth Rogan Will Smith Robin Williams Emma Thompson Bonnie Andy Disney James Earl Jones Chucky Marquel Phoenix Donald Glover Oscar Brad Pitt Chris Hemsworth Olivia Wilde John Fabbro
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"But I think it's a false science because it is it's a contrived formula. And it's exactly the same. As a, you know, a book line musician looking down on though, sang musicians as you describe him because they don't know anything both things a false, the real truth of it is the feeling is the feeling on the technical things that you pre agree. They can be the absence of technique. Just as surely as a display of technique, you know, agreeing to pretend you don't know more. Three colds is is conscious autistic decision that some great bands of made. But I don't know too many bands. The speaking of that, really don't know other music. You know, the example would be, you know, Jim Jarmusch film danger. Yeah. Like, what does that tell you what the stooges listening to bright in Alba Isla? You know, they weren't listening just two three chord cowers. Bam rock they had a win of other types of music, and other kinds of expression, he heard about way, and the flip side as you were alluding to there's the idea of sort of visibility of beginner's mind, where if you can get into and I think that's maybe that relates to your protein guitar where maybe there is some aspect of other being primitive or pretending the whether I was ever pretending. Definitely I just mentally made a conscious choice to step up and speak up a little bit more. Because when you playing just for yourself, and your your realizing songs just in the space that you're in which could be a bedroom. Or something and maybe just gonna to play little clubs little folk clubs. And then you discover the people talk over the music, so then you have to put the keys up and try and command the room with the volume a little bit without wrecking the song. And that it's short jump to writing a song that fills the space. And that's what I did. When I wrote some of the songs on the first that ended up on the first album. I didn't play very many of them in public as a so most thing so I had to come out of nowhere. But if you listen to my first record references, lots of music that wasn't particularly groovy in the hips book of seventy seven van Morrison, probably via Mollison, Marvin Gaye, you know, this. I mean, the rhythm of one of the songs whether it sounded at all like, it was taken from you and live in your Lovin Bukovina, Tammy the rhythmic idea that just that that that that's how far off the model I could possibly expect to be given that I've never really been in the studio before but for. Times little demo room. You know, you've I'm not mobbing gay, by the way, that's the other thing. Which is the big drawback. Yeah. It is you've learned to read and write music, which is highly unusual for rockstar. Well, won't I'm not real start to. It's no, I'm not. Business cadre, and I'm just a musician songwriter. So when I needed to have the skills to communicate ideas, more clearly, a not necessarily have my ideas bent out of shape by excellent. But inevitably, you know, the they were arranges who had their own ideas of I was trying to say I was working with some people who only spoke with musical the musical. Yeah. Yeah. With the with the sequel tat. Yeah. Now, I'm glad I didn't now because it's opened up the possibilities of doing something. Like this record where I could write out sketch out on my ideas and events for the orchestration. And then what would Steve naive who could filled every available spice on this record and would have done gladly and wonderfully, but that would have been a different record. I worked with him closely to say this thing, you you've made up for this part of the song is so great. That's hey that because I by the way, how string section coming in here. And that's going to take into the course. And then you join them, and you play together, he said something to the extent that simple way simple way of thinking of it. It's a little more intricate than that. But that's a sensually won't doing. He said that with Nick Lowe, you realize when Nick when Nick Lowe was producing Steve he was you had to distinguish between something like the genius of. What's doesn't that missed the the magic of the mischief because as really startling with things you do..

Nick Lowe Steve naive colds Jim Jarmusch Alba Isla Marvin Gaye van Morrison Tammy
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Sell good number eight is the four hundred blows by Francois Truffaut. High also had the poster in my college dorm room. Do you get extra points for that? Because I gotta go back through the lake. Number seven is eight and a half by Rodrico Fellini. I number six is persona by Ingmar. Bergman. I five is the rules of the game by John Renoir. Number four is Russia Mon by Akira Kurosawa? Number three is Tokyo story by ozo-. I haven't watched it. How we've talked about those cool things they do at New York Film festival where like a modern day luminary filmmaker comes and talks about films that influence them. Jim Jarmusch at the one. I went to listed this film as one of his still on my list. But now, we're like shamed. We all have to watch Tokyo story by like next week. I'm generally shaving by this entire brasses. Number two is bicycle thieves. Number one is seven samurai. I. I don't think I've seen it. Now that's a four hour in a lot of. But there's so much samurai action. Yeah. It's so good. I know seen the magnificent seven the remake not there. Yeah. Denzel Washington won in the one from the sixties which any sleep. So what are you guys favorite just around this out? What are you guys favorite for films? Actually breathless is not my favorite good Dr weekend, two or three things I know about her in praise of love breathless is the canonical title. So I could see why it would be there. But I wouldn't have selected that from him. For instance. I think pure food my favorite. Yeah. That's good as well. From that time period, there were sixty seven filmmakers on the list. So there must be multiple titles from almost half of them. So I bet there's more than there. You know? Like, if we went further up on the list, you get to like, your mother Toro, and like pants labyrinth is on there. So like a lot of them are more contemporary. It's just like the classics are, of course in the top twenty. So. Yeah. We have more Bergman on Bergman, persona persona. Not seven seal. I'm surprised. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Love these films are really classic to Johnny. We're seeing those more contemporary ones higher up on the list. I I would say generally that like the cinema scene from Israel in the last twenty years has totally lead only say blown up. It's a bad bed words for Israel. But it has been burgeoning a lot of the shows we like here in the US come from Israeli show is so I would definitely recommend people. Check out some Isreaeli cinema. Any anyone film in particular or nothing coming directly to mind, but I would say generally, I haven't seen like a bad movie out of Israel in the last decade, and there's been a lot. But I think super Indy wise to mama tambien is probably my favorite. I was gonna say I'm shocked by the lack of like Mexican and Latin American presence in the surprising. But yeah, it's done said, I guess like higher like in higher numbers there are, but that's spent one of the top languages. Yeah. This is a massive undertaking. You know, like sorting out the one hundred greatest films of like. Regardless of the fact that their foreign or not it's just like this is the entire world. We're talking about it's not just America. It's and every decade like they didn't even narrow it down. Surprising. How much of the like dominant mid-century thing is still part of the top of illest. That's all it's just interesting that like a whole lot of the ones that were used to seeing there are still up there. Well, I guess that's what makes them classics. Yeah. And then I'm also conduct not see the conformist. Although I wonder what Berta Lucci made it. I'm sure there's a Berta Lucci somewhere in there. But it was kind of surprised not to see that one. I think probably right up the whole list. And while we might not have it by the time this podcast is released. It'll probably go out on Friday. So stay tuned in to that cool and speaking of voting for things you all know by now that we had election day in America this week. There were lots of races all over the country, and there's one I can pretty much guarantee. You heard nothing about, but it's actually relevant. Indie filmmakers, I'm talking about the fight over the congressional seat in west Virginia's third district a rural..

Bergman Israel Berta Lucci Jim Jarmusch Denzel Washington America Francois Truffaut Tokyo Akira Kurosawa Rodrico Fellini Ingmar John Renoir New York Film Russia west Virginia US Isreaeli twenty years
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on /Film Daily

"It also star selena gomez in her first feature film with with jim jarmusch so this is a zombie comedy that we don't know many details about yet but it's currently shooting in new york jso i never thought we would ever see at zombie comedy from from that filmmaker you know you mentioned bill murray is in that film bill murray has played a played a zombie in a previous film and that was that was ambi way and and now we know that samba went to is officially happening post about it yes since i'm your land to is alive after being basically dead for ten years since the first two thousand nine film became a cult hit so sony is officially moving forward with zombie land to and the original cast and original director ruben fleischer are all set to return so that means emma stone woody harrelson jesse eisenberg and abigail breslin are all set to reprise their roles in the upcoming zombie land to so zombie land to will follow the quartet as they move from the white house to the american heartland as they face off against news kinds of zombies that have evolved since the first movie as as well as some human survivors so this will definitely be a different probably bigger movie since the first film was made on about twenty four million budget and starred all of these actors as relative unknowns except for what he harrelson but now they've all become essentially oscarnominated stars and are returning for the still which will be released in october two thousand nineteen just in time for the tenth anniversary of the original film though i think we've talked about this in the past the originals zombie wayne was kind of refreshing when we were in in our of you know that time when i think sex neider started donna the dead like that whole zombie craze of serious scary zombies and it was kind of fun in style with stick and what i liked about it was you know the whole the whole title premise of them being in a in amusement park fighting off zombies you know ten years later i'm finding that premise far less interesting do do either of you have any interest in into nope sorry i don't mean to be flippant but it's just like i can't i don't understand why it took this long to make this movie because people were clamoring for a sequel for a few years afterwards i don't know if it's just because the people involved with it didn't have a script ready to go and recent waren it could there were the writers and i think our writing back to write this screenplay maybe had to make deadpool before and have that the a huge hit before they could get enough juice to get this thing going but if that's the case i mean ten years that's like i don't know i just feel it gets too long and i've lost personally i've just lost interest in in picking up with these characters again maybe we'll prove me wrong i hope they do because i always hope every movie is great but i don't know just like right now in terms of like taking my temperature on this project and home feeling about it i could not can i just don't care about this when i have to admit i'm like this movie than ben i really enjoyed the first dombi land and i haven't seen it since it first came out but.

selena gomez jim jarmusch ten years
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Which was directed by jim jarmusch in the i guess nineteen ninety nine yeah and it's one of those movies that's very difficult to explain to people because it doesn't sound like a real move basically you are the title character name you are a hit man and a sort of samurai like a like a warrior and but you live in contemporary city and you know it's like a it's like a crime drama in some ways i mean and in some ways it's in some ways it's a comedy as well but it really hinges on your performance as you know at the center of this film as this as this actual you know you have to believe in bushido or whatever and we have to believe that you believe that with no explanation there's no it's not as though everybody is there's like a lot of scenes of other people going like oh yeah that's goes talk he's like this because blah blah blah blah blah right like you're just in that world and your natural to that world did that role come to you through audition or was that something that jim jarmusch wrote for you jim wrote the movie for me oven he in some ways was thinking that this character was his representations of me what happened was we met we said we'd like to work together about a year later he said you know the can we get together and talk and idea and then he proceeded to like for months for the for about a year like meet me in la and we would just have like these sometimes four five our conversations and then he would go back to new york and then one day you said okay i have enough i'm gonna go write the script he wrote ghost talk it has some dematic's that we're talking about even the different way you know i think the movie deals with purpose and whether you can live and die by what you believe in the dow was tested that goes on with with him quite challenging film but.

jim jarmusch new york la one day
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A matter of their a little bit off beat from the traditional comedies that that were used to seeing him in and that's a jim jarmusch fell i mean that's a film that you know is going to be visually uh impressive but at the same time rely heavily on great talent on this grain and yeah i mean bill murray really carries that film quite well and i remember when it came out you know he was he was really talked about his like showing of something he had before and i'm like now this is just a really counted actor and and i think it's it's just a it's a shock to some people to see a guy who you know is one of the best comedic you know you know named that we've ever known especially because you know the guys from going really hard since the '70s and he's never really done anything particularly you know that you know there's been a couple of movie she's made the just didn't click they didn't find their audience they weren't too uh great but at the same time he's never really have any huge myth like even those films have their cult followings and broken flowers was one that i think it's just sort of slipped under the radar uh for a lot of i've ever heard of at least seen rug of ours i haven't seen it by speaking of bill murray i'm gonna go with rush more at which a elesse was iverson fleck from several years ago um you know that's kind of about a student who falls in love with a teacher at this private school that bill murray plays a great carrot that would would use it i was kind of anti valentine's day an anti logo is it yeah and that was the movie that put wes anderson on the map to hear a lot of people uh for those that didn't see bottle rocket rush more was the movie that you know that.

jim jarmusch bill murray valentine wes anderson
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Movie Crush

"I think i i think the only roberto panini movies have seen of the jim jarmusch ones was a down by law down by law and then he was in the night on earth see i got a huge hole for jarmusch in my in my catalogue you need to fill that hair and into at stumps gross nestling robert lam our own robber lam of stuff to blow your mind he's active on this page which makes me feel really good roberts awesome i fear and loathing in las vegas for him actually which is kinda funny pena robert that doesn't seem like beer loathing would be his movie but he says it actually inspired me to go back to school take some journalism classes rather than take the l set go down that road i watched the movie first then read the book not that i expected the same gone to adventures or anything but the movie and book ignited something in me and then he procured a giant suitcase full of drugs and took a roof no other realizing okay bo kelly butler olsen one of our old pals the secret life a walter mitty uh has been a huge reminder to not get so caught up in plans in daydreams that i forget to actually experience life that's a good one all right and finally will lead you one more here one carlos uh carranza says invictus which i haven't seen yet on the list a great story of how after the apartheid mandela and meet south african rugby team work together to give the nation the first win as a unified country in order to go forward we have to talk in work with the people that have completely different points of views man that's a good one to finish up with given what's going on in this country right now those are some good answers and i think i mean look i wish i could read them all everyone to these are all great but it we don't want an hour of just reading facebook post but uh i think it's really shows it like movies necessartish idea behind the show is a lot more going on than entertainment sometimes it can be just that which is great but movies can inspire in in a really cause you to question things about yourself in the role around the u n inspire you.

roberts las vegas mandela roberto panini jim jarmusch walter mitty facebook
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Crybabies

Crybabies

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Crybabies

"Um so i got what was that the could also i mean just to interrupt here we we also don't want to portray you as a a nonfunctional human i mean europe person who gets up in the morning and does work and live the life so yeah rat i i just don't want but she's crying the whole time to tell ya tired in fact she just she has a kleenex dispenser the shadows really been surgically i bet it i think what i'm trying to say to be more direct is you have a lot of authentic reasons to cry but you still cry at movies and songs and things like that and i'm just wondering if it feels like a different sort of crying to you and i think they're all so a related they're connected like a usually cried something because it it connects to some either some issue in my life or just some larger issue in humanity that i find upsetting and so i don't i don't even think that those are really detached like i don't think that there is such a thing is shallow crying or shallow triggers for crying because if you're accessing that thing inside of you that this committee go blah then that's very deep will your first crying q is kind of interesting because it's not technically not a sad thing it's more of its the scene from uh the movie down by law the jim jarmusch movie which is a great movie i love that movie but i also have very romantic connotations with it because where this age yeah kinda came out like when i was starting college and it was like one of the first indy movies i saw but it also has new orleans in it and it's filmed in the south than its filmed in the swamp and eat it was like seeing.

europe jim jarmusch indy
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The new steady chateau du gay the mysteries of chateau was gay 1929 film silent film bye man ray with live music played by the band squirrel that set to musician who are actually much better known in the film world the director jim jarmusch and his associate carter logan handling all of the loop in the electric guitar in the keyboards and what not and the two of them as squirrel creating these works especially for these films and premiering them at this new sound live event on february seventeen and nineteen in our 2015 series at brookefield place in winter garden atrium where of course we screen the films while they were playing an eight you know i i'm not giving you much in the way of or anything really in the way of explanation of what the films are because they're really hard to explain their very abstract there there are kind of narratives were bits of narrative you need to sort of peace it together but basically as jim jarmusch told us earlier in the show he was playing with the form of of cinema of what a movie camera could do of what a film could look like and and so you know the the film end the music both as separate entities stand up really well and you can find the films on on youtube anyway there is one more film score that we haven't yet heard and will take care of that.

jim jarmusch carter logan youtube director
"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"jim jarmusch" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"A really unique body of work which is sometimes dismissed by american critics i think in a colleague near its widen as wannabe jim jarmusch whereas i think jim jarmusch would probably be the first person to admit that his films will all inspired by aki kaurismaki and his whole did and sensibility radio aki kaurismaki was doing that long before jarmusch started this filming particularly the other side of hope i think is just an incredibly original and human way of looking at the syrian refugee crisis in a way that only carries makki could it so did pan it's so funny so drawl but it's really got a lot of heart i mean it's so full of compassion i just can't imagine anyone coming out of that film not moved by it to have that shut out and the finns instead selecting tom of finland about the gay porn artist i mean i grew up with trauma fema tom of inland is like marvel superheroes to us cable and film is just okay it's very conventional it's kind of soft if you will you know the what made that art so revolutionary what made it have such an impact is kind of missing from the movie it does have some poignant moments it has some nice performances but i think it's not half the movie that the cars markieff illness i would agree and i would just say i guess it is nice though to obscene and just really the last few years starting with the with cars makki's work in then now expanding to a number of others.

jim jarmusch aki kaurismaki makki tom finland fema