29 Burst results for "Jim Crow South"

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 6 months ago

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"I'm talking to Brian kill me, you may know him from fox and friends, but he's written a lot of books. This one is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass in their battle to save America's soul. America soul could use a little saving right now. But we're not going to talk about that. What made you want to write a book combining these two figures? Well, I was looking for the last time I was here. You kind enough to interview me about Sam Houston, the Alamo Avengers. So I try to find an angle not plowed and the Alamo is, but San jacinto isn't 9 months later he ends up taking him out as San jacinto beating Santa Anna in 17 minutes because Texans know it, but the rest of the world. So I go, what's next? The Mexican war, I didn't think had enough. My opinion, I'm sure there's a lot there with Lee in the quartermaster grant and the fact that these generals fought on the same side and then years later, they'd be trying to kill each other and a lot of them successfully. I said, all right, the Civil War. What could I do that's not plowed ground from Ken burns a series to the remarkable book, David blight wrote about Frederick Douglas Scott? I think the book of the year, 5 years ago. And then what about Lincoln? I literally you and I gave the same situation. We get books about linking to our desks all the time, and they're all great. I'm waiting for nobody who's written been written about more. It's like maybe three people like who've written about Napoleon Jesus, Lincoln. I mean, I don't know how many books have been written about Lincoln. So yeah, what do you do for a fresh angle on the Civil War? So what I wanted to do is also I didn't mind tackling race, but I wanted to do it through quotes, not opinion. And racist never left the news, Black Lives Matter is raging at the time. And then you have you have a situation where as late as Condoleezza and rice Condoleezza Rice on the view, having to defend herself growing up in a Jim Crow south who knew all about racism, but grew up as his conservatives says, don't ever let it be an excuse. So I said, what have I talk about their parallel lives to the degree in which they read a lot of the same books? Did they overcame incredible obstacles? Nothing like Frederick Douglass. I get it. The guy was enslaved until he was in his 20 years old, two tries, got out in the second time within 7 years has a biography. It's a bestseller, and then starts a world tour and becomes famous in Scotland, Ireland, Germany, and England. This guy was a slave ten years before, but decides to come back to America because his 4 million enslaved 350,000 slave owners and he sees potential in this guy Lincoln and the Republican Party that we're finally ready to do

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug San Jacinto Alamo Avengers David Blight Frederick Douglas Scott Lincoln America Santa Anna Sam Houston Napoleon Jesus Texans Ken Burns FOX Brian Rice Condoleezza Rice LEE Condoleezza Jim Crow Frederick Douglass Scotland
The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:12 min | 9 months ago

The Life and Work of Mamie Phipps Clark

"Me was born on april eighteenth. Nineteen seventeen in hot springs arkansas. Her father was a well to do physician. His position gave the family comfort. Rarely afforded to black people at the time especially in the jim crow south while mamie attributed her later career successes to growing up the she did. She was not shielded from the stark racial realities outside her home. When she was six years old she witnessed a lynching in an interview in nineteen seventy six. She described knowing she was black at a young age. She said i became acutely aware of that in childhood. Because you had to have a certain kind of protective armor about you all the time. After graduating from high school. Mimi received a scholarship to attend howard university. A historically black college in washington. Dc she intended to study math which she loved but the professors proved uninspiring. Then she met a student. Named kenneth clarke who encouraged her to try out psychology. Kenneth suggestion led to me means lifelong career and to their forty six year. Long marriage the summer after mamie graduated. She worked in the law office of the prominent. Acp lawyer charles hamilton. Houston it was there that she witnessed preparation for racial segregation cases. When she went back to howard in the fall for her master's degree in psychology she planned to address racial disparities in her work. Mimi's thesis surveyed one hundred fifty black preschool age children and set out to understand at which age black children became aware that they were black for the study. She and kenneth presented the children with different photographs including of white boys black boys and images of animals and other objects. They asked the boys to pick which picture looked like them and then asked the girls to pick which picture look like their brother or other male relative mamie and kenneth concluded that the boys showed a racial awareness at three or four years old which kenneth described as disturbing mamie and kenneth were on the forefront of a shift in the field

Mamie Jim Crow Mimi Arkansas Kenneth Clarke Howard University Charles Hamilton Kenneth Washington Houston Howard
Author Jonathan Eig Discusses His New Book 'Ali: A Life'

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

02:02 min | 9 months ago

Author Jonathan Eig Discusses His New Book 'Ali: A Life'

"Book is ali a life biography. And it's incredible and the author of jonathan joins us on the podcast. We're going to kind of do an ollie specific pot here so let's start at the beginning just like the book does his family's two generations removed slavery. We know there are some history that none of us really knew about. Even he didn't know about about his own grandparents. He has a father whose abusive but talented. They weren't a destitute family by any means In their neighborhood louisville it was. It was a family that was probably doing better than some others. But i think the the foundation of who ali became as a person. How did he develop this kind of unpolished. Personality is non compromising personality at such a young age. That's really one of the central questions to understanding. Ali and i think it goes to understanding american history. You know when. I interviewed dick gregory for this book. He said to me e books not going to be worth a damn. If you can't explain. What made a kid from the jim crow south same age as emmett till think that he could talk back to white people and get away with it that he can call himself the greatest when everybody around him was telling him he was a second class citizen. You got to be able to understand what made ali capable of that. And it's a really difficult question. I mean it's really complicated. Part of it is that he grows up in. Not the deep south louisville thinks of itself as more progressive. There are some opportunities That wouldn't be available to him anywhere else For example to to walk into a boxing gym at age twelve and have a white cop offer to help him and to be to get in the ring and mix it up with white kids. That didn't happen in alabama or mississippi. But it did happen in louisville and so all of these things And the fact that his father was really a you know a fighter Not in the boxing sense. Which is somebody who didn't think that we should have to take the the conditions that we were born into because of this racist country that that That we live in.

Jonathan Joins ALI Louisville Ollie Dick Gregory Jim Crow Emmett Boxing Alabama Mississippi
"jim crow south" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Christmas presentation of Dear Father, Dear Son, two lives eight hours. So my dad said that He never knew his biological father. His mother had a series of boyfriends. And One boyfriend that was in the life. The longest was a man named elder. Elder was an alcoholic, my dad said. Who sometimes work and when he did work, he would bring his money home. To Dad's mother. For safekeeping because he knew he was irresponsible and would drink it away. So come Tuesday. He'd want to drink and you go to her to get the money and she would not giving the money and remind him that He's given it to her for safekeeping. He insisted she refused. He would hit her She was still refuse, he would beat her. My dad said this happened over and over again, he said. On one occasion, he intervene. He was beaten to So my dad is now fast forward 13 years old. And he came home. And he was making too much noise for his mother's then boyfriend, elder with long gone His mother sided with the boyfriend. And through my father out of the house at age 13. We're talking about a black boy. In the Jim Crow South. Great depression. No money. He literally just goes to the nearest house and ask, Can I do anything? Eventually somebody gives him a yard work. And from that he gets a job as a shoeshine boy from that to get the job as a hotel valet. And then he begins to cook for private family. Started getting pretty good at it. The point where he asked for more money. And when the lady wouldn't give him more money, go to somebody else. Because his reputation was beginning to Become that of a good cook. Dad apply for a job with the Pullman porters. It was a PBS special on the Pullman porters years back called Miles of smiles. It was about how the pull importers where the largest private employer of blacks in those days And to get a job was a big big deal. There were PhDs who were Pullman porters. Let alone people that left school when they were 13 years old. So my dad got that job. And unlike virtually any other black boy in the south, he was able to travel around the country as a result. He came to California one time In the thirties. It was such a warmer place, Sonny. Your place and people seem friendlier, and they seem less racist. And my dad made a mental note that maybe after some time he might relocate to California Well, Pearl Harbor. My dad joined the Marines. And I asked him why the Marines? For two reasons. I like the uniforms and they went where the action was. And they did. My dad was stationed on the island of Guam as we prepared for the invasion of Japan invasion that we thought was inevitable because Japan would not surrender. There was a cook. You soon became a sergeant. I found out after he died. My dad don't even tell me As I was writing the book, he became a staff parking, which meant he was a leader and a marksman. And somebody could motivate other men. And even by the accelerated standards of the Second World War, my dad became staff sergeant in warp speed. That's how good he was. He was a cook. Soon he's in charge of the cooking facilities. When the war is over. He returned to Chattanooga, where he had met my mother. Yeah, and they married. And my dad having all this experience now as a cook. Went to restaurant to restaurant to restaurant to get job as a cook. And he was told to with face. We don't hire here. My dad said he went to an unemployment office. The woman said. You went to the wrong door and told me to go out in the hall. Come back to the right door. My dad went out in the hall looked up and there was a colored only sign over the second door. He went through that second door back of the very same woman to send him out. My dad came home to my mother and said, This is BS. I'm going to California. I'll get a job in two days and I'll send for you. My dad comes out to California. But now we're talking about 46 45. He walks around the city. And nobody will give him a job as a cook. He has told you don't have any references. Which was California's way of saying the same thing that he was told in Chattanooga. They just did it on the Maury. Show until way. Did. I went to an unemployment office. This time, Just one door. They had nothing. My dad asked one. What time do you open? She said A 30. What time do you close? You said five. My dad said I will be here at 8 30. I will be here in five. Do you find something? She's a fine, my dad said in that one chair for a day and a half. Finally lady called him up. She says. I have something for you. I doubt that you'll take it. My dad says I don't know what it is, but I'm sure I'll take it. What is it? She said. It's a job with the fiscal bread should be cleaning toys My dad to find He worked at Nabisco for almost 10 years, cleaning toilets and took a second job with another bread company called Barbara and Bread. Also cleaning toilets. And Cooking for a family occasionally on the weekends to earn extra money and going to night school a couple of nights a week. So the man probably averaged about 4 4.5 hours asleep for years. No wonder he was so cranky. No wonder he was so grouchy. I know how I get when I've only had five or six hours of sleep, let alone four year after year after year after year. Dad.

California Chattanooga Elder Pullman Japan Nabisco Jim Crow South Sonny Pearl Harbor Guam Maury Barbara
"jim crow south" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The sixth grade the youngest none in in the school that pregnant. That's when I stopped believing just believing everything. Stop it like that. You let me come on. Confess in Rochester, New York, buddy Listen. Rochester, New York, Buddy Way never know. We never know where your phone calls are gonna go. But the pregnant nun, I believe that it's the first on the show as well. Jeff, take a bow. All kinds of fine fund family program today on Fox across America, 8887889910 the clip. I need to play it. So what? Jeff is saying he does make a good point. I'm not talking about him being upset with nuns playing loose ball. I don't know the answer. I can't speak to whether or not that is a real thing. But I can speak to the fact that he raised that issue. That very much is the world view of the show that we have, like We have one mission on the show, Man, if you're new to this shop We are. We don't care who you vote for. Okay? I do lean a little bit to the right. I believe the president's policies are wholeheartedly better for the country that anything Joe Biden and Kamila Harris or pushing. I think Joe Biden's policies. Are terrible. Come on, but I do. I don't You know anything? You tell me like student loan forgiveness or we're gonna get back into the Paris climate Change agreement, which was nonbinding. It Did nothing. It was symbolic the Iranian nuclear deal. Awful. You're gave $50 billion to the biggest state sponsor of terrorism in the world. There are white folks, and then they're ignorant like you. But the truth is it did And The idea, though, of the show is if you think it was a good deal. I still want to talk to you. I don't think where America If we're going to really try to buy into the the current political narrative, which is so hyper partisan And aims to on Lee communicate with like minded individuals. Okay, That's not how you make progress. First of all, making progress, understand what the other side wants and trying to find a medium not let perfect stand in the way of better, you know? And we've gotten away from that in the day and age. We live in of social media and these Twitter thunder domes because everybody just wants to win. But when we live in a world where you can't communicate across the aisle, and all everybody wants to do is win. The end result is that the entire country loses. He knows what he's talking about. So when I get on the show on the air every day, you know guys like Jeff, who might not agree with may think Trump's nuts think I'm not gonna hear from them. Okay. And if you're out there listening. We want to hear from you as well. Because that is our real mission statement is we're not trying to swing the election one way or the other. I believe in my ideas. Don't need to try to swing this thing through social pressure like the Democrats are doing where it's like, If you don't vote for us, you're a racist. You know if you support this president yet support white supremacist idiotic. It's stupid. Social pressure campaigns are what you do. When you can't win the idea battle, Okay, I am more interested in the idea Battle and I'm more interested in conducting it in an honest and welcoming for him. We're not looking to hang up on you and scream at you and run you off the phone. We're looking at an honest conversation because the truth is Most of the divide in this country. Is because of the intolerant left and it's because of their obsession with identity politics. The left took us backwards. On race in this country. During the time Barack Obama was in office. Okay, But think about this, you really need to think about this. And what a wasted opportunity. The Obama presidency was for this nation when Barack Obama became president, okay with overwhelming victories two times against John McCain. Uh, he was, by all accounts and so pretty iconic guy and Mitt Romney. It's one of the biggest slobs and non slob. But he's one of most useless presidential candidates I've ever seen. He just awful. And but Obama beat both of them by huge margins. And you know, it didn't mean a racism was gone in this country. But it did mean that the vast vast majority of the country was past race. We were Okay? I didn't say it was gone. I didn't say there wasn't a fringe, dopey element out there. Of, you know, don't be, you know, uneducated white supremacist fringe yahoos, but they have no influence in polite society. They're not represented in the upper echelons of our government. They're not represented in the corporate board rooms. Yet the left in an effort to advance Barack Obama's agenda. Continuously and relentlessly. Tried to portray this country as if we were still living in the Jim Crow South. Because social pressure was the only way they could get people on board with his terrible ideas. Okay. And what happened? Barack Obama got elected with overwhelming majorities. But every time somebody said, you know, I don't like this idea of like, Oh, why? Why don't you like the idea What's so different about this guy? You can't buy into his ideas. As if conservatives who opposed You know, expanding the size of our government. Crushing the You know the private health care sector stifling innovation, increasing taxes. Hurting the backbone of our economy, which is small businesses through all of these mandates and regulations they had to take on, you know, as if Conservatives were always in favor of those things. Till a black president came along. That just was empirically. Not true. It was never about race, but the left is advanced every argument behind the casual behind the battery ram of race. Because they know the ideas aren't going to work. Think about that. Barack Obama gave the biggest state sponsor of terrorism in the world $50 billion. That's stupid. Use your common sense. It really is. But When people got mad at that when people got mad at the fact that Iran was out there serving is as a proxy and sponsoring all kinds of attacks and militant groups that were striking our interests around the world. When people got mad. The color they were upset at was not black. The color they were upset at was green as in the $50 billion he gave them. I think he's got a park and it's a damn good one. But that's the problem with the country right now. Is everyone is disingenuously portraying the other side's arguments, at least on the left. Anyway. They think if you don't agree, you're a racist. You're a monster. You don't care, You know you care about other people, and it's just not true. And it drives me crazy. So on this show, I'm trying to be a place where even leftist can come hang out. Have their ideas, you know, hurt out. Represented articulated whatever way they like them, too, and to hear out hours from a a tolerant perspective where we're not trying to win Ban, we're not trying to win. I mean, the God's honest truth is, if this whole country comes down to whether or not you know I can save the day. We are all screwed, man. Every single one of us If the whole democracy comes down to me, I went to community College spent most of my adult life driving a cab. You know the idea that I'm going to save this thing. Means it's just too late to be saved. Okay, I You know, I went to national community College, nothing against community colleges. There are plenty of really smart kids, saving a ton of money on tuition and making a much better life for themselves than they would if they took an $800,000 student loan out to get a degree in human study, you know, gender studies. You know, we're the only place is going to hire you is probably Starbucks. But, you know, assuming one of the other gender studies majors leaves for another Starbucks, I mean, it zah bad it zah bad waste the money, But I'm not on the air. Trying to save the day is the point I was, you know, Drank my way through Committee College. My G P A is not nearly as high as my B A. C. If you will, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life. I don't know It's treat me Okay, Quick break. We're back with your calls after this. You're listening to the honey show in the country. Our country is in serious trouble. This'll his fox across America with Jimmy fella..

Barack Obama president Jeff America Fox Rochester New York Joe Biden Starbucks Mitt Romney Twitter Jim Crow South national community College Paris Committee College John McCain Iran
"jim crow south" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on How I Built This

"So, , most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. . There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. . The rent is lower, , and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. . Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, , Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, , and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, , ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, , Carolina. . But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, , hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. . This is where Dave Anderson, , after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, , ninety four. . Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. . But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. . Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. . My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. . Homa and if you were to look at a map, , of Oklahoma, , you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, , which is way down south, , and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. . A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? ? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them <hes> now fortunately for me, , though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for , Indians, , Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. . So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. . Don't know. . Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. . She was <hes>. . A choctaw speaking Indian and <hes>. . When he got put into these boarding schools, , he can remember. . Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. . But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. . No, , they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? ? My Dad was electricity and <hes>. . My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. . So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. . In Chicago being a great pizza town. . Chicago hotdogs, , my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. . For rips and growing up I. . Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine , eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. . Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. . As Barbecue. . Capital because of the great migration. . So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, , what a great combination in. So . Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, , barbecue. . Dave as a kid. . Did your mom and dad instill strong. . Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? ? Indian identity as a kid. . You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. . We were America's first people. . My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. . My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. . My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom <hes> with growing up. . She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. . And so <hes> throughout years. . My Dad would always. . Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. . Corn. . Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, , and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and <hes> but more importantly to raise money for the family. . My parents would have a Indian. . Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. . Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Chicago Dave Zig Ziglar America Indian Freiburg secretary English Lawrence Kansas Likud George Washington Mississippi Abraham Lincoln Jim Crow South Yazoo O'hare
Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

How I Built This

07:06 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

"So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Oklahoma Dave Anderson Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Dave Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud Domino America
Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

How I Built This

07:06 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

"So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Oklahoma Dave Anderson Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Dave Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud Domino America
Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

How I Built This

08:17 min | 1 year ago

Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

"Did you. Give it the name famous Dave's as kind of a joke because you weren't get famous, right Well on the road out of town, there's Dave's guns, Dave's antiques, Dave's boats so. was going to name my place Dave's famous barbecue shop. I get my business cards and it said famous Dave's barbecue. I imagine I can't believe the printer messed up my business cards and my wife's a dave calm down when she just leave it. So famous Dave's. History. From NPR, it's how I built this show about innovators, entrepreneurs, idealists, and the stories behind the movements they built. I'm guy rise and on the show today our passion for smoked ribs lead Dave Anderson open a barbecue. In the middle of nowhere and how it grew into famous Dave's one of the biggest barbecue chains in the country. Are. So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Dave Dave Anderson Oklahoma Dave's Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud NPR
"jim crow south" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Imagine with me this scene. . It's a scene that played out and nearly all of our families. . It's the scene in which a young person. . Somewhere in our family tree. . Somewhere in our lineage had a heartbreaking decision to make. . It was a decision to leave all that they had known. . And all of the people they had loved and to set out for place far far away that they had never seen. . In hopes that life might be better. . Migration. . Is usually a young person's endeavor? ? It's the kind of thing that you do when you're on the cusp of life. . And so there is in all of our families this young person somewhere in our background. . That person is standing at a dock about to board a ship that will cross the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean. . That person is loading up a truck. . That will cross the Rio Grande. . Or that person is standing at a railroad platform. . About to board a train. . That will cross rivers and mountains out of Jim Crow South to what they hope will be freedom in the north. . And they're with this young person. . As they are about to board that ship. . That boat. . That truck. . Bat Train. . Are The people who raised them? ? Their mother, , their father, , their aunt, , their uncle, , their grandparents, , whoever it might have been who had gotten them to this point. . Those older people were not going to be able to make the crossing FAM-. . And as they looked into the eyes of the people who had raised them. . There was no guarantee. . That they would ever see them alive again. . Remember that no skype. . No email. . No cell phones. . Not even reliable long distance telephone service. . And even if there had been many of the people that they were leaving did not even have telephones. . This was going to be a complete break from all that they knew and all of the people that they loved. . And the very next time that they might hear anything about the people who had raised them. . Might be a telegram. . Saying. . Your father has passed away. . Or your mother is very, , very ill. . You must return home quickly. . To see her alive again. . That is the magnitude of the sacrifice. . That had to have happened. . In nearly all of our families just for us to be here. . A single decision that changes the course of families and lineages and countries and history to the current day? ? One of his migration streams. . Stands out in ways that we may not realize. . It was called the great migration. . It was the outpouring of six million African. . Americans from the Jim. . Crow South. . To the cities of the north and west. . From the time of World War One until the one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred, , Seventy S. . It stands out because this was the first time in American history. . That American citizens had to. . Flee the land of their birth. . Just to be recognized as the citizens that they had always been. .

Bat Train Jim Crow South Pacific Ocean Rio Grande skype
The Great Migration and the Power of a Single Decision With Isabel Wilkerson

TED Talks Daily

04:14 min | 1 year ago

The Great Migration and the Power of a Single Decision With Isabel Wilkerson

"Imagine with me this scene. It's a scene that played out and nearly all of our families. It's the scene in which a young person. Somewhere in our family tree. Somewhere in our lineage had a heartbreaking decision to make. It was a decision to leave all that they had known. And all of the people they had loved and to set out for place far far away that they had never seen. In hopes that life might be better. Migration. Is usually a young person's endeavor? It's the kind of thing that you do when you're on the cusp of life. And so there is in all of our families this young person somewhere in our background. That person is standing at a dock about to board a ship that will cross the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean. That person is loading up a truck. That will cross the Rio Grande. Or that person is standing at a railroad platform. About to board a train. That will cross rivers and mountains out of Jim Crow South to what they hope will be freedom in the north. And they're with this young person. As they are about to board that ship. That boat. That truck. Bat Train. Are The people who raised them? Their mother, their father, their aunt, their uncle, their grandparents, whoever it might have been who had gotten them to this point. Those older people were not going to be able to make the crossing FAM-. And as they looked into the eyes of the people who had raised them. There was no guarantee. That they would ever see them alive again. Remember that no skype. No email. No cell phones. Not even reliable long distance telephone service. And even if there had been many of the people that they were leaving did not even have telephones. This was going to be a complete break from all that they knew and all of the people that they loved. And the very next time that they might hear anything about the people who had raised them. Might be a telegram. Saying. Your father has passed away. Or your mother is very, very ill. You must return home quickly. To see her alive again. That is the magnitude of the sacrifice. That had to have happened. In nearly all of our families just for us to be here. A single decision that changes the course of families and lineages and countries and history to the current day? One of his migration streams. Stands out in ways that we may not realize. It was called the great migration. It was the outpouring of six million African. Americans from the Jim. Crow South. To the cities of the north and west. From the time of World War One until the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Seventy S. It stands out because this was the first time in American history. That American citizens had to. Flee the land of their birth. Just to be recognized as the citizens that they had always been.

Jim Crow South Pacific Ocean Bat Train Rio Grande Skype
"jim crow south" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"Those can be for pulling those apart when practiced well, and of course, can do the exact opposite when they're practiced. Practiced, very poorly I I wondered if you could share with us. A story of. A Win, win win some of this came alive for you in terms of your own practice of of imagination of your own sense of possibility being unlocked for you within the course of your life. Okay. So the context is as follows I come from impossible folk walk on water folk I come from folk who done amazing things they're over achieving they're over educated and they're brilliant in every way that said. The Jim Crow South, definitely, a impaired their ability to feel certain things or demonstrate those feelings of particularly at anger right It just was trained out of my family. However, it was introduced to me in riotous fashion by my stepfather and for four and a half years I. I knew a specific kind of of vulnerability in pain. when my stepfather died. My entire school went to his funeral K. through eight. They all showed up his he was philanthropic and charitable, and no one knew he was a monster but I knew and I sitting in that Front Pew Looking at all of my peers. To pay their respects to a man that was frankly glad was dead I made you feel like I was flawed in some way and I I had whatever version of whatever version of nervous breakdown a nine year old can have Amsoil my family made the choice to take me out of less. It's accurate because I had been privately schooled my whole life and let me go to a public school for one year so that I could just hit a reset button. Right? I returned was it's accurate. My Fifth Grade Year my fourth grade year however, I went to an underperforming. Elementary School because the fourth grade teacher was my grandmother's best friend. My grandmother was hoping that she would just love on me the whole year right which she did but what was happening was? I didn't know the rules of engagement. It was a setting I never been in before. In my family didn't prepare me for it. K- I don't know if that was intentional or unintentional, but I found myself in a setting where I was making enemies I didn't even realize I was making. I was making enemies because the teachers always called on me. They weren't calling on the other kids and the teachers always compliment in my clothes on my clothes always clean and they were always knew and the other kids didn't have that reality and. My person who was being affirmed not space in bears worked. And so one day. After school. For girls jumped me. And it was brutal. In their blows were punctuated by Sorta these commentary about various things about me. You think you're cute. You just think you're so. SMART. Teacher always calls when you write every blow was punctuated by this this sort of assessment. And I was trying to block the. But I was also listening to their testimony and I realized everything they were saying about me was either something I couldn't change or I wouldn't change. And I, dropped my hands and I just let them. beat me. I stopped defending myself. When my mother saw me. I had two black eyes I had split. I had bruises all over my face and neck was it was bad She was devastated crying took me to my grandparents house. They were devastated in crying. These are the same folks who in the Jim Crow South their house was bombed in all kinds of stuff because my aunt was you know integrating central high school she got Congressional Medal of honor for later..

Elementary School Jim Crow South Amsoil
"jim crow south" Discussed on MTR Network Main Feed

MTR Network Main Feed

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on MTR Network Main Feed

"The power that lies within her I am a big fan of. Natural Magic I'm a big fan of people digging into what had to be lives that were lived outside the confines of the restrictions that existed by looking at the world and experience in the world through a very white lynch. So it may be set in the Jim Crow South, but it sounds like it may give us a way of talking about things that seems interesting. So I took a risk and ordered the. Now part of the reason why I was willing to do that is Carla. Corinth. Is a playwright who lives in La and she does really amazing plays and I was willing to take A. Take a risk, take a chance. She's won awards her first novel. The truth is right now was really good. Wasn't completely my bag, but I don't think I was the target audience. So I feel like I might be the target audience for this because. It seems like things might get rowdy and that's generally my bag. So I am all in for daughters jubilation, which also released October thirteenth and I found this one at the last minute I ran across interview with the author talking about their book. The author is Martha Sterile, the book coming out of the on the roof veil and I have things four unlikeable characters doing something and learning to grow and be more than just. A bitch or an Asshole, and I also have a thing for enemies, lovers stories, and this looks like it might give me all those things that I like. The Synopsis Isn't Manual. Oh. Ranko has always gotten exactly what she wanted the privilege of the house of Rango, her darling, her daring and sharp mind kept her from being the traditional young lady everyone wishes. She would be what other people think of her is of no consequence the. Mary her best friend and heir to the first house of Osa despite the fact that they are both secretly gay through AOL Emmanuella, we'll be able to rule the city..

Rango Jim Crow South Ranko Martha Sterile Corinth La Carla AOL
"jim crow south" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"This is going to be a ah, rapid fire One. My hope is that we get through eight questions. I don't know what's gonna happen, But it's gonna be a little quicker paste and a little more scattershot. Okay, a little more succinct if you will know. Okay. All right. It's going to be a disaster. Listening at 11 30 0 boy already sell it, huh? Eddie, who's a LL? Fargo is back with its fourth season after a three year hiatus and three year hiatus. Yeah. So can I ask the question right after Gates right out of gates because I saw a promo for it last night. Can I jump in now? You have to have watched the first three. No, they're all stand alone. Oh, good. Oh, you know, sometimes there might be, You know somebody who joins in who was in another season, But it doesn't matter you I probably wouldn't even notice it's some of this stuff is hard to watch because the Cohen brothers. You know their style is just very Quick, you sometimes you don't have time to, like absorb what it is that you're seeing this story. You know? Usually the stories take place in, you know the Midwest. Minnesota, especially this time it's were in Kansas City, Kansas. I believe Kansas City, Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri. Right now, there's two of them. Just the border you more more is on the Missouri side. All the good stuff. Maybe we're in Missouri. OK, whatever the case. It's basically the story of American immigration. And it's starts out being told through the eyes of this like precocious. Schoolgirl. Who is a black girl who has a white father and a black mother. And it's and then I think it's in 1950. And she's very smart. She's telling, basically telling the story of immigration and as year as she's telling it, then we go and see. You know some of the scenes of the you know the storytelling starts to play out. So we're talking about Chris Rock plays a black crime leader who's trying to escape the Jim Crow South and Comes to Kansas City, and then it's bye Bye. Irish. Italians think Jewish people and they're all trying to get a piece of the pot. And they're all kind of making a pact. To be, you know, like an alliance with one another and in order to make that alliance A theme like they're not going toe, you know. Steer away from it or screw the other person over. They take The family is The youngest son, so they swap kids. And the other kid goes and lives in the potential enemies household. It's so weird that it's so complicated. There's there's so many like moving parts. I'm trying to wrap my head around it, but I'm a simpleton, you know. A simple girl looking for a simple story. So does that mean you're out on Episode two, but But you're on. They'd better win you over. Next up soda. You're gone. Yeah, I'll watch another episode. Chris Rock. He seems great. There's another guy in there who I feel like is miscast. Um I'll get you his name in a second, but I mean, don. Are you into Fargo? I've only watched like the first episode and I was telling them see this couple days ago. That I was so confused because the first season like it starts out like the movie, and I thought it was just like a remake of the movie s O. I was super confused about I thought those were supposed to be the same characters and I'm like, Wait a minute. That's not the story it slightly different stories only given story, But there's a pregnant cop, and they start this story kind of the same way where they're finding a body. In the snow. You know, I'm like, yes. It was just really an odd ways. It's very good, though. I have to say that first episode things about it and the one with you and my great MacGregor. That was a really good one. The styling of the movie. Fargo is the same like in the TV show like they mimic the style of storytelling. Okay, you know they're laugh soon, where he Not yet. Really kiss with Chris Rock. You think you know the last season? There were some laughs there was on. Oh, God, I can't remember his name, but he was Hilarious almost in the pulp fiction kind of way that on Oh, my God. Don't worry about it, but it's you know, it's got kind of that Pulp fiction e kind of humor, but so far not yet know. Chris Rock Serious sees a serious guy. Okay. And now are they going back in time to So, so it's safe to tell the stories and then they go again back in time. Yes. So sometimes you'll see a character grown up and then they'll go back and show how he wass. Traded off to another family. Okay, And then there's betrayals. And then there's more trades. It's just it's There's a lot there's a lot and it's dark and it's gangster and there's people being shot. It's violent. Okay. You won't like it, Okay, But anyway, I'll give it another shot. I mean, it's it's well. Produced and it looks pretty and it's well directed. Sure it's just a story that I just get like, Wait. Who know what this makes me worried about us giving you homework, Toe Watch inception. Yeah, the TV show Fargo's losing you. And if she says, I'm just a simple girl who likes simple material this But this is kind of why I want you to eventually watch inception because I know I'm anticipating that you will be deeply frustrated and irritated by the movie, but maybe there is a chance. That you might think, huh? That was.

Chris Rock Kansas City Fargo Missouri Kansas Midwest Gates Eddie Minnesota Cohen MacGregor Jim Crow South
"jim crow south" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"From the preamble to the Constitution. Which means We, the people. Of the United States in order to form A more perfect union. Who were we? The people in 17 87. You would not be among we, the people. African Americans would not be Among the people. That women weren't there. African Americans weren't that even white men who own no property. Now let me remind you of something. Ladies and gentlemen, this extremist Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Is the modern godmother of Bolshevism. She wanted to do away not only with the U. S Constitution. But with with America as we know it itself And let me remind you of something else. This constant overuse of race race race by the left. Is meant for one reason only, and that is to divide and conquer. I want to remind you that race itself is objective. What does it tell you about a person's character? Nothing. What does race tell you about a person's beliefs? Nothing. What is race tell you about a person's past behavior. Nothing and yet the left makes it the big ole and end all of a person's identity. I shouldn't have to tell you this, but white supremacy has a definition. Into a Ruth Bader Ginsburg. All white men. Except Communists. Were white supremacists. She is the godmother of all of the hatred that has permeated the universities. Quite supremacy has a definition as I point down and pig 66 of our fight for America. Chapter is actually called Hijacking Martin Luther King's Dream incident like In a white supremacist society. There are laws on the books that grant privileges to white people that deny to others. There are laws on the books that prohibit members of other races from doing things white people are allowed to do. That is a white supremacist society. South Africa under apartheid was a white supremacist society. The old Jim Crow South was white supremacists and effect, even though they tried to hide that, with the separate but equal nonsense. America today is not a white supremacist country. These riots, a part of the normal course of business for the Marxist Leninist Brigades, of whom Of whom I must tell you. By the way, this comes from page 66 of our fight for America. The most important book you're gonna be able to read before the election and give it to a friend. Let's go to Ginsberg. Where did they get these ideas to hate America to hate the Constitution to hate our borders to hit our language to hate our culture. They got it from people like Ruth Bader Ginsburg and I got to remind you again. It's so important. You hear me? You must hear me, please. Liberals tried to make a federal case out of Justice Roberts membership in the Federalist Society. That's what they did. But Ruth Bader Ginsburg Had been The general counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union. When she was nominated. Which, unlike the Federalist Society, litigate CE to bring about far left even radical goals. Ginsburg was a litigator. Ginsberg believes that judges should legislate which is the opposite of the whole meaning of the courts. Object of the courses to interpret not to legislate. This woman. Wanted to legislate from the bench. She is what is wrong with so much of the thinking in this country today? She was like a cult leader. Are extremist views are seen as normal today because of the psychos who don't even know what she stood for. And what you stood stood against. I know a Jewish person who quit his Jewish temple Friday night. He submitted his resignation from a temple. You've been a member ofthe why? Because during the holiest night of the year Or one of the holiest nights of the year. The heir of Russia shut of the eve of Russia, Tiana in the midst of the eulogies in the prayer sessions, rather The liberal rabbi got up and started to talk about how great Ruth paid against bird Wass. My friend was so offended that is, religion has been hijacked by the American left Rabbinic ce. That he submitted his resignation to the temple. He said. I will never set foot in that place again. He said. I joined this house of worship to talk to God not to hear about politics. I wanted a place a refuge from politics in this time. And yet, this rabbi Had the nerve to eulogize Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the middle of a Russia China service. Help my friends. We're living in very, very Except crazy, Evil times. And again. I want to take your calls. I promised you I would Phone number's 855 470 Way too. Let's begin with Larry in San Francisco. Larry, Welcome to the program. Go ahead, please. Thank you, Doctor. I'm surprised that you haven't taken it one step further. You just last Friday told her If you didn't if you were Jewish On the holiest day of the year, and you didn't get your life right with God. He wouldn't write your name in the book of life for the next year. And it's sunset. In Washington. It wasn't sense it here yet, but at sunset in Washington, be sweet. God didn't right Ruth Bader Ginsburg name down anymore. And I took it. I'm not. I'm not going to wait. But wait. I got it back. Sorry I got to back you up on this. People die all the time. People are born and die all the time, So I can't say God punished her. You're implying that God punished her. Well, I'm implying that God sent me a signal. You had said that if you don't get your life, right? With God. He won't Put your name in the book of life Now I'm not a Jewish person. But it resonated. I understand by my friend, but at some point all of us go to the next world, don't we? No, but the point is, it doesn't mean we're being punished by God because we died. So I don't know that I would jump. Did I hear you and it's very beautiful to hear how carefully you listen to the show..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg America Federalist Society Ginsberg United States Martin Luther King Marxist Leninist Brigades South Africa American Civil Liberties Union Jim Crow South Larry Russia Washington Justice Roberts San Francisco general counsel Russia China Doctor Tiana
"jim crow south" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"They have that we have the biggest life expectancy gap. In the entire country. What I mean by that is in Streeterville neighborhood, which is near Michigan Avenue wealthiest neighborhoods. City mostly high rises. Average life expectancy, according to GNU School of Medicine is 90 years old, just a few miles away on the south side of Chicago and angle with the poorest neighborhood in the city. Life expectancy is 60 years old. A 30 year gap in life expectancy in one American city. Those air because that that gap is because of the failed policies of people like our current mayor. Lord Lightfoot. I call her Lord Lightfoot, Lori Lightfoot because she thinks she's a British Lord. She thinks she rolls over it with an autocrat. Um and and I'm warning the country again as a Chicagoan. Take our city. Take my city Azali warning shots to the rest of the country that this is where failed left his policies leave. I would like to know where it has been successfully tried the past 22 50 years. That lousy public schools, high taxes, impossible job creation, massive crime and lawlessness and the taking over of our educational systems by left wing activists has actually worked. Are people saying, you know what I want to move to the south side of Chicago. That's one or want to raise my four kids on second. What I really want to do is moved in Minneapolis or Kenosha, Wisconsin. That's where I want to put my family. The fact and matter is black, White, Latino and otherwise are heading out of the urban areas because it's too expensive and is too dangerous. And when I look at what happened last night in Minneapolis, allegedly according to media accounts that the Saks Fifth Avenue was not yet looted. But there was a report of a death of a black man that turned out to be a black man killed a woman. And then the police recalled to the scene to address the fact that there's a dead body in the street. And the and the murderer killed himself shot himself on camera video. Whatever. And then that was a launching pad to go loot the only remaining department store in downtown Minneapolis and that we're waiting for something to occur. That has nothing to do with racial justice. Nothing do with racial equality, which role in favor of And I think I said this to my producer Tony Bender that I think if you think about this, the last 10 2030 years there has been such a failure of the Democratic Liberal City state in every major city that they cannot admit to the failures themselves. They want to project their failures on to some other entity and that other entity is becoming Trump or Republicans or whatever it might be. The other entity is being blamed for the failure of the city states of the Democratic Party that have collapsed and the media will not look at himself and say, Okay, why don't we investigate? Why Chicago? Why Detroit? Why the city of Cincinnati? Why Minneapolis? Why Seattle has failed. What they want to do is go after Trump and blame him as if he's responsible. For 97. Years of Democrats rule in Chicago and Cincinnati has been 50 years. They project on others their failures and the media doesn't hold them to account. Can you smell what I'm cooking? Yeah, I think I should do Bill and let me tell you, you're exactly right, by the way about people voting with their feet by leaving the state of Illinois, the city of Chicago. Both seem significant population losses, and you're also very correct about you know who's really leading Chicago and drugs are black people. Black citizens of Chicago who have options who have the means to leave are leaving. Which means by the way, the neighbors they leave behind, unfortunately, gets even worse. When you lose stable people, people who are operable E Mobile right when they decide I can't take it anymore, And if it's interesting, there's almost a reverse reversal of the great migration. So lot of blacks came up from the Jim Crow South Particular started World War two and thereafter to the industrial North because they were treated better, of course, by law by culture and their job opportunities. So they went to cities like Chicago, Cincinnati, Chicago. Detroit. What we're seeing now is is a reversal of that a lot of people leaving these old northern cities out of black folks in particular leaving these places and going to the South. Why? Because that's where the opportunity is now in Red States. It's in Texas in Tennessee in South Carolina, so it's fascinating and you know, you look at what people actually do. Look at the choices they make with their lives when they vote with their feet on DH leave these failed places. I just hope that people who lead places like Chicago and moved to places like Tennessee and Texas. Don't change the politics of those red states on unfortunate that the risk saving Cortes of the Trump campaign let me share with you a tweet that I put out last night. After the Wisconsin attorney general who is a Democrat, held a news conference. This is my tweet, which is at Willie 700 wlw. Two Facts matter, Wisconsin A G, a Democrat, said tonight which was last night. That a woman called 911 to report that Jacob Blake was violating a protective order by being around her as two and uniformed cops arrived. Blake said he had a knife told the police he had a knife in his car. He resisted arrest fought, the cops was taste without effect. Blake, then walk towards the car or ignoring orders to stop as he arrived at the car. Blake reached inside the police, then discharge seven rounds in the Blakes back. Police found the knife on the driver's side floor that Officer Schelsky commit a crime. And so the diatribe gets out. Then the fax catch up, whether it's George Floyd or Michael Brown. They're these air, terrible deaths of these individuals, But each of them began the process that ultimately ended in their own death or injury. And so I would ask the question a relative to Officer Chesky of Kenosha. When you get a 901 call and you show up on an African American woman says I got a TP o against that guy Blake. They run him. He's got an outstanding warrant for sexual assault, allegedly on a 16 year old girl from July the sixth. They identify him as the person with the warrant and the identify him as the person that the African American woman said had beaten her up. Previously, they say to the D A say to Mr Blake,.

Chicago Minneapolis Jacob Blake Cincinnati Wisconsin Detroit Lord Lightfoot Kenosha Mr Blake Streeterville Democratic Party GNU School of Medicine Trump Jim Crow South Particular Tony Bender Seattle Officer Chesky George Floyd Red States
"jim crow south" Discussed on The For Real For Real Podcast

The For Real For Real Podcast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on The For Real For Real Podcast

"He had a racist overtones whenever he depicted people people of color. Again, he was riding in Jim. Crow South while even before the Jim Crow South because he was writing before all of this stuff happened before Jim Crow. was put into effect in the laws will put into effect. He even wrote an essay about the creation of the Negro and the essay. This I alluded to in the show. It's an essay that imagines God created the Negro, but he creates new. As an afterthought he liked creates everything beautiful and he does everything he puts everything together in this world and he then he goes you know what I`Ma Addy's black folk over here. Yeah. Just to just to add a law and he believes this stop right he writes this as Thome, and so he is both you know heralded as a sci fi writer but also lambasted as somebody who had really really problematic thought processes when it came to women and people of Color, take you for gracefully navigating. That work that he wrote man when I came across his name and the backstory of the show that was one of the first things I saw pedia like that that poem on the creation of the word and my first thought was, why does this guy with this history regardless of how impactful or great his works of writing might have been in the time? Why does his story get elevated especially in this time? Like so thought that came in my mind is was the approach to cast. Black people. In this show and kind of flip things and kind of how you tell the story May to kind of make up for the racist kind of behind some of these stories like I feel like that was something that was a little bit questionable to me because I feel like if everyone knew because I went into show, not I like I said, I, just thought it was a black drama kind of coming on with a little bit of sci-fi look great like I didn't know who loved graph was..

Jim Crow South Jim Crow. Thome Jim writer
"jim crow south" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whether it be voting or protest or organizing that all of this is a misbegotten enterprise that black people should get themselves out of it. This explains in part why he almost always comes down against voting rights. He believes that this is a fool's errand. The second conclusion is that capitalism the marketplace while it tends to be geared towards white interests, nevertheless offers Nisha's Where black people can achieve some kind of measure of autonomy, specifically black men. Thomas derives this in part from his reading of Malcolm X. I should say a selective reading because Malcolm X had a complicated view on this. Thomas also derives this from reading a black economist by the name of Thomas Soul. Very prominent conservative and in Seoul, Thomas finds a vision. Four black people not of emancipation. What of kind of autonomous space where black people can create their own world apart from white people, So that's the second conclusion that follows from this bedrock principle of the erotic ability of white racism. He may have been more receptive to this idea because of the example set by the most powerful male figure in his life. His stern, humorless But successful grandfather Myers Anderson, My wife had a bust of my grandfather made right after I was confirmed. And I put it up on a bookshelf where it looks down on me. Is that brooding omnipresence? And he's looking down on me with one of his favorite sayings inscribed on it. Old man can't is dead. I helped bury him. And here's what I wondered on the days one self pity is consuming me. I look up at him. How can I complain to him? No education. No father. Raised in part by freed slave In Jim Crow South. He never complained. My grandmother never complained. How can I tell him that as a member of the United States Supreme Court, I can complain part of Meyer's Anderson's whole gestalt. Was a refusal toe. Look, tio any kind of benevolence help or aid from White society through that kind of self reliance that very stern iron discipline. He created a world for his family that was relatively safe and spread that protection and largess to other parts of the black community. And so this spirit of what in the tradition is called, do for self a kind of collective self reliance, looking inward to the community, and particularly to very strong, powerful blackmail figures. Is something that Thomas learns very early on. And, of course, in his college years, employment in the community.

Thomas Soul black community Myers Anderson Malcolm X White society Seoul Jim Crow South Nisha United States Supreme Court Meyer
"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It took the agonies following reconstruction, trampling of basic freedoms, the unbridled the exploitation, the gleefully executed lynchings to spur the historic exodus of the incompletely emancipated spring, six million African Americans departed the caste system of the Jim Crow South. From the time of World War one until the 19 seventies. Isabel Wilkerson is the author of the Warmth of other Suns. The epic story of America's great migration. The only Americans has had to actually leave the land of their birth for another part of their own country, just to be recognized as a citizens to which they have been born. I called, and it changed. Every single city in the north and Midwestern weather changed our culture. It changed the music that we listen to. It changed literature and changed politics. When the great migration began, 90% of African Americans lived in the south when it was over more than half Living elsewhere in 1916 the Chicago defender in African American newspaper beckoned their quote Southern brothers to Come North quote. Better 1000 times to run chances of being nipped by the fingers of Jack Frost to shake off this mortal coil.

Jim Crow South Isabel Wilkerson Jack Frost Suns Chicago America
"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To spur the historic exodus of the incompletely emancipated. Spring where you call six million African Americans departed the caste system of the Jim Crow South. From the time of World War until the 19 seventies. Isabel Wilkerson is the author of the Warmth of other Suns. The epic story of America's Great Migration group of Americans has had to actually leave the land of their birth for another part of their own country, just to be recognized as citizens to which they have been born. And it changed. Every single city in the north and Midwestern was changed our culture. It changed the music that we listen to. It changed literature and changed politics. When the great migration began, 90% of African Americans lived in cells when it was over, more than half were living elsewhere. In 1916 the Chicago defender in African American newspaper beckoned their quote Southern brothers to come North quote. Better 1000 times to run chances of being nipped by the fingers of Jack Frost to shake off this mortal coil at the end of a lynchers rope. The White perspective was displayed in the 1918 headline in The Chicago Tribune Quote, fearing Negro Invasion Crowd attacks House.

Isabel Wilkerson Jim Crow South Chicago Jack Frost The Chicago Tribune Suns America
"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Exploitation gleefully executed lynchings to spur the historic exodus of the incompletely emancipated. Our spring, you six million African Americans departed the caste system of the Jim Crow South. From the time of World War until the 19 seventies. Isabel Wilkerson is the author of the Warmth of other Suns. The epic story of America's great migration. The only Americans has had to actually leave the land of their birth for another part of their own country, just to be recognized as citizens to which they have been born. And it changed. Every single city in the north and Midwestern weather changed our culture. It changed the music that we listen to. It changed literature, It changed politics. When the great migration began, 90% of African Americans lived in the south when it was over more than half Living elsewhere in 1916 the Chicago defender in African American newspaper beckoned their quote Southern brothers to come to North quote. Better 1000 times to run chances of being nipped by the fingers of Jack Frost to shake off this mortal coil at the end of a lynch your throat. The White perspective was displayed in the 1918 headline in The Chicago Tribune Quote, fearing Negro Invasion Crowd attacks.

Jim Crow South Isabel Wilkerson Jack Frost Chicago Suns The Chicago Tribune America
3 Aurora Police Officers Fired Over Elijah McClain Photo

Guy Benson

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

3 Aurora Police Officers Fired Over Elijah McClain Photo

"Aurora, Colorado police officers for mocking last year's death of a black man in police custody. 23 year old Elijah McClain was killed last summer after police used a choke hold on him. He'd been walking home from a convenience store. Three officers later posed for pictures near a memorial from acclaim, smiling, imitating a choke hold. Now. Interim Aurora Police chief Vanessa Wilson says two of the three officers are being fired. The third resigned. Another officer who laughed when he got the picture and was one of McClane's arresting officers has been fired as well. Claims. Mother's attorney Martin Newman says this is like the Jim Crow South, where White's the promises thought that it was amusing to take pictures of themselves next to the bodies of lynch human beings. She says she anticipates filing a civil rights lawsuit boxes.

Aurora Police Aurora Elijah Mcclain Martin Newman White Vanessa Wilson Jim Crow South Colorado Mcclane Lynch Officer Attorney
The New American Library

After The Fact

05:35 min | 2 years ago

The New American Library

"When was the last time you went to the library? Was It for a book a movie? Even a toy. Was it for an exercise class, or maybe it's one of the few places where you're able to access the Internet. For the future trusts I'm Dan La Duke, and this is after the fact. Libraries aren't just about books anymore and haven't been for a long time. But. They've always been about the democratization of information. Thanks to Benjamin Franklin it was about this time of year on July. First 1731 that Franklin created the first free lending library in Philadelphia it signaled a real change in the world that America, not yet its own country. Was a place where information could be available to everyone turns out. That concept has become a cherished one. The Pew Research Center reports that seventy eight percent of Americans say public libraries provide information, and here's the key part information that is trustworthy and reliable. That's no small thing in this digital information age when many people are also saying they have trouble. Sorting fact from fiction sounds like something we're talking about and celebrating and joining us to do just that is Carla Hayden the Librarian of Congress the fourteenth person and the first woman and African American to serve in that role. So Carla Hayden Welcome. It's a delight to talk to you. Thank you. This is a great time to talk about libraries this time of year this podcast likes to talk about the importance of certain American institutions and how they've made our country great. We are right around the fourth of July. That's whenever we want is sort of paying attention to the Declaration of independence, and that's an important thing, but there's another another big American holiday that people may not realize on July first back in seventeen, thirty one when Ben Franklin created the first library in this country beckoned those days. What was the stated goal of a library? And how how if any way is it different? Than the goals today. Benjamin Franklin if you remember was a bookseller and a lover of books, and that time books were very rare and very expensive, and they could only be obtained with great difficulty and so Ben, Franklin. Wanted to have a membership society, The Philadelphia Library Company and he started the idea of lending library and it was in this time. They weren't a nation yet, but it was starting and the idea that. Information and ideas should be free and not clasp out. So that library was created not scholars, the rich one class, but for people who could not afford to have their own, and as time in the decades progressed I mean. The other founding fathers Thomas. Jefferson, being one of them recognize the need for the institution that you now head the library of Congress. It's IT'S A. It's the biggest in the world for for for one thing. Why was there this decision back then to create a library of Congress and National Library sorts in eighteen, Fifteen The British destroy the US capital and there were about twelve hundred. Legal books near for Congress and I've been told, and even shown the fireplace in the capital where the British actually use some of those books, those initial books to start that fire, and at that time Thomas Jefferson the great collector books at the largest personal collection of books in the country at that time. Had retired to Monticello, and he offered to sell his collection to the country to start the library of Congress, and it included the Koran. It was a universal collection. The idea that Congress needed more than just legal books soon said there is no subject to which member of Congress may not have occasion to refer the democratization of information was The whole democracy notion was pretty new in the world in those days. How important is the free flow of information in libraries? ROLE IN OUR DEMOCRACY? Libraries have been almost bastions of equal opportunity to information. The idea that anyone could have access to books. And what more importantly was contained in them was the great equalizer in unifier in many ways now there were difficulties in this country as you could imagine in the Jim Crow South. On there was the segregation of public libraries like public facilities, and that was something that even carried over into some of the northern. A states that had as they call them colored branches. Actually were designated, but that idea. Of A library, being a place as librarians like to say, books could battle it out on the shelves. You put. A book about one thing there and the possibly opposing idea book that describes in another idea. Right next to it and let the public decide.

National Library Benjamin Franklin Congress America Library Of Congress Thomas Jefferson Librarian Of Congress Carla Hayden The Philadelphia Library Compa Dan La Duke Pew Research Center Monticello Philadelphia United States Unifier Jim Crow South BEN
Barbara Smith

Making Gay History

07:59 min | 2 years ago

Barbara Smith

"Arbor. Smith has never been a single issue activist her entire life. She's demanded justice and dignity for those whose voices aren't heard that's just how she was raised. I Barbara and her twin sister beverly reborn in Nineteen forty-six in Cleveland Ohio. That's where the family had settled after leaving. Small Town Georgia in the Jim Crow South South their mother Hilda. The first person in the family to earn a college degree died when they were nine. The sisters were then raised by their extended family in a household of women who put great stock education in the mid nineteen sixties. Barbara attended mount. Holyoke an all women's college where she later recalled she surrounded by quote Lesbian undercurrents that were not spoken at the time. Barbara wasn't aware of any gay rights efforts and while her feelings for women and were nothing new she didn't come out. Until the mid nineteen seventy s nine hundred seventy four barber co founded the combat. He river collective a black black feminist organizing group dedicated to the struggle against quote racial sexual heterosexual and class oppression in nineteen eighty barbara and Audrey Lorde the self-described Black Lesbian feminist mother poet Warrior Co founded the kitchen table. Women of Color Press. It was run by and for women of color whose writings got short shrift shrift by the mainstream publishing industry by the time I interviewed Barbara. She'd been speaking truth to power for decades as a woman against Misogyny as as an African American against racism as lesbian against Homophobia and as a black lesbian against those in the gay rights movement. Who sidelined the concerns of LGBTQ jibbed Q.? People of Color. So here's the scene. It's January twenty ninth. Two thousand one and Barbara has driven from her home and Albany New York to my weekend. Place a half hour south. We're seated on an overstuffed SOFA looking at photographs. That Barbara brought with her. She shows me a photo of herself and her twin sister at the nineteen seventy-nine national march on Washington for Lesbian and gay rights. This is my sister and me. At the March seventy nine and I'm the one on the right with my hair braided and I was thinking about that. As as I pulled that picture out I mean it took hours to get my hair braided. I only did it like a couple of times because I am so not into the the Muslim festival. The I was thinking like just seeing the fact that I had my hair braided shows how special I thought this March was. Do you recall anything about the march. You spoke or I just remember the feeling of incredible joy and being there and excitement there is such a kick in being visible and out and doing that in a mass way I think that if one is like manifesting or if one is visible and by yourself that's really kind of scary. Three scares me to this day. But the thing is to have the The support of numbers everything. This is a general statement undeveloped. The seventies are the second half of the seventies which was a period. When I was first out? There is a feeling that we could do anything. I had the feeling that we could do anything that everything was possible. Because we were toppling such mammoth taboos and such a mammoth notions oceans. That women were supposed to be passive and stay at home and have a baby and in in black nationalist context. Stay home and have babies for the nation. This extreme amount seems to me of male chauvinism in in a certain context which is a direct result of racism and the deficit of never be able to lead in have freedom in a racist country so to make up for white supremacy in certain black. Political context of black men are even more chauvinistic. Because they're really we're GONNA show you who's boss because they are so rightfully angry about not being recognized as capable and full human beings in context were white men and get to call the shots. Being a lesbian feminist. As I was in that period was about just sticking holes you know in in every terrorist value and belief lesbian work there was an actual lesbian feminist movement which was very vital and Had great positive impact. On the way that issues in a variety of movements were were shaped and were defined during that period and we worked with gay men like we were able to work with gay men who were ready to deal with us so the thing is the line between lesbian feminism and feminism and the lesbian and Gay Liberation Movement. Those winds were not like hard and tossed so lesbian feminist were active in the reproductive rights movement. Lesbian feminists were key in building that while the movement against domestic violence and sexual assault. If it wasn't for less would be no movement but the thing is a lot lot of history is a racist we really we were so What's the word of hated? We were so hated and so ostracized Ivy League by our communities of Color. There is nothing saying to be heard. Hardly anything sane to be heard about the reality that not everybody. Here's heterosexual people. Color context anywhere I spoke Howard University used to have on national black writers conferences sponsor them throughout the seventies and I was invited to the last one would say ever had It was in nineteen seventy eight. I had written toward block them. Criticism in public set in nineteen seventy seven and As as a result of that I was invited to speak at that conference and I was supposed to speak from the essay where I talk about. Lesbian isn't lesbian. That lesbian the other this a perfect example of how black people were dealing with the reality of both gender and Sexuality Politics So I was invited to speak on their first panel. They'd ever had about about black women writers record no and they wouldn't even invite any other feminists I asked him to invite. Would you please put another feminist on this battle and they refuse to that It was at one of their large auditoriums at Howard The place is packed. You know maybe five hundred people. I read excerpts of twitter black feminist criticism and then I wrote a few paragraphs that were specifically aimed at the black community. Not Cruel things by any means. Just interpretive things that would be helpful. Given that essay had originally been and for primarily white feminists audience. So you know I read it you know and then I said and all hell broke loose because they were so upset that that music system deserve to be hated. Oh Yeah Oh no they while you gotta read the essay. You should read the essay. Because it's like when I tell you how upset they were you. You should see what they were responding to which was like. Hey you know. There's a black women's literary tradition. You know it's a strong and long as anybody else's legitimate and we use a feminist perspective to look at writing by black women. There is such a thing as sexism and the the people who are most marginalized in this whole mix or black lesbians in Black Lesbian Writers. But yet we're going to continue and do what we do.

Barbara Black Lesbian Writers Gay Liberation Movement Black Community Arbor. Smith Cleveland Color Press Ohio Georgia Mount Hilda Beverly Ivy League Twitter New York Washington Warrior Co Howard University Assault
"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hi tech clear skies will have a low of seventy degrees W. NYC it's ten o'clock WNYC supporters include roundabout theater company's Tony stone a new play about the first woman to go pro in baseball's Negro leagues based on true events Tony stone tells a story of race gender and ambition in the Jim crow south tickets at roundabout theatre dot org this is W. NYC FM HD and AM New York from W. NYC in New York and this is on the media Bob Garfield this out I'm Brooke Gladstone this week we came up for air after the objections.

Tony stone Jim crow New York W. NYC Bob Garfield Brooke Gladstone WNYC NYC seventy degrees
"jim crow south" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At home, and the special broadcast from the Oakland public library, I avenue branch in east Oakland. We're looking at the role of libraries in the digital age joining us Jamie turbot. She's director of the Oakland public library. Welcome. Hello. Thank you. Glad to have you also glad to have Anthony, proper care outreach and community engagement coordinator, or the Oakland public library. Welcome. Thank you, and welcome to you as well. And we'll also welcome our our library eight here at the first avenue branch. Oakland public library, also heads, the scraper bike team offers bike fix it clinics at the library. Good to have you the morning, and we'll also say, good morning to Wayne Wiegand. He's American Library historian, author of part of our lives of people's history of the. American public library, and a book called the desegregation of public libraries in the Jim crow south civil rights local activism. When we have you back on forum. Thank you for having me. Let's have you glad to have this live studio audience live library audience, and let me begin if I may Jamie travek with you. Let's talk about how libraries have changed, we've done that before on forum, but to change to the degree that this particular branches changed really in many ways, if I may say, so extraordinary me, it's still a place of learning. It's still a place of education of books and all of that. But who would have thought for example, you'd have a critical response team, which you do? Yes, this particular branch is our newest branch of the Oakland public library. It was built about eight years ago. So it's was really our first attempted being responsive to the communities. We can it's very flexible and has a lot of different programming. What we're trying to do at the Oakland public library's very responsive to the needs of the community and be as flexible as we can as a government institute. Shen to whatever those needs may be. So for the critical response team that's a group of staff that were formed to sort of respond to any sort of immediate need either a national issue. That's going on a local issue provide information to citizens or offer support in any way. So, for instance, there were recently ice rates in Oakland. And we did a lot of work on immigration and immigration rights, and we had different legal experts come in and talk to the community as well as provide information to patriots, who are coming into the library next actually, the pollution of the most public institution in Oakland, we should add and have actually been a place of refuge for people during have to go shit fire that whole tragedy and also refuge for those who were seeking sanctuary during the ice rates. Mayor shaft got a lot of pushback for that. What about the library? I believe we were one of the places that people consider safe, although we are a government institution. I don't think the general public recognized us is such. And so we feel like a neutral place for people to come, but it was another when I asked pushbacks community said, this is okay is a sanctuary city. We're all for it, as opposed to the kind of response nationally that we saw were Oakland was uses kind of whipping city from Trump on down. I believe internally in Oakland, people were very supportive of her position. And, and the stance of trying to be a sanctuary city, thriving, though, largely real estate taxes and bond issues seemed to go pretty well to yes, we're very lucky. We had a parcel tax pass in two thousand eighteen so almost exactly a year ago, measure d passed in Oakland and that generated, an additional ten million dollars of the live for the library that's allowing us to open about two hundred hours a week across the city seven days. A week at this particular branch which is never happened before that was measure de correct. And no more funds. And know moreover defines, we are officially fine creek. Why no funds. We found that they were an economic barrier wasn't necessary. They aren't shown.

Oakland Wayne Wiegand Jamie turbot Jamie travek Jim crow Anthony Shen coordinator ten million dollars two hundred hours eight years seven days
"jim crow south" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:35 min | 3 years ago

"jim crow south" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Tape up is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Wow. Hi, I'm Jonathan Kaye part and welcome to Cape up. On this day when we honor the life and legacy of Martin Luther King junior. I want to introduce you to one of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions all across the south throughout the United States closer to its founding principles. Her name is miniature Brown tricky. And she was fifteen years old when she integrated central high school in nineteen fifty seven as part of the Little Rock nine. I sat down with many gene on January six during an store gathering of civil rights veterans and next generation leaders at the Annenberg retreat at sunny lands in Rancho Mirage, California. Here why she got involved in the movement and how her historic actions impacted her life right now. Mini-gene brown. Tell folks who are listening who you are. Well, I can in short time. I'm one a Little Rock nine and the Little Rock nine. A group of young people who desegregated central high school in nineteen fifty seven. So it's almost in the middle ages happened longtime ago, we were fourteen and fifteen sort of at the beginning. And then the people who were in the eleventh grade turned sixteen by the end of the year. My birthday is September eleventh. So. Yeah. So we're the youngest were fourteen and the oldest were sixteen. You were fifteen years old. Doing something that even from my perspective having read and watched and seen the pictures. See scary scary thing was it as frightening. In real life in walking up those steps and going through those doors as it looked. It was more frightening than can be imagined. In part of the reason, I think. Is. We'd never seen mob violence. We never been hated individually or as a little group. And it was it was bit wilder. And 'cause when I when I see the pictures of the first day when we're turned away. We all just look really confused so hatred comes ad. In a way that was so scary because people were shouting kill them. Lynch them. Mean horrible things. So it was it was more frightening than anybody can never imagine. And so I'm grateful that still photos couldn't show how we're shaking in our boots. Did you see familiar faces among the people who were shouting and yelling and screaming? No. Because the the idea was to make sure we didn't see them. So basically, they were behind us and the governor had placed the Arkansas national guard around the school. To stop our insurance. So I didn't really want to see these people. So I. It's like some kind of monsters coming at you. You don't really want to see it. What was what were some of the other things they yelled at you at the just set that they go home man integration is a sin an abomination against God. So I say that when we see. Protests signs by a particular group. I say they never got any new signs that just went into their basements. And brought out the ones from little because they say the same thing. The buzzword was integration communism. So we see that we saw all the anti. Everything signs. They're the same sort of. Belief system or some kind of weird. Idea of what's evil, and what's wrong and integration? Apparently was one of the states. Did your parents talk to you? Is it the night before? Or when you got home about to prepare you for what was going to happen or to talk talk you through what happened. Did they even did they try to discourage you, let me first of all I think we're really brainwashed in the United States about it'd being democracy and freedom and even in a Jim crow south. We're still pledging allegiance and saying anthems and. There's no preparation for hatred. That's gonna come that could come at us. And so it was something brand new. So we couldn't have in -ticipant it what it was going to be like. Nor could appearance. So I mean, I think the. I think the newness of it made it impossible to prepare for or to even I'm still trying to work it out. I still can't figure out how how. Unbelievable. It was I can't believe hatred. I I've been working on it for, you know, sixty one years. So it there is no. Logical conclusion to people's behavior in out behave. You know, when we hear the age fifteen fourteen or sixteen we think of all these innocent children. They have these visions of the world are so pure maybe naive. And then something happens that just strips all of that away from them. Were you? So is that what happened to you on that day or everything stripped belief in the mythology of the country belief in? Any kind of it's. Yeah, it's stripped. And I think we each talk about what that that stripping with about. I mean, your heart our hearts were broken and. I'm the word stripped stripped of allusions. Stripped of innocence, because you know, fifteen fourteen and fifteen thousand nine hundred fifty seven was really innocent. You couldn't even wear pants publicly. So. It was an interesting time. And we were stripped of I would say most belief systems. I certainly was because they were using the bible to justify integration. And. The preachers were. Joining in about it being abomination against God. And so all the sort of. Safe things that you get in your life about what the world is about. It just goes away. You said something among many things many interesting things this weekend. But right out the gate. You said something that I I wrote down, and it was a message to we're talking about the young people who we were about to meet. And you said something I'm paraphrasing young people need to be reminded that not everyone was a hero. We were simple people who were thrust into this space something like that. Can you talk more about that? Well, you walk into the space.

United States T. Rowe Martin Luther King Jonathan Kaye Rancho Mirage Washington Post California Cape Arkansas Jim crow fifteen years sixty one years
Rami Malek and 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Win Big at 2019 Golden Globes

Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough

01:01 min | 3 years ago

Rami Malek and 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Win Big at 2019 Golden Globes

"With a look at some of the awards bestowed Sunday night at what some call the pre-oscars. Here's USA radio's Chris Barnes at the seventy six th annual Golden Globe awards bohemian rhapsody the saga about the rock band Queen which could have easily been categorized. As a comedy musical. Ended up winning the year is best motion picture drama enact Karami. Molly won best actor in a motion picture drama for portraying, Freddie. Mercury. The band's frontman. Thank you to, Freddie. Mercury for giving me the. Lifetime. I love you, man. The real, Freddie. Mercury died back in one thousand nine hundred ninety one while green book the account of a true life road trip through the Jim crow south could have been competing for best drama, it ended up winning the award for best comedy or musical and Christian bale. Tacoma, Golden Globe for best actor in a motion picture comedy for his portrayal of former VP Dick Cheney in vice for USA radio news. I'm Chris Barnes

Freddie Mercury Chris Barnes Golden Globe Awards USA Golden Globe Dick Cheney Jim Crow Christian Bale Tacoma Molly VP Karami
Movie Review: “Green Book”

The Filmcast

04:00 min | 3 years ago

Movie Review: “Green Book”

"Which I said, let's see I'm looking up here. I said I watched green book, and it was about a white racist who teaches a black guy how to be more black and how we'd all be better off racists in the victims of racism, just got along. Better your enjoyment of the film will likely depend on your receptiveness that message. And I literally thought I think I'm only my leagues agitating. When I literally thought I was just stating the text of the film like that. That is what I thought the movie was trying to. Say a lot of people were like criticizing me being like, you know. That's super harsh. Dave. And I'm like that is what the movie is like it's Viggo Mortensen plays a racist. There. Mercia Lally plays a black pianist going through Jim crow, south touring and and being subject to racism and the to kind of teach each other. Better understanding if humanity, and I think Mark Harris did a great job of running down like what's wrong with movies like green book, which they feel like they are out of I dunno late eighties early nineties. Right. This kind of by this. This type driving. Exactly, right. The like driving miss daisy. Both sides have something to contribute to the conversation. Like, oh, like like, look at how much we all have to learn from each other. You know, like. I'm sure I can imagine somebody who was big in Hollywood in that period. Looks at this way. Now now, the white guys driving him that's the movie, I know. And so it's not I mean, it's certainly I can understand why people find it to be an offensive film. And in fact, the the relatives of Dr Don Shirley have since come out and publicly denounced the movie, they have said like this movie contained they called it. A symphony of lies is what they said face like everything about the movie is that it is a gross misrepresentation of their relationship because like a big part of the movies about Dr Don, Shirley, the pianist and how he's like so disconnected with his family. And and he doesn't like he feels like a like an outsider to his own race. And it's it's Viggo Mortensen 's mildly racist character that helps them to reconnect with his like, it's all this stuff and his. The real life on Shirley families like well that never happened. None of that was true. But at least it was a symphony of lives. That's correct. The poster will say a symphony. No, I don't I don't know if they're gonna use that poco, Jeff. But in any case, I mean, yeah, it's so it's not even really that accurate and the story as it just it just feels like it's from a different era. Feels like we don't really need this kind of story anymore. We have other choices today about you know, how we've you these types. I mean. Yeah. There's there's a more diverse slate of filmmakers behind the camera. These days that can tell stories like this and from a different and more interesting perspective. So poignant views like, you know, more nuance point of us. I will say when I first saw the trailer for this. And I was like oh, my Herschel eilly. That's so that's interesting. This looks cool Vigo Mortenson and then Peter Farrelly. And I remember we talked about project greenlight a couple years ago. I will never forget how Peter fairly treated producer EFI Brown. And like, you know, she's a really well known and very prolific. Black producer. Yeah. And she's made a lot of stuff and Peter fairly would not show her any any instance of like respect or like there's just like a like subtle racism going on there.

Viggo Mortensen Dr Don Shirley Peter Farrelly Vigo Mortenson Mark Harris Jeff Producer Mercia Lally Dr Don Efi Brown Hollywood Dave Jim Crow Herschel Eilly