13 Burst results for "Jim Fallows"

"jim fallows" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:30 min | 5 months ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KGO 810

"It's about locating leaders in networks and understanding how those how those networks function, The distorting, I think perspective. Which the modern media uh the door is the one that emphasizes all was the personality of the person at the top, especially if that personality is dramatic or charismatic, or just clownish and amusing. It's a great mistake to argue, as James Fallows did last year in the necessary for the Atlantic. That the president of the United States is like the pilot of an aircraft and that if the plane crashes, it's it's probably pilot error. There's just no way being present. The United States is like flying a play not even close. In truth, people at the top of complex bureaucracies have and this is something I've learned partly from racing back to singer. Have surprisingly limited information flow often and generally confronted with choices after the options have been filtered down, typically three by the bureaucracy. So this is a very important point of connection between my 35,000 ft work books like Doom or the Square on the Tar and the biography. I mean, I needed to write a book about networks to understand Kissinger. And understand his role in American and world politics. And then I think I needed to write a book about disaster because ultimately in volume to Kissinger. I have to write about Vietnam and make sense of of one of the great military disasters and political disasters of modern American history. Now It does sound a little bit like I'm saying it's a bit of boats. It's a bit of great or wicked men. And it's a bit of, uh, the grapes forces of history. But let's face it. That's the truth about what we do is. Historians were trying to tease out those things over which individual leaders don't have control and and then we're trying to identify what exactly their decision making. Role was good illustration of this from Doom is Churchill and the The Bengal Famine, which has always been the stick with which Churchill's critics of have beaten him and it's not been hard to do because Churchill said numerous callous things about about the Indians and particularly about the leaders of the nationalist movement. But if one actually looks closely at what happens, and I discussed this with the marcher and got him to read the relevant part, it's clear that it wasn't the British prime minister who was the key culprit for what went wrong in Bengal during the war. And ultimately, although he didn't do very gracefully, Churchill did the right thing and making sure that supplies were diverted. To the area that was affected so that that's a good illustration of how I think we should proceed as historians Churchill matter the huge amount. I think he probably was, as a J. P. Taylor said, the savior of his nation Without Churchill, It's hard to mention. Actually, Britain would have come through 1940 1943 in Ben Gold doesn't seem to me like something that has a huge amount to do with his decision making had much more to do with the people closer geographically to the To the disaster. You are listening to the Commonwealth Club radio program featuring Nile Ferguson in conversation with Maya Jasin off you can learn more about the Commonwealth Club. It's many programs. It's travel program and how to become a part of it all at Commonwealth club dot org. You can find thousands of our podcast on apple podcasts, Google podcasts and Spotify now back to our program. I wanted to ask you a little bit about disasters that don't count, but that's what I mean. You know you just we're talking about Churchill Churchill is a man who spent much of a professional career. I mean, he was he was rather old. By the time he became prime minister, you have decades of experience before them Throughout the decades of his career before becoming prime minister, he frequently mobilized exactly the same sort of rhetoric that he would later applied to Hitler. Two very, very different kinds of situations. You know, he'll talk About the suffragettes as being you know, the the evil of all time he'll talk about, you know, Irish Fenian. You know Irish rebels as being you know, the greatest evil of all time. We'll talk about obviously the greatest evil of all time, and we'll talk about Himmler is being the greatest evil of all time with Hitler. He actually got a lot of people to agree with him. But my point of this is to say that there are obviously lots of people who Are wrong nine times out of 10. And then if they're right the 10th time. Um it's that's the time that really sticks and I'm wondering in your accounts of disaster if some of the disasters that are standing have here in a sense this goes back to my Titanic question is is that some of them are the ones that stick? I mean, that is clearly, you know. The Spanish flu killed an awful lot of people, but some of these other things such as again the Titanic or the Challenger. These are the ones that kind of rise above the transom. So what about the ones that don't you allude briefly? To the opioid epidemic. At the end of the book, Um one could point to the Syrian civil war on the migrant crisis that has followed do these counts as disasters. And if so, how? And if not? Why not? Well, certainly the opioid epidemic because it hasn't been global. It's been national has been a disaster. And it killed over the course of back Obama's presidency as many people as Covid 19 killed in the final year of Trump's presidency. And yet, I don't remember ever reading a piece By Jim Fallows blaming Obama for the opiate epidemic. It happened on his watch the each year more people died, the administration totally failed to to deal with the problem. And I do think it's a reflection of the way our media work that there was so little criticism of of the administration that presided over that disaster. A disaster that was beginning to urban, as of course, deteriorated again last year with big spike in overdoses. I guess The key here is is how disasters get framed, and you're right. There's a phenomenon of the the lucky Cassandra..

Jim Fallows Maya Jasin Nile Ferguson Obama James Fallows Hitler Trump J. P. Taylor Covid 19 Himmler Churchill Kissinger last year Cassandra nine times 10th time Ben Gold Bengal 1940 10
"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 5 months ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So If the judgment had been made When Donald Robertson was around age 45 or 50, people would have thought a promising precocious, moderate career. So here's Donald Rumsfeld in 2000 and six This is three years into the Iraq war. It's a recorded message he gave to US forces after he was forced to retire. It's about the war on terror. Long struggle we are in is complex. It's unfamiliar, and it's still little understood, leading some to believe that there is no need to go on. So Jim Fallows the war in Iraq to what degree is Donald Rumsfeld responsible for the U. S decision to invade Iraq in 2003? He was relatively under involved in the decision to go to war to use the 9 11 attacks as the justification for invading Iraq itself. Dick Cheney was much more centrally involved in that Paul Wolfowitz and some others, But it was when the planning for the war began in its execution that Rumsfeld himself came much more into center stage. To your knowledge. Did he ever feel regret about what happened in Iraq or taking the responsibility? It's worth being clear about what it is that Rumsfeld should take responsibility for might feel culpable, which was essentially he refused to prepare for what it would mean to hold the territory that the U. S. Forces could take relatively quickly in the Spring of 2000 and three Russell believed in a concept of lightweight precision and military operations. He kept low balling the figures for what it would take in terms of troop presence to hold Iraq. And in his public and private life, both in the following years of Secretary of defense and then as a private citizen, he was notably unreflective, unrepentant. Quite a contrast to Robert McNamara, who spent the rest of his life after secretary of defense is during the Vietnam War essentially bearing the burden of those decisions. And run cells memoir. I mean, despite the massive casualties in Iraq, he essentially seemed to say that the war went over time and over budget. Did he ever express any regrets about the death toll? Not that I would am aware, And this seems to be in the nature of the man that that he had been so successful so early with this jaunty straight ahead approach, And it's worth mentioning that after serving as the youngest secretary of defense in U. S history under Gerald Ford, he went on to become a very successful business CEO and made a lot of money that way. And everything in his life had prepared him for the idea that quick decisions, snap judgments. Look forward rather than back. I'm not aware that he ever talked about the hundreds of thousands of lives that were lost in Iraq and around the world and the United States because of the way he had planned the war. It seems like everyone who knew Rumsfeld, friend or foe described him as driven, tireless, smart, politically cunning. As someone who interviewed him several times, Jim, how did he come across? He was somebody who prided himself on quick ray part a like responses to questions. He viewed interviews almost as debates. Themselves enjoyed this sort of fencing, parry and thrust of discussions. You don't really mean that you can't say that. Well, what do you mean? Okay, I did say that and so back and forth again. He enjoyed the quickness, I think as opposed to the depth, so he was interesting to talk with, but I think it showed again. The strengths and perhaps the limitations of his, uh Executive functions. That's fascinating, Jim, What do you think, is wrong? Cells legacy. Sadly, it has to be the management and mismanagement of the Iraq war. He was the exemplar of a mid century moderate Republicanism when he rose in politics. He ran the office of Economic Opportunity during the Nixon forward a years and was an ambassador to NATO. But sadly, he went back, perhaps when he should not have and made a very destructive decision even worse and its consequences. James Fallows is a writer, journalist and correspondent for the Atlantic who interviewed and wrote about Donald Rumsfeld throughout his long career in public service, Jim Thank you very much, Marco. My pleasure. Thank you. The impact of US wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is a story that we continue following a story that.

James Fallows Dick Cheney Donald Robertson Donald Rumsfeld Marco Robert McNamara Gerald Ford Rumsfeld Jim Fallows Paul Wolfowitz 2003 2000 Jim Vietnam War United States Spring of 2000 NATO Afghanistan 50 U. S. Forces
"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They're They're really different issues and really different from erosions of democracy. And when we play into that, when we sort of Push the bounds just because we don't know another way to seem objective. We're doing a disservice to the honest And Jim Foulest talk for just a moment about what are the values that that come into play here when there's no more equal time provisions for television for broadcast networks, too. Tio have to abide by. So what are the standards that journalists should be thinking about? So I think back in the earlier days of journalism, when when I was getting a start, there were certain norms that we could expect politicians to operate within. There were, as you say, the legal requirements of the fairness doctrine where broadcast networks had to put on things from from opposing parties, and most journalists could assume that most politicians Would try to avoid saying things that were provably untrue as we move into different terrain where there was Norm's don't apply in the same way. I think there's a new movement that is necessarily underway in journalism to say our Our two loyalty should be to the process of democracy, democracy, small democracy and two observable truth. And sometimes this puts us in a difficult position of saying. We think this side is saying something. It's true and this fight is not But our larger, longer term loyalty is should be to democracy and to the truth as weaken death best determine it. And Susie Bana. Karen that does take Tina's Jim is suggesting that does take journalists away from what many journalists were were taught and that is you try to give as equal as fair. Treatment on time to all candidates as you can. Yeah, but I think it's just time to evolve the thinking right? There's a certain sort of pattern that we'd established that Donald Trump just doesn't appear too right. He's unwilling to here to these norms, and he uses them to manipulate the media. So when you see that you're being played or manipulated, it's time to change the playbook and adjust to what's happening. And you know, to some degree. I think what Donald Trump really took advantage of in 2016 is that political journalism had become very akin to entertainment that had become very sports like, well, just constantly talked about was up and he was down and you know if we just continue in that same harm, we're going to just continue to have elections where people aren't getting good information, right? And I think this is the moment as we go into What's going to be a very difficult election week and where a lot of information is going to be coming in, and we're gonna have to be processing it and helping people understand it to really take a step back and ask what is the role we play in making sure we'll get the best information information they need to really assess things accurately. So Jim Fallows. What is it that viewers consumers of news who care about this election and want the best possible coverage? What should they be demanding right now from the news meeting, especially from television. So I think it'll be awkward for me to say this right at this moment. But I personally appreciate the effort that your program makes to try to say no to represent different sides and arguments, but to say At this moment, we think certain side you're more grounded in reality. I think for readers, viewers listeners, there is a tremendous array of material available now. And I guess the main thing that the public can dio is similar to what we in the media, Khun dude, which is to try to avoid Just the distraction of the spectacle minute by minute by minute that if we find ourselves as citizens or as reporters being in the mode of a cat chasing a laser dot You know where it is exciting in that instant, but we're not God deciding about the things that matter in the long term, so there's a lot of material out there to listen to to watch and to read, so seek it out. We're gonna have to leave it there. And we thank you both so much. Jim Fallows, Susie Bana carom. We appreciate it. To duty. As the war over the ethnic Armenian en clave of Nagorno Karabakh continues between Armenia and Azerbaijan. The push for a cessation of hostilities accelerated this week..

Jim Fallows Donald Trump Susie Bana Jim Jim Foulest Nagorno Karabakh Norm Armenia Karen Azerbaijan Tina
"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Weren't true, and it just became accepted the well, That's what he does. Not calling that out more for what it wass and then holding the other side more accountable. That was probably a mistake. Another notable difference A 2017 analysis from the Columbia journalism Review. Found the coverage of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server dominated mainstream news coverage more than any other topic during the 2016 election. This time, Republicans and some journalists say Joe Biden is the one not getting his fair share of scrutiny. Voters have one last opportunity to watch the president and the former vice president debate together one week from today in Nashville. Yet another story broke late today, adding to the controversy over the fall debates. Steve Scholar who's the political editor at C span, it was supposed to moderate tonight's debate was suspended by C SPAN for lying and saying that his Twitter account was hacked. Scully made that claim last week after he exchanged messages with a former Trump's spokesman who is now opposed to President Trump. Scully apologized, but the president tweeted that quote he was right. He said the debate was rigged, and the Trump campaign was not treated fairly by the debate commission. Let's take this moment to look at the news media's coverage of the campaign. James Fallows is a writer and author who wrote all about this for the Atlantic and Susie Bana carom. She's the director and producer of the documentary We just mentioned. She's the executive vice president at Vice news, and we welcome both of you to the NewsHour. Jim Fallows to you first. What do you make of the network's decision tonight? ABC had scheduled a town meeting with Joe Biden and NBC scheduled a town meeting President Trump at the exact same time. In my view, this was a very, very serious misjudgement by NBC, which I think I don't know what this will have any lasting political significance, but I think it will be seen as a really a miscalculation on their part. The reason is one of the lessons of the news media walking back four years ago was just their attraction to the spectacle of Donald Trump of covering his rallies in 2015 onward. We've seen that with the coronavirus passport Thinking's etcetera. The coverage of the helicopter from Walter Reed. The on ly reason to run these events head to head is for the spectacle value. See Who's gonna win the ratings battle, etcetera, etcetera, and NBC could've given Donald Trump a time after Joe Biden the next day or whatever. So I think this was an unfortunate judgment on your part. Susie Obamacare. And what about that? I mean, you've worked at the networks. You know how these decisions are made. What do you think has happened here? Look, I think this is incredibly disappointing, but it's not a surprise what Trump's riel skill is knowing how to draw attention away from a story that's not working for him. So he didn't do well in the first debate. E, you know, really didn't want to do the second debate and was getting criticized for that. And now all anybody's talking about is NBC and not Him and the things that aren't working. I'm in his campaign, right? And when NBC agrees to do this, they just played completely into his hands. They let him control the narrative, and he's already you know. Talking about how they're fake news on Twitter. So it's also just disappointing that they would give him this kind of opportunity, Tio, use them and also maligned them at the same time. Which does raise the question. Jim Fallows, a CZ we mentioned there's so much criticism of what the media did to enable Donald Trump in 2016. How do you see coverage this year? I think that the two big problems I tried to write about in the Atlantic from the previous cycles coverage one was this attraction to spectacle of a sitting. Karen was just saying that you have Where you just were doing in the setup piece. The other was the difficulty the media and dealing with a call with both side or ism. If one person is saying something that's true, and somebody else is saying something that simply beyond the realm of reality like that the U. S is doing fine with the pandemic, etcetera. It is difficult for the media to try to have our standard pose of centrism while having these two conflicting views. I think more of the media have been trying on this second front to deal with both types. I tourism, then have been trying to resist the spectacle Donald Trump, so I think it is an evolutionary process. But basically, I think Donald Trump has played the media more than than the media have been aware of being played. Susie Banik harem. What about that? I mean, it's It's something that all of us in the media struggle with, of course, not wanting to take sides warning to cover fairly, but you're covering a candidate the likes of which we've never seen. I think this is an incredible push to balance with just naturally how we're taught to think about things as journalists. But the reality is sometimes two things. They're just not equal, and it's our job to contextualize it that for people and help them process it, and when we don't do that, when we sort of just giving equal weight to everything they don't have any way of understanding, But at the same time Time as Trump is saying that he wants, you know any kind of Barrett confirmed so she can weigh in on the election. If it goes to the Supreme Court that the media sending a lot more time asking, buying about packing and those things are equal..

President Trump NBC Trump James Fallows Joe Biden president executive vice president Twitter Scully Columbia journalism Review Hillary Clinton Atlantic vice president Susie Banik Susie Obamacare Susie Bana Nashville ABC Supreme Court
"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Center for harpy eagles in the world in Panama but the thing I'm most most proud of is I got to meet with the president I got to meet with the mayor and we actually met with the Panamanian Congress on April tenth in two thousand three well I was able to present to the penny Congress and the law was passed designating the harpy eagle the official national bird of Panama wow that's an amazing accomplishment nobody knew what it was when I went there twenty five years ago now so national board it's all over the place I'm a great grassroots effort did the president of Panama say open thank you Ron this is wonderful and here's a harpy for the area at zoo Miami we actually have part B. said to Miami and the first one that hatched we name the Panama and we love going down to Panama it's still resides there it is an icon of an animal in Panama throughout the entire country the president gave me a beautiful declaration of of appreciation for the president the mayor gave me a key to the city to Panama City but the most important in the came from all that is that the people of Panama now know and love their harpy eagle they protect the harpy eagle that's a conservation all about this and we cannot to conservation by going and telling scientists according to if you don't connect with the people who are living side by side with those animals all the time your conservation project is not going to be successful you've got to get people who live with these animals and I would like to know how to love them you know the treasures that I have there's another old saying this is this is in the end you protect what you love you love what you understand and you understand what you're taught I'm most proud of this project because it taught the people of Panama to love the harpy eagle and to protect well I'm sure that your campaign to protect them was aided in no small part by the amount of celebrity that you enjoy and at Latin America you know Shannon I'm very very fortunate and I I I have a chip on my shoulder because of this I've been very fortunate do some very popular Latin American shows found internationally one shows call subtle he got there the number one you've right showing the world wow and I did that show for twenty seven years I didn't realize the impact that show until ironically I was working on a harpy eagle project and I went down there with a dear friend for those who remember the show wild kingdom his does Jim Fowler Jim fallows the co host of that show Jack Perkins what marlin Perkins Jim Fowler to cry I write down right to Panama with Jim Fowler and we had to go down to the Daddy in which is down the remote Forrester on the board of Columbia and to get to this village to meet with these indigenous people who are going to show us a harpy eagle nest was gonna take this little dugout canoe for four hours down to a return ours on a connection that we get to the side of the village and this you know little indigenous guy comes out rainforest people very short stature okay and he's just wearing nothing but loincloths and some beads around his neck and he comes out and you know they speak Spanish did I do the dollar they don't he spoke Spanish in addition to his dialect and he looks at me and Jim is becoming the boat it looks to me because my kids I go what I think I've been putting up who told you I was coming who's and I'm looking at my guide is a dear friend of mine from Panama look at me look at me structure what does god this guy knows who you are hello hi Tom and Spanish assisting you guys how do you know who I am because of course you what you want so that we got there and I thought I was being punked I really do is you don't think of them having a television here in the middle of the rain forest we go to the village these folks are so resourceful they actually wait a television to a satellite dish to a car battery with some kind of wild system that got electricity so they could watch some little he got there every week it was like the once a week will like going to the movies for the village and that's what they knew me for that show so they didn't know you were coming this was surprised to have like some and I thought it was I was freaking out you know I thought it was because I'm so tall because they're so short right you are gonna gonna god yeah how tall are you exactly I'm six six he said so so I was like oh my god to thee but it was this and then I really imagine palaces holy cow who would have thought the middle of the rain forest in the middle of nowhere that you would be recognized by indigenous yeah that is way more exciting than being stopped on the highway but that's that's the power of television now I will tell you this Shannon that I god I carried a chip on my shoulder because I think we live in a society today has become very shallow I think people see people on television I think they're important and I'm with the first one to tell you that television gives credibility to people many times don't deserve it you think that's our modern phenomenon pretty sure that's always been true it helps you and your great mission around the world through that's why and that's why I'm happy about it I'm happy about it because it opens the door and it gives me a platform to reach people connect people to make them care about this wildlife and conservation now you're you're originally from New York but your parents are from Cuba's that my father was born in Santiago Cuba my mother was born in New York but her father was born in Medellin Colombia okay yeah I heard a funny story about median and the surrounding jungles that they have a hippo epidemic problem because public Obara sand in his shoes and these hippos are thriving in a climate that they were never supposed to live and there are some issues with some of Escobar's exotics that are kind of running for either that but not really running free either they they happened somewhat contain but they've got to feed him in the kind of care for them to try to find a place what a strange problem to have although I guess not that's strange you you are Florida the Ellis Island of the exotic animals I am originally from Florida and one of my earliest memories was hurricane Andrew in the early nineties I was right one of the things that happened during the hurricane was that all of these exotic snakes from South America from Africa got loose because the reptile enclosure was destroyed by the hurricane and now they are taking over the Everglades yeah that's partially true out some animals to get loose after hurricane but before that we had so many animals that were released as pets we harass parents yeah hi fans you know and and now they've taken over South Florida environments in some places for instance in the replaced with a fine the pythons it is now devoid of furred mammals dental records and it's such a fragile eco system I think people forget about the Everglades and if you go to Miami and you don't have time to go to the Everglades zoo Miami one of their five sections is there another life artist Everglades right we built that exhibit kind of like as a window to the world of the Everglades not to satisfy people's curiosity about the Everglades but the plant a seed in them so when they come they say I want to learn more and they go out into the real yeah you know I feel like people go to Florida for for Miami beach or for Disney world and the Everglades really get overlooked there it's this incredible unique eco system that the mangroves are beautiful you have sent me some days of wildlife Yoxall South Beach art deco Mr all right I took I had to but yeah I don't know the Everglades are fantastic the one suggested I do give people is if you're going to go once a year go between November and February so you're not dying well so you don't get a blood transfusion yeah that that's really a a year long concern it's the craziest thing that miscue does were such a a past for me growing up and moving up here I see people get eaten up by them every summer and they don't bother me up here I guess it's just the Florida mosquitoes that it can be tough in the summer in Florida it can be yes the cabbie it can be you have spent some time at the zoo in Havana since Cuba has been opened up to American tourism and we talked about this a little before we started taping today and there is you is it develops basically independent of the conventional wisdom of all of the others use and the developed first world and it's very different as a result of absolutely one of the best trips the classic escapes have a plan for me and other fellow directors in the zoo field we went down there on a scientific research mission to examine disease what goes on down there and you know we have put the AZ eight associations is an aquarium so it's kind of a credits ours use and says what can and cannot be done and you know we have these preconceived beliefs of what cannot be done well those police a lot of them were thrown out the door we went down to the zoo in Cuba we're anticipating seeing this run down decrepit place that has nothing and you know everything starving doing yeah I think a lot of people assume that that's Cuba in general well you know there's no question the people in Cuba are suffering in many ways but having said that this issue was one of the biggest pleasant surprises I've ever experienced we went to this one exhibit it's called the African varada exhibit the African plains exhibit and it's about forty acres and I can tell you we drove out there like in a safari vehicle inside the enclosure inside enclosures right into the closer and closer they have elephants hippos rhinos zebras buffalo antelope giraffe altogether separated no barriers between them historically our teachers would tell us that it's physically impossible to do those animals are gonna kill each other the elephants are gonna kill the rhinos vice versa whatever that you can't do it well there no predators and shared a close that predators but still well I know that hill something yeah okay so you thinking how can I do this how does it work they make it work and then they go in there and you see all these natural trees and he couldn't and I have to go how do you know which trees to put in there in the office Tony because when we played a bunch of trees the ones they don't eat we keep playing his sense of did they do that because they they were close to a western of a preservation conservation for eight years or or did he do it deliberately they did that because the Cuban people are by nature resourceful people they don't know how to make things work I think it blew our mind out the worst is here we are directors and managers and majors is United States we're going to the vehicles that will I think take care these outside of the keepers care for these animals and that's one of the guys points over a shoulder there's three guys on horseback when lows riding with the elephants the right hurting the rivals on horseback well you can't do this yet it is possible because they are doing it so the lesson again learn there we talk about travel is there's no greater education and travel so those were close minded on the things that we do thinking that we're the.

eagles Panama president Panamanian Congress Congress official
"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Center for harpy eagles in the world in Panama but the thing I'm most most proud of is I got to meet with the president I got to meet with the mayor and we actually met with the Panamanian Congress on April tenth in two thousand three well I was able to present to the penny Congress and the law was passed designating the harpy eagle the official national bird of Panama that's an amazing accomplishment nobody knew what it was when I went there twenty five years ago now so national board it's all over the place from a grassroots effort did it the president of Panama say open thank you Ron this is wonderful and here's a harpy for the area at zoo Miami we actually have part B. said to Miami and the first one that hatched we name the Panama and we love going down to Panama it's still resides there it is an icon of an animal in Panama throughout the entire country the president gave me a beautiful declaration of of appreciation for the president the mayor gave me a key to the city to Panama City but the most important thing they came from all that is that the people of Panama now know and love their harpy eagle they protect the harpy eagle that's a conservation all about this and we cannot do conservation by going and telling scientists according to if you don't connect with the people who are living side by side with those animals all the time your conservation project is not going to be successful you've got to get people who live with these animals and I would like to know how to love them another treasures it but I have there's another old saying this is this an Indian you protect what you love you love what you understand and you understand what you're taught I'm most proud of this project because it taught the people of Panama to love the harpy eagle and to protect well I'm sure that your campaign to protect them was aided in no small part by the amount of celebrity that you enjoy and at Latin America you know Shannon I'm very very fortunate and I I I have a chip on my shoulder because of this I've been very fortunate do some very popular Latin American shows found internationally one shows call Subhi onto the number one you've right show in the world wow and I did that show for twenty seven years I didn't realize the impact that show until ironically I was working on a harpy eagle project and I went down there with a dear friend for those who remember the show wild kingdom his does Jim Fowler Jim fallows the co host of that show Jack Perkins what marlin Perkins Jim Fowler to cry I write down right to Panama with Jim Fowler and we had to go down to the data yet which is down the remote Forrester on the board of Columbia and to get to this village to meet with these indigenous people who are going to show us a harpy eagle nest was gonna take this little dugout canoe for four hours down to a return ours on a connection that we get to the side of the village and this you know little indigenous guy comes out rainforest people very short stature okay and he's just wearing nothing but loincloths and some beads around his neck and he comes out and you know they speak Spanish did I do the dollar they don't he spoke Spanish in addition to his dialect and he looks at me and Jim is becoming the boat it looks to me because my keys I go what I think I've been putting up who told you I was coming who's and I'm looking at my guide is a dear friend of mine from Panama look at me look at me structure what does god this guy knows who you are hello hi Tom in Spanish this is a new device how do you know who I am because of course what you want so that we got there and I thought I was being punked I really do is you don't think of them having a television here in the middle of the rain forest we go to the village these folks are so we force will they actually wait a television to a satellite dish to a car battery with some kind of wild system that got electricity so they could watch someone though he got the every week it was like the once a week will like going to the movies for the village and that's what they knew me for that show so they didn't know you were coming this was surprised I thought it was like some and I thought it was I was freaking out you know I thought it was because I'm so tall because they're so short right you are gonna gonna god yeah how tall are you exactly I'm six six he said so so I was like oh my gosh look but it was this and then I really imagine palaces holy cow who would have thought the middle of a rain forest or the middle of nowhere that you would be recognized by indigenous yeah that is way more exciting than being stopped on the highway but that's that's the power of television now I will tell you this Shannon that I god I carried a chip on my shoulder because I think we live in a society today has become very shallow I think people see people on television I think they're important and I'm with the first one to tell you that television gives credibility to people many times don't deserve it you think that's our modern phenomenon pretty sure that's always been true it helps you and your great mission around the world through that's why and that's why I'm happy about it I'm happy about it because it opens the door and it gives me a platform to reach people connect people to make them care about this wildlife and conservation now you're you're originally from New York but your parents are from Cuba's that my father was born in Santiago Cuba my mother was born in New York but her father was born in Medellin Colombia okay I heard a funny story about median and the surrounding jungles that they have a hippo epidemic problem because public bars and his zoos and these hippos are thriving in a climate that they were never supposed to live and there are some issues with some of Escobar's exotics that are kind of running for either that but not really running free either they they have been somewhat contain but they've got to feed him in the kind of care for them to try to find a place what a strange problem to have although I guess not that's strange you you are Florida the Ellis Island of the exotic animals I am originally from Florida and one of my earliest memories was hurricane Andrew in the early nineties I was right one of the things that happened during the hurricane was that all of these exotic snakes from South America from Africa got loose because the reptile enclosure was destroyed by the hurricane and now they are taking over the Everglades yeah that's partially true out some animals to get loose after hurricane but before that we had so many animals that were released as pets we harass parents yeah hi fans you know and and now they've taken over South Florida environments in some places for instance in the replaced with a fine the pythons it is now devoid of furred mammals dental records and it's such a fragile eco system I think people forget about the effortless and very and if you go to Miami and you don't have time to go to the Everglades zoo Miami one of their five sections is there another label artist Everglades right we built that exhibit kind of like as a window to the world of the Everglades not to satisfy people's curiosity about the Everglades but to plant a seed in them so when they come they say I want to learn more and they go out into the real yeah you know I feel like people go to Florida for for Miami beach or for Disney world and the Everglades really get overlooked their it it's this incredible unique eco system that the mangroves are beautiful you have sent me some days of wildlife your South Beach art deco Mr all right I took I had to but yeah I don't know the Everglades are fantastic the one suggested I do get people is if you're going to go once a year go between November and February so you're not dying well so you don't get a blood transfusion yeah that that's really a a year long concern it's the craziest thing in the skaters were such a a past for me growing up and moving up here I see people get eaten up by them every summer and they don't bother me up here I guess it's just the Florida mosquitoes that it can be tough in the summer in Florida it can be yes a tabby it can be you have spent some time at the zoo in Havana since Cuba has been opened up to American tourism and we talked about this a little before we started taping today and there is you is it develops basically independent of the conventional wisdom of all of the others use and the developed first world and it's very different as a result absolutely one of the best trips the classic escapes have a plan for me and other fellow directors in the zoo field we went down there on a scientific research mission to examine disease what goes on down there and you know we have put the ACA dissociation is is an aquarium so it's kind of a credits ours use and says what can and cannot be done and you know we have these preconceived beliefs of what cannot be done well those police a lot of them were thrown out the door we went down to visit Cuba we're anticipating seeing this run down decrepit place that has nothing and you know everything starving in doing yeah I think a lot of people assume that that's Cuba in general well you know there's no question the people in Cuba are suffering in many ways but having said that this issue was one of the biggest pleasant surprises I've ever experienced we went to this one exhibit it's called the African parodic exhibit the African plains exhibit and it's about forty acres and I can tell you we drove out there like in a safari vehicle inside the enclosure enclosures right into the closer and closer they have elephants hippos rhinos zebras buffalo antelope giraffe altogether separated no barriers between them historically our teachers would tell us that it's physically impossible to do those animals are gonna kill each other the elephants are gonna kill the rhinos vice versa whatever that I can't do it well there no predators and sure to close that predators but still one no they will kill something yeah okay so you thinking how can I do this how does it work they make it work and then they go in there and you see all these natural trees and you couldn't and I have to go how do you know which trees to put in there in the office Tony because when we played a bunch of trees the ones they don't eat we keep playing a.

eagles Panama president Panamanian Congress Congress official
"jim fallows" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The cold but often very real voter who could move to either side could vote for the Democrat or Republican as those orders have shrunk elections become bout based mobilization and so what you want to do is make sure that you weren't very good standing with your site into the set of issues that are being discussed are issues that activate your side and the press the other side to the swing state Republicans what you're seeing there is twenty years ago they'd be very worried about of voter who might defect from them to the Democrats but now they're much more worried about having the election take place on ground that is gonna be depressing to Republican turnout which impeachment is and one of the things I've been hearing from political reporters covering Iowa ahead of Monday's caucuses is that impeachment isn't landing one way or another on Joe Biden it isn't helping him because trump's false accusations are making him more of a hero or eliminating them from him because they think even of trucks a fascist biking shouldn't of got himself into the conflict of interest with his son neither is happening because the voters at events on even thinking about the issue the reporters in the field are telling me and my listeners on the show so is that your sense and if so does it tell us anything about Washington being polarized differently from the rest of the country yes there's no doubt that Washington and political it's in general are much more ports but not just more polarized they're more attentive to whatever the new cycle issue is of the moment whereas when you if this is an old thing goes back to Jim fallows why Americans hate the media but when you listen to the questions reporters will ask candidates it'll be whatever happened in the news that day what's going on in the polls did see the scandal so and so said this what do you think of that and then you go to a town hall and the person says my health care is too expensive how you help me and so the concerns Americans have for the candidates are always different than the contents political Portis push them towards but I don't I I do think it is interesting that impeachment is not helping or hurting Joe Biden one way or the other and I don't know that we really know how it would play out for him I mean I think something is interesting here about witnesses is it something that is kept the witness conversation a little bit stymied is Republicans about this counter argument well okay what if we did it but we did a witness trade now not all of them have said they would have braces but Lisa floated it and one reason Democrats have been a little reticent on that is that the witness trade their public would want is for hunter Joe Biden I think of Joe Biden we're in a stronger position as a candidate in your more confident into some performance it is always be very good thing for him to be able to come into the Senate and show that if this is truly ridiculous than show it's ridiculous I think it speaks not to strength but to his weakness of there's a lot of fear about that happening I will continue in a minute with as a client and we'll turn the page from impeachment two other things related to his book why were polarized including why Barack Obama tried but failed to unpolarized the country and why everything's Democrats don't have the luxury that president trump has in those swing state Republicans we were just talking about of just playing to their base stay with us starting.

"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Mayor there I said we have to make a better place for these harpies at that that you have the perfect can you have the minutes horrific said I can't do anything on the mayor of gonna take your bottles pick up garbage so I said always the money make a long story short I went out there I got major corporations like Sony corporation bees international give me hundreds of thousands of dollars we built the greatest center for harpy eagles in the world in Panama but the thing I'm most most proud of is I got to meet with the president I got to meet with the mayor and we actually met with the Panamanian Congress on April tenth in two thousand three well I was able to present to the Panamanian Congress and the law was passed designating the harpy eagle the official national bird of Panama that's an amazing accomplishment nobody knew what it was when I went there twenty five years ago now so national board it's all over the place I'm a great grassroots effort did the president of Panama say open thank you Ron this is wonderful and here's a harpy for a year at zoo Miami we actually have part B. said to Miami and the first one that hatched we name the Panama and we love going down to Panama it's still resides there it is an icon of an animal in Panama throughout the entire country the president gave me a beautiful declaration of of appreciation for the president the mayor gave me a key to the city to Panama City but the most important in the came from all that is that the people of Panama now know and love their harpy eagle they protect the harpy eagle that'll conservation's all about listen we cannot do conservation by going in telling scientists going to do if you don't connect with the people who are living side by side with those animals all the time your conservation project is not going to be successful you've got to get people who live with these animals and I would like to know and to love them no the treasures it but I have another saying this is this is in the end you protect what you love you love what you understand and you understand what you're taught I'm most proud of this project because it taught the people of Panama to love the harpy eagle and to protect well I'm sure that your campaign to protect them was aided in no small part by the amount of celebrity that you enjoy and at Latin America you know Shannon I'm very very fortunate and I I I have a chip on my shoulder because of this I've been very fortunate do some very popular Latin American shows found internationally one shows call subtle he on the the number one view variety show in the world wow and I did that show for twenty seven years I didn't realize the impact that show until ironically I was working on a harpy eagle project and I went down there with a dear friend for those who remember the show wild kingdom his does Jim Fowler Jim fallows the co host of that show Jack Perkins what marlin perk Orland park is engine fellow to cry I write down right to Panama with Jim Fowler and we had to go down to the data yen which is down the remote Forrester on the board of Columbia and to get to this village to meet with these indigenous people who were going to show us with a harpy eagle nest was gonna take this little dugout canoe for four hours down like a river hours on a connection that we get to the side of the village and this you know little indigenous guy comes out rainforest people very short stature okay and he's just wearing nothing but a loincloth and some beads around his neck and he comes out and you know they speak Spanish or did I do the dollar they don't he spoke Spanish in addition to his dialect and he looks at me and Jim is becoming the boat it looks to me because I go what I think I've been putting a who told you I was coming who's and I'm looking at my guide is a dear friend of mine from Panama look at me look at me structure with this guy this guy knows who you are hello hi Tom in Spanish assisting you guys how do you know who I am because of course we want you want someone that we got to and I thought I was being pumped I really do is you don't think of that have a lot of these in here in the middle of the rainforest we go to the village these folks are so we force will be actually wait a television to a satellite dish to a car battery with some kind of while the system that got electricity so they could watch someone though he got every week it was like the once a week for real like going to the movies for the village and that's with the new me for that show so they didn't know you were coming this was a surprise to him like some and I thought it was I was freaking out you know I thought it was because I'm so tall because they're so short right you are gone it's gone abroad yeah hi how tall are you exactly I'm six six he said so so I was like oh my god to thee but it was this and I really am Jim palaces holy cow who would have thought the middle of a rainforest or the middle of nowhere that you would be recognized by indigenous P. yeah that is way more exciting than being stopped on the highway but that's that's the power of television now I will tell you this Shannon that I god I carry the chip on my shoulder because I think we live in a society today has become very shallow I think people see people on television I think they're important and I'm with the first one to tell you that television gives credibility to people many times don't deserve it you think that's our modern phenomenon pretty sure that's always been true it helps you and your great mission around the world through that and that's why I'm happy about it I'm happy about it because it opens the door and it gives me a platform to reach people connect people to make them care about this while at the conservation now you're you're originally from New York but your parents are from Cuba's that my father was born in Santiago Cuba my mother was born in New York but her father was born in Medellin Colombia okay yeah I heard a funny story about median and the surrounding jungles that they have a hippo epidemic problem because public Obara sand in his zoos and these hippos are thriving in a climate that they were never supposed to live and there are some issues with some of Escobar's exotics that are kind of running free there that but not really running free there they they haven't somewhat contain but they've got to feed him in the kind of care for them to try to find a place what a strange problem to have although I guess not that strange you you are Florida the Ellis Island of a good topic animals I I am originally from Florida and one of my earliest memories was hurricane Andrew and the early nineties I was right one of the things that happened during the hurricane was that all of these exotic snakes from South America from Africa got loose because the reptile enclosure was destroyed by hurricane and now they are taking over the Everglades yeah that's partially true out some animals to get loose after her king but before that we had so many animals that were released as pets we harass parents yeah hi funds you know and and now they've taken over South Florida environments in some places for instance in the later they find a pi fonts it is now devoid of furred mammals this will raccoons and it's such a fragile eco system I think people forget about the effortless and if you go to Miami and you don't have time to go to the Everglades zoom Miami one of their five sections is there another label Artemis Everglades right we built that exhibit kind of like as a window to the world of the Everglades not to satisfy people's curiosity about the Everglades but the plant a seed in them so when they come they say I want to learn more and they go out into the real yeah you know I I feel like people go to Florida for for Miami beach or for Disney world and the Everglades really get overlooked there it's this incredible unique eco system that the mangroves are beautiful you have sent me charges of wildlife your South Beach our data Mr but that's all right that's okay I had to but I don't know the Everglades are fantastic the once you decide to give people is if you're going to go once a year go between November and February so you're not dying well so you don't get a blood transfusion yeah that that that's really a a year long concern it's the craziest thing it miss ghettos were such a a past for me growing up and moving up here I see people get eaten up by them every summer and they don't bother me up here I guess it's just the Florida mosquitoes that it can be tough in the summer in Florida it can be it can be you have spent some time at the zoo in Havana since Cuba has been opened up to American tourism and we talked about this a little before we started taping today and there's you is it develops basically independent of the conventional wisdom of all of the others use and the developed first world and it's very different as a result absolutely one of the best trips to classic escapes have a plan for me another fellow directors in the zoo field we went down there on a scientific research mission to examine disease what goes on down there and you know we have put the AZ eight associations is an aquarium here which kind of a credits ours using says what can and cannot be done and you know we have these preconceived beliefs of what cannot be done well those police a lot of them were thrown out the door we went out of his in Cuba we're anticipating seeing this run down decrepit place that has nothing and you know everything starving doing yeah I think a lot of people assume that that's Cuba in general well you know there's no question the people in Cuba are suffering in many ways but having said that this issue was one of the biggest pleasant surprises I've ever experienced we went to this one exhibit it's called the African parotid exhibit the African plains exhibit and it's about forty acres and I can tell you we drove out there like in a safari vehicle inside the enclosure deciding close right into the closer and closer they have elephants hippos rhinos zebras buffalo antelope draft altogether that's a pretty no barriers between them historically our teachers would tell us that it's physically impossible to do those animals are gonna kill each other the elephants are gonna kill the rhinos vice versa whatever that I can't do it well there no predators and sure to close out predators but still well I know that il something yeah okay so you thinking how can they do this how does it work they make it work and then they go in there and you see all these natural trees any good and I have to go how do you know which trees to put in there the.

Sony corporation twenty seven years twenty five years forty acres four hours
"jim fallows" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on WGN Radio

"That area. Recently. My GPS is all confused if I ever if I'm ever trying to use that figure out where to get off her on what's closed. What's not does? They can't keep up with now right now. That's it's you've got to look into signs it just look at the signs. Listen to Mary. Yeah. Exactly. President Trump's chief economic adviser told Fox News yesterday that both sides will suffer from the trade war experts say that American businesses and consumers will face higher prices on everything from computers to toilet paper. That's important too. Because that's not what the president has been saying. He's been saying that the consumers won't suffer generally. So Kudlow can put his foot in his mouth little yesterday on that. And he right, right. It's absolutely. Yeah. It's going to be an easy way to win. But we're going to be the consumers are the ones who are going to be hurt. Okay. There's bright note for a Monday morning. Mike Pompeo is scheduled to make his first trip to Russia. Secretary of state this week on the gender a discussion with President Vladimir Putin. Putin about different information efforts of before European elections. Coming up this month. Did you see the plane hockey? The he saw Russia. His teammates to keep him before. He hit the red carpet with his skates. It's hilarious. If you you know, I will post it on the Steve Cochran show Facebook page because regardless of what you think about ladder Putin. It's funny because he's skating, and then he hits I was the carpet down for puck drop or why I don't know why after the game. Oh, maybe it's for the post game interview or something. But he he ran into it and fell in. It's funny. Anyway, that is to get going this week. They visit by the secretary of state Chicago hospital emergency rooms could start seeing a new kind of patient those hurt after falling from tripping over or getting hit by those electric scooters and they're bringing the scooters to Chicago. And we talked about this a little bit last week. Number cities are ready have them in those cities have seen hundreds of injuries from broken arms to brain trauma. They have them the last place. I was that had them a lot of them is San Diego. Yeah. And I think there's a lot of them in Nashville to Austin. I think too that's in the what made what I found. Interesting is, you know, unfortunately, Walter Jacobson our own Walter Jacobson his wife fell walking her dog and Florida and she hit her head and then ended up passing away from brain trauma in. I think. That when you're falling off of these electric scooters getting hit if you hit your head. You gotta go to the doctor, but they're they're they're convenient. They're also pose a threat. They're not wearing helmets either helmets. And also they get kinda left all over the sidewalks. Real after watch your step wheelchair to another hazzard thing might trip over scooter one of the stars of television, and Mary you're too young to remember this Vandevelde tonight, certainly die. So depressed about this Hegi Lipton star of the mod squad. That's where I know her from also twin peaks died over the weekend at the age of seventy two. She was she was part of that triumvirate on the mod squad, which is a hit show in love with Michael Cole. There was Clarence Williams. The third third women link I forgot what my name was on the show but Peggy Lipton she was such a bad. You know, a SS. She was just she was just wonderful on this show. She never smiled. She just pulled a gun out. You know, she never knew where she was. And I loved her. And I know she's seventy two is young is. She looked beauty. Awful though, she was gorgeous seventy she was she was repeated Jones mom, I didn't Johns. Mom, she you know, she was married to Quincy Jones for years and she had those two beautiful daughters and repeated Jones was one of them. And she looks just like her. You know what? Now that you say that. Oh, yeah. Put the two of them together as a picture of the two of them. Yeah. We're talking about we missed a big win on Friday in this. This was a hero of mine. Jim fowler. Remember, Jim fallow? Forbidding while kingdom Marlin Perkins wild ride always on with Johnny Carson, right? He goes about the animals on Johnny Carson. He was the guy that Merlin Marlin Perkins. Always used to send out into dangerous dirty work. Go jim. Marla stayed back. Z GM was out there. But as a kid I used to watch mutual of Omaha wild king. What got me interested in animals? Love him. Is it natural causes or with? It was eighty nine years old. I think Peggy Lipton had colon cancer. I believe some kind of cancer and finally. Rid son Justin Trudeau in the second city audience Margaret Trudeau performed her one woman show, I guess this is the right title certain women of aid is the right title. And she was wearing jeans, and she was sick sipping like a beverage. It seemed like a really cool. I know that the kids were a little embarrassed by some of the stories she wish airing, but you know, he's he's going to be up for reelection. I dunno Steve might be in an election right now. But he's got some stuff going on. So just interesting that. It was cool that they were here to support their mom for her for show. A one woman show. They're like Canada's most famous family, so but it's going on. Yeah. That was yesterday. Next time. That's the top six..

President Vladimir Putin Peggy Lipton Quincy Jones Steve Cochran Merlin Marlin Perkins Mary Johnny Carson Russia Walter Jacobson President Trump Hegi Lipton Fox News Mike Pompeo Jim fowler president Justin Trudeau economic adviser Clarence Williams Kudlow
"jim fallows" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Is the podcast. Listen, if you want to better understand what is the largest global displacement some since I'm Revie gourmet it I'm grand cordon in this season. We're going to focus on one of the most important issues shaping the displacement crisis. That's how the nature of wars changing. We will look at how technologies like drones cyber warfare. And social media are changing the ways that conflict start and how they play out two seasons to displace now on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. So let me ask you about something tactical in that air. I've always been very curious about the period of time after you got the the highway Bill passed the auto safety Bill passed and building Nader's raiders. And I've always been very curious when you got these young people in and said, hey, investigate the FTC or whoever it might be. What instructions did you give them? What was the what was the the playbook? You gave Nader's raiders to go and ferret out. What was happening at a government agency or go and understand what was happening at a government agency or give them a lot of autonomy. First of all we had a huge amount of of resumes to pick from so first of all we got really motivated knowledgeable hardworking youngsters coming in second. I had them read upside down whatever's written on department of agriculture or the Federal Trade Commission. Or the food and Drug administration third. I had him go and talk with the outside experts on it. So that they could always call them when they needed fourth. I introduced him to the heads of the agencies. I would go down with them and say, you know, the these young people they are really capable of doing an evaluation of your performance than putting it together in a report. And when we got back to the office. I would tell him if you had any trouble I've got your back and at that time, you know, I could call Martin meant. So the poster I could call Pat slowing of UPI, and we get some exposure if some agency was trying to close them out, and I gave him a lot of autonomy. Then they knew that they were going to be authors of the report, it wasn't going to be my name on the book with a footnote or acknowledge -ment to Joe or J James schmo that they did a lot of work, and thank you very much. We made them authors. At a very young age. And they knew they have a huge step up when at age twenty three twenty four twenty five authors of a book, which had a substantial circulation and got a lot of media coverage. And so when you looked for these people, what did you look for? I look for thirst for Justice, a passion for Justice that is they have to show some fire in the belly not just some cognitive capabilities. That's one the second is where the just out to burnish their resume at that time was a big deal to be Nader's raider. Or were they seriously interested in affecting change third. Did they hog credit because they have to work with a group or did they know how to share credit that did they have personal skills and fourth and most important where they're going to stay to completion. Because, you know, September comes back at school or they're out, and you know, we'd be left with one or two members of the task force and. It might not get done on time. So they had to stay with it. Like, Jim fallow stayed with it and put the book out on the Savannah River polluters while he was at Harvard undergrad or a task force from miss Porter's school. They stuck with it until they put out the report on the nursing home abuses in America. And they testified for the house and Senate at age eighteen and got a lot of mass media try that today and how did you pick up on nursing home abuses as a topic? You would wanna focus on. How did you get from big picture national? You know, millions of people are dying in in car accidents on the road who who maybe don't need to to Savannah River pollution or nursing homes. Well after I got the auto and highway safety Bill through with.

Nader food and Drug administration Bill Savannah River Federal Trade Commission Revie Pat America apple department of agriculture UPI Senate Jim fallow Martin Joe miss Porter
"jim fallows" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"We'll be negative if he respond to that. Because they support us great. If they responded that because they hate Trump great because they'll go away over Peter. Not sure that the eggs are from the book that you read is criticism. I'm just it's true. Trump has been a gold mine for television ratings and for newspapers. So that's all on. That is true. I wanted to talk about this pew study and people have a general distrust for the media and in the suggestion, I get from reading the book is that if we tone that back a bit that would help the media regain trust. And it seems like we're well beyond then. Now, I I'm not talking about Tony down. But I am talking about maybe better module. Relation like often. I'll open let's say the Washington Post's app and one of their apps, the posts most actually interchanges news story is an opinion as they aggregate and seriously on not few days. I I have to scrawl pass like eight or nine thin set aren't Trump Trump, Trump Trump and the other day, again, I those are Trump stories that are negative there. Feeding on negative stories. Less. Find interesting is that they all get clicked on. So there is an incentive. I just think I'm not that is an criticism. It just is sort of. It's Michael Kinsley is rule that the biggest crime is to say what is true a gaffe? He does define a gal right deaf. Ashes fact checked you live on the podcasts. Yeah. Well, it was a long time ago. That's I think that's you have a younger memory. I kinda want to quit while I'm ahead. But instead, we're going get quick break. Looking at Golda. We'll be right back. Displaced is the podcast. Listen, if you want to bet on the stand the largest global displacement crosses since I'm ready gourmet it I'm grand cordon in this season. We're going to focus on one of the most important issue shaping the displacement crisis. That's how the nature of wars changing. We will look at how technologies like drones cyberwarfare. And social media are changing the ways that conflict start and how they play out Schwab to season to displace now on apple podcasts or wherever you get. You podcasts. I'm back with Jill Abramson. We could talk for a long time by your book. Go read it. It's great. What surprised you about the Washington Post when you spent time writing about that company that thing that surprised me immediately? When I started going there to interview journalists was that it seems so happy because you expect them to be complaining about Basil's and the new not necessarily, but it was such a contrast to you. I spent twenty two years of my career in Washington in the Washington bureau of the Wall Street Journal, and then I was Washington bureau chief of the times and during all of that time, I mean, they were so reducing their staff, and it was just depression city over there. And. Yeah, people whose criticism. Awesome. I respect a lot like Jim fallow. We're saying in what they wrote that the quality of the newspaper was suffering. And so was you know, misery alley and then you know, what I found on day one was Happy Valley. And and that's just you know, it was surprising. It's not like I expected them to be sour grapes about Jeff Bezos spot just to have such a quick turn. Or I figured their honeymoon period where you've got money and someone says they want to invest and they've been losing assets and losing people for a long time. And then after a while the billionaire in this case, the tech billionaire would go what am I doing here with this company? And actually, I don't want coverage of this all or the other version B, I'm a technologist I'm gonna fix the company with my own special software or management mandate. And. Fits of that. But you haven't certain haven't heard complaining about it..

Trump Trump Washington Post Jill Abramson Michael Kinsley Jeff Bezos Washington Washington bureau chief Peter Happy Valley Tony Jim fallow Wall Street Journal Basil apple Schwab twenty two years
"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:15 min | 3 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is. This statistic. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do, you know, where those four thousand people come are captured the courts, not always certainly the State Department says there hasn't been any terrorist found coming across the. Land and it's spicy. It's all of the above the one thing that you're forgetting the most vulnerable point of entry that we have in this country is our southern border, and we have to protect it and the more. Coming across the southern border, Sarah, they're coming and they're being stopped. Well, there we have a pretty good example work last, but also many examples coming from Krista Nielsen and also Donnelly from Sarah Sanders, but the president himself that just don't square with the facts. So, you know, this was I think what's newsworthy about what Chris Wallace did is that it's newsworthy. Just it isn't we don't push back. The way the say the BBC does you know there? There are British correspondence. Jeremy Paxman is a famous one. Who will just literally ask the same question in real time fifteen times, Eric without editing. And so that you can see exactly how much is is being invaded. When you directly go to it. Chris Wallace did a couple of rounds. She said the same thing about the most vulnerable point. And then talking about the fourth. I'm sorry. Sarah Sanders, and and Chris Wallace did. Go through that a couple of times. And the problem was that they only have a couple of times on FOX TV, but you could see her effort to just conflict four thousand most vulnerable point is the southern border four thousand the most vulnerable point is the southern border to things that may or may not be true. But she's trying very hard to put them together. We've seen that sort of conflict technique in other administrations and many many times. But here he wasn't letting or get away from it. That was big news, especially because it was FOX and we've seen Jake tapper do similar things on CNN. It doesn't get quite the same play. But it was wonderfully satisfying to watch. Now, we can do real time. Fact checking on this because we pretty much know his points. We may not be able to get all of them. But you could get some of them. Jim fallow suggests maybe be doing ESPN style, scroll down the back. Jim Jim fellas of the Atlantic may be down the right or across the bottom. He even suggested maybe a continuous oral commentary, LA MS T three K mystery science theater three thousand ways the back heads of the correspondents literally talking back to the screen, which is what they do in their mock criticism of really bad science fiction films. One thing he is concerned about, but he says, it's still a good option. But it shouldn't be alone is the democratic political response of this is an overtly political discussion there should be an overtly political response that would be fair. His problem is and our problem is that. So these are just two political opinions and reasonable people disagreeing, we know just by dint of the unbelievable volume of lies the president generates, you know, minute by minute basis that this is going to be sheer fantasy land. And it's almost dignifying it by saying, it's a reasonable. He's you know, reasonable people can disagree argument. This is plagued the media's coverage of global warming for a long time. You put on one person who's paid by the oil company, and whose extreme outlier and have it have him suggest that there is a disagreement within the scientific community when there is not. So you've got the problem of perception there, but you can fix it with real time. Fact checking prior to that response. There's also the partisan you alluded to the whole partisan side of this issue. I mean, the president has said that the Democrats are blocking. The Democrats have said that the Democratic Party spokespeople. Who said this is immoral to build a wall? He's got a real divide. An extraordinary divide here among different sides and prisons blaming the Democrats. The Democrats are blaming the president. So to have at least some response and some feedback from the other party would seem to be perfectly normal and in the plantings. Yeah, I completely agree with you. And by the way, there isn't just disagreement between the two parties the president himself disagrees with himself. He was perfectly willing to sign an agreement to keep the government open absent mention of the wall. You know, if this is of such deep national security importance, he probably wouldn't have agreed to that. But he did it was all set up. And then he was knocked off that position by of all people and Coulter is what it seems goes. Also, Rush Limbaugh, and Sean Hannity a combined effort, I think. Yeah. It was the, you know, I guess you'd call them the three horsemen of the apocalypse or something like that. But the thing is is that the. Undue attention to and the rapid response to you know, people like these who I guess Trump assumes represents his base. I don't think that's true. But what do I know there are certain? There are a lot. There's plenty that. I don't know. But what I do know is that if Trump had really cared about this as a national security issue that he felt was existential. He wouldn't just turn after that criticism came in. And there was no other external situation that had changed for that reaction. Talking to Brooklyn hosted managing editor of on the media from WNYC in New York, and she's with us here, and you can be with us as well. In fact, let me give the phone number.

president Chris Wallace Sarah Sanders FOX TV Jeremy Paxman State Department Trump Jim Jim BBC Krista Nielsen Jake tapper Jim fallow Democratic Party CNN WNYC Rush Limbaugh Eric
"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:16 min | 3 years ago

"jim fallows" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Most vulnerable point of entry is. Statistic. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do, you know, where those four thousand people come they're captured the court, not always certainly the State Department says there hasn't been any terrorist found coming across. Land and it's spicy. It's all of the above the one thing that you're forgetting the most vulnerable point of entry that we have in this country is our southern border, and we have to protect it and the more. Across the southern border, Sarah, they're coming and they're being stopped. Well, there we have a pretty good example of work last film. But also many examples coming from Kristen Nielsen and also not only from Sarah Sanders, but the president himself that just don't square with the facts. So, you know, this was I think what's newsworthy about what Chris Wallace did is that it's newsworthy. Just it isn't we don't push back. The way the say the BBC does you know there? There are British Carson Wentz. Jeremy Paxman is a famous one who just literally ask the same question in real time fifteen times, Eric without editing. And so that you can see exactly how much is is being evaded when you directly go to it. Chris Wallace did a couple of rounds. She said the same thing about the most vulnerable point. And then talking about the fourth. I'm sorry. Sarah Sanders, and and Chris Wallace did. Go through that a couple of times. And the problem was that they only have a couple of times on Fox TV, but you could see her effort to just conflict four thousand most vulnerable point is the southern border four thousand the most vulnerable point is southern border to things that may or may not be true. But she's trying very hard to put them together. We've seen that sort of confession technique in other administrations and many many times. But here he wasn't winning or get away from it. That was big news, especially because it was FOX mean we've seen Jake tapper do similar things on CNN. It doesn't get quite the same play. But it was wonderfully satisfying to watch. Now, we can do real time fact checking on this because we pretty much know his points. We may not be able to get all of them. But you could get some of them, Jim. Jim fallow suggests may be doing ESPN style, scroll down the back. Jim Jim Fowler's of the Atlantic may be down the right or across the bottom. He even suggested may be a continuous oral commentary Isla MS T three K mystery science theater three thousand see the back heads of the correspondents literally talking back to the screen, which is what they do in their mock criticism of really bad science fiction films. One thing he is concerned about, but he says, it's still a good option. But it shouldn't be alone is the democratic political response of this is an overtly political discussion there should be an overtly political response that would be fair. His problem is an our problem is that these are just two political opinions and reasonable people disagreeing, we know just by dint of the unbelievable volume of lies. The president generates you know, on a minute by minute basis that this is going to be sheer fantasy land. And it's almost dignifying it by saying, it's a reasonable. He's you know, reasonable people can disagree argument. This is plagued the media's coverage of global warming for a long time. You put on one person who's paid by the oil company, and whose extreme outlier and have it have him suggest that there is a disagreement within the scientific community when there is not. So you've got the problem of perception there, but you can fix it with real time. Fact checking prior to that response. There's also the partisan you alluded to the whole partisan side of this issue. I mean, the president has said that the Democrats are blocking him the Democrats have said that the Democratic Party spokespeople. Who said this is immoral to build a wall? You've got a real divide and extraordinary divide here among different sides. And. Prisons, blaming the Democrats. The Democrats are blaming the president. So to have at least some response and some feedback from the other party would seem to be perfectly normal and in the plantings. Yeah, I completely agree with you. And by the way, there isn't just disagreement between the two parties the president himself disagrees with himself. He was perfectly willing to sign an agreement to keep the government open absent mention of the wall. You know, if this is of such deep national security importance, he probably wouldn't have agreed to that. But he did it was all set up. And then he was knocked off that position by of all people and Coulter is what it seems. Also, Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity. Okay. A combined effort, I think. Yeah. It was the, you know, I guess you'd call them the three horsemen of the apocalypse or something like that. But the thing is is that the. Undue attention to and the rapid response to you know, people like these who I guess Trump assumes represents his base. I don't think that's true. But what do I know there are certain? There are a lot. There's plenty of that. I don't know. But what I do know is that if Trump had really cared about this as a national security issue that he felt was eggs essential. He wouldn't just turn after that criticism came in. And there was no other external situation that had changed for that reaction talking to Brooklyn nets host and managing editor of on the media from WNYC in New York, and she's with us here, and you can be with us as well. In fact, let me give the phone number.

president Sarah Sanders Chris Wallace Jim Jim Fowler State Department Jeremy Paxman Trump Jim fallow BBC Carson Wentz Jake tapper FOX Kristen Nielsen Isla MS T CNN Brooklyn WNYC Rush Limbaugh