7 Episode results for "Jim Axelrod"

#198: Meditation And Loss, Dean Valoras

10% Happier with Dan Harris

1:19:41 hr | 1 year ago

#198: Meditation And Loss, Dean Valoras

"What if you knew your drink of choice can make a positive impact on the well being of others around the world with honest beverages every fair trade certified honest tea juice and lemonade contribute back to the communities that source their ingredients visit honesty dot com slash podcast to learn more about honest and how your small decision has a big the impact six forty five march nineteenth? It's about fifteen degrees. I'm on on my knees on the Massachusetts Turnpike and I'm cradling Alexandra in my arms the rush hour traffic is going to work. It's really cold and it's it's not necessarily early processing but I think I get it. I lost my daughter eight-year. She's gone. I can tell she's gone and then from that point on and it's trying to make sense of it. That is our guest this week Dean voluminous as you can <hes> tell from from that clip. This is going to be a heavy episode but it is also I promise you <hes> aside from being really moving. <hes> quite inspirational in reassuring on some profound levels dean is a father of three and it everyday meditators who started practicing <hes> back in two thousand fifteen <hes> as you'll hear in two thousand eighteen he lost his daughter Alexandra to suicide aside and I heard about Dean story after I saw I got an email from my friend Jim axelrod who's a longtime anchor occur in correspondent over at C._B._S.. News <hes> and a friend he sent me a story he had done on Dean and his family and mentioned that Dean was imitator and that had he had read my book and did I WanNa talk to him and not only did. I WanNa talk to you. I thought actually maybe the rest of you would want to hear from Dean so <hes> in this <hes> interview we talk to Dean about something I think is incredibly important Gordon and and and really gets to the reason why I wanted to have him on. I think I think really to two things. Actually one is we're in the middle of a mental health crisis assists in this country <hes> especially as pertains to young people where the rates of depression anxiety and suicide have escalated quite dramatically and the other is I think thank dean is a fantastic example of how meditation can help in really extreme circumstances and if he can stick with with it and derive value from it in <hes> in his situation. I think the rest of us can really draw some <hes> inspiration from that just one thing eh before we get started. which is that on the back end? We're going to have a whole list of resources. If you want to learn more about this subject but for now here is Dean villares. I always start with the same question which is how did you start meditating. So what's your story. I started meditating. I'd say around two thousand fifteen in early two thousand fifteen. I stumbled across your book ten percent happier that was I think it was inaudible sort of pops up as like hey a you know you know try. This and I thought to Myself Wow eleven eleven ninety five or one credit. I think it is if you're an audible subscriber scraper whether I wanna be spend eleven bucks toolbox to be ten percent happier and if I'm wrong lap and what I found was it took about four four or five chapters before I think it was like around the Eckhart totally Aha moment you know when you you Kinda hit a point where you're like <hes> aw and it took me a while to get there but you carried me forward because the the skeptic that you were I was are already had me at hello so I I had to work my win on my come on Buddy. Get there and then you know I started to like okay all right. It's about now. If what is that me and then that's been the journey wh what do you mean now I am in the now or am I await tomorrow. What did I do yesterday or you know whatever I'm spinning on? You're you know which is all the time and that's been sort of that. Journey of that was the starting sort of stamp in the ground Senate. Okay there's something here. Did you actually actually start meditating at that point. Yeah I tried it. I think I downloaded a hit space up because I you know the graphics were so stupid simple. You know you look at it and says watch these cars go by. Oh the cars are your thoughts. Keep watching them. Go by. Oh yeah cool all right. I got it visually now you to settle in and I thought it was a good did that for about I think about a year year and a half and did it fade at that point or <hes>. No it was <hes> I think that launched me into Sam Harris's waking up the book the book yeah which I'm still on my fifth or sixth time and eventually I'll chew through it to <unk> actually get the <hes> you know the the essence out of because it's it's it's a lot this is so funny you say that because I mean Sam as you know is a buddy of mine and met really huge formative force in my life because he was one of the people that really got me over the Hump to to take this thing this meditation more seriously I I have read that book at least three times. Maybe maybe four times and every time I get something out of it the Great Book Right. It's it's like gum. If it's just a chuckle and nuts you got even keep going back to something input. I'll go yeah and then he's still step back and say it's still very simple. <hes> you know what is this first line. The mind is oh. It's all we'll ever have and I'm like Oh yeah. I can start their start there. What can I do today today? And then I get caught up in the day you know and it's I'll say from two thousand fifteen to now especially in this past year. I think I've you know I've earned. I'll give myself a pat on the back for saying at least it's more present throughout the day there's moments within every hour of the day where I say he meant. Where are you right now right? Stay here. You know what what matters in in trying to take a breath performing at work performing at home and you know getting better still got a lot. It's definitely definitely a practice what I hear. There is really good practice but I hear there is if you're one of the original I've been talking about this on the show. Oh in recent interviews a lot. One of the original translations of the word mindfulness is recollecting or remembering and <music> that is but for some reason it's one of these things I've heard for ten years and it's never really landed with me but now is starting to become more and more powerful for me because what what you're describing is it's just your memory to wake up every once or twice and our that's huge and that you just the more you practice at the better you get. I will say this. You know there's there's a little bit of an urgency there because once you've sort of tasted the waking up portion you go into these sort of spins of what the hell am I doing for the last fifty years my God you know fifty one okay but I you know what I find that statement to be very powerful. I'm forty seven and you're thinking okay you're looking at. I don't know how many years left left and have I wasted a bunch of time and I don't how much time I've left and I've a little kid and I don't know how much time my parents have left and I want to be here for it right right and the whole thing is now. I don't WanNa get a tight about it and stress too much about maximizing every moment because then I'm kinda doing the opposite of how I should be just living in relaxing into it. That's right well. That's you know the classic hindrance to meditation is desire and and so if you're clamping down too hard that's just desire for clarity as control yeah or just going to you know have those the feeling of security dirty that you've built over the years or whatever your definition of successes and you're trying to just stay with keep those knowns known when they're their variables so set the table for me by a graphically on you circa. Two Thousand Fifteen yeah got three kids. You're living in suburban Boston. What's going on in your life that this idea of a little bit happier would be attractive to? I'll say it was probably on my second or third year. You're not putting pesticides in my line right. Where does that go like what the hell you're going with that and it was just looking at like? Why don't we we do what we do? Why does the lawn have to be cut an inch and a half because I live in a suburban neighborhood in it's a nice neighborhood and I'm very proud to raise my kids? There and it's a safe neighborhood and an like but do like. Is this what I need. Do you need like an acre. Do you need a house host. That's why we don't fill up that space and I just started to question why I'm part of that journey as well as you know with my children Alexander Emily Nicholas Alexandra was my my wonderful intellectual beam of if I could just keep pounding those questions at her. I'm like why don't we do that. Let's not let's not put pesticides in the lawn anymore. Let's enjoy the Danny lines damn straight right and so two thousand fifteen for some reason it was. Maybe that you know this. Probably you know could have a doctor factor here telling us like Oh yes yes to the euro. How would you forty seven middle aged? Men Go through this a lot where they reevaluate their lives or it could be something thing along those you know along that vein as well so I just started to say you know what can I learn. What can I read you? You know. Alexandra was part of that journey from hey. I just read this book ten percent happier. Is that that guy on A._B._C. in the nine. Hey I just I'll try. Sam Harris's first chapter did the meditation and Alexandra had tried it and I had tried it as well and she was like that doesn't work Magui she goes well. I was thinking about what to wear tomorrow. <hes> what I'm going to do after school the Robotics Club and she had all these things that she was working toward than I was. It's crazy and then you know and it was hard in that sense because we're trying to be in the stories but think we're we're not realizing that you have to step out and say we are not thoughts <hes> yeah but she was she'd had been part of that since two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then more so me I think I just continued that because I found value in trying to carve out fifteen minutes a day which is hard when your brain is in high gear. Her fifteen minutes was going to do. I just take fifteen minutes because he promised yourself right in the spent enough to help. I don't know just this. Maybe keep questioning thinking man breathing you know and just trying to and I feel like adult. It's a live current though because sometimes sometimes I'm good. Sometimes I'm bad it's the question it's interesting what you mean by good or bad or if I go by the old rules you know or I feel that it's it's a little bit of a new me because I haven't I keep trying to <hes> relax into the present in trying to figure out all right. Can I do this to you know. Can I do this at work. How do I bring this to work in? Just not be a stress ball. Was it helping <hes> yeah I <hes> I I had introduced <hes> last fall my my one one of my first day coming back into a billable assignment for a few months off and I'm stressed and I was feeling not as confident as I would have liked to when he said you know what just bring it to show up just dress up show up and hey guys I got a sign on got worked in into a team and sat with the team. He'll take three breath was just we've got so much stuff to do over the next six months. Let's we only know it's coming so let's just no fourteen and let's just start and so I started my daily stand ups. We call them for agile methodology. <hes> WPRO company. That's the name of the methodology used in the sort of the consulting work that I do and so it was like it's been helpful we do to ten percent happier. We have our we have standups up meetings every morning. I think I don't know ten minutes and you. Just you know cover ground. What are you doing today? You know what would happen tomorrow and anything blocking yes. I haven't been to one because our corporate headquarters in Boston and I'm here so I'm not part of the standup but it but so it sounds similar to what you're we're doing right. I think what was interesting. I think we're probably should step back and talk a little bit about Alexander Wright and coming back to work. You know billable that September. I was a challenge for me. Just mentally getting money getting sort back in the game. Since September I was the day you went back to war when I went back to work so now eighteen of two thousand eighteen so if we rewind one year when a little over a year ago you know <hes> my wife Alicia <hes> Nicholson with a we we lost we lost an awesome friend a a daughter or sister Alexandra and we lost her march nineteenth two thousand eighteen and that was a homeless man Dan that was really quite a shocker because nothing really stood out as signs or anything I mean six six forty five March nineteen. It's about fifteen degrees. I'm on my knees on the Massachusetts Turnpike and I'm cradling Alexandra in my arms the rush hour traffic is going to work. It's really cold and it's it's not necessarily processing but I think I get. It tossed my daughter right here. She's gone. I can tell she's gone and then from that point on. It's is trying a little bit to make sense of it not to go crazy about it but it's hard I'm trying. I think what we're trying to do is put tools rules in place that allow well honestly selfishly me as a human to continue to operate families. You go down the list. You know you've got your. You've got your kids. You've got your you know your family and yeah but I'm no good if I can't process this in my mind if Alexander couldn't speak up and felt that she was the burden and felt that that was a solution to her pain or one. I wish I could have been there and had a conversation but to why couldn't they like well. I don't have to say why doesn't happen to other people because I think we learned from <hes> Jennifer Ashton a couple of weeks ago that the stats are pretty high Chris that I mean it's an epidemic yeah and that opened our eyes because then you start looking and reading reading little more about the stats and you're like Oh man a lot of people dying by suicide forget about suicide for a sec and you got people who aren't <hes>. I Dunno mentally resilient or have that resilient so maybe they dance depression you know or the anxiety I know I have felt more not depression more anxiety and stress that I'm trying to figure out how to process the heck through so that I don't tighten up all the time some days. I'm really good at it some days. I'm not so good at it but I'm trying. Is it anxiety and stress or is it grief. I am in trouble putting a name on it. I've got a first label it so it it it's grief. It's I'm I really really really really sad and then I say and again to what I learned a couple of weeks ago from just you have Jennifer on. She talked about multiple truth. It's about the end you can feel sadness and I can swim in this. God awful sucks. I Miss Alexandra Alexandra so much at the scene time. I'm laughing with my son Nicholas because we're watching the latest marvel comics spiderman a man at the same time. It's like this <hes> it's like to me. Maybe the definition of bittersweet in a way this is like to emotions at once. We like wow my having a fun time in it's almost not quite guilt but it's just you feel on the other end and there's no more more of his times with Alexandra Alexandra of which there are so many right be grateful. I'm happy but you know what sucks of course of course I I remember reading a article in the New Yorker by a father who would lost a child to disease and he said a parent who's lost a child has a new organ whose only job is to secrete sadness business and you don't know when it's pumping out extra juice. It comes when it wants when it wants to you. You know I can be driving home of course of all the triggers. <hes> Song triggers places that you've been sure those are gonNA come I wanted. They're such good times. They're such good memories punch you in the face or do you do you have to drive under the bridge. We're five over that Bridge Ridge Multiple Times a day. My wife does <hes> the kids to practice Damn town says all so happened. So you know you just keep catching yourself. We awake Oh yeah on central is gone and it's not what she's gone on vacation. She's going away. She's gone forever. I don't get to have another conversation vacation with her. Okay Yeah Yeah that sucks because we were good friends. He was a great daughter. She's really really good person thoughtful kind nice just fun to be around Karen. I WANNA take a deep dive into how you're doing and what the the various techniques you're using coke because I think that's in exhaustively interesting but I do think it makes sense. Maybe now to Steph t t tell us a little bit about Alexandria. You just didn't but maybe a little bit more and also the events leading up to <hes>. It was a night tonight time tonight. <hes> is sure sure <hes> will six forty five pm well. There was six forty five A._M.. So let me give you an idea. It happened yeah how it how it how it happened so we have the Google location on for all the kids in the family so we know where everyone is in the morning when we woke up on a normal otherwise normal Monday morning right Alicia got up to wake up the kids. I'm a guy sleep as late as possibly can. I don't know how you can get up in the morning and <hes> at least it was wary. Allies and it's not there. I'm thinking to run yes. You don't want some friends <hes> what they can. Maybe she's broke a rule. Maybe something but it's just not in the sphere of possibilities anything that Alexander would have done it seemed out of. I don't know something I wouldn't otherwise be proud of. I don't know how else to say it other than that so was I worried now but by that six A._M.. Till six forty five you know all we can find myself on the Mass Pike and leashes on top of you'll tractor down through the self with that that not at the time we looked back later to track her events and thanks I can probably clarify so the actual what had actually happened with. She left the house at around and twelve forty five one A.. M. Went to the bridge and took her life and the Mass Pike is a major highway way in Massachusetts clarify for folks and how did you locate her. <hes> well in the morning came. We were just sort of driving around. I had my phone on Johnson to tell my wife I she must have dropped the phone because I was going up and down North Street not realizing I'm driving boven frequent mass pike not realizing you know that's always another one of those in our down but anyway at least took emily to go to school 'cause it was getting late <hes> Blackstone Valley Tech and on the way there they sort of tracked the patterns and I don't know if it was emily or Alicia who saw her boots her water bottle her jacket and her journal in a stack neatly lately on the pylon on the end of the bridge they pulled over they called me and I hit on my car and headed back in Damn I was by this three or four five times uh-huh so we stood there and then it looks so stupid to be standing on the sign of a bridge reading your daughter's journal Journal getting a sense of tread. You know something's wrong but nothing's processing quite yet other than well. Why don't you look so I leaned over the embankment and I saw Alexandra all right so jump the fence and ran down and I was hoping that maybe it was recent? Maybe she was warm. There was nothing so we lost her. Then it was just stunned I mean unleash it was stunned. Emily was just sitting in the car. Not Moving just stunned when I come back up and we we had waited around for. I don't even know how long long I was down there. Honestly it's a blur. I think the thing one of the thing that hits me those talking to Nicholas. Maybe a few weeks ago Nicholas. What were you doing any when we were at the bridge? This is my son. He's thirteen years old and he said how the children are younger anger. Yes so emily's sixteen now Nicklaus's thirteen in Nicholson. I was waiting for you guys to come home but he knew the dread I mean he was definitely kind of knew something bad eh epidemic. All how hard is that to sit there in an empty house you're not going to school. You know you like just waiting for your parents to come home in to find out what happened to your sister. You know all those hard we bizzare so where we have a million questions I went up in my mind is like how impressed I am. I mean <hes> I as father. You know. I worry about this EPA. Some bad happened to my son all the time have you. I'm I'm a little embarrassed to admit how <music> often it goes through my head <hes> but it's it's really frequent and if I imagine how I would be if I lost awesome I don't think I would be as you have light in your eyes. There's right mission. You're is you're alive even there. It's very obvious to me sitting here looking at you and you're speaking so well and you're upright and not fetal and I just don't. I can't imagine how I would be able to do that so that was June July August into September of two that was that panic doc attack that was the things that would just closing in on me of rules. Change things are changing of go Kay. Is this house this how what does it mean. How do you lose Alexander whose brilliant smart you know? Just you know just dives into the subject very you know she was pining for M._I._T.. He was really going for you know the big schools. What can you do in pushing herself and love that about her a love that self-driving push we love that we never saw saw the double edge or we didn't? I didn't even sense that that was a you know a you know when that could cut the other way meaning I would recommend everybody and perhaps we'll put it in the show notes. We will put in the show notes. I would recommend everybody watch Jim axelrod's from my friend from C._V._S.. His piece specifically the one that was on C._B._S.. Sunday morning the longer version which is really a love letter to your daughter and you will see phenomenally ferociously impressive Young Woman Who's in robotics club straight a students in my right and the Utah Jazz to one of her teachers said of Mile Career. She's one or two ooh number one or number two of the smartest humans I've taught so and this is just a very impressive person and you're saying doing what I just heard you say something about the double edged you think there was something in the strive. The striving for excellence that by all appearances was was was there. She was the this the other edge of that. She was cutting herself. I think so I think there's something to that where if when we learned through going going through generals and I haven't gone through every page because it's not constructive for me. I got an idea. I've got lots of help from <hes> Jim axelrod Wendy krantz isn't producer is producer correct <hes> mark Arsenal. Who was the globe writer who took the time to sit with us for you know six seven eight? I can't even remember all the sittings he got to sit with me and very angry stunned state and we simply build relation. We built a relationship of guys just they went. I'm Outta here. This is a Boston Globe reporter yeah in new in what he gave us was construction ruction 'cause we had we trusted. We decided to trust them so when you do that you know we handed over the Journal and what he give us was a heart felt reconstruction of the the day hanging out with our that neigh going to with Alexandra to a Buffet Claro Concert in the Paradise in Boston but that night her writings in the journal was so opposite from from the fun. I thought she had it's. It's interesting because there's video of her that I watch. Jim axelrod's P._S.. His story as video Jio. I did one of maybe you were. Somebody shot of her at the concert. She looks happy yes but then you see your journal entry from that night. She said all I want. I just wanted to be by I myself. I just want to be in the cover or what's he gave us a sense of like she was having a good time and again probably definitely stressed A._P.. Courses Junior in year in high school lots going on but it didn't feel as a parent at least you're on a leash and I didn't feel it was out of the norm or or it didn't feel like it was extreme. It just felt like I something we just keep muscling through in a way or at least that's the way I felt in. Only she was working in towards you know Alexandra is everything okay you know in a sense where more quiet than less quiet and and you know in hindsight I have about a dozen things around like dean. Didn't you see that or why didn't you see this but honestly it was nothing that have to be honest to myself Alvin and give myself and my family a little credit and not going to beat nothing about myself because I can go down this rat hole of why didn't I do this I do. I do that and I just stopped. Look at that and say okay these again. These sort of my thoughts ready to rip me apart. If if I WANNA go there we are good parents. I know we are. She's an awesome kid. I think she got caught in a little warm whole of thought that was hard to come motto. When you don't feel like you WANNA share it you know and you don't want to at least be vulnerable? He said when you read those or when you became aware of the contents of the Journal read all of it but <hes> you really didn't have any visibility into the depth of the anguish yeah no no <hes> it was a shocker to find that my daughter would be constructing sentences like you are worth without you are a burden you are a burden and it goes and it goes. It's the self-loathing Nichols really deep. Oh I think <hes> <hes> Emily Emily who's sixteen my my second notch out. She said she had been sitting looking at the looking at the journal Channel about three days after the event as a data. I'm like oh no I don't want emily. Reading Alexandra's journalists is always to fresh and I think she just held up her hand and says don't just give me a minute that she scans to Mike Okay two minutes and and then she looks he closes it and she just pushes it aside because this is not the Alexandra. This is not Alex. This is not my sister. I'm not understanding who I'm reading here and that helped me say she was in a different place by the time that journal progress through the fall into the winter into March. What would you say to other parents who are listening to this just terrified yeah <hes> <hes> Oh he's a great question? This is usually wear my wife leash will have a more. Maybe eloquent answer to that. I don't know the answer is I don't know I have after I. I don't want to try to throw things out there to say. Talk to your kids. You know open up with your kids more you you know or you were doing that. Read this yeah we were doing that. This is an pretty open family. We have great conversations at the dinner table. I mean all the time so if this can get to someone like Alexandra it does scare me because I think it steps back into a mental resilience and this might maybe this is a little bit of a Segue to where we go open. If you can recognize that you're not your thoughts or at least step back to say look go at least have a capacity say. I'm spinning spinning like crazy I need help or this doesn't feel right then he should. At least maybe make it a point to talk to. Three people talk to two three people. You're close to is weird my mind spinning right now actually thinking that the world doesn't need me or you know if you're thinking my being getting out to have a conversation with someone that you trust because if you can't do that it's GonNa Start from you. The parents are outside tide going in. It's your mind. It's the person in the mind like yeah. I think that's I would say it starts from within. How do you build them into resilience from within and honestly I would say childhood? Meditation may be or starting early enough so a kid says will who get me go. I'm freaking out right now. All right I still WANNA freak out but have enough visibility into their own inner processes so that they're not sure so that they recognize Oh this is this is unusual. I need to talk to somebody and we're not an expert on my childhood development or- when concrete goes to abstract reasoning I know there's that whole <hes> Piaget talks about about how you can kind of look at things a little differently in your mind develops but I've gotta think that you can start pretty darn early where kids can just go and that has weight to it that means something as opposed to. It doesn't quite have that Gravitas us today. I don't feel it in the schools today that that's that important we spend more time doing teaching about other things than getting a good base of operations in our mind so you think we are at EPA. We're unprecedented levels of anxiety and depression among young people these days <hes> <hes> so the answer. If I'm hearing you correctly is when we when we talk about what has become an epidemic of teen suicide as well is less about what individual parents can do especially because kids don't always show signs but it may be more of a systematic approach to teaching all young people to have some sort of visibility to have some sort of inter resilient so that they can talk when they need help right yeah have you I think so something along those lines and it's more that becomes more of a program motive <hes> you know collective investment but even if it's just just you know mom and dad in you got two kids and you think what can I do to help with depression. Maybe it's something to say. Let let's start the little bit of slowing things down on the head so you have space to observe. Are you still going to be anxious. You still made me depressed but I think that's a starting point and then you can ray the modalities and the tools and all the things you want to build on top of that but start with an idea that you are not your thoughts. I think that's probably I don't know I feel like this is still fairly new to me but I'm trying to practice it because I don't really I don't really have. I don't really feel like there's another option for me anyway. Stay tuned more of our conversation is on the way after this better help offers licensed professional counselors specialized in a wide wide array of issues like depression anxiety and grief connect with your professional counselor and a safe private online environment. It's a truly affordable option and listeners listeners can get ten percent off your first month by going to better help dot com slash happier fill out a questionnaire to help them assess your needs and get matched with a counselor. You'll your love get cash back for shopping. You're already going to do racket in is a free member based loyalty program that lets you earn cashback on shopping being over two thousand five hundred stores like macy's best buy Nike and more shop online and earn a percentage of every purchase you make up to forty percent cash-back every three months members are paid by pay PAL or another method sign up today at rackets in Dot Com. That's our A.. K. U.. T. E. N.. Dot Com so you've been through what I would imagine to be the worst thing anybody could go through. What are you doing to keep yourself up right yeah the IT'S A it's a great question so first of all I promised I think a I promised my wife that I would stay open? First thing you want to do is close off. You know a little bit of an f you to the world a little bit of like <hes> aw you know I I've lost control. How did this happened so then I say okay what's the opposite of that? It would be being remaining open and trying new things so step one is to keep trying new things <hes> you know you. You showed me a line to say you have an interesting I have the waking up podcast from Sam Harris. I use his he changed the name of the he changed. The podcast making sense also has an APP that teaches people to meditate which is called Waking Up. Yes it'll take a year or two before he gets his channels right getting chills right. That's okay you know tired when you he got such a good groove with the waking up yeah it's it can be so I so I use that and the idea is anything and everything I tend to need guided because that keeps me focused <unk> as opposed to an unguided <hes> in my pocket. I have three dates for a ten day retreat but I'm scared crap to do but I'm just three dates a ten day retreat. Maybe I'll try that someday. It's on the docket. <hes> I've Gosh I've entertained <hes> Meditation Ocean with gratitude that House because when you think gratitude and from what I've read if you're feeling it. I'm really happy happy to be here and think of the joy that we're getting being in New York for the first time as a family you have. We should say that your your wife and children have come down made the trip. I'm looking looking into right now through the glass. Yes that some waving back. There's a gratitude like I can sit and I can honestly say this is cool right. This is fun. I'm doing something with the family all right and you can feel the Gresley you can take that feeling of gratitude and apply it to as part of my conditioning additioning whether it's fifteen or twenty minutes a day. I'll try to meditate with gratitude. I try to set some <HES> <HES>. What are they mantras or? I'll just say like I'm worthy an intention my intention. I am enough <hes>. I am loved boy those simple things to say you now two guys I'm fifty one year forty seven yeah you know hey let's talk. Let's go get a beer and talk about how your worthy how you loved and how does that go down you know in hanging out with the guys to grow Macho Boston right ration- but I have to say is kind of exposed caused my underbelly of Oh. Maybe there's something to you not feeling worthy that you feel like you drive or you aren't enough that you drive drive and reported. It strikes me that those mantras or intentions were slogans. Whatever you WANNA call them those kind of like the opposite of your daughter's journal? I haven't haven't thought about that I mean I don't know if I'm on a selfish journey or I simply feel like if I don't get my game together. I really felt like this this past summer. I don't want to repeat the panic attacks I don't want to so I feel like this has been helpful. You were having actual panic attacks. Yeah I remember crying waiting to hope someone would come home. You know and I remember doing that a couple of times and it was it was pretty strong of not feeling just feeling very every tenth and anxious so getting a regular habit or practice of meditation making sure you're feeling that that a power whether you wanNA think shock rose way new WanNa just take in you know energy or grounding or visualizing a white lighter you know there's something to taking that in and either turning that into yourself and applying it to where you feel you need it the most or projecting it out to to you and just wrapping you up with white light of love and not practice at that. I don't have years of that but I'll sure as heck keep that gone because it does put me in a state of being more compassionate I go through the day just a little more a little more. I Dunno Donald tooled up with with <hes> I duNNo. It's like all right. Don't worry anything that comes on your way. Just try not to get wrapped up in your thoughts that Chakra White light thing who who were you getting that from yeah so so my sort of my influences dozen church has a book mind to matter Dawson Church Dawson Church. I thought that was helpful because that's one size sort of camped out on the meditation says okay ten percent happier my foot in the door. I'm in the door on this something all right. What else would you go from here? It'd be interesting to hear like where your journey Kony is because you've got five six ten. I don't know ten years now. Yeah you're into it so how you know. Where are you from that practice practice <hes> from for me? I think I got a foot in the door and I still need to honor that because I can't ever assume I am not. I don't assume that I'm stable and I've got everything because they don't when I lose it. I lose it and that's okay. I'm trying to process but the grief Com let it wash over me but don't hold onto it. It's about the the permanence of things it's about. I think <music> <hes> the gentleman by the name of Joe Denardo you had on guess who lost his wife but yet he's working working and processing through it. He seemed to have game around meditation in a good place <hes> I don't feel he'd been doing it for decades though right and my call. I didn't quite feel that Mike don't feel like I can just camp out into say I'm just GonNa go meditate now. I'm like I'm GonNa Grieve like a a mother. I'm GonNa Grieve hard and I'm going to say that's Ok in grieving hard meaning lately it's been writing and in a blog and a friend suggested put it out there. Expose your underbelly but you know just if it feels right. Let it go so that's been another method. I've been using his writing it down. My friend gave me a link to wordpress which is a way to blog so I'm kind of new to this too and I just created. This thing uncalled a facebook account. I had promised Alexander we'd go there. We'd never go to the dark side but I did create it and <hes> I because I wanted to send that links those someone could look up my name Dean Blerta's on facebook and I'll I'm readily accept and I'm not doing it necessarily for personal connections. I've already agreed set my intentions that I would like to share my stories because this other people out there who are feeling what I'm feeling in through that you can get a link to the wordpress. The proper U._R._l.. Will be in the show notes for this podcast <hes> so would you say you know we're talking before about permanence in like the other thing I've been thinking about recently is impermanent can be deeply inconvenient and then incredibly convenient. It's deeply inconvenient. When you realize that you and everybody you know we're all impermanent and that's hard right and then the comedian side is when you're drowning in a hard emotion if you can wake up in the middle of it and say if I lean into this thing or not a thing at all actually if I lean into this set of feelings <hes> they will pass and the ad is really convenient and the here's how I here's how I think I know what you just said is true <hes>? I'm I'm drawing a blank from where I read this from but it's really hard and might be Sam. DAMPS keeps coming up. He's hard to sustain your anger like if I'm angry at something you know whether I'm really sad or you know think about Alexander. I can stay there. It's a little bit easier. You see your high. Thank you know with Alexander but just on the surface. If you're angry at something you almost drift away from that after three five minutes and then it's like how was I pissed on guy cut me off. He must took off my front bumper. What the hell was he thinking? People drive like crap these days and then I just just working back into that state of whatever it is or like getting you know just whatever worked me up in I just I get the spoon I just sterling hot. Get outta here on this. I just want let's talk about how bad this sucks to for you. Yes let's for me to do you ever get yeah yeah and and we do that. Sam I think the riff you're referring to and I've I love this thing. He said which is that the half life of anger or of any emotion motion is like two minutes right so but the problem is we re up it voluntarily we we take the spoon as to use your analogy and we stir it up Yep Yep <hes> we don't know any better and sew anger gets extended from two minutes to an hour or two a lifetime and his his argument and I love this is that the the difference difference between the amount of damage you can do an hour of anger or grief or whatever it is jealousy or whatever it is and two minutes but that difference the Delta there is incalculable title but yes and I apply that so that's sort of like something that I had read two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen whatever in it still holds true so so when I'm driving home and I have a trigger and a team seems to happen at different. I never know when something reminds reminds me of Alexandra that hits minutes. It's usually a song that we loved or even like a new album comes out that we would have shared. I can't share it with author and then I really really sad and I'm okay. You're gonNA cry all right. You're gonNA ball all right. You're gonNA probably punch the Dashboard Dashboard Iran. Put You blinker on get over in. Sometimes I'd lately. I've been blogging or not necessarily bugging me just writing down notes. That's exactly what I'm feeling. How hard is it go there? Go there and let it rip the one thing. I can't say that I argue Sam's half-life off of two minutes when you're in this this sadness like I actually the gravitational pull but there still is a half life so I know it may not be too in for example. I'm thinking of in West Bro Center going home. I'm from work where I pulled over to write down. I think it was my sunny reflections what it was fifteen minutes of pure balling crying and and then something it I don't know if it evaporates just distance where I say you know it is time for dinner. You know you do have have Nicholas to bring to Lacrosse at seven thirty or you do have Mike Okay and then you can choose to feel guilty and and look at you you forgetting how important Alexander was and you should you should live in this. You should stir that pot dammit. I miss her. I miss much puts the damage right. What's that damage? I'm doing in so so those. There's a tool as the tool to say you are not my thoughts. It's just a good one. I have so many things to say. This is incredible practice because when Sam's talking about the half vagueries talking about garden variety annoyance right you're talking about something Assu Nami right Assu Nami. It's not in the ballpark and so the ability to wake up out of that I I can't imagine it. I can't imagine it but it sounds to me to my years unbelievably believably impressive <hes> it's a practice though of course 'cause you know it. It doesn't doesn't necessarily come naturally but but some but it's it's coming up more than the not to say hey heating you feel like stepping back from this one because you're about to go deep in. You know you know where this might go. Just it's just an gets to an ugly place yeah. I WanNa dance a little bit. I think I WANNA be a little bit ugly ugly right right and that something trying to say give myself permission but boy. It's akin feel either the the slippery slope of sadness of like okay. Let me just make a cheap keep trying to carve some lines there because again. I have have to negotiate this in my mind right okay. I don't even WanNa talk about my sadness for Jeremy Richmond <hes> just another her another tangent but boy when I heard about his passing <hes> Jeremy the I think he's a was heading up the area foundation of Yale L.. He's daughter Jeremy Jeremy's daughter Ivy L. Avi. He called her <hes> died in the massacre newtown and he was on the show he was in that chair because on this show and he was an incredible human being met him you met him and we got him. We got to see <hes> Bruni Brown's daring greatly he he gave us v._I._P.. Tickets and I can't imagine what you went through Yeah Ken. He lost his daughter. It's just as bad I get an eight he was he was a Hook W.. Guys <hes> my wife Eliezer reached out she reached out to the foundation and they responded and they said come on down. Keep going keep going. Try New things come mind if there's a talk that you think might help get on out so we drove down on Tuesday night. I thought he was the Code Guy. I was in two hours for a car. Ahead of I go to the bathroom and he's like Hi. How are you? I'm great. You know as the food over there. I need something and I kind of. I felt like I felt like a Dank my wife of course you know how wives can be hi Jeremy. This is my husband Dean. Oh dear is still didn't dawn on me. I'm like okay so so she knows the guy's name and then to the course of that night I got to see a dad who stood up on stage who didn't look the guy who would stand up on stage who spoke very well who spoke with passion about something he believes in and I just finished Burnett Brown's <hes> <hes> daring greatly <hes> in her new book during to lead lead. We're reading now my wife and I but I was so impressed with Jeremy in his courage. Look at him after six years so let's go back to the slippery slope. What do I do with that right? I is a guy who I thought was negotiating as a dad as someone who's trying to negotiate his his way through this thick of all right well and he's gone chose as a solution or a way to end his his pain to take his own life yeah very recently and <hes> we in our little ten percent world here that obviously through us for a loop I can only imagine what's his family and people in his immediate circle and yeah so which is you you mentioned Jen Ashton recently my colleague Dr Jen Ashton Medical correspondent here he was he news. We had her on to kind of help us process that because she lost her husband to suicide. She's very hopeful. She S <hes> she. She is very helpful so I I. I don't know what I still don't know what to make of it. It's hard so hard so he can start each day. I started state trying to find the time to just give a little pause because days going to get ahead of me work and stuff and then say how you doing today. What's my mind like all right? I WANNA be here. I know I wanna be here or order things I can do and what you know. Keep moving forward and so I'm trying things like doing things. I've never prudan before or just saying yes. It's a little bit more in that Brunei Brown daring greatly which is being vulnerable leaning into your fears. I mean leaning into and okay I it's kind of hard when you have the stress and anxiety that's rising but I'm like okay. Let pet come. Come and see if you can see if you can do this and each time I do. I'm I'm finding that I'm surprising oppressing myself. What would you say to people listening to this? Who have gone through horrible things or we know that we all go through horrible things and are worried about folks may be worried about their own ability to to handle? It sounds sounds like your overall messages. Actually maybe we're stronger than we think we are. I hope so here's what I've been getting <hes> or when your when you lose the daughter to suicide you hear a lot of stories. I think people need to share a lot of times you find yourself listening not necessarily about your story Alexandria about it's it's about a person sharing what they've gone through and I think everyone has a story. I'm learning very quickly then. Everyone's got a story <hes> what I'm not so sure about in now. I hope I'm wrong but what I'm resonating. Is I see a lot of fear I see a lot of fear I see a lot of people who are nervous and and not sure how to carry forward other than by being tight got to hold it together. Dean got a family there come on but we're kind of on you. An order can be toughen up toughen up worked for like forty nine years. Throw anything at me. I'M GONNA come back at you twice as hard. Something's changed the tools of saying toughening toughening up muscle through it. I can handle anything I'm thinking of parents. Aims is how it is. I don't know I think if you slow down and have a little bit of faith. I don't know how to use that word in the sense that amusing. It's like leaning into things you otherwise otherwise wouldn't have trying. I think we atrophy as we get older we do less and less and less than we get more and more slowly get her a nice good chair to watch our show on make sure can recline and where do I put my drink and all right hello eighty five. Maybe I can make it that long and just sort of settle into let me put on the you know the the news the channels that work for me and I actually think we need to turn all of that on its head and if you're not listening to again you can listen to whatever amount of news you want but it should be from all sources it has to be from all sources sources. You should talk to people you don't agree with you should do all these things and it's real easy to know. Oh you don't want to do because you know when you start shying away from it it starts by lack of eye contact you head down. I don't WanNa have a conversation with someone <hes> it starts when my son Nicholas tells me Hey dad it's She tells me at seven twenty two on a seven thirty practice but I've got my gym bag in the backseat. I drop him off and I drive away. I don't want to to make him look. I don't know if I can still dribble. Basque almost been twelve fifteen years. I think I have the capacity to run up and down the court. This is all as I'm driving away but oh look at me. I'm smart enough to put on that Brunei Brown audible audiobook. Am I gonNa just hits me a Mike aw dude stop why not why not try something. Do things keep breaking out. Keep testing the edges so I turned around went back and played basketball hopefully showed him and his friends. I got a little game. We're we're looking at him. He's smirking. He's not giving you night but everything I thought about that night from that seven twenty two to seven thirty to those eight minutes was a non a positive thought it was like Oh only how I could screw it up or only how I could maybe not look cool as a <hes> dad into a seventh grader with his friends and now I'm thinking just just go play so these are these are examples. I'm like when I would say to a parent is do something think of love. Be Creative be open screw it. Everyone on things lean into it and try something and help me. Damn right cares what people think because you've already started from a good place. I love that it's it seems to me. We're in the wake of this disaster where you could have done what I would imagine the instinctual move for most of us would be fetal curl up into a ball create a shell find a local pub for the next forty years to get you know to own yes to anesthetize ask the ties yourself and you're saying no. I'm going to do the counterintuitive thing and I'm just going to open up to the whole world. He blew disagree with me. People who agree with me experiences that scare me etc etc CETERA. That's your counter intuitive approach to this horrible event yeah and it doesn't come naturally 'cause you WanNa go you want to stick with your safeties and comforts and I still do but that's okay I now recognize it and say okay for now. You don't have to be out there all the time but question it every time and if I'm not at least maybe my rule now is. I don't even know once a week every couple of days. I'm not saying being yes. I'm not responding to and probably more social than I've ever been. I don't like to text. I don't necessarily to call people on the phone a little bit like my grandfather. I think my prepare I like to just putz around in the backyard or just do things and just be a little homebody. Then I realized now says all about networks it's all about social networks not in the sense of media in the sense of connecting thing with people in community so that you grow and you have a place in you love in while you're here you share that and that's as simple as going to breakfast every month with a bunch of guys I go with keeping that up and just saying yes to something like sitting in talking on a podcast. I'm very glad you did I think it's old and important and I valued immensely and before we closed and we just ask you. Is there anything I should've asked you but fail to <hes> Oh boy no I. I would think there's I feel like I have the luxury of listening to you for for several years and I love what you do because I think what you bring is a a sort of an you're more readily acceptable to a larger channel of people who need I think especially in today's Day and age need an entrance to a different way to go about things so I do have thousands of questions but they come from unlike previous conversations that you had that would be all out of context so step. One is the reason you know what I like to say. Is You got game over Sam because you are approachable. You know I I think what I would say is that <hes> the Jonathan Jonathan Height referencing the righteous mind of the <hes> you can reason the crap out of everything and really have game and Sam nails it but it's like he's trying to send all these elephants over to the left and they're just not listening to them. Because within everyone here we're all going by our intuitions guts our feelings and that's hard to change. I think the platform that you bring maybe a little bit of Joe Rogan <hes> it's it's. It's a nice entrance. I I don't know what the channels are but I think what you guys do. Who is I think more? Hopefully you see it as you in Jeff Warren and other C is so important because I think we're starting to <hes> I dilution of information this is I think you know this today's Day and age we have more information coming in than we can console. Guess and we know that <music> so if can't consume it all you have to chew channels all right if you've got A to Z channel's Kinda make sure that one's bringing me the right stuff. I think you're we're bringing the right stuff so I would just say thank you for having me on and I do appreciate what you're doing and you gotta keep this going. I every intention angie to keep going. I really appreciate you doing this. I can't read the minds of our listeners. I've not developed that capacity yet. We hear from them all the time and I have strong wrong sense that people are GonNa find this incredibly valuable so thank you thank you. Thank you great job right big. Thanks to Dean for coming in. That's quite brave <hes> one. I want to give you some some resources for <hes> dealing with this subject before I dive into that big thanks to one of the producers on this show Grace Livingston who did a bunch of research. I'm just going to read to you from what she wrote. After the episode we did a few months ago with Dr Jen Ashton in my colleague. We heard from a lot of you <hes> that you you'd like to hear more practical information about how to relate compassionately <hes> to the topic of suicide so before we head into our voicemails close out the show we're gonNA share some resources and information that should help us all flex our compassion muscles on this incredibly important subject so the the following information came from a few key sources that I would recommend that you check out a good place to start is a website called be the one to dot com so that's it's B. E. T. H. E. Number One T. O.. Dot Com will put this in the show notes but be the one to dot com it was created by the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline line which offers tangible action plans for helping to prevent suicide you can check out their resources page which will link you straight to many other sources for the information. We're GONNA share here. One jumping off point on this subject is to think about the language we use around suicide. It is best to use the phrase death by suicide aside or someone died by suicide rather than the phrase committing suicide since the word committing <hes> has a sinful stigma that may actually deter somebody from looking for help or for going out and getting help if they in fact are experiencing suicidal thoughts that that was a new learning for me and I'm <hes> making that switch as of now be the one to dot com offers a tangible plan for helping prevent suicide with at risk individuals. I would recommend you check out the full details yourself but here's a brief overview five steps according to them step number one is to ask so literally asking the question. Are you thinking about suicide contrary to popular belief asking and at risk individual does not increase their likelihood of attempting suicide but rather open and non-judgmental communication about suicide may in fact decrease suicidal idealization. An important part of this step is also listening to the person's response in a compassionate way. Step two is keeping them safe by asking questions. I'm finding out more about their thoughts or plans taking steps to reduce access to things like firearms if they're in immediate danger. This may also include driving them to the E._R.. We are step threes be their dismay include being physically present talking on the phone or finding another way to show support. You want to be careful not to overcommit but letting the person to know that you're there with them can be a huge source of connection and support step four is to help them connect this might mean ensuring they have access to the lifeline which is the eight hundred two seven three eight two five eight hundred two seven three eight two five again. We'll put that in the show notes or you might connect them to other support systems within community might also set up a safety plan using the my three APP or or <hes> other crisis intervention tools and the final steps that five is is <hes> whether it is following up whether in person by phone or by text following up after the initial conversation helps build connection and ongoing support so so again the website is be the one to dot com and if you personally are struggling with thoughts of suicide or you've worried about a friend or loved one there there is help available. You can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five one eight hundred two seven three talk or you can text talk t. a. l. k. two seven four one seven four one or you can visit <hes> suicide prevention lifeline dot org <hes> and that's free confidential emotional support twenty four hours a day seven days a week so even if it feels like it you are not alone big. Thanks again to Dean Flourish for coming on in in for Grace Livingston for putting together that information okay. Let's do some voicemails. Here's the number one hey Dan. This is Brian calling from Civil Isla <hes> I've been meditating for off and on two years now <hes> to fall out while ago and came across your book for about two months ago <hes> ever since then I've been binging out on your podcast but every day <hes> go I appreciate all of that. <hes> had a couple of questions foia <hes> first of all how do you I'm hoping maybe you can help me on this. I find myself getting more frustrated and then I'd like to it's my kids. They got a two four and eight year old. You know I try to stay mindful when they push my button but <hes> sometimes <hes> <hes> my angry at me and I don't stay in full and then later on I regret become more than I like to and really think about now how I have done things differently. Just was wondering if maybe you had some <hes> tips on how to handle that maybe different minute meditations or maybe a couple of secondary or a podcast. I can listen to Kinda help me with <hes> I guess because they parenting secondly <hes> thinking about going to <hes> there's some meditation classes. I'm not really sure which one I should look into. I know there's a vast variety out there but I didn't know maybe you were familiar with the Iowa area and maybe you get a point in the direction but I appreciate everything you do. <hes> I really it really help me out so keep up the good work. Thank you bye. Thank you great great set of questions here. I'm going to do the second one. I just do it really quickly because we've talked about this kind of thing about how to find a meditation resources before but I don't know the Iowa a super well but I think if you just search you know inside or mindfulness meditation Iowa on Google you probably Oh you probably should come can come up with something. If you're not finding anything. Locally there are teachers who will teach via skype. Also there are APPs. You know that's gonNA sound a little self interested since I have have one or we have one but there are many apps out there to my <hes> just from the noodling around that I've done <hes> they all seem quite good so <hes> that's that on the on the on the stuff about kids look I would give yourself a break speaking as a parent <hes> it is basically if you're a kid. It's your job to to figure out your parents <hes> weaknesses and exploit them relentlessly so they're they're going to be pushing your buttons. <hes> and you're not going to be perfect. I mean maybe some days. Maybe if you're enlightened <hes> you're going to be perfect but I don't know anybody's perfect I. I'm going to mangle this quote but Joseph Goldstein Meditation Teacher wants quoted the Dalai Lama to me so this is a second hand quote that I'm trying to reproduce memory something about somebody asked the Dalai Lama Emma once <hes>. How do you know if you're succeeding in meditation and he said well if you used to lose your temper eight times a day and now you're losing your temper six times a day? Ah You're succeeding so look <hes>. I think that you you know you're gonNA take it from from pretty good source there. <hes> perfection is not on the menu and you'RE GONNA lose your temper once once in a while. Maybe frequently it's it's really about marginal improvement over time in my view <hes> but here's one practice from my friend Diana Winston <hes> <hes> the great meditation teacher who was on a few weeks ago that might be useful in those acute moments when something's going on with your kids. It's a little acronym S. T. O. P. Stop so I'm going to. I try to reproduce this from memory as well so the S. is for stop so you just stop and pause for a second as Diana says <hes> with she's she's got a nine year old daughter and limiting T._v.. During the summer is a place of conflict so which he finds yourself frustrated <hes> she finds it stopping and pausing is really powerful. The tea is for taking a breath that there's a lot of science that indicates that deep breathing can have a positive physiological the impacts of creating com reducing emotional reactivity. Oh is observe observe. What's happening is your heart? Racing is your stomach churning or feeling irritated Taylor angry etcetera etcetera simply knowing that you have these feelings can help you not be so blindly yanked around by them and there's research that shows that naming your emotions this can turn down the volume on the fear circuitry in your brain so this is basic mindfulness and then p. proceed hopefully with a little bit more common awareness and so S. T. o. p. you know at first it. You'RE GONNA forget to do it or when you do it. You'RE GONNA struggle to remember what what is S.. What's he what's up but if you just keep added over time you'll develop the mental muscle memory so that <hes> eventually you'll get to a situation where some reasonable percentage of the time you'll be able to put it to use and not blow your stack every time your kids push your buttons but again <hes> don't don't aim for perfection because I think that's going to be he pretty dispiriting? Thanks for the questions. Let's do voicemail number two highdown greetings from George <hes> calling from offense in Greece yeah congratulations <hes> love your podcast love your books <hes> been falling you ever since <hes> burtless day one quick question for you <hes> when it comes down to <hes> meditation for Non Native English speakers do you see benefit benefitting. Are there any studies for changing and translating the meditation into our native language <hes> for example so when it comes down to Meta I always find it easier and slightly more effective to translate the Meta phrases in Greek <hes> or maybe <hes> the same full of the pain <hes> and any other things that require noting <hes>. Are there any studies. What do you think about that? Should we pick doing lease or other benefits thing going straight to the native language thinking I haven't seen seen any studies and all I can answer is from my own personal experience and perspective like what I would do. which is that I would put it in your native tongue? Hillary's and I say that it is it's really not about the power of any specific language. It's the power of what's happening in your own mind and so if it's easiest for you who to generate the awareness or the feelings of Meta friendliness in your native tongue then go for it why not even if the guided meditation you're using as an English if it's not grading too much cognitive load than doing the translation and using using the words in your native tongue seems to me if I were in your position I certainly would do that. NAPPING said you know there are there are little <hes> words in Pali the ancient Indian language that I've been taught overtime that <hes> or useful for me like the word puncture which means it's technically imperialistic tendency of minded <hes> when you sit something bad happens to you <hes> and all of a sudden you know you get <hes> you get an email from your boss saying I need to talk to you and then all of a sudden you create this quickly quick <hes> and and horrifying movie in your mind of all the terrible things these are about to happen to you're going to get fired and live under a bridge and it happens just really quickly your imperialistic lease colonizing the future with these <hes> negative thoughts fantasies imaginings. I find that that Word Punch is a good mental note when I notice it happening in my meditation practice US punch or in my life noting it and then that allows me to kind of loosen my grip on it and not be so attached to it and not be so owned by it so there are times when obviously polly is not my mother tongue <hes> using another language can be useful but in an and don't take what I'm saying is Gospel people but for just my gut is that using your mother tongue would be more useful so cool to get a call from Greece. That's great. Thank you for following <hes> what Yeah I've been doing for so long George appreciate that I know whether or not another George with Greek roots George Stephanopoulos previous guests on this show shut up to George <hes> shoutout a to <hes> Mikey who's running the boards <hes> as I record this on a Sunday morning and to the producers of the show the aforementioned Grace Livingston Samuel Johns and L. Hefei F._A.. Ryan Kesler who is is the boss around here big thanks to our podcast insiders who give us feedback every week we look at it closely and informs how we do do what we do and of course thanks to everybody who listen to the show will back next Wednesday with another one. Is there something that interferes with your happiness or is preventing

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CBS Sunday Morning November 11, 2018

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

55:36 min | 1 year ago

CBS Sunday Morning November 11, 2018

"Sunday mornings podcast sponsored by QuickBooks. Backing you. If you work for yourself don't think of that sound has a receipt being crumpled think of it as lost deductions because every business receipt. You lose is cash lost five dollars three dollars two dollars. And if you misplaced ten dollars of business recedes every workday for a year that's twenty six hundred in loss deductions, unless you've already snapped them with QuickBooks snapping sort your expenses for maximum deductions at tax time. Visit QuickBooks dot com smarter business tools for the world's hardest workers QuickBooks. Backing you. Good morning. I'm Jane Pauley. And this is Sunday morning. We're beginning with the age old debate over whether homosexuality is a behavioral choice or an inborn trait over researchers have long concluded it's part of a person's nature. There are still those insisting it's an affliction in need of a cure. We call our cover story. God only knows it's reported by Erin Moriarty. And that is the mood state that sets you up for homosexual inactive meant it's dangerous debunked practice. That's happening right now all over America happening in Sunday school classes, it's happening at youth camps. There is this underlying believe that a ten year old gay child needs to be repaired or converted later on Sunday morning. The secret world of gay conversion therapy. In any who's who of rock music legends? The lead singer of the who would be high on the list, he's Roger dole trait and he's talking this morning with our Jim Axelrod. Roger Daltry has been the voice of his generation for more than half a century from its longer is going to go on this business. You Don retired from it. Tell us you. But only now is he ready to look back on it. All very volatile group of people up close with the front man of the hoop later on Sunday morning. Then it's onto our look back at that year of years nineteen sixty eight as Richard Slesinger will remind us it was fifty years ago this month that a seemingly washed up politician made a comeback for the ages. This is my last press conference in the nineteen sixties Richard Nixon had an image problem. It was a loser. Get lost and lost and lost. But as former vice president Walter Mondale remembers Nixon got some unexpected help. Do you think Johnson wanted Nixon to win? I thought so for nineteen sixty eight a year of setbacks for the nation and the comeback of Richard Nixon ahead on Sunday morning. A headline making great escape from prison is about to be relived in a new television series, and directing this most serious of stories is the comic actor, Tony dako-. Feels been talking to over the past decade male modeling has had a shadow cast over by one man, Ben Stiller known for acting in. Only in directing comedies has made a new drama about an Tories prison escape. What do you hope people get from this film? I'm hoping that people get drawn into the world. And I think we all to certain extent one scape. From part of our lives. Ahead on Sunday morning breakout. With Ben Stiller, Seth tone has Veterans Day story about the wounds of war. Serena all schol- talks with Matthew Broderick and Kenneth Lonergan about a family saga on Broadway. Ben Tracy finds pizza on the menu, but far from Italy and more coming up when are Sunday morning podcast continues. Is homosexuality choice can religion steer young people away from that toys? Our cover story is reported by Erin Moriarty of forty eight hours. I was a perfect golden super Christian ideal man and inside inside. I was scared broken afraid. And who it wasn't real? I cried myself to sleep so many nights praying God. Please change me. Twenty nine year old. Adam trimmer grew up outside. Richmond. Virginia struggling to keep a secret from his deeply religious southern Baptist. Parents. I was hiding was singing church was a missionary. I did everything to try to be the best Christian, and I would just wake up and. I was still gay. And so at seventeen Adam came out to his mother Paulette. He said, I am gay. I know I am gay, and I just turned and look to the side and tears rolling down my face. And I looked at him. And I said, Adam. A man shall not lay with another man. And he started. I wanted him to know that it's in the bible. And you're going against God. Did you hug him at that moment? Not good. And I remember hearing him tell somebody when I went to my mom instead of getting love and support. I got religion. Year later after Adam was also rejected by his I love college. He attempted suicide. I was trying to leave this world. I just wanted to die while in the hospital a youth passer suggested a controversial treatment known as repair or conversion therapy. Had you heard of that before never what was it called healing from homosexuality. Even though it's been forty five years since the American psychiatric association determined that homosexuality is not an illness that can be cured an estimated seven hundred thousand adults in the US have received some kind of conversion therapy, even Jellicoe people essentially believe that homosexuality is a sin transgression against God's heart and mind, you are safe because God is with you. Stand mitchell. A pastor in Nashville. Tennessee says conversion therapy is used every day as he puts it to save souls, even those of children as young as ten these children are dealing with the fear that they might spend eternity tortured because of their natural way of being in the world. So to ask them, do you want that do you want to be gay? You're asking them to do. You wanna go to hell to avoid that fate. Adam trim Rastas family to help him pay for retreat with an organization called exodus international. The mission of exodus was to help people who were same sex attracted to. Not act on that. We're here to listen to encourage exodus was once the leader in the field in part because of its charismatic director, Alan chambers. He refused to even say the word gay that it using the word gay. I'm a person with same sex attractions. And why is that better because I felt like the even the word was caving in on something that we shouldn't cave in on chambers was the organization's best advertisement. He had undergone version therapy himself, and now had a wife and two children to that give you hope -absolutely. I looked at it. And I said, wow. Wow. Can really happen lonely frustrated, and that is the mood state that set you up for homosexual enactment therapy is based on the belief that homosexuality is caused by nurture, not nature. And so it could be reversed Hendra hands on hips, go. There are classes as depicted in the current movie Boya raise on how to act less gay is this a manly shape making or is it a girly or feminine shape? Adam trimmer was introduced as something called cuddle therapy intended to create a version to another man's, touch, and we cuddled in his bed cousin with another man. And this is supposed to help you get rid. I'm sorry. It is okay because that's real. And Adam like most to go through conversion therapy was also told his homosexuality could be traced back to a troubled family relationship, usually for the boy who will develop same sex attractions around the age of two and a half. Or so there's something that prevents him from detaching from his mother in attaching himself to his father in Adams case, a disembodied and over involved mother, the counselor looked at her and just told her that she was so overbearing as a mother that she needed to let me go and mind, you this is being told to a mother of a son who just tried to kill himself. What did that there be due to your relationship with that? All but killed it. He didn't to have anything to do with me. Alex Cooper says that what she was subjected to when she was fifteen almost killed her. And when you say beat me, what do you mean like fists to the stomach raised in a loving Mormon home in southern California? When Cooper came out to our parents, they sent her to Utah to live with a couple recommended by church leaders who offered unlicensed therapy. So I was there to become three your parents thought that this couple could turn you straight. It's wild to think that it's even thing that goes through people's minds. But it happens every day that I it was just meetings. It's going through the gospel and talking about why I was there. It's a giant terrible mind game. But the most I'm bearable part Cooper says was a backpack filled with rocks that she was forced to wear. All day every day. Do you have any idea how much weight you were carrying I think about forty pounds and the point of the backpack was to represent the physical burden and pain of being gave the so called their abate didn't change your sexual orientation, but Cooper says it broke her spirit and after several months sheet to tried to take her life on may sixteenth birthday. I was kind of like a gift to myself. I just took every pill in the house. And I just remember being so excited to not either any more. I was a pastor in a mega church, and I was party to destroying these people pastor STAN Mitchell once himself sent parisioners to conversion therapy. Do you have any idea of how many young people you had recommended go through conversion therapy to forget? Trying to forget, buddy. Camp forget the damage. He's seen in the last four years I've done at least three or four funerals of people who took their life because of this issue since Mitchell began speaking out in two thousand fifteen he has lost two-thirds of his congregation. The only thing I regret is. I didn't do it sooner people died while I was trying to find courage as for the American Medical inside a logical associations. They warn against the use of conversion therapy. And now more than a dozen states ban. Licensed therapists from using those practices on children. So especially if you're a woman, and you've got some friends who are gay just be careful about their relationship. But some powerful religious organizations such as focus on the family say the government is going. Too far. I want people to know that God changes people that leaving homosexuality is a possibility and that we should have the freedom to do. So the government should step between me and my counselor. That's not their role. Jeff Johnson the group's issues. Analysts insists people who don't want to be gay even children have the right to try to change. But you know, the state has the right to limit any kind of therapy when there's some evidence that it can be harmful new. I know there's some outrageous things that happen in life like backpacks with rocks. I know that's horrific, but those are such wildly extreme examples. And that's not what we're talking about in general, I have met dozens and dozens of people who have had deep change and deep transformation, and that's why we continue to advocate for their freedom. We haven't done everything. Right. But even the man who has once the living example of the power of. Conversion therapy admits he's never seen it work. We've heard people Alan chambers shutdown exodus in two thousand thirteen it didn't make me straight here. I am happily married to a woman for almost twenty one years, but here still attracted that hasn't gone away. And it it won't. Alex Cooper, finally ran away from the home where she was placed and Utah judge ruled she could return to her family and live is a gay woman. She's now twenty three and shares an apartment with her girlfriend import Lenora gun where did you get that kind of strength. I knew what happy felt like I grew up happy. And I I just knew that I could have that. Again, he stay in for scrabble tonight. I think so and Adam trimmer with their be on his own and says he is now trying to undo the damage today. My mom, and I have a restored relationship that conversion therapy tried to take away from us. It has been so powerful to reconnect with her. You have your church and your church tells you that homosexuality is wrong. But you've got your son. The only way I can answer. That is I love God. I'm not going to change that. And I love my son. I'm not going to change that. On the menu just about anywhere on earth pizza, and some of the best Ben Tracy tells us can be found in an unlikely place. It's your. That's. If you're searching for the best Neopolitan pizza in the world, you'd probably head here to Maples Italy. After all this is the birthplace of the namesake pie known for its San Marzano, tomatoes and mozzarella Di along. Bouffe along. But now some of the world's tastiest pizza is being made here in Tokyo Japan. This is the pizza RIA of bossa Tamaki, eight pizza maker who has never said foot in Italy. Of course, I would like to visit Italy Tamaki says, but in my mind, I want to focus on creating Japanese Neopolitan pizza. So what makes your pizza Japanese-style come on on his show? My giving the pizza a salt punch, his Japanese style. He throws the salt directly into the oven. Where it bakes into the dough enhancing the flavor Tamaki. Also pussies pizzas closer to the fire. Then the Italians do in search of the perfect char. He's oven is heatedly searing nine hundred degrees resulting in pies that are too hot to handle if you're in a hurry. But what really sets to Maki's pizza apart is the handful of Japanese cedar chips. He tosses in at the last minute which smoke the oven and glazed the dough with a slight bitterness. So I'm one of those guys who I don't eat the crust. I ate the whole thing and then leave the cross, but when I came here in HR pizza, I the whole cross call. It's so good. I. Exactly the way I wanted. He says for you to eat every last morsel just ten months after Tamaki opened his doors last year, the famed Michelin guide was already recommending his pizza. Perhaps more importantly, it's kid tested and mother approved never thought I would say this coming from close to New York and New Jersey. I think pizza here in Tokyo is better than a lot of the places in the US fighting words, they are fighting words, you're right. Delicious. I was going to real Krieg mod is a writer who has been spreading the word about the new wave of Japanese pizza. What I I found. It was it was a total revelation friends would visit from New York, and I'd say, I know you're using Tokyo. But trust me, let's go have a pizza and they go come on. Let's go get Rahman's go get sushi. We'd sit at the counter Tamaki would service pizzas, and they would just speechless. There's something culturally here the exact nece striving for perfection that is making work Japan has history and culture of valuing commitment as a way of defining success not necessarily connecting successive making the Muslim pizzas. But making the best pizzas as well. As you can make them. But if Tokyo has become an unlikely pizza mecca heats, thanks largely to this restaurant that opened more than two decades ago cold Syrian con. Tuner Susumu Cucchi Numa studied pizza making a Naples and then brought it home to Tokyo to this day. He serves only the original Eminem's Margarita in marinara pizza. Joni owner learning was a pleasure. Cocky, Numa says pizza is really like playing music mozzarella tomato and basil. Former melody it's a metaphor. He takes literally at the end of each day. Begging on a drum set in the basement of his restaurant. Cocky Numa is considered the godfather of Tokyo's pizza culture and has now trained many of the city's top pizza makers. He also inspired Tamaki who worked at one of his restaurants before deciding he finally had the skills to open what he calls his pizza studio. So let me ask you this. Then do you think the Japanese or the Italians are making better pizza? On the show. I'm not sure I should answer. This. He says, this is all I know battalion, tastier. I'd be making it. Ben Stiller has won plenty of laughs in comedies like meet the parents now with a new miniseries about a prison escape he's looking to win notice as director. Here's Tony dokoupil. They could be literally anywhere. We're leaving. No stone unturned in June. Twenty fifteen pair of convicted killers vanished from their cells inside a maximum security prison in upstate New York. And it seemed only a matter of time before they're brazen escape and the twenty three day manhunt that followed gut it's Hollywood close up. It was a traumatic event for not only the members of this agency. But also the community, but what might supplies? You is just who's behind that close up. On time out of the country shooting zoo lender to when it happened. So I wasn't as with. Derek zoo Lander aka Ben Stiller is one of the funniest actors on the plant the star of three separate billion dollar comedy franchises night at the museum Madagascar and parents. We got not to mention classics like there's something about Mary. Tropic thunder the time they'll model of the year. And of course, those Zulu lender movies about an airheaded male model yet got a team to let it out of its cage. So this is what's confusing? It's sort of like a big prison break, we should make this into a great drama. Let's get the zoo lender guy to take a look at it. Some people might think that this could actually be funnier than Lander to. I don't blame them for that. Because I would probably think that too. If I didn't know anything about what I was doing. And they said open slow is going to do this is they don't know what's going on in my head. As it turns out, nothing was more serious than directing a real life drama. The result is escape bet. Dan, Amore a seven part miniseries debuting net. Sunday on CBS, showtimes. It stars Benicio del Toro as Richard Matt serving twenty five years to life for the kidnap and murder of his former employer. And hall dano as David sweat also sentenced to life for murdering a sheriff's deputy at even get a hacksaw played in the prison when that's sleep with the woman who runs the tailor shop key to their escape was help from a prison employee with a romantic appetite Joyce Mitchell played by Patricia Arquette, and I think she's bored, and she she's looking for to feel something. What is Ben do to help you bring out this character wasn't, sir? How is going to be as director, but he's really generous with actors and gives you a lot of support and listens to ideas and Willie let you try them out in a really offensive way. Although Stiller at fifty two has directed in the past this marks the first time he's taken on the job exclusively. It was a personal revelation, directing and not acting because you know, who wants to direct me. Stiller says it was the nitty gritty details of the story that hooked so much. So that while filming on location last February he made sure we saw the actual manhole cover where the to escape emerged to freedom. Just kept on coming back to the facts like what what really happened. And if there was something that seemed kind of almost unbelievable, but it was true. That was something I wanted to try to include. So that people would have that reaction come on that can't be true. Wait, and what Stiller couldn't get permission to film inside the prison? So he and his team built a full scale replica of the cell block where sweat and met hatched their plan. I pounded through a wall. I mean when you look at what they actually did. It's it's incredible. Then they cut their way into a steel pike exactly like this one and then shimmied fifteen feet to cut a second hole to freedom. Did you call through the pipes? Yeah. I got an our own pipe. So you she me through. Yeah. I mean as a director, I got up I felt like I had to he ought to know. I I was planning on taking someplace fancy his parents are show business comedy grades, Jerry Stiller and the late end Mira. But Bendon exactly dream following the family into performing in my mind. I was thinking I wanna be director. I'm going to be director. So the whole gut aid super eight camera age eight or nine that's true. It's yeah. Yeah. I mean that was the only option back then. It was just lots of fake blood. I remember making my sister throw up yogurt once the elevator by the way, you might wanna put on a bathing suit because you'll be channel surfing in no time. But after directing the nineteen Ninety-six movie the cable guy Hollywood executives had a message for Ben Stiller, the director of the message being that the phone ringing. That's being there is no message checking your messages, and there's no message that you about right there cable guy was not a hit. I looked up the review in the times. Yeah. I think. Yeah. The first line like the first is Astra movie this summer, if it comments Jim Carey, I remember I don't know if I read the rest of it. I wouldn't have. Two years later. There's something about Mary was a surprise hit beginning actor Ben Stiller's career as a master of gross out humor. Humiliation. N pain. How gags and you've looked at in the script and been like sorry. Just not doing that. Sure. Yeah. Those are the ones you didn't. See I have no gum gum. Sorry. My name is he's Larry still broad comedy has always coexisted with the more serious roles. Stiller says he's proud of seven, but he now admits humor may have to take a back seat beautiful. I'm not really that interested in doing that kind of stuff, you know, that's just where I'm at in my life. Now, always seeing a kind of semi retirement from comedy. Possibly. On retirement. I am going to known smy. It always goes well for actors when they announced their retirement, doesn't it? And actually, even so escape at Dan Amora does sound more and more like in escape for Ben Stiller to do that. Again. That'd be a great escape. Yeah. For sure I love directly. I would be very happy to to do this. You know as long as I can do it for sure. Nice. All right. Let's go one more time. Again. What was so rolling, right? On this one hundred -versity of the end of World War One Seth tone has a story about a veteran of World War Two still grappling with the wounds of war. Ninety four year olds journey from Pennsylvania all the way to a tiny grave in Cologne. Germany is deeply personal. Katrina. Never forget you. He never met Katharina Esser yet. Always feared her death might be his fault. What were you thinking when you were at her grave? Ca forgiveness. If it was my shot. Harmed her. Shot that still haunts him more than seventy years after he fired it in World War Two. At the time Clarence smaller was a gunner with the US army's third armored division. He'd come as shore in Normandy three weeks after d day. Crisscrossed France Belgium in March of nineteen forty five the fight to capture the key city of Cologne. Lay ahead or Lieutenant got on the radio. Gentleman. I give you Cologne. Let's knock. Oh, incredibly army photographer. Jim Bates who is documenting the allied advance filmed Clarence moyer's Pershing tank in a battle with a German Panzer fight. That's now seared into smokers mind, so moving over on my left side. So I fired our Mercure seashells the core of the building thinking, maybe I'd get a lucky hit not take. German car came around the corner. I right done feet in front of us. And I think I may have hit the car I might have been one at the car and move on got Kuttra Katharina Esser was a grocery store clerk young girl. Taking out us street. They're still alive. Two shot in the chest. I saw the medic or their entreated her and the. For lying beside the car on. Deserted die that way. All the time. I see her. Line three. We went to that street now bustling and two smaller almost unrecognizable. Was it the film that jug your memory? The he admits he's a little confused between what he recalls from that day versus what he later saw in that film stored away for decades at the national archives. Could say her hair remember seeing her hair? And I I remember seeing. Her eyes. Blink. He had heard somebody said, hey, they've uncovered the film of the third armored division fighting in Cologne, and I think that's your tank, and he plugged it into his VHS player and the war came back to him author and historian Adam ako, she's writing a book spearhead out in February which chronicles clearance moyer's battles through Europe, Clarence had seen a lot of death and destruction. But it was this moment Cologne that stayed with him. I think there was something about Cologne. It's a narrow streets. I mean, it was close urban warfare. They're worried about German guns dug into the basement, you have German soldiers and snipers moving through tunnels through the walls of the houses. And then on top of that you have to worry about a German tank coming around the corner inside the German tank, which also fired toward esters car, was bowed Gunnar Gustav, Schaeffer whom smaller met years after the war and befriended. The former fighters from both sides were United by the fear Dade been the one who killed Katharina Esser while working on the book, author Atta Mako also developed a friendship with spoiler and tried to help them in. He sees as a war hero come to terms with the past. And so the more he watches the film, the more he replace it in his mind the deeper it, sinks and how it's part of him. You don't think a World War Two veterans is holding onto something like this? But they suffer just like the guys in the modern wars, the grandson of those system Neko's setup dinner in Cologne, so small your could meet some of Katharina Eser's extended family, including her niece Lenny who's eighty three. They shared stories and toasted to her memory. Say this. Viscera becomes real to my grandmother. Iran has a PHD in history and is a relative of Essar. It was a nice friendly meeting. But this man who's responsible for taking the life of your great. Yes. Yes. Or no is really responsible in the wall like the second World War, and there's never been a war. Like this before never Norika is there is bounce ability for for the death of one post, and I don't think so more than seventy years later on what he acknowledged was likely his last trip. He went up to the top of colognes cathedral. To look out over a now, peaceful city that's been rebuilt down in the nave of the cathedral. He took another moment to reflect. Forgive me. If it was my shots, armed or. You probably have to forgive yourself. Just don't go away. He still has nightmares in admits there were still tears. This veteran is proud of his service, but says the battle never truly those away. Sunday morning on CBS. And here again is Jane Pauley, that's a classic from one of the legends of rock and roll. He's Roger Daltry of the who. And Jim Axelrod has paid him. Visit. The. Any of that? Plays. Consider the sweep of Roger Daltry career rock and Roll Hall of fame frontman for the who one of the most influential groups ever Golden Globe nominated film, Acton fashion icon when London was mod and swinging. The wherever I coined. He's a rockstar as shorthand for both face. Success could easily have add Daltry in mind. How long did it take you to get used to this grand scale fame? It's been half a century and up fifteen. Now, pushing seventy-five Roger Daltry is at the point where he's considering not just his career, but his life. And for the first time he's looking back on it with a memoir called thanks a lot Mr. Kibbe way title that nods to the source of his ambition his school principal who throw him out at the age of fifteen for misbehaving. That moment when he kicked me out of the school, and I was going through the door with my back to him. He said you'll never make anything of your life to try. And that was it. If he had said that my mind. This here is the house we moved to. When I was eleven years old. This is a house. Well, my first Utah. And that room out there. My mother's bedroom. The who started. Born in a working class neighborhood in one day. Don't treat a couple of schoolmates Pete Townsend. John it whistle. Who shared his love for Elvis, VO Diddley and the ever Lee brothers. And we've Mike racket the knives. Never complained. I was happy that guy. The ban. They would refined that racking Ed drummer, Keith moon and build a sound around Townsend's hard-driving chords that spoke to teenagers rage. Thanks, then 'isolation. Different than what the Beatles are doing. In your face stuff stuff from the inside of of tonight. While the chemistry. Clicked they'd go on to sell a hundred million records. It was a combustible mix. It was a very volatile group of people Pete's described as for people who should have never been in a band together. Again. We were much more like a game. The band success. Was matched only by its excess threat that constantly shadowed. The who from the beginning. We went on I appeal to a nice. I am too means new coins of. Doug's by the loss show. I think we did about five. Playing things so fast. I couldn't get the lyrics in. Still to this. Into the rush off to the right case lose soup guys flush it down the toilet. But the drugs never really went away. Keith moon fatally overdosed in nineteen seventy eight. I wish we could have nothing. He now drunk abuse rehab veteran done better a cocaine fueled heart attack claimed basis John Entwistle in two thousand two that left just Altria Townsend who don't actually see much of each other these days so after half a century working so closely with this guy, it's never ring up and go get a beer and talk about life. Don't have that kind of relationship. We never did. We didn't have very early dice. We used to off two gigs. We used to go fishing. We used to play golf any part of that said to you not really because I had it within one some if you ever wanted to have a guy might in approach, but I don't wanna play golf. It's still the to remain linked by something other than their music. So where are we? Well, this is the first Team Canada, America. The would that we manage to get UCLA for decades. Daltry Townsend have given their names money and time to building team cancer units in hospitals across the UK and now America lessons, you're young people. Don't realize that they get the rarest most aggressive cancers Daltry feels passionately that medicine was treating teenagers. The way music did before rock and roll as either kids are adults. When actually they're neither. We're trying to achieve independence when we're our age and like getting locked up in hospital isn't like a great way to go about doing it. Like, it's nice to be given something like this Carlotta pay back to the fans who formed. The foundation of the who success. Without the simple. It will be music NewsPoll style. At a time of life. When many stars might he focused on their legacy. Roger Daltry doesn't appear particularly concerned. I'm just curious. Did you ever see Mr. Kibble white again? No. I don't know if he's still alive. He must've been Roger the book, I said is a kind of few moment. But when I when I say it now, I'm really I'm thanking him. I mean, I'll really mean it. Nineteen sixty eight was a year filled with twists and turns including dramatic turn of fortune fifty years ago this month with the election of a politician, all but written himself off years before Richards lesson John looks back. You don't have Nixon to kick around anymore. It was hard to imagine in nineteen sixty two that Richard Nixon would be worth kicking around anymore. He'd lost one presidential election. And he just lost a second election to be governor of California. Even Pat Buchanan who would become one of Nixon speechwriters new rehabilitating him would be tough. He was a loser had lost and lost and lost. The only way you get rid of this loser image is to win. But by nineteen sixty eight the stage was being set for a law and order candidate like Richard Nixon the country was pre revolutionary in nineteen sixty eight historian Evan Thomas is the author of being Nixon there were race riots rice on campuses, the country was divided in a way that not since the civil war worse than it is today. Nixon's Maine, Republican rivals George Romney and Nelson Rockefeller dropped out. Nixon was lucky in that. The Republican party was falling apart around him and Nixon the old pro was there to fill the vacuum. So as Nixon lucky or good all great politicians are lucky and good and Nixon was both lucky for Nixon the. The Democrats were being divided on the left by the Vietnam war and on the right by George Wallace who siphoning off voters attracted by his race based populism. The kind of folks that people are sick and tired of in this country. Ready to get kicked around again. But he still had a lot of kick left in him. Those who have lost elections in the past have come back to win. I hope to come back to win the plan was to run against Lyndon Johnson, the incumbent president. But just two months after Nixon got into the race. I luckily for him, and I will not accept everything change the nomination of my party for another term at your Patrick Buchanan, told Nixon that Johnson had dropped out. Did he seemed surprised stunned? We were stunned Nixon accepted the Republican nomination in August of sixty eight just a few weeks before his biggest break yet. The Democratic Party can't be democratic. I mean, what hope is there for democracy? Democrats had their calamitous convention in Chicago. While the cops were outside clubbing demonstrators on the head delegates were inside shooting themselves in the foot. The convention. Nixon loved every minute of the democratic convention. Don't elect those crazy Democrats. You're gonna have riots in the streets elect me, and I'll bring some order and quiet vice president Hubert Humphrey won the democratic nomination. But his old friend, then Senator Walter Mondale remembers it didn't mean much finally had his chance and nation was worthless. Worthless well proved to be worth something. But at that time, it looked like poisoned by contrast Nixon's, campaign ran with military grade discipline, he traveled with an entourage of managers and message men overseen by John Mitchell duopoly eight I believe in an orderly fashion, and that comes from preparation we have planned program that have had the time to carry it out. It was all working Nixon was up way up in the polls until September thirtieth when Hubert. Humphry turned the tide with this speech. I want to talk with you about the up nom. Humphry repudiated Lyndon Johnson's war policy as president. I would stop the bombing of the north as an acceptable risk for peace. The announcement would narrow the polls dramatically Nixon immediately had an unexpected order for his personal aide. Dwight Chapin get president Johnson on the phone who who'd you say that he said to me I had no idea what to do. So I asked rose woods who was Nixon's secretary. He said call four five six one four one four and the White House number. That's the White House number and asked to speak to the president. Yes. President Johnson was recording the call as Nixon discussed Humphry speech. Matic. Did you have a sense of how strange that call was? I felt that it was one of the most intriguing political maneuvers that I had ever heard for Richard Nixon to be calling Lyndon Johnson. And he's telling the president. I'm with you, not exactly the words, but implying it Mondale things evidence that Johnson might have been rooting against his own party's nominee his own vice president do you think Johnson wanted Humphrey to win? Maybe I'm not sure I think at the end the last two weeks he wanted the win. But I think the early part of the campaign. He was mad at Humphry. He thought Humphry wasn't being loyal enough. Do you think Johnson wanted Nixon to win? I thought so for a while because he was doing things to help Nixon, but Johnson ended up helping Humphry come within a hair of winning with this speech five days before the election. I have now ordered. That all air naval and artillery bombardment of North Vietnam. Sees I thought we had lost to comprehend momentum. I thought we could make those must have been very heady days. Yes. Get a Minnesota present almost did. But Nixon held on to win by just about five hundred thousand votes. Richard Nixon goes over the top Nixon had known bitter defeat in elections even closer than this. And he was magnanimous in victory. Nixon had Dwight Chapin set up a meeting with Humphrey just days after the election. And as the meeting ended Chepe in saw side of Nixon of visit by president Humphrey. You others ever saw the men had their arms around one. Another Humphrey was Saghbin. Nixon was patting him on the back saying Hubert. Everything's going to be okay. Mariel going to. Have a great life Humphrey chokes out. If there's anything that I can ever do. I want to be doing it for you. It was such a poignant moment. On Broadway new production that shines a light on the frailty of age. Serena cultural has saved us a seat. I've had eight the gallery for years. Now. Nobody comes in there. Get myself a job in an office and you'll take place in the front. It's a story of family relationships and grandmothers last year's in decline. Writer Kenneth Lonner against the Waverley gallery, just opened on Broadway. This is play who's the ginning trace back to the late nineteen seventies. When the lives of two teenagers and a gallery owner intersected in New York's Greenwich Village, I came here with Matthews families matter of fact, small and dad Matthew is his childhood friend that celebrated actor Matthew Broderick grew up a few blocks right down the street across the street from the way really gallery than I would see his grandmother in there. Before I knew Kenny at fifteen he and Kenny met in school additions midsummer night's dream almost immediately. They began taking note of who got what role. We both got a much bigger part than me better part. I think it's better part. Yeah. I mean, I was the wall, and you are Dimitrius. Although he had the chops to perform even Shakespeare Launer gin didn't stick. With acting started writing plays, I guess in ninth grade, and I was really interested in writing all through high school, really. In fact, he went on to write and direct a movie two thousand UK count on me. You don't write me for six month? I don't know where you are for movie if you're not going to direct you might as well said by the material forever. If you're the writer all the while he was writing plays, of course, like the starry messenger, featuring broaddrick and Lonner gins wife j Smith Cameron and last year his Manchester by the sea. I'm nuts on earned Lonner. Again, an Academy Award for best original screenplay and a best director nod Margaret, are you grieving and constant films. I semi his movie star Powell divinely meet you, Patrick and always a supporting role little teeny. Time passes. Just walked by kidding aside. Their support for each other is unwavering. So it's no surprise that. Broddrick was there when Lonner GAN's once vibrant grandmother began showing signs of dementia. It was very gradual. So you know, I knew about thinking her dog was still alive. Wasn't that always broke my heart that she had to be told again that our dog was dead because she'd forgotten I was that is a miserable thing, you know. My grandmother's gallery was right here window was right there where she used to sit at her desk writing for the newspaper. No, I don't write threat. I don't write for the newspaper. Oh, what do you do? I write speeches for the Environmental Protection Agency. The ways them. The Waverly gallery. First staged in two thousand was a finalist for the Pulitzer prize in drama the next year. Here. Did you recognize me? The mother is played by the Tony award-winning. Actress Joan Allen, Lucas hedges plays a version of a young Launer gin as for the grandmother. That's the legendary comedy writer and actress Elaine may she last appeared on Broadway more than fifty years ago with another legend Mike Nichols. Choose incredible. The part why wishy perfect for it. There's a son Kenny resonance that that's both Elaine character, she's playing, and my grandmother and broaddrick says her performance shows, an anguish that's usually kept private this rare that somebody has held a glass up to like that intensely in that accurately. Just my. What is at me? Will you tell her? You're not. My case. Did you find my keys? I can't find my keys. Well, understand that they don't understand and they don't see themselves as as someone who should be put on the shelf. It said that Kenneth Lonergan works are timeless and that the Waverley gallery might just be his best. So far. Of course, not you broaddrick sees them only as a best friend. Can I love all of them to tell you the truth? I really can't pick an I can't pick from his three wonderful movies. I like all of them. I like the first one because I have a larger part in. I'm Jane Pauley. Thank you for listening, and please join us again next Sunday morning.

Richard Nixon Ben Stiller director Adam Roger Daltry Jane Pauley President Johnson STAN Mitchell Utah Ben Tracy America Adam trimmer Tokyo Cologne Jim Axelrod Alex Cooper Tamaki Kenneth Lonergan New York Erin Moriarty
CBS Sunday Morning March 17, 2019

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

49:56 min | 1 year ago

CBS Sunday Morning March 17, 2019

"Today's Sunday morning podcast is sponsored by prudential. What would you do if you had to choose between saving for your kids, college or your own retirement with the cost of a four year degree estimated to be over two hundred thousand dollars in eighteen years? It's a real decision. Many families must make at prudential. We wanna make sure your biggest financial goals never have to come at the expense of one another because financial wellness means planning for their future, and yours. Get started today at prudential dot com slash plan for both prudential insurance company of America. Newark New Jersey. Good morning. I'm Jane Pauley. And this is Sunday morning for too many. Parents it's terrible. And troubling question. A well, you know, your children and for too many parents the answer can have life or death consequences as the final entry in one. Young girl's diary made. All too clear. Jim Axelrod will report our cover story. She was a seventeen year old high school junior with a golden future straight as loving parents and bunch of friends, she's such a happy girl. And so full life. But there was another darker side to the story. Leaned over the embankment and look down. And I saw her just happen to us. But it did happen. Why these parents are sharing their heartbreak ahead on Sunday morning. Whatever your political affiliation. Julia Louis Dreyfuss may be just about everyone's favorite. Vice president her show veep is launching a new season Tracy Smith catches up with her. I am still young woman. Really look at my hands. Look at my neck. Okay. Inter final year HBO show. Julia Louis Dreyfuss had both the role of a lifetime, and maybe the fight of her life. How are you going to say goodbye through tears and laughs? I don't know. It's awful forget it. We're going to do another season. Behind the scenes that veep later on Sunday morning. Our series now serving continues this morning with Martha Tyson's visit to America's test kitchen. If America's test kitchen says a particular Skillet is. Believe it. If a recipe appears in one of its cookbooks know that it's been tested and tasted hundreds of times. The mission really has been the same for twenty five years, which is to our home cooks succeed in their own kitchens ahead the Sunday morning. We follow some carrots from peeler to page. Lee Hourn gives us a read on bestselling author. Delia Owens with Conor night. We visit a museum of music machines. And on the Saint Patrick's Day will be hearing from the chorus of University College, Dublin and more all coming up. When are Sunday morning podcast continues. Any law. Cut shore is tragedy especially for parents who a child and never sought coming. Jim Axelrod has a cautionary tale from the final entry in a young girl's diary. With beautiful. I try them. I. The home video will look so familiar to so many Barron, the sweet little girl singing and dancing her way to teen years. Where she's recognized for achieving outside the home consider me for the national on a site and thoroughly cherish insight. Like, this was awesome, Alexandra. She was such a happy girl. And so motivated in so just full life. But for millions will turn terrifying. When parents here the whole store, Alexandra velours. Just weeks after a family ski vacation smile. This seventeen year old high school junior straight a student class officer and robotics with made her bed tidied her room and walked to a highway overpass in Grafton, Massachusetts. Leaned over the embankment and look down. And I saw her dean velours Alexander's father. I was just hoping for. There was no one that was done. All cars driving by. My daughter's on the side of the road. Nobody saw this and she's cold. Nearby dean and his wife Alesia found two journals in their daughters belongings her final entry was written just hours before her death. The Gulf Coast of you listening to a playlist, she entitled goodbye. We had this one open at the bridge. And it was just like, phrases and words, and I'm not good enough. I'm worthless. I'm like these are things that we've never heard. There was just so much joy and everything she did. And it doesn't matter. What was in that journal two hundred pages of self loathing and despair written in Alexandra own hand broken? You are a burden. You're lazy you're failure. She was a highly motivated Cheever, but that's how she felt inside. Such a sherpa and confusing. Contrast to who they thought was they're happy oldest child strumming her way through outta lessons and still talking to her parents. You having all these conversation conversations. It just doesn't seem possible. But it's what reality was because it's written, right? With teen suicide at a forty year high for young women Alexandra's age and now the second leading cause of death for fifteen to twenty four year olds of both sexes. It is this disconnect that most haunts dean and Alicia Valois. The girl who seemed to love it. When her parents took her to a concert by the Scottish rock group. Biffi Claro went home and wrote. I hated it. I just wanted to be alone. I tanks two weeks before she died on March nineteenth two thousand eighteen Alexandra's robotic team won regionals and a place in the international finals. We went there that day. We went there that day. She was so excited. But none of that made the journal. Instead the next entry. I need an excuse as to why I'm doing poorly. She was able to obscure this feeling of despair. You know, this hints, but I'm not thinking. Yes. The journals were a complete shock to her English teacher. Tim freedus her intellect her candle power where does that rank and of nine years worth of of high school kids, number one and number two, absolutely. That's mart. Alexandra head confided in him. She was having a hard time staying motivated, but freed is chalked it up to teenage angst. It's always playing back. How would you do things differently? Now that the outcome has been seen you still wrestling with that. Of course, how do I go forward and have kids sit right in front of me. And I don't have a clue what's going on in their personal lives. But still trying to figure out if there's something going on. I think we all carry a little guilt because we all thought we knew her so well her friends are also haunted. Molly Turner and Zoe Mahoney to Alexandra's closest friends at Blackstone valley technical high school, they were in engineering shop together read this thing to you. Okay. A hang out with my shop is someplace I can let my guard down a bit more. I shouldn't do this. Really, I'm pretty sure they've noticed by now I've been out of it for while. But I don't wanna concern them. When you hear that? Now, make you all happy to know that was a safe place for her or something else. I feel so happy that she was able to let her guard down. But I feel like she shouldn't have had to had a guard up at all like anytime. Did you notice she was in her words out of it? Well, I think we noticed that she was a little more stress than usual. But with junior year like everyone stressed, it's normal to stress. I have more kids who are cutting who are attempting suicide who are entering impatient psychiatric facilities students who in the past would have been considered the sort of model students many of Scott whites forty years as a guidance counselor were spent in affluent, New Jersey communities full of high-achieving kids. In your view is the spike we're seeing in teen suicide related to this. What you call an unhealthy culture. Absolutely. We have a culture that makes kids think that if they're not perfect. They're less than good Alexandra's journal. It begins with a checklist. What will get me into MIT valedictorian first robotics, captain hundred plus our service award model. You Anna ten both conferences win. Is there something wrong with these goals? There's no balance on these goals. There's no check is to not every person can reach them whether that child can reach them, it's sort of unknown. But if she did there would be another goal beyond that, you know that an I know that for Alexandra nothing was good enough. There was no pressure that you have to get into the school. You have to do this. She put that pressure on yourself. I don't want this notebook to end. I love it more than myself. She wrote I need a place. Where there is no need for me to be perfect. When Alexandra was terrific towards as you read through the journal is a place of unhealthy thinking, and I would probably wage that there's some type of mental diagnosis that could have been done. Which is why the Loris is are taking the crippling pain public that most keep private headlining suicide prevention works visiting schools to share Alexandra's story hurt the sadness is evolving. And now there's this thing called living. So then good five good husband person. They hope that in sharing the story of their daughter may be another family will be spared this trauma while I missed by dying tonight. The possibility of getting a lot of other kids out there that are like her that are high achievers that are balancing a lot. That's what. Makes her very relatable. And why maybe it's affecting people in why they're listening is because I have a child like this too. And in the pain of what Alex wrote tour parents in her final entry hours before she took her life. Don't blame yourselves for not seeing warning signs. His also what the Valois family hopes to salvage from her death. Some meaning for others, so many emails last summer the morning after an interview was published. They found this note on their doorstep. But he said an Alex Sanders article truly changed my life. Families are talking to their kids about their mental health. It lets me know that she didn't I ate having such a huge impact. Feels really good. And now a page from our Sunday morning almanac. March seventeenth nineteen nineteen one hundred years ago today the day the world gained in unforgettable voice on forgettable. That was the day Nathaniel Adams, Cole's NAT king. Cole was born in Montgomery, Alabama. The son of a Baptist pastor by age four. He was learning piano from his mother directed the church choir every time at fifteen colquitt quit school to play jazz fulltime at I just behind the Pano, but once audiences heard that silky smooth baritone. They understandably wanted more. Took people ride in the air. Cole had his first hit in nineteen forty four. And quickly became one of the most popular performers of his time. Are you? Are you? Really? Though, criticized early on for not being vocal civil rights activist that king cold go NAT king. Cole broke barriers is the first African American to host his own national TV show in nineteen fifty six. Often seen with a cigarette in his hand NAT king Cole died from lung cancer in nineteen sixty five. He was just forty five. But in nineteen Ninety-two he sprang back to life through the miracle of CGI in a duet with his daughter Natalie at the Grammy awards. Proof that while NAT king. Cole is long gone. His voice will remain. Well, just listen. Win. On. Marking this Saint Patrick's Day with a choral scholars of University College Dublin. And then there are music machines. Laura's music machines, presented by Conor Knighton for your listening. Pleasure. So ladies gentlemen, for your listening pleasure. Mr. Scarf. This player piano was released in the nineteen twenties. It offered an opportunity to conjure up the spirit of stars like George Gershwin intervene own living. But in the rooms of this, Pennsylvania mansion turned museum the piano, it's just one of more than one hundred forty music machines. All come together to bring the story of one man back to light. The self playing banjo upstairs. The self playing in the foyer. Curator Jim Masao guides visitors through the home of Charles Brown. The third one off the millionaire if you don't have any money you're in that. No. And if you do then you're eccentric Brown had a lot of money, and he was very eccentric. Born in nineteen thirty seven he made his fortune in the gas lamp business and spent a good chunk of it building, the Barron Hof, his Bavarian inspired dream home. Overlooking Pittsburgh, there are six bedrooms, twelve bars an indoor pool and surprises around every corner. The P was in near doc into you heard something else going Leonard. He didn't want to deal with it. Then he would just lead against this cabinet here. What we'll see where this secret passage leads us to. This like much the first step. It's a doozy. As whimsical is Brown's home was P was fairly buttoned up. The man was rarely seen without his signature blue Oxford shirt and after died in nineteen ninety nine the executors of his state discovered. He had two hundred eighty three of them. I say this is a guy who's wearing a blue shirt, but that's nuts. That isn't sorry meant eccentric. And you walked on this way. And what about the bottom floor of the baron Hof is a labyrinth cave made out of concrete and paper because well, why not I feel like I have to ask now wealthy, man. Giant mansion Bhaktapur is he Batman? Don't no the mention if instead of fighting crime, Bruce Wayne started buying a bunch of old instruments. That's the baron Hof. Instruments like this nineteen. Oh, wait, double violin meant for hotel lobbies species. The proud started adding them to his home and hopes of making it museum worthy nineteen Eighty-eight. He realizes need is the house was it wasn't going to be a standalone museum, he needed another attraction. So he started collecting music boxes. So he secretly wanted. This to be a museum opened do that. They will. Because the Barron Hof is in a residential neighborhood. It can't operate like a traditional museum. They're only seven small group tours week arranged far in advance and the ten dollar tickets don't come anywhere close to covering the cost of maintaining a place like this and the machines in south. Charles Brown king Chuck left behind enough money to take care of all that he wanted the music at the baron off to keep playing long after he was gone. And so it does how do you think he would feel that? We're here right now talking. Oh, he dance. Out. So what is the perfect recipe for preparing hard-boiled egg now serving an inside look at the show that answers nearly oh you're culinary questions. Our server is Martha tasha. A whole year before publication America's test kitchen was fine tuning a contender for its newest cookbook at its headquarters in Boston a recipe for roasted carrots and shallots. Is it salty enough not to sell to day? One testing was about experimentation. Here's a sweetness with aids naturally. Carry sweetness taste of more flat unday to the test chefs made adjustments. I'm gonna try roasting carrots less and try it again, this one turn out really nice their conclusion medium-size carrots any kind cooked in butter at four hundred fifty degrees and of story. Thanks, guys. Not in this busy place. On any given day. A television show is likely being is delivered down a dozen or more recipes are being developed in the test kitchen for flare-up, five sweet food stylists tidy up lights for photographers. I like the annual the pictures for a future a magazine good or one of America's test kitchens websites. So you're the model I mean, take special care of your hands. Yeah. I mean, I'll get a phone call once in a while to just get a manicure kidding. Does that cake look good enough to eat? What's left is headed for the take home fridge an irresistible perk? AT ks growing staff who now number almost two hundred in two thousand seventeen the expanding edible empire moved to this. Fifty five thousand square foot space along boss. Sins waterfront, so we have the two shows are two magazines about fifteen books ear, and then our websites chief creative officer Jack Bishop like a lot of AT ks experts is a regular on the TV shows what Mexico fish sauce more protein. Dispensing? The often surprising results of eighty K research searing meat does not seal in juice. You do not need to sift flower. You should be steaming your eggs rather than boiling them. We have about five thousand books Bishop co founded the company in nineteen Ninety-three mission really has been the same for twenty five years, which is to impound your home cooks succeed in their own kitchens. Tie. Once you know, how to cook. Sam in this way, it's a game changer. It was and is the opposite of slick America's test kitchen, the first host eighty ks. TV shows wasn't some flashy celebrity. Chef we spent most of our time eating bad food. It w-. Was nerdy. New Englander, Christopher Kimball. Little dry. This was not an obvious blueprint for the huge success. AT K has had garlic breath is actually very real phenomenon especially since the company didn't then and doesn't now accept any advertising. The one problem the handles get really hot over a gas flame. In addition to the recipes review contents, very important part of the mission that America's test kitchen, and that's difficult to do if you are also accepting advertisements from the same companies that you're then reviewing five hundred Lisa McManus gets paid we go. Sorry little. To abuse still for no see very warps in this case Skillet. Wow. Okay. That in order to figure out which ones. Corpse war. Tough enough to take to get there. Just think the job satisfaction. We always try to find out. Why did the winners win? The losers lose just say take our word for it. We wanna prove why as executive tasting intesting editor how's that for a title? Her. Rigor is part of the reason people trust eighty K product recommendations today, I got some of the worst gadgets of the year. Trust is the reason AT ks cooking shows reach more than four million viewers tested. A lot of ways to heat up the Skillet. We found the oven worked best our whole business is cooking things wrong way. So that we can eventually find the right way. Bridget Lancaster and Julia Cullen Davison to longtime test chefs host the TV shows now after you've washed your parsley if it back into a bundle you take your knife. And you just start shaving it just like this on the outside. They come across like skilled stand ins for their viewers. God, that's so easy who truly eat up. Their advice. That's such a great technique. I learned wow. Which brings us back to that. Carrington shallot recipe. We sent it out to be row. Tested, by volunteer home cooks, and we don't debt eighty percent of the people to say, I wanna make that recipe. Again, it goes back into our kitchen and gets reworked about ninety percent of my kitchen equipment is based upon their recommendations. Stephanie Patterson of Wooster, Ohio is one of seventeen thousand volunteer home cooks who signed up on the website to test recipes currently in my Email. There's four new ones to test, and how long have you done this nine years, Carol Chris of holmdale, New Jersey is in other unless like there's too many recipes in too little time to say they're groupies is an understatement on their Facebook group in on Instagram. There's a lot of people. So it's like a clamp. If definitely a pattern. Sohn who has muscular dystrophy, it's actually more. It's a world. And I feel like I'm helping them. Make the recipe is good as it can be before they printed, and it makes you part of their families -actly. Yes. So did they like the carrots and shallots high marks high marks shallots or sensational? The recipe made the cut it's unpaid eighty six of America's test kitchens, just released vegetables cookbook. Very good. Steve Hartman this morning has a story that gives new meaning to the expression in the long run. No one wants to feel like old news like their glory days are gone. But Ernie Andrews says that's exactly how he felt in the months after his celebrated record-breaking run. Back in two thousand sixteen then ninety three year old Ernie Andrews became the oldest person ever to run across America. From San Diego, California, all the way to Saint Simon's island, Georgia a huge crowd joined him at the end as this World War. Two sailor storm the beach one last time to fervent chance and flying coach it was pure joy. That all happened about two and a half years ago today, Ernie still runs for exercise and still dreams of the glory. I was running three days a week. But it's the same thing, and I just got a little bored. He recently got so restless, he decided to do something remarkable. And I don't use that word lightly. If he pulls this off this would be truly remarkable yesterday at the age of ninety five Ernie return to the Georgia beach were his run ended to start a new run back across the country. Again, we ask you to bless Ernie day as he begins this journey in earnest his last trip took three years. But now his run is more like most. Earn expects this one to take a bit longer. He hopes to reach San Diego sometime after his hundred birthday. The man is nothing if not an optimist. I've got plans crypt to two thousand twenty five play to get their way or the wheelchair gurney. Whatever it takes not in a coffin. Just like last time Ernie dedicating his run to the L S T that's a kind of ship the same kind of ship Ernie served on in the war. There's one left and it's open for tours in Evansville, Indiana. He's running to raise money and awareness, restrict be forgotten ships like a person to you know, we call it the gray lady sounds like your love of this lady. Oh, yeah. There's part of my so. Honoring his naval passed by plotting toward the Pacific and in his wake Ernie Andrews leaves behind all the proof you'll ever need that there's no fun in fading into the sunset at least not when you can run into it. Julia Louis Dreyfuss was left out loud. Funny as Elaine in the classic sitcoms. Seinfeld. And she struck comedy gold. Again, this time mining the world of Washington politics, here's Tracy Smith. Why do I have to tell people why I want to be president? I mean, I don't wanna hear about their jobs. If only politicians were really this funny. In HP owes veep. Julia Louis Dreyfuss is Selina Meyer, a one time veep and accidentally president and a fulltime Queen of disaster. I'd like to begin today. Her character is a narcissistic trainwreck a- politician who bad winner. Thank you want at your Beck and call Senator Secca and poor loser. Nevada's my state. I'm going to be president. I could be the first elected lady president the lovely inauguration. Billy Joel is going to sing. So now in her seventh and final season Dreyfuss says it could be her best role ever. Actually for me. It's the role of a lifetime. I really do feel that way. And you've had a really good roles. Yeah. Exactly. I really have. And but I feel like this is sort of unsurpassed for me in many ways, you top this or what we were busy writing culture references and a funny song about the speaker. In celinas world. Nothing is sacred. No insult is left. Unsaid military industrial complex. These are the president's flying monkeys. And she's pretty high maintenance Tony HALE is her faithless system. Gary for the perfect moment in the perfect life of perfect. This is Kathy Bates misery described. Gary's feelings for Selena. He worships her. She is his Jesus she's an awful person. But to him is just the second coming take all these meaningless syllables with you. Just get. Yes. Get up. Absolutely. But the shows real whipping boy is Joan Ryan play by Timothy Simon's Jones bumbling aid who eventually runs president himself. I want to make clear that she does do all the housework. It's been incredibly fun to play Jona. It is kinda hard to be this dumb. All the time. It takes some smarts to be this dump it does. I think you thank you. We have so screwed like so many great American TV shows fever has British Reuss derive from K political comedy called thick of Nippon minutes taken to extract from a bluetooth. This little inquiry has few it is now growing faster this. Of course. Total meltdowns are funny over here too. You have made it impossible to do. This job. You have to sex no decision and bad decision is Alitas fed up. Chief of staff is played by Anna, clump, sqi, so many people like a lot of young women, especially will come up to me like hear me. And I'm like, oh, God, I'm so scared here you are running America. You are the worst thing that has happened to this country since food in buckets, maybe slavery pick up. One more time veteran show runner. David Mundell knows how to bring out the best of the veep cast, especially Julia he worked with her back in the nineties as a writer on another show Gillian. Very nice to meet you. Yeah. This one. Remember the man hands episode David Mandel wrote it she had men. For veep. The standards are just as high Mandela cast shoot the same scene again. And again adjusting the timing and punch lines and facial expressions until it all just works. All sounds stupid. But I mean, we would crawl through glass to get an extra laugh into the scene. My favorite thing. When people say. I was watching I had to stop and go back because there's so much in there. I was laughing and didn't hear the next two lines. And that's that's I mean, that's all I care about are there moments where offstage you're trying not to laugh out laugh God, you'll if you're watching me at the monitor if we're lucky I'm somewhere where I can laugh. So that's number one. If we're far enough away. I will laugh can't help. But also, I am laugher. I guess I sort of subscribed to sort of the happy parts of comedy. I mean, don't get me wrong. I can be as miserable the next guy. But I like when I hear joke I like to laugh, but but I will I will cover my head. Sometimes I will bite my fingers, especially sometimes I'm on the set behind the camera sort of throwing like different lines and stuff in and I I so worry about like, I'm here. I don't wanna make any noise, and I'm sort of like, you know in trying to look at them. Now, I'm really close. To like actually seeing what face Tony's making. I don't know how sometimes how. Julia even handles it with that close to tone stasis. No my gosh. So you ready for these buzz cut bows, talking about dealing with angry, aggressive dysfunctional men. I eat men and now just as with Seinfeld. Julia Louis Dreyfuss is leaving her audience wanting more you said goodbye to shows before and you know, you tend to shake about a shows when they're up here. Yeah. Is this different this one? I don't know. Because I haven't said goodbye goodbye yet. But I will say that our final table read that we had I was actually surprised by how. Frankly, hysterical, I became and maybe that's because I don't know. I'm more cognizant of what a treasure. This is just because I'm older I've been doing this awhile, and I'm sort of a wear of. When it's good. It's a very lucky thing. Yeah. And the EMMY goes to Julia Dreyfuss, and it seems lucky is the operative word in two thousand seventeen Dreyfuss won a record sixth consecutive EMMY for veep. No, one could tell as she accepted her statuette that she was waiting to hear whether or not she had cancer. It was so strange because that Sunday night we won them e she won. We won. We were at the party. We were at the after party. She was there at the after party. She knew she most likely had it. She was like, I think ninety percents. Sure, we didn't know she knew she's at the after party, she learned her diagnosis the next day and not long after that she told the world with a note on social media saying one in eight women get breast cancer today. I'm the one God at that point. It's like, what's what's forget about any of the show. What's going to happen to her true? This not even she knew that. But even when she began chemotherapy, it didn't stop her from showing up to work. Yeah. It's funny because I'm so yes, it is is been a tremendous gift to come back to this. And frankly, even when I was going through my chemotherapy that I had I did come back here every three weeks, and we did table reads and stuff just so that we, you know, kept the machine operating and took it as an opportunity to sort of get scripts written in advance and. And that was in so many ways, very booing. It was hard to do. Because particularly towards the end. I was pretty surf strung out. I mean, you sick, right. And you're still doing the table. Yes. Still doing the table reads. But nothing beyond that, I will say I mean, then I had to really sort of hunker down and just focus on getting better, which I did. But then coming back to this. You know, it's it's sweeter than ever because I don't know. It's it's a great gift to be able to do what you love not everybody gets to say that, you know. And and I really love doing this. I'm not sure about this part where I say I want to be president for all Americans. I mean, do I, you know, all and now a year and a half later. She says, she's a cancer free. I mean, it sounds so trite, but did it add to appreciating things? Well, it certainly added to appreciating life life doesn't go on forever. And so that sort of you know, came right up to my face. A reminder. And so, yeah, I think I have kind of a pretty solid sense of priority. Shall we say moving forward now so global incompetence this office is staggering moving forward is bittersweet the cast members that seem to hate each other onscreen genuinely admire you could even say love each other in real life. What do you think you're gonna miss the most? I guess that. Yeah. The relationships when you spend twenty hours a day with with people, you know, you see them at their best and their worst. And. And at this point, you realized how much how much they matter to you. It's okay. Damn it. It's the morning. Good morning. If there's a takeaway for long runs, maybe it's this in comedy as in life. Nothing. Good ever comes easy. Long flight we squeeze as much money out of it as we possibly can. And can that be torturous at times? Yeah. The. To. I know this is CBS. So I can't swear beep you you can beat me it can be awful. But once you've walked through the awful to find your way to the right moment. The right language, the right emotion, and you land it. It's like. Chocolate cake for days. Yeah. This week's New York Times bestseller list is out and once again at number one where the crawdads saying from author Delia Owens, just how the novel came to be is a story in itself as Lee Cowan explains. It's almost in Canada with a view of Montana. That's just how remote this northern corner of Idaho. Really? It's worlds away from almost every except nature. Now, this is really special. Sees oughta prints like Purdue yo ins, it's having wildlife is church fast isolation from you. Get lonely. Do I get so lonely? Sometimes I feel like I can't breathe. There's only like a part of do. And decide to write a book about please welcome the book where the crawdads sing. As become a phenomenal. It's still haunts me. It was so beautifully written recent book fair and Savannah, Georgia. She had readers lined up around the block just to meet him. It's so many stories of annoyed. I couldn't put it down. The book has become a fixture in the New York Times bestseller list over the last six months. On the day, we visited. Publisher gave her a coal gradually. Oh, you what to tell her? She just made it to number one for the third week in a row. Oh, thank you. They keep sending me. Champagne one thing is I have learned how to open a bottle of champagne by myself as they keep coming. They keep coming. What makes her success all the more remarkable is that Owens seventy had never written a novel before I have had such a great response from my readers. I just feel overwhelmed with gratitude the book is pretty tough to categorize. It's love story of murder mystery a courtroom drama and owed to the outdoors all in one year old copies of the manuscript which of the hilarious to read, but took her the better part of a decade to write inspiration coming whenever it came. I sleep at night with a little pad of paper in my bed with the flashlight and a pin. And I wake up in the middle of the night. And write something down to occurs that I think is brilliant. And then when I wake up in the morning out look at him half the time. I can't read what I wrote. Now, the long way to Nope. A thousand such moments became little scraps of goals and keep secrets much better than mud that one made it to the book sand keep secrets much better than. Great wine never occurred to me a million years. Title where the crawdads ING was taken from a phrase her mother used to use encouraging or tomboy daughter to take to the woods around the rural Georgia who and listen to what those woods had to say. I learned from the book crawdads don't really sing. But I learned from my mother that if you go far enough into the wilderness by yourself, and there's nothing, but you in nature. You will hear the credit saying she took that advice to heart. Earning a Bs Oualadi and a D animal behavior and the twenty four to one way ticket to Africa to put her science background to work with her. Then husband, Mark Owens. They made a name for themselves in the wild writing three books together about their experiences with elephants and lions to rupture and wear. Help. The owns determine lions age even appearing in this National Geographic documentary. Company. We were in what stage the only two people in area the size of Ireland, and we have no not unless people came to our camp. And that was very very rare. The two have since divorced, but Owens kept on writing which you wanted to explore was something she felt all those years in Africa, but couldn't really measure at least not in the scientific way. And that was her feeling of being alone. Our watch the lions in the late afternoon the sun setting behind the dunes, and they'd be playing and tumbling with their cubs in each other's cubs. And it made me think about my girlfriends back home. It made me realize how isolated I was not to have a group. And that was one thing I wanted to write about in my novel was the effect that isolation and loneliness can have on a person. Seed for her first novel was planned. She chose a setting a lonely place Indy. The Mark like the one she took to just off the coast of savannah wasn't. We cannot Cannell that she would come through her protagonist is a girl named not too bad the Marsh girl that she's known in town forced to scratch out a life out here. All by herself. This is just sort of habitat. She would be in after her family abandoner. They're like we should see her coming. Talk about her like, she's real. I see. She. Very real to me. This was her world the wild her teacher both in love and loss. The way owns herself had found her way through. I feel at home when I'm in place like this. You can put me in the middle of tests or new mountains when I'm out away from everything else. I feel like I'm home perhaps. That's why writing fits or sell after all it's pretty solitary pursuit. But being a successful writer. That's anything hard doing a book tour and all that other stuff you're surrounded make so many people and you've got somebody events book signings and everything it's very hard. I don't want that for into stand up in front of a crowd and talk. I've lived a remote life. I'm not used to seeing so many people in one place, and although I'm sure you're very nice the feeling of excitement that I get right now sort of the same as being charged by lioness certainly can't put the genie back in the box. She's even sold the rights for an upcoming movie. One Reese Witherspoon is producing. Hollywood though is a different animal that she's used. Owns remains a nature grew apart. Happiest way out yard, just like her mother or waste your dinner. Boy, this is where the credits right here. This is finally found it took a lifetime. I'm Jane Pauley. Thank you for listening, and please join us again next Sunday morning.

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Alexandra America president NAT king Cole New Jersey Delia Owens Ernie Andrews Georgia Jane Pauley University College Dublin Barron Hof Tracy Smith Jim Axelrod cancer HBO Tony HALE Alexandra velours Charles Brown Alicia Valois
CBS Sunday Morning February 17, 2019

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

50:55 min | 1 year ago

CBS Sunday Morning February 17, 2019

"Today's Sunday morning podcast is sponsored by prudential. What would you do if you had to choose between saving for your kids, college or your own retirement with the cost of a four year degree estimated to be over two hundred thousand dollars in eighteen years? It's a real decision. Many families must make at prudential. We wanna make sure your biggest financial goals never have to come at the expense of one another because financial wellness means planning for their future, and yours. Get started today at prudential dot com slash plan for both credential insurance company of America Newark, New Jersey. Good morning. I'm doing, paulie. And this is Sunday morning tomorrow. We celebrate presidents day honoring all our nation's presidents. Especially are very first, George Washington. We've all heard about Washington's long-standing marriage to Martha Custos less well known or some other possible. Romantic exploits, Jim Axelrod will report our cover story. He was the father of our country and the husband of Martha. But who remembers George Washington's I love there's never any mention Mary Phillips has she been forgotten and didn't her novel author Mary county imagines George Washington as you've never seen him. He stroked the side of her face. He felt her shiver. So revolutionary passion. This president's day weekend ahead on Sunday morning. Dionne Warwick has a singer who spin entertaining audiences for more than half a century this morning. She speaks for the record with our Morocco. You see the in down and out. The songs are unforgettable. Singer unmistakable. To say the fact that you can't really be categorized. You can't Amen. Them for being a box singular life. And voice of Dionne Warwick on had on Sunday morning. Well, the Oscar call for the envelope. Please bring best actress honors to Melissa McCarthy if so she'll be reaping the rewards of playing against type as Lee Cowan will show us. You're gonna pay me five thousand dollars. Hockey about. Not used to seeing Melissa McCarthy playing an alcoholic petty criminal. But she says this is as rewarding role as she's ever had and do love the underdog. And I love showing those undervalued people in those women that we don't give always full credit. I love to show them at the end in a very different place. The funny thing about Melissa McCarthy's Monceau funny south later on Sunday morning. On the heels of President Trump's wall declaration, Jeff glor- explores our southern border with author Don Winslow, Steve Hartman, finds a quiet sign of the times. We'll take in the exhibit that forever changed our definition of art and more all coming up. When are Sunday morning podcast continues. Where fairly sure on this precedent? Stay eve that the story of a young George Washington chopping down. Cherry tree is a myth, which brings us to this morning's mystery to George Washington love Mary Phillips. Our cover story is reported by Jim Axelrod, when it comes to the familiar portrait of the father of our country, the model of virtue in resolve who could not tell a lie. He stroked the side of her face. He felt her shiver. Maybe just maybe we didn't get the whole picture. He felt her relaxing his arms soften. It turns out of Hugh years before Martha Mary Elisa Phillips. My font heart overflows with joy to see you she smiled and her lips trembled. There was Mary. This is a massive amount of land that Marielle her family owned a quarter. Million acres of land all along the Hudson river in her debut novel. Dear George, dear Mary author. Mary Calvi rights of Washington's I love Mary Elisa Phillips, one of the wealthiest women in the colonies, what do we learn couldn't tell a lie across the Delaware. Martin. There's never any mention Mary Phillips. Why is that? Why has she been forgotten in the eighteen hundreds? She's written in every book. There is that I could find about George Washington. And yet since then I feel like she's sort of been left out of history. Calvi wants to put her back with a love story that begins in seventeen fifty six as the newly minted French and Indian war hero. Colonel George Washington is passing through New York. He stops for a party in his honor possibly Phillips manor. A mansion in Yonkers when he meets the heiress who lives there. Sparks fly was George Washington sex. George Washington stud that can seventeen hundreds zero. You kidding women wanted a touch of him as what was said. But Washington sense of duty to the king of England trumped cupid. If this guy has fallen for this heiress, and he make plans to take some leave. Go check on this potential love of your life. Coach Washington requests time off ten days twelve days fourteen days, and he writes us commanders. He's denied every time. When Mary married a British officer Roger Morris, two years later, Washington quit his command perhaps according to Mary Calvi changing the course of history, they really took away freedoms to be able to follow his heart. It's a story that has long fascinated Calvi who like Mary Philip. Grew up in Yonkers and where she's the first lady married to the mayor, Mike Spano when my husband was inaugurated as mayor I asked the question, isn't it true that George Washington once court at the who lived here it was urban legend. And when we couldn't find the answers and substantiate that story, I let me try to research shit on my own for three and a half years Calvi sorted through thousands of letters publications and journal entries. This CDS to news in her spare time since she already had a day job cowbys an anchor at the CBS station in New York City. This is not what I do for a living. So I had all of the research done and I thought well come each kid a shot. She wanted her work of fiction backed up by as many facts as she could find the NFL. She didn't always like where those facts took her. This is exactly the room. Liked to this mansion in Harlem in seventeen seventy six twenty years after George and Mary's relationship failed to blossom Washington outmanned and underresourced was fighting to keep the British from capturing Manhattan, the mansion perched on the highest point in the city made up perfect headquarters the New York harbor you'll see Harlem river, you'll see Hudson river. And so if you're looking for the enemy, you would see them coming from here and the mansion was owned by none other than Mary Phillips. Where was Mary Phillips when George Washington decided to move in? So the question that's when I went into the documents to try to figure out things were getting even more complicated for both Mary's Phillips and Kathy the author knew that Martha Washington was back in Virginia. Kenya for her own safety. And that Phillips has been was in England. No one knows for sure where Mary Phillips was. But Calvi had an idea she wasn't upstate with her sister. And she wasn't in Yonkers with her brother. So it is possible. That George Washington moved into mansion in Harlem in which is I love was living at the time. George Washington is here living in a bedroom down the hall using this as his office at the same time that his first love may very well be living in this house. Now, you're saying I know what you're thinking and cats what I could see in the documents. You really could see if you were here. This makes a lot of senses headquarters. Right. Historian, Richard Brooke Heiser, one of the world's preeminent, George Washington. Scholars confirms George and Mary Phillips were an item in seventeen fifty six, but says well historical fiction is one thing is it possible. They shared this house. We don't have any evidence of it is Stoorikhel fact or is quite another. I think she's found a possibility for a good work of fiction until we find some letter. Dear Mary, you know, so nice to see you after so many decades, it's not going to enter the historical record not saying it didn't happen. Just saying we can't say it did happen. There are rigorous standards for something to enter the historical record. That's right. And this doesn't get over that bar. Not yet. We can still look still as we Mark that two hundred eighty seventh birthday of George Washington. Mary Calvi has a story that seeks to liberate the historical figure from the marble that so often in cases is legacy. You look almost pain too. I was so torn when I found this information out, I was really a bit of a quandary, truthfully. As to what to do with this inclination because you didn't want to be the one suggesting other George Washington, the father of our country was carrying on. Well, because I'm the first one to say it there's something really uncomfortable about that for me night turn to dawn she had fallen asleep in his arms. The last small flame was burning out in the hearth. He walked over to the fireplace placed white Birch logs into it. And waited to be assured. The glow did not go dark. And now a page from our Sunday morning almanac. February seventeenth nineteen thirteen one hundred six years ago today the day, a landmark art exhibit opened at the sixty ninth regiment armory in New York. Known forever after as the armory show the exhibition presented nearly fourteen hundred works by simply put a who's who of on guard artists. Everyone from Picasso Matisse to Van Gogh and Kandinsky visitors. It turned out we're less than ready. Twenty five years of autism activity was telescope and thrown at the American public at once, and they will very confused other Milton Brown wrote a book about the armory show and talk to Sunday morning back in nineteen eighty eight on the show seventy fifth anniversary with mocking cartoons and fearmongering headlines. Formulating critics skewered that first armory show. Marcel Duchamp, new descending. A staircase seemed to provoke particular bewilderment. I think people thought that if they put find the new they understand what modern aunt was about and nineteen sixty three CBS news. Correspondent Charles Collingwood was able to confront to shop in person realize at the time as you do Sean that this would create such a furor not the slightest bit Valen painting and his twenty six years old, and there's public to receive it today that did not exist in continuing recent tradition. A new armory show will open in New York in just a few weeks. Only not at the armory and presumably not with all that fuss. President Trump has touched off a heated debate with his national emergency to fund a border wall. A certain bestselling author has long been committing his border knowledge to find print shares his thoughts with CBS evening news anchor. Jeff glor-. Tell me where we are. Here in the big nowhere. The heat in the windy, southern California desert's hundred nine right now is searingly familiar to done Winslow Nexico just across those hills. And these are drug trails coming about Mexico. By foot mule force all-terrain vehicles, usually come at night, the drug trills almost like snake tracks. They do that tell you what they are Winslow now sixty five and a bestselling author has been a third of his life at our southern border writing to critically acclaimed novels based on what he's seen after more than two decades. He thought he'd exhausted the topic. I swore I promise to myself. I promise to my wife. I wasn't going into another one about the border about drugs. But there was more story to be told. He tells that story in the border out later this month, his crime trilogy will soon be made into big budget movies by acclaimed director. Ridley Scott gets about internal borders about ethical borders. Moral borders political borders, and whether we cross them or not. And if we cross them can we ever cross back winslow's been a fierce critic of President Trump. He even got a full page ad in the New York Times criticising his border policies. We want to stop drugs. We wanna stop traffickers, we want to stop criminals from coming in walls. Save lives. Jim Agean saying wall out there someday. No. Then on every mile of the sport every month. Let's go to cloud-cuckoo-land for awhile and say, you could build that wall build it as high as you want deep as you want wide as you want. It has gates. Jeff, those gates are always open. Winslow believes a wall would make the drug situation worse by driving small-time smugglers into the hands of big time dealers. What we critically have to understand is that a border is also something that joins two communities to countries into cultures. We forget that. Sometimes if completely forgotten it what is it that people don't understand about? What's happening there right now there is no invasion of the United States through this border. These are not armed people. These are people for the most part hard working family people trying to find a better life, something we used to welcome in this country. Are they're bad people in these caravans are there some criminals, of course, I would also argue to you there were bad people on the Mayflower. There are bad people who came into Ellis Island. But that's what built this country. Done Winslow didn't expect to be spending his sixties speaking his mind about politics with twenty one novels to his name. He is now one of the most intimate crime writers in America. But for many years, it wasn't that way. You're late bloomer? Yeah. Overnight success. But it was an Arctic night in the job of of always wanted. You know, and I'm grateful now that I have it, you know, it took the world along time to agree with me that you know, I should be a writer, but he knew from the beginning spout. Six or seven years old six or seven. Yeah. My dad was a sailor who loved books, that's what he wanted to float around on the water read books. My mother was a librarian. We were always encouraged to read we're always allowed to read anything we wanted. And I thought you know, if I could make my living telling stories, that's the way I'd like my life to go Winslow published his first book in nineteen Ninety-one. He sold just enough to pay the bills but kept at it. There have been multiple times. I think when you've thought about packing it in. Yeah. Giving up. Yeah. And so what is it that gets you through that you just just continuing to work. Yeah. Right in new book, stop complaining, stop thinking, just work. That's it. That's always it. It's four miles finally to the four years ago. Winslow hit the big time. Exactly. The blockbuster international bestseller. We had a cartel markers. You don't share this much? Never shared it with anybody before you. It's this view. He says in the hills east of San Diego that gives him his inspiration. It's a lot of times where I come to think where come to create characters characters like those in his 2017 bestseller. The force Don Winn flow, a raw and profane tale of an anti hero Cobb in New York City, four AM when the city that never sleeps at least lies down. The novel is set in upper Manhattan where Winslow once worked is a private investigator. It describes a heroin mill run out of an apartment complex this area works because of its location, you're very near several major highways remarkably just before the book was published a real life heroine wasn't covered in the very building wins. They'll use to base his fictional building. Reading the newspaper, and bam those major heroin bust. I think twenty two pounds right here. Coincidence, maybe more likely the product of winslow's meticulous research team of one. He spends years digging for details. This was the gestation office the writing twelve hours a day in an old converted gestation near his California home, you're addicted to it. I think diction might be the accurate phrase. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it's an addiction. My love doing it. A love. A passion. It's given done Winslow a platform to speak his mind, not interested in apologizing. Interested in regrets. But I'm not saying I'm sorry about anything. I've written or anything. I've said. Guess this is the awkward moment portion of evening. Yup. Illumine question who gets Philip Dover? It's Sunday morning on CBS. And here again is Jane Pauley Melissa McCarthy showed off her comic skills. Opposite Billy Gardell in the popular CBS sitcom, Mike and Molly. So it would be quite a turnaround next. Sunday's coal for the envelope. Please brings McCarthy an Oscar for a very different sort of role. Here's Lee Cowan. At the bookshop at north Hollywood, California. You can find just about anything. Including on this day. Actress Melissa McCarthy. Thanks so much. See is buying actual books with actual pages tablets aren't her think every weekend we try to go to a bookstore. So wants to my husband's really good about it. I don't know I need to I need a real book needed tangible book. Thank you. Thank you books are great. But she enjoys studying people been more I read somewhere that you have a real obsession with. Observing people who really just don't care. Don't care what they look like they don't care what they say. They don't care what they eat Drake. Whatever. It's also a hobby for you're watching a hobby, and it's gotten harder since I'm a little since this is a little more recognizable. My husband many says been like you cannot follow like you. Now, you get caught more and with some of those characters that you would stock, but they mainly they make they make it into some of your other characters. Like, I think I think when I really see like a a mannerism or just a way somebody carries themselves. I really I tend to keep like playing it over and over. She's megan. I'm I want apologize. I'm not even confident which in that came out of Whitney back to you. I'm sorry McCarthy's characters cringe-worthy, if they are loveable our collection, the bits and pieces of people she's gathered along the way. I get it. You'd will little tastes Tammy. Come clamouring back from more. But for all her outrageous hilarity. Perseus is capable of some Oscar worthy subtlety to skill. She shows up in her latest performance, can you ever forgive me? You've actually carried nine books here, and you are lea- Israel. We have copies of your latest work right over there. Mccarthy is up for an Academy Award for her portrayal of lia's real the true story of a caustic bestselling biographer who inter later years typed, her way into a life of petty crime embellishing literary letters writers within the first fifteen pages of the script. I just thought I like her quite a bit. I'm not sure why. And I thought I don't know what I'm fully rooting for all ready the real life. We Israel made a name for self righting profiles of celebrities, including actress, Tulu banquet and gossip columnist Dorothy Kilgallen. But when her biography of makeup mogul, Estee Lauder flopped, Israel found herself on welfare began fabricating letters typed correspondence from celebrities like Louise Brooks at the Ferber and no coward. And then scammed New York City booksellers into mine as the genuine article, he's wonderful. I thought to name your price for letters. Do you think are still out there? But got it left to know. I think there's quite a bit of them hanging hanging on people's walls, proudly proudly and now maybe even strangely. It's like could make them even a little better. A story within the story. Action lily fervor Dorothy Parker. Marland isn't. He's yearly or is no coward. Over the course of three years, Israel carefully. Crafted more than four hundred fakes making you're one of the most prolific literary forgers in history of the people. I mean what I'm sure come home. Nobody's buying Lee. Israel lettuce. She did do some damage to the literary community even though she didn't see it that way. Now, she didn't. And I guess I don't. But I mean clearly on her side. She Griff did people. There's I'm not saying that it's okay. What she did. It's the gentlest gripped. I've ever heard of that. People got conned, and they don't take that lightly. But also she she was in absolutely desperation. You'd never know it from a writing though, which was desperately good take this letter Israel claimed was written by cetera. Dorothy parker. Dear Joshua, pal and told me to write in apologize. I have a hangover that is a real museum piece. I'm sure I must have said something terrible to save me. This kind of exertion in the future. I am thinking of having little letters runoff saying can you ever forgive me Dorothy? But until I do that can you ever forgive me Dorothy. She was such a talented writer such an incredible writer and so- witty. I mean, she was covering these lines in these incredibly funny replies. And she was really really good. You'd so was McCarthy's performance if you go by the award recognition in addition to her Oskar nod, she was also nominated for a sag BAFTA and golden glow all a pretty dark role that some see as far different from her comedic bread and butter. There's no difference for me in preparation of. If it's, you know on paper a comedic role or dramatic role. I still think you'd build them the same way in even with all the companies I've done they spend more time thinking about what makes them scared or when they feel vulnerable than I ever do about. Like, what makes them funny in fact in the nineties after a stint of doing stand up in New York City clubs, but Carthy actually found drama refuge. I really did all dramatic work on stage in New York for years and years off Broadway, pretty grim. They're pretty grim. The theaters. Oh, yeah. It was themselves. Oh, there were all it was like the darker, the more Macab, I could do the more. I just loved it. I mean, the interest was an is always someone who's much further from myself. We Israel is light years away from the midwest nice of McCarthy to an alcoholic big city. Porcupine died largely alone in twenty fourteen. After finally writing her own memoir, outlining the gritty details of her literary larceny. But at the end of the day read the book, and it does not contrite really about what she did. She actually kind of bragging about it. She's she's she'd never ever took back. The writing was good someone just recently sent me a letter that she'd written, and she mentioned I've gotten myself into a bit of trouble with some writing. And then there's some line after it basically saying, however, the writing was good in the letters are great. When line here was particularly clever. Don't you think caustic wit, you know, cost to quit as my religion Carthy doesn't excuse Israel's crimes, but she hopes the movie might serve as a reminder that there is talent in all of us, even those who are unlikable, maybe even criminal want. But we all do to be seen. I just want people to look up and notice people feel like we're so separate now. And I do think all the time like look up. Anyone you don't know who's passing you? You could be passing Lee Israel, who is sugar to be more interesting and smarter and funnier than than the average than the average person. So don't don't underestimate people. From Steve Hartman this morning. A sign of the times at the end of is Lincoln road in Newton Massachusetts lives a little girl near and dear to the neighborhood two year old Samantha savitz is deaf. But boy does she love to talk to anyone who knows sign language her parents Raphael, and Glenda, she's super engaging. She wants to chat up with anybody. Yeah. Her whole personality change at someone who can communicate with our likewise, if someone can't. Well, that makes Sam just the little sad. Her desire for engagement has been painfully obvious to everyone in the neighborhood whenever they see her on a Walker inner yard and Sam tries to be neighborly. They find themselves at a frustrating loss for words. What to say back, wouldn't you like to talk to her basic conversation that one would have with the child her about her day and make a feel it? She is part of the neighborhood just be her friend. Unfortunately, this isn't something you can solve with a casserole you'd need the whole community to learn sign language just for a little two year old girl can expect neighbors to do that. You can only appreciate them when they do. On their own SAM's neighbors got together hired an instructor and are now fully immersed in an American sign language class. The teacher Reese McGovern says this is remarkable. Because a lot of times even the parents of deaf. Children don't bother to learn sign language, but here Sam has a full community that signing and communicating with her and her family, and it is a beautiful story. And he says this level of inclusion will almost certainly guarantee a happier. More well-adjusted Sam. Which is why her parents say there aren't words in any language to express their gratitude. It's really shocking and pita fall. We are so fortunate. In fact, they say they're already seeing a difference in their daughter just here when she comes in at the end of class, the first thing, she says to us is friend. I think your heart would melt just as minded. Sometimes it feels like America is losing its sense of community. But then you hear about a place like this where the village it takes to raise a child is alive. And well and here to remind us that what makes a good neighborhood is nothing more than good neighbors. It's Sunday morning on CBS. And here again is Jane Pauley. Day war Warwick, built her career on hits like that one right now. She's looking back with our Morocco. Recording studio in nineteen sixty six. A classic comes to life. With Hal David's words hurt back. Rex music and Dionne Warwick's voice. I'd say a little prayer would go from work in progress. To a pop standard. When I go to be fitted for again. Nobody can wear that gown, but me. David and very back record songs for Dion Warwick, and nobody can single songs, but. That's because no one else sounds like Dionne Warwick. Over six decade career. She's charted fifty-six hits in the billboard top one hundred and won five Grammy awards with songs that generations have swayed to do. Sob too. Love. I say it all the time. And I truly mean it to be a part of people smile times and their lives. You can't beat it. We joined Warwick near her home in south, orange, New Jersey, not far from the church where it all began. How old were you? When you started singing in church six six years old. Yeah, I'm standing books. So that people could see me over the lectern and also hope and one I and notice everybody was smiling. And that was my very first standing ovation. By eighteen she was suing backup for Sam Cooke. Ray Charles and the exciter. Voice was distinctive to remain in the background for long. And it was exactly what the songwriting team of Bert back rack and how David needed were. You surprised that they wanted you to sing lead vocal? Yeah. Well, I mean, I haven't ACLU's why he chose me. But I didn't read me sick songs are not that easy to Ren Disley easy, saying don't make. Don't make. Nine hundred sixty three the trio put out their first release. Don't make me over her actual last name Warrick was misspelled on the album type type and w instead of an hour. And then it'd be more back and said, I can't instead her the name stuck. So did the success? Each time. Walk on by is a song about someone who's been jilted. Right. It's a way of saying, you know, what? Good. What was the back Iraq David song? You'll like singing the most on. Well, not all of them except to say. To send those. Yes. Justice apprised as you. Why does she hate it? Whoa. Whoa. Will alot. No. I don't think you've had this. If Warwick seems unclassifiable unique in sound and style it may be because of the surprising variety of musical mentors who raised her her godmother was Sarah Vaughan twos. Ances- to us all blue eyes himself took her under his wing tonight. Fiction instill refer to poppy, I became his surrogate child screen legend Marlene Dietrich taught her how to dress too. Must be cooked too. And Lena Horne? She says gave her the most valuable advice of all what did Lena Horne? Teach. You always always. You cannot be anywhere. But. And nineteen Seventy-three being Dion meant breaking with back. Racking David was at a tricky period for you. In the what it was actually a blessing gave me an opportunity to enjoy my own have my babies. After a hiatus Warwick back and in a big way, the nineteen seventy four she had her first number one. Then came you. Some. Seems that. That was followed by a couple of Grammy winners. Great song deja vu. So it was like oh really didn't need that crack David to continue her career. No, I didn't. Warwick would reunite with back rack for the most popular song of nineteen eighty six. Gladys Knight Elton, John and Stevie Wonder, that's what friends are helped raise awareness and money for aids research. Warwick was also the host of TV's dance music show, solid gold. The new edition of psychic friends network and more controversial as the pitchwoman for the psychic friends network. How do you look back at that? Experience was wonderful. Made a wonderful living exposure was incredible. You know, though, people forgot that sang for living that was a psychic. She's comfortable talking about that experience. But not much else. That's personal. How's your love life? It is. All right. Very well. I'm glad to hear it. She declared bankruptcy battled with the IRS. And in two thousand twelve her cousin superstar Whitney Houston died. What are your memories of Whitney Houston as girl and today deeply still do? No, it's like talented young lady gorgeous to look at. She's a sweetheart. And we'll always be and that's about what's it all about. At seventy eight and a proud grandmother Dionne Warwick still performs and has a new album coming out this year. He shot. We've been listening to her for so long. She's become a part of our lives. I like me and. Apparently, all those who I call my friends. You got a lot of friends kinda like the n to always begin. Morocco. And I've got a brand new podcast. It's all about the people who have long fascinated me. The one thing they've got in common. They're all had the name brand new podcast mo- Pichu Aries from the twentieth. Century's greatest entertainer. He was everything. I mean, he could play any instrument. He could dance like a maniac to the founding father who just doesn't seem to get much respect. This guy did everything wrong. So there's no statue there's no signature on the declaration of independence. You'll learn new things about people you thought you knew what you wear that the day of your inauguration, Audrey Hepburn died. You'll learn about people who aren't real they did not have room in the writing for the older brother because the funds became the older, brother. So join me this premier season of mobile Aries. Roses, a red violets are blue. But for a real fashion statement, faith, Sailly tells us to think paint. Consider pink the color of flowers, ballet, shoes and candy hearts. So how do you explain this pink is the most divisive color in American society, people either love pink or they hate it. Valerie Steele, curated a recent exhibition about the shade at the fashion institute of technology in New York. How can anyone object to pink will because people object to the stereotypes pink? These associations of dumb, immature girls than a lot of girls and women go that's not me, but still says pink entered the world, gender free and has led quite a colorful life. People want to believe very simple stories about colour, and in fact, like culture, in general, it's more complicated. In the eighteenth century and expensive South American die made pink fabric. Chic Paris was the center of fashion, and so became the ultra fashionable color men. More women were boys girls wart interiors were paying so it wasn't about gender. It was about class. It was about being fashionable and aristocratic just after the civil war pink hit mainstream America in the novel Little Women, one of the characters has twins a girl and boy, Amy put a blue ribbon on the boy and pink on the girl, French fashion. So you could always to buy eighteen forties. The French had decided pink was for girls or women and blue for boys be Americans decided that you could really make money out of color coding children's clothes. But I there was confusion many stores in America thought pink was for boys and the other. Go on and on and on Pincus for girls and blue is for boys. Little boy blue come blow your horn, if Pincus for girls the die, shall we say was cast businesses. Started seeing green once pink was linked with notions of sugar and spice and everything. Nice. There's a lot of inertia in an association like that. Once it's established. It's tough for it to change. But decades later a little girl bounded on the scene who shook up pink sweet image. Kirsi an ele- ways. I am six I think she basically owned version of pink and said pink can also be mischievous who could be a little bit more playful atom alter teaches marketing at NYU stern school of business. That was a really good thing for the color pink. Gave it this extra dimension. And meant that pink. Didn't just mean being very well behaved in doing exactly the right single the time. It also meant being yourself. And being the real version of who you are when we started the book, the concept of the background color was never planned this will empower little girls, but it did Hillary Knight created the illustrations for the book. Louise, he decided she'd be only black white and bathed in bright pink, the book became a sensation. Life magazine published six pages directly from the book. It was on the best seller list. Think think pink when you shop for some clothes and its author Kay Thompson became a movie star playing fashion editor with a rosy idea. Forget them deal. Assess black addressed everybody knew about Ella is and the color paint. It is why she is saying pink, but nineteen fifties America had a less spirited message to spread pink became a part of a whole sort of feminine mystique push women back in the home and get them to do feminine things. And so began pinks well dark period while some of the gentler sex embraced pink, some sixties feminists. Soulread? So when the little girls wanna buy all, the pink toys a lot of mothers, go. I don't really like that kind of bubble gum Barbie thing. I don't want my daughter to just buy into that. That is until recently. Whoever said orange is the new pink with seriously disturbed as filmmakers began to celebrate the shades smarts resume. Pink sent it. I think it gives it a little something extra. And it's sass. We want to invite you to have lunch with us on Wednesdays. We were pick their emphasizing their girls on their girls empowered. Especially girls and women with a 'cause the pink ribbon brought awareness to breast cancer and other groups saw its power a lot of activist movements have embraced pink as a political color for women when you saw all of those pink pussy hats, you realize if you want to be noticed, we're pink and Valerie Steele says that leaves everyone in the pink over the last twenty years different genders sexualities and racist have gotten together and said pink doesn't have to be childish and feminine pink can be powerful and trudge Innis, political cool is kind of a dream color. Now thoughts on President Trump's declaration of a national emergency. From Norman Ornstein political scientist at the American Enterprise Institute. So we're going to be signing. Today. And registering. National emergency in a rambling announcement on Friday. President Trump said that despite signing the compromise funding Bill he would still declare a state of emergency to build his border wall. A president invoking. Emergency powers is not new over the past hundred years presidents have done. So dozens of times from FDR to prevent a run on banks to George W Bush allowing warrantless wiretaps after nine eleven to Obama on the swine flu epidemic. Thirty still remain technically in effect, even where presidents overreached like Harry Truman slap down by the supreme court after seizing steel mills during the Korean war. They had valid loss to rely on an urgent reasons to act this is different in his answers Friday to reporters questions Trump gave away the game. I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn't need to do this. But I'd rather do it much faster. I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn't need to do this. But I would. Rather do it much faster? This is not trivial if the president can succeed with this voluntary state of emergency. He is setting the table for something. Much more dangerous. Emergency powers are sweeping a president may seize property institute. Martial law control, all transportation, and communication and much more. All these emergency powers are there. Under an assumption that a president puts the nation's interests first respects, the other branches of government and the rule of law. What if we have a president who does not fit that description? There are guardrails in place. Congress can pass a joint resolution racing an emergency declaration. That will no doubt be vetoed by President Trump and to override that veto. We'll take at least a third of Republicans who've shown no interest in checking this president. Then we have the judiciary from says he expects the supreme court to rescue him. If the five Republican appointed justices uphold this order, they're saying an affect. That presidential power is unlimited. There is no article one of the constitution establishing the powers of congress making congress meaningless pay attention, our fundamental freedoms could be at stake. I'm Jane Pauley. Thank you for listening, and please join us again next Sunday morning.

New York City Colonel George Washington Dionne Warwick Don Winslow CBS Mary Elisa Phillips President Trump George Washington America Mary Calvi president Melissa McCarthy Martha Mary Elisa Phillips California Morocco Manhattan Jane Pauley Melissa McCarthy Israel Washington Lee Cowan
Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings 2019-11-21

The Takeaway

37:03 min | 9 months ago

Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings 2019-11-21

"Where does the impeachment inquiry go from? Here everyone was in the loop. It was no secret. Everyone was informed armed via email on July nineteen days before the presidential call. I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for November twenty. I will walk you through. What's up next on Capitol Hill also on the show Gordon? Silence path to the White House has put a spotlight on the pay to play world of us. Ambassadorships bashers like Woody Johnson to the Kingdom Jaime McCarthy US ambassador to France their big donors they've already given hundreds of thousands of the twenty twenty reelection fund and and while the threat of natural disasters is growing throughout the country. Recovery aid is not being distributed equally. US citizens receive twenty six dollars per person per a year from the federal government while tribal citizens receive approximately three dollars per person. So that's one of the gaps that we found When it comes to disaster aid alright everybody? Let's get started while yesterday's hearings are a tough act to follow today. Two more key witnesses or closing out the busy week we heard from. I'm David Holmes a career diplomat and political counselor at the US Embassy. In Ukraine beginning in March two thousand nineteen situation at the embassy and Ukraine changed changed dramatically specifically the three priorities of security economy and justice and our support for Ukrainian Democratic resistance to Russian aggression became overshadowed by political agenda promoted by former New York New York City. Mayor Rudy Giuliani at cadre of officials operating with direct channel to the White House and Dr Few hill the former top Russia advisor to the trump White House who worked under John. Bolton Hill recounted a heated July tenth conversations she had had with Bolton over Gordon Sunland Mick Mulvaney role in the White House is Ukraine policy. Specific instruction was that I had to go to the lawyers to John. Eisenberg America was senior counsel for the National Security Council. To basically say you tell Eisenberg Ambassador Bolton told me that I am not part of the this whatever drug deal real mulvaney in sunland cooking up. What did you understand them to mean by the drug deal that Mulvaney Sawn Lynn were cooking up I took it to me? Investigations Russians for a meeting Byron Tau is a reporter for the Wall Street Journal covering the Justice Department and the FBI Byron thanks for coming back on the takeaway. Thanks for having me. We just heard Dr Hill talking about her July tenth conversation with former National Security Adviser John Bolton reminded us the importance of that conversation. Well that conversation was one of many incidents that are under investigation by the House. Lead the how the Democratic led House Intelligence Elgin's committee Namely that meeting was important because it was one where the two different sides of the Ukrainian policymaking Elsie making apparatus or came together in this meeting with some Ukrainian officials who were visiting Washington DC The ambassador Gordon. Sawn Lynn Glenn was sort of pushing this what he described in his testimony as a quid pro quo and you see Other officials including John Bolton and Fiona Hill wanting to distance themselves from it one person whose name has come up repeatedly throughout all of the testimony is Rudy Giuliani former. US mayor and of course I Trump's personal attorney Hill has already said in her closed door testimony that she was alarmed by Giuliani's role in the US Ukraine policy. But she also referred to Gordon Sunland as a national security risk. What were her concerns with? Both of them. I think her concerns were essentially that this was an irregular channel That was possibly being manipulated by foreign officials Indeed she testified On on Thursday. The same thing that there was this prosecutor in Ukraine who wanted to hang onto his position and he was essentially using Rudy Giuliani and and others as essentially a tool In order to hang onto his position and and sort of derail. US policy. And I think that was what her concern. Ah was both then and now one of the narratives that we've seen emerge at least from the the Republicans in the house is that of the Ukraine being the WHO interfered in the two thousand sixteen election and hill had some pretty strong words To say to that. Let's take a listen to what she had to say. And the cost of this investigation investigation. I would ask that you please not promote politically driven falsehoods so clearly advanced. Russian interest as Republicans Democrats have agreed for decades Ukraine is a valued partner the United States and it plays an important role in our national security and as I tell the committee last month I refuse to be part of an effort to legitimize an alternate narrative that the Ukrainian in government is a US advisory and Ukraine. Not Russia attacked us in two thousand sixteen these fictions harmful even if they're deployed for purely domestic political purposes purposes Byron. What are you make of those comments? I mean she's clearly stating that. It was not Ukraine who interfered in the two thousand sixteen election and instead it was Russia yet though she didn't name names. Those comments were squarely aimed at the Republican allies of President Trump on the committee who In the course Savini of these hearings have suggested that the president may have had good reason to be concerned about what Ukraine may or may not have done in the two thousand sixteen election and these are some very forceful comments from a top national security professional That those allegations. That Ukraine interfered in the two thousand sixteen election. Shen on behalf of Hillary Clinton have no real basis in reality and that the main driver of foreign election interference wasn't fact Russia. We also a diplomat. David Holmes Talk about the July Twenty six phone call that he overheard between Gordon Sunland and president trump and home says that after that someone told him. The president didn't care about Ukraine but he only cared about quote big stuff that benefits. The President Lake the quote Biden investigation. And that goes against the Republican narrative. The president trump only cared about Ukrainian corruption. Right that's right and not just Did homes testimony. Make this point but Gordon. Silence testimony also made this point when he said repeatedly that the thing Rudy Giuliani was interested in was not that the investigations themselves into Perez MMA or the Biden's were conducted but the fact that there was an announcement of them meaning that that was useful for her sort of domestic political purposes But the actual investigations were not something. That Rudy Giuliani was tremendously concerned. About and so this does go to the heart of The Democratic Case that this is not concerned about corruption it is in fact They were looking for a talking point for the twenty twenty election about Biden and his sons activities subodh. Well here's where it gets even more interesting we heard yesterday and Gordon. Silence testimony that Gordon Sunlen repeatedly said that he Did did not realize that. An investigation into Burris. MMA was also an investigation into the Biden's he made that clear in his testimony. Daniel Goldman Council Yes today. Brought up the same issue between Hill and homes. Let's hear a clip from what From that exchange Ambassadors Volcker and Sunland Onlin have tried to draw a distinction between their understanding of the connection between Barista in the Biden's but Dr Hill. Was it apparent to you do that when president trump rudy. Giuliani or. Anyone else was pushing for an investigation into Barista that the reason why they wanted that investigation related to do what President Trump said here. The Biden's it was very apparent to me that that was what Rudy Giuliani intended. Yes intended to convey that Barista was linked to the Biden's and he he said this publicly repeatedly Mr Holmes you also understood that Burrito was code for Biden's yes and do you think that anyone involved in Ukraine matters in the spring and the summer would understand that as well yes so Byron yesterday in Sunland testimony. He kept referring to the fact that everyone was in the loop. It seems like when when it comes to whether Burrito was a direct connected to the Biden's seems like there was a disconnect there. How significant is this contradiction? Were hearing here from Hill and homes to what Sunland Thailand said yesterday. Well it's very significant because a number of these officials you've noted including Gordon Silent Kurt Volker and others have tried to distance themselves elves from this idea that they knew very early that the president and others were referring to the Biden's when they were using the term Barack Obama And you you know Rudy Giuliani and others made no secret as early as May or even before that that They wanted this investigation into corruption that it was directly linked to Joe Biden son Hunter Biden and his role on the board of this energy company. so it does go to show that it You know a lot of this was public a long time ago in that most of the people who were paying attention to Ukraine policy understood exactly what was going on and of course it has come up and testimony testimony that with a simple Google search For Barack Obama. You would clearly see that Hunter Biden was at least a part of the board of directors there our Democratic Council Goldman again seemed to be tying some of these theories about Ukraine's involvement in the two thousand sixteen election directly to Putin. Let's take a listen to that exchange and Dr Hill by promoting this theory of Ukrainian interference in the two thousand sixteen election was president trump. Adopting Vladimir Premier Putin's view over tone senior advisers and intelligence officials. I think we have to be very careful about the way that we phrased that what this is a view that President Putin and the Russian security services and many actors and Russia have promoted. But I think that vis view has also got some traction POPs in parallel on separately here in the United States and those two things have over time started to fuse together Byron. What stood out to you in that exchange because we know For example to bring up another moment in history here in the Muller Report It was clearly stated there that there was interference in our twenty sixteen elections. So what stood out to you about that exchange. Will I think what she was saying. There was essentially that this sort of alternate narrative. It was Ukraine that interfered in twenty sixteen election or may have interfered or allegedly interfered benefits Russia. which has consistently? He denied anything to do with election interference even though every body of the US government including the House Intelligence Committee has concluded that there was some sort of election interference now the scope of that interference or what their aims were. That's still disputed but no one who's looked at this really disputes That Russia interfered in the two thousand. Sixteen election rudy. Giuliani Has not been on television at much. But he was vocal on twitter yesterday today. During Gordon Sunland testimony. What was his What did he have to say? Byron actually didn't catch Guiliani said but essentially I mean the case. He's he's been making is in public. Is that nothing was wrong here. And that you know he was He's not responsible for any any of what's going on. Yeah one of the things that comes up a lot in this is whether or not Despite what the case is that the Democrats are laying out whether or not That's going to affect The Republican strategy at all whether they're going to reshape their talking points are not Devon Nunez has essentially said His opening statement it's been very similar for each of these For each of these witnesses. So I'm wondering. Do you see any of this having any effect whatsoever on the Republican strategy going forward well the Republican strategy has actually changed a little bit over time At first they were making process arguments. Now they seem to be moving towards defending the president on substance But it remains to be seen exactly how they're going to handle some of these very damaging allegations that witnesses who have paraded before their committee. They are making a about the president's conduct and the US policy towards Ukraine. Any sense when we might actually see him. Articles of impeachment drafted up. I think Democrats have said they'd like like to do this by the end of the year. Though that timeline is quite ambitious and we're coming up on that right now Byron Tau is reporter for the Wall Street Journal covering the Justice Department and the FBI Byron. Thanks so much thanks revenue. The ambassador Gordon Sunland has been at the center of this week's impeachment proceedings while the witnesses before him were all career diplomats with extensive. Track records in foreign service. Sunland is a wealthy West Coast hotel ear who donated a million dollars to trump's inaugural committee which helped him land his ambassadorship. Senator Ship silent leading role at the heart of this saga has put a new focus on the longstanding. Bipartisan practice of political appointments to overseas posts. Bachelor's there's like Woody Johnson to the United Kingdom Jaime McCarthy embassador France their big donors they've already given hundreds of thousands to the twenty twenty re election refund. There are people like Robin Bernstein and the Dominican Republic landmarks and South Africa. They belong to Mar-a-lago. That's two hundred grand joint. That was Jim. Axelrod axelrod chief investigative in senior national correspondent for CBS News. CBS recently uncovered emails from San Diego. Billionaire Doug Manchester. Who was nominated to be the the ambassador to the Bahamas? Manchester clear support from President trump but his nomination was held up in the Senate for more than two years and then in September. The Republican Looking National Committee reached out ahead of the RNC. Ron Daniel Sends Doug Manchester an email and it asks him for a half million dollars donation Manchester responded to the RMC and was very clear about what he wanted in exchange for his donation. But he says as you know I'm not supposed to do any but my wife is sending a contribution in for one hundred thousand dollars. Remember they've been asked for five hundred thousand assuming I get voted out of the Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday to the floor. We need you to have the majority leader to bring it to a majority vote. Once confirmed I. Our family will respond and wants. Congress found out about his email. The White House asked Manchester to withdraw for all his name from consideration. Manchester's example might seem extreme but the transactional nature of these appointments is not that unusual when it comes to presidents naming ambassadors theaters but under the trump administration. The number of political supporters who've been appointed to ambassadorships has gone up significantly for more more on this. I'm joined by Ryan scovill associate professor of law at Marquette University Ryan. Welcome to the show thank you thanks for having me. We're also joined by ambassador. Dennis Jett Professor International Affairs at Penn State and author of the Book American Ambassadors. The past present and future of America's diplomats welcome to the takeaway. Dennis thank you for having Ryen Ryan. Let's start with you. We said at the top political ambassadorships aren't a new phenomenon. How far back does this trend go? Well it extends almost as far back as the founding of the country itself These types of appointments were extremely common during the nineteenth century and they remained main common through the beginning of the twentieth century. since roughly The Nineteen Twenties and eighteen thirties. The percentage the political appointees has dropped pretty significantly to the point where over the last several decades. It's been approximately thirty percent of all ambassadorships But you history is pretty long standing ambassador jet We mentioned that these appointments are growing under president trump Quite a bit. You have worked in foreign service for decades decades you've worked in Argentina allow Liberia. Mozambique why is this. Pay To play system if you will so troubling for the foreign service well well. I think it's expected that the president will not name a certain amount of ambassadors political appointee ambassadors as opposed to career. Foreign Service officers officers. But I think what troubles me and other officers is when it's done on the basis of money if there's some obviously qualified person who has the the credentials to be an ambassador. That's one thing but if you have a real estate developer who gives a million dollars and catch the post because of that. That's something else. What is it about these posts that hold such a lawyer for wealthy donors ambassador because I can imagine you know if you're a young person looking to get into a career in foreign service it could be you know really exciting to think you'll be traveling around the world and all these posts that I just mentioned but if you've already got Pretty significant stash of wealth. Y White the ambassador. Well it's a fancy title that's something you put on Your Business Card and your resume and nobody has to remember your name. After that they all ambassador her and show for people with with a lot of money and and a low self-esteem or whatever their problem is they can they can buy the the title. Do Best do these political appointees I mean other than the fact that this is a fancy title and it has a lot of accolades and and mystery rounded. Did I mean they're actually D- depending on your ambassadorship. You actually have to get stuff done If you're not qualified to do that work does that have the potential to do damage to the US SS relationship with Whatever country you might be stationed in absolutely and I think it's A? It's a danger to national security when these people are are nominated and approved some Basseterre intercept. If you suggested that you're going to turn over the command of an aircraft carrier to a real estate developer because of political contribution everybody would go nuts but if if you turn over an embassy to a similar kind of person then people say oh well it's a diplomacy. It's you know that's endless. Cocktail parties and not not paying parking tickets. But the reality is you have to manage a complex organization the embassy and we'd like to think that the better our government functions the better off we all are and secondly you are the United States. You're the number one representative in the country. You're in and so people look to you and and reach conclusions about the the United States about its reliability about seriousness based on the image you project. And how will you do the Job Ryan you looked at the qualifications of political appointees and I'm wondering if you could Share with US whether or not. There's a connection between how much money they donated how wealthy the person is and what position. They end up receiving receiving. Well there has been as pretty significant development in qualifications over time if you were to compare the political political appointees under trump in Reagan for example you'd find that there's been Rozhin across the board that is trump's political appointees are not the same as the political appointees appointees that have been taking place under prior administrations they're not radically different. But there's been an incremental decrease in qualifications and that's true not only only with respect to language abilities prior experience in the receiving state or the region but also with respect to prior experience in foreign policy prior experience in organizational organizational leadership so There has been a very noticeable downward trajectory here in terms of the average qualifications of the political appointees Who Make it into office? There's one study that has found that. There's about a ten percent a decrease in the performance in office if you were to compare political appointees with career our appointees that is the political appointees are less successful And there's also evidence that there is a confluence of two significant trends here one a decrease in qualifications over time and then to alongside that a sharp increase in the average size of campaign contributions and this raises the possibility that campaign contributions. Are you know effectively creating pressure on the president to choose individuals based on how much money they're giving rather than whether they're qualified to serve In that in turn creates the possibility that performances essentially falling off as a result of these pressures to look for individuals who are contributing a lot of money. Embassador jet This is not a new tradition as we've been saying throughout the segment. This is something that has happened under multiple administrations it has seen an increase under the trump administration. But the part of the reason we're talking about this is because the United States Citizens yesterday watched ambassador Sunland Testify and he unlike many of the folks who came before him is not a career foreign service employees or diplomat. He was a donor of a million dollars to the trump campaign. So what was your assessment of how he conducted himself with respect to Ukraine. Well Ambassador Sunland is as qualified to be ambassador as I am to run a chain of hotels he he clearly doesn't get it he said. Yesterday I'm not a notetaker. I have all these conversations with heads of state and other important people but I don't bother to take notes when you are an official in the United States government. You are speaking not on your own behalf. But on behalf of the American people the American government and therefore you have an obligation to do things like take notes. So you know what's commitments are being made what's being said and and the policy is properly implemented and so I think he's just the latest this demonstration of somebody who's completely out of their depth even though you were sitting there smirking the whole time and obviously thinks because of his wealth. He's entitled to be arrogant as well as incompetent Ryan just wrapping up the segment here. We saw this issue play out for those who did not tire of politics yesterday. A. And Watch. The Democratic presidential debate came after the The testimony. Let's listen to a clip of Elizabeth Warren. And how she brought this up. How how Pat Basset are suddenly get there? You know. This is not a man who had any qualifications except one. He wrote a check for a million dollars. The whole notion that donors. I think they're going to get ambassadorships on the other side. Anyone who wants to give me a big donation. Don't ask to be ambassador because I'm not GonNa have that Happen Ryan. We've got thirty seconds. Is this going to take off in twenty twenty as a political issue. I would like to think so. I'm a little bit skeptical in part because this has been a recurring up political issue over the course of the past several decades. It seems to pop up any time. There's a controversial appointment. I would like to think that Congress could step in here to take take action and the presidential candidates themselves will repeat this promise but I'm not sure we will see I'm speaking with Ryan scovill associate professor of law at Marquette University ambassador. Dennis Coleman jet professor of international affairs at Penn State. Thanks to you both is the takeaway. I'm Tansy Hansie. Vega two hundred and fifty five million dollars of funding for minority serving institutions including historically black colleges and universities is being held up up in the Senate. The money is intended specifically to keep their science technology engineering and math or stem programs afloat. Federal funding for these programs expired on September thirtieth. And while there's been overwhelming bipartisan support for this funding Democrats and Republicans disagree on the logistics of how it should be passed last joining me. Now is Erica L. Greene and education reporter with the New York Times arrogant. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So what's the holdup here in the Senate Senate hold up is that there is an effort by a Republican lawmaker. Lamar Alexander Senator of Tennessee. Who who has been intent to get packages of the Higher Education Act passed? He feels very strongly that there will never be a comprehensive overhaul for this federal law which is outdated and he saw an opportunity to use the H. B. C. refunding which does have bipartisan support to introduce several other packages. That have bipartisan support. To get them all passed and Democrats. Don't believe that that's the way to go. They believe that this funding should be passed in a standalone bill and that they should deal with other parts of the more comprehensive law separately. How many students are we talking about in terms of The ones who would benefit from this funding between all of the colleges which rage Spec- US tribal colleges and Hispanic serving institutions about four million students who are attending these institutions across the country. A an offer fifty states. HP See us Generally at least have been struggling to different degrees with funding. How are they preparing for this delay in funding for stem from what I reporting suggests? HPC's have you know the planning for this funding programs that it supports have come to a halt. They have stopped extending job offers to candidates in the stem field which are very difficult to recruit and to retain they have canceled contracts for any work that they have planned to renovate their laboratories classrooms classrooms to get supplies all of these kind of support measures that they need to keep their programs up and running at least to be high quality. They have stopped into the Education Department to get approval to spend any funding because the education department cannot authorized derived funding for a program that is no longer authorized. In the most extreme cases some college presidents are having conversations with staff staff whose salaries are supported by this funding to inform them that they may not be back next school year. What are the wider implications to this lack of funding? I mean as you mentioned. HP See us have dealt with chronic underfunding for decades and decades that puts them at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for staff students and for them a lot of them feel that they have been able to get some momentum at least in this particular field old they really fear the loss of that momentum you know they are producing pipelines of Black Hispanic professionals in the stem the field where those populations are woefully under represented. They are producing black doctors. which we we all know? There is a shortage of across across the country and that impacts marginalized communities in terms of the hugh landscape under the trump administration. What is that that relationship been like thus far? Well that's interesting that's it has actually been an good relationship. They use they have always. It's been clear that they will work with anybody. And they believe in working on both sides of the aisle not just for you know goodwill but also because has a large swath of HP see us are located in southern states have enjoyed the support of Republican and Democratic lawmakers lawmakers for the HP sees as long as they have the support of Congress even better the White House. They have been willing to work work with anybody and they've been very very outspoken about that. Erica Green is an education reporter for the New York Times. Eric thanks for joining us. Thank you here's so many people they're living in hotels. You can't go back to work. Because their job was taken from them but the storm the tens of thousands of virus had been burning so far this month or at least a ten year high. I couldn't get a hold of. My parents hadn't talked to my mom and overpower their house. Completely dead well how right. After the tourism industry in Puerto Rico was actually completely chuck down. I have not experienced anything quite like this. As an adult Armageddon. We literally had to drive through a wall flame to get get out. We hear a lot about natural disasters these days. He's everything from fires to hurricanes can lead to billions of dollars in damages for communities across the United States in two thousand nineteen whether in climate disasters resulted resulted in billions of dollars worth of losses but indigenous communities tend to get far less aid from the federal government states. Do that's according to a new analysis by the center the Republican Party in high country news while US citizens on average received twenty six dollars per person from the federal government tribal citizens only get about three dollars per person per year and because of fewer resources and unemployment tribal nations are more vulnerable than the US overall when a natural disaster strikes I spoke to Alison Herrera. A member of the show Lonzo Linen tribe from the central coast of California and a freelance reporter for high country news. Over the last decade there were seventy natural disasters that occurred on tribal lands and we also found that data from the National Congress of American Indians. Though citizens citizens that live on tribal lands are more vulnerable overall than US citizens because of factors like unemployment and income and and we also found that U. S. citizens receive twenty six dollars per person per year from the federal government while tribal citizens receive approximately three dollars per person. So that's one of the gaps that we found when it comes to disaster aid looking at tribal communities versus a community that is in a state that is not a tribal community. And let's give some examples specific examples of reservations that have been hit hard by I natural disasters in recent years one is the confederated tribes of the Colville reservation in the last ten years they had four natural disasters. There's they had Severe storms straight line winds flooding and fires in two thousand fifteen two hundred fifty five thousand acres of their land where burn that's approximately twenty percent of the tribes land base and some of their housing was wiped out during that period of time yet they were ineligible for her individual assistance. To help rebuild those homes and those homes were rebuilt with some help from the neighbouring Tulalip tribe. Another the thing that happened in two thousand eighteen. They had severe flooding. The caused a nearly half a million dollars in damage so we know L. that there are reservations that have been hit pretty hard by natural disasters. How does it compare when you're in a tribal community requesting funding from the federal government? Meant to what someone outside of tribal community would do to request funding from the federal government. When it comes to female for example the process is by all accounts similar similar except that tribes have to have this thing called Disaster Mitigation Plan States. Also have to have that plan but the difference is that you know those plans they we have to meet certain requirements but it takes a lot of money it takes a lot of specialized personnel. The process to approve contractors to put together. This plan takes a long time because tribal governments run differently and also sometimes they don't have the staff to put that together. Sometimes they don't have the money to be able to hire those contractors. They can get a grant from fema to do that but then again. That's another process. FEMA leaders that I've talked with in the community like Nelson Andrew's junior who's the emergency management For the Mashpee tribe said it just kind of a separate but unequal system. I mean it's very unequal. Equal given the the dollar amounts that you've cited at the top of the peace like. Why is there such a difference in how much tribes tend to get on average then folks who are not living on tribal lands you know? Tribal communities are smaller compared to you know citizens that live in you know. The state of Minnesota are the state of North Dakota but at the same time. That's her capita. I mean that is such a smaller amount. I think the problem that I've heard from a leaders is the process by which funding is obtained for instance. I cited the fact that you have to front the costs so a tribe has to pay. Hey for that half million dollars in damage and FEMA doesn't only on they reimburse up to seventy percent. The tribe has to pay for the other thirty out of pocket. And so that seventy percent that you get reimbursed for like in the example of Colville they in those two thousand eighteen flooding. They're they're still waiting on the reimbursement and that is because some of the paperwork was not coded properly and that goes to staffing staffing issues. I mean so state has a department that can their whole job is dedicated to coating that paperwork. Making sure that it's accurate. Well a tribal community a trouble government. They have to shift people around. They don't have that one person that does that and so that creates a lot of delay. So it's that process and it's also just having that hazard mitigation plan right now out of the five hundred. Seventy three federally recognized Tribes News on According to Nelson Andrew's junior who's the emergency management person. For what mashed we want our tribe only thirty percent of tribes have a disaster mitigation Shen plan and that leaves you really vulnerable very very exposed so what can tribes do or are tribes trying to do anything to change that. I know that Next year at the National Congress of American Indian India's is GONNA be lobbying for an increase in funding for disaster disaster aid. They want twenty million dollars more annually in additional funding for Tripos grants for the next five years to help tribes assist on that technical uncle level when we talk about the paperwork. We're talking about people that are to train people to know how to do that at train people in how to do that and I think that comes with some lobbying and just some awareness on the part of you know the needs that tribes have allison. Harare is a member of Jolanta Linen tribe from the central coast of California media a freelance reporter for high country news. Thanks so much. Alison thank you so much ten Zena The crew that makes this show is just fantastic. And I WANNA read their names to you. Our senior producers are Amber Hall Alexandra not and they lead our producer user team Ethan. Obermann Rob Gunther Wholesale Lavarra's Meg Dalton Jason to rescue Jeevan Ka Varma. Under so Harra Tammy Fog Ben. Lay Joseph Gideon and Lydia mcmullen layered polly Ru Andina site a med our digital editors clear McCain and Debbie daughtry. Our board operator's. Jake Howard is our director and sound sound designer. David Gabriel is our baby. Yoda an executive assistant and lead. A Hollowell is our intern huge special. Thanks to Lee Hill. WHO's back with us in the trenches for awhile did? Your deputy is our executive producer. Also if you missed anything or WANNA listen back again check out our podcast and of course you can give us a call about anything at eight seven seven eight my take or tweet us at the takeaway takeaway exit much for listening. I'm Tansy Vega this is the takeaway and we'll see you Monday

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CBS Sunday Morning October 28, 2018

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

48:51 min | 1 year ago

CBS Sunday Morning October 28, 2018

"Sunday mornings podcast sponsored by QuickBooks. Backing you. If you work for yourself don't think of that sound has a receipt being crumpled think of it as lost deductions because every business receipt. You lose is cash lost five dollars three dollars two dollars. And if he misplaced ten dollars of business recedes every workday for a year that's twenty six hundred in loss deductions, unless you've already snapped them with QuickBooks snapping sort your expenses for maximum deductions at tax time. Visit QuickBooks dot com smarter business tools for the world's hardest workers QuickBooks. Backing you. Good morning. I'm Jane Pauley, and this is Sunday morning. Pittsburgh the nation is in mourning today following yesterday's mass shooting at a synagogue. We'll have the latest in just a few minutes. Then it's onto a crash course in the great financial crisis that rattled our country ten years ago. This fall with repercussions that we feel to this day. Joel Slesinger will report how cover story. When housing prices crashed a decade ago. The Dow traders are standing there watching in amazement, I don't blame them tax payers had to shell out. Billions to bail out Wall Street, but many on main street never recovered the fact that they never really got around helping the troubled borrowers. I think led to this idea that the system is rigged. How two thousand eight change the world ahead this Sunday morning. The case of NBC today host. Megan Kelly reminded us this past week of the legacy of the very old show business convention known as black face racist and degrading its roots in our popular culture. Go way back as MAURICE DuBois will show us. For more than a century. The most popular form of entertainment in this country involved actors in dark makeup, white even black performance, why on earth would a black performer put on black face and demean him or herself. It looked business. The nineteenth century they had limited options. They were expected to the haunting history of black face later on Sunday morning. We'll have some questions for Jona hill this morning, the accomplished actor making his debut on the other side of the camera. He'll be answering to our Tracy Smith. I know you're gonna love it. Green beer as a comic, actor, Jonah hill and never seemed to be afraid to try anything. Just go back and forth on that. And now as director of a new critically acclaimed film, he still taking risks were there times in this long process that you said what? Am I doing? Yes. This morning when they woke up later this Sunday morning director Jona hills, precarious leap of faith. Qatar night and has liquorice on his menu. Roxana Saberi takes us to the birthplace of Frankenstein. Anthony Mason has the gripping tale of south pole adventure, gone wrong and more all coming up. When are Sunday morning podcast continues. Ten years later. The great financial crisis of two thousand eight still cast a long shadow and given the stakes not to mention recent weeks on the stock market. We figured it was time for crash course from Jill Schlesinger. Remember, those dark and frightening autumn days of two thousand eight. Be one of the watership days in financial markets. The speed with which we are watching this market deteriorate. The Dow traders are standing there watching an amazement. I don't blame them. It was very scary. Let's get to our top story the government bailout of Fannie Mae, and Freddie MAC who was next. Why are these companies failing Liman which has twenty five thousand employees will be liquidated back? Then Grichin morganson was a business columnist for the New York Times. Meanwhile, Merrill, Lynch fearing it could be next agreed in an active disparition to a shotgun. Marriage with Bank of America. The banking system was near collapse, the stock market in freefall and too many. It seemed like government officials were as clueless as the rest of us. There was just a real sense of being in a dark room filled with furniture that you were going to stumble on and fall over and that you didn't know how to kind of maneuver, and there was so much that we didn't know, and that really people did not want us to know. Morganson says the seeds of the crash were sewn in the boon years leading up to it. The housing boom is a coast to coast story with that reliable national barometer. The median sales price of an American Home rising every year jumping more than nine percent. Just last year. Don't weights home prices were skyrocketing. Many believed. They would never fall. We're pretty confident that the housing market. Here is not going to go down at all. It's just going to go up, but to keep their monthly payments, low more and more borrowers were opting for risky mortgages on business. I'd do I'd say probably seventy five percent are just mortgages. And out of those are just mortgages I'd say ninety five percent are interest. Only and many lenders were stretching the limits offering so-called subprime mortgages to those with shaky credit allowing them to buy homes. They could barely. Afford. There was under lying at this drive for home ownership in the United States. That was almost an overarching policy that bigger rates of home. Ownership was good for America. Few knew that at the same time. Some banks were pushing those untraditional mortgages in order to repackage and sell them to global investors pension funds insurance companies even other banks bought these mortgage backed securities that's who's the trigger. That's what sets the bomoh Columbia University. Professor, Adam twos has focused his historians. I on a new take of the causes and affects of the financial crisis. He says policy makers were caught by surprise at just how fast it's spread. Think they understood the way in which you're gonna tiddly small bit of the mortgage market, which is well, subprime was how that could spiral into this general crisis of the Atlantic banking system. Good evening. This is an extraordinary period for America's economy. We are in the midst of a serious financial crisis as home prices plunged, millions of homeowners could not repay the money. They borrowed driving down the value of those mortgage backed securities on the banks didn't have that money that they will using to hold those mortgage securities with bowed it the result tax payers had to shell out. Billions to help cover the bank's losses. We're talking hundreds of billions this needs to be big enough to make a real difference and get at the heart of the problem. What do you think would have happened if the mantra of let them fail were enacted? I think we would have seen a catastrophe of the tight we've seen before worse even than the great depression of the nineteen thirties. But the bailout sparked fierce public anger, what do you say to them? They're very angry. They're even being asked to contribute with American. People are furious leaving little appetite for then saving what some believed were reckless homeowners. People want to pay for your neighbor's mortgage that has an extra bathroom and can't pay their bills raise their hand. Swift action may have saved the financial system, but not before nineteen trillion dollars in household wealth evaporated along with nearly nine million jobs in retrospect, a lot of people feel like the banks were bailed out. Okay. I understand that saved the system, but people were left hanging out to dry is there something to that. There's a huge imbalance between the emergency efforts and the very slow moving and inadequate measures that were in acted lights on to support American homeowners. Some measures were taken this plan will not save every home. But it will give millions of families resigned to financial ruin a chance to rebuild very slow acting. They provided relief to small minority of American homeowners in the end many years after the acute crisis two thousand tonight. And in the meantime, ten million American families lost their homes all American households ordinary MAC and families. That's where the real losses all of which made the recovery long painful and uneven Wall Street today turned back the clock at twenty seventeen and other selloff. So what about now despite this month's turbulence ten years later, the stock market is still near an all time high. The economy's booming wages are rising and more Americans are working today then ever before ever before. In fact, the unemployment rate is the lowest in nearly fifty years, but many of the new rules put in place after the crisis to protect the system from another meltdown are now being weakened. What's the danger of rolling back? Some of those regulations dangerous that you have banks which unawed able to take the hit of a large amount of unexpected losses and able to withstand a sudden panic confidence when people just won't pull them money out of the banking system. Well, the banks are much more. Well capitalized they have a lot more money set aside for a rainy day than they did leading up to the crisis. But by not. Prosecuting any very high level executives who were involved. I think that message was very clear that this kind of behavior this kind of big risk taking behavior that risks. The entire financial system will not be punished Gretchen morganson now an investigative reporter at the Wall Street Journal worries that failure to hold anyone accountable will resonate for years to come. I think people get what happened that this inequality that was pervasive in the response to the crisis, the very powerful institutions got taken care of the individuals who are powerless did not. I think people understand that very well. And now a page from our Sunday morning almanac. October twenty eight eighteen fifty eight one hundred sixty years ago today the day Roland hussy Macy opened a small dry goods store in New York City his first day sales total just eleven dollars and six cents. But over time business picked up so much. So that in one thousand nine hundred to r h Macy and company opened a huge new store on Manhattan's herald square, which it expanded to make even larger in nineteen twenty four that same year. Macy's staged its first big holiday parade on Christmas day. I it was later moved to thanksgiving. In nineteen forty seven. The Macy's parade provided the opening backdrop to the classic film miracle on thirty fourth street, starring Maureen O'Hara and Edmund Gwenn as the department store Santa who turns out to be the real McCoy this Tristesse visit q-quick it. You'll get to lovely out here at Macy's. We get ten percent off today. The Macy's parade and its flagship herald square store remained prime attractions for visitors and shoppers from all over the world and together with its hundreds of other stores across the country. Macy's racked up nearly twenty five billion dollars in sales last year eclipsing that first as take of eleven dollars and then some. Trick or treat these high end liquorice candies from Denmark, and pack and unexpected punch as our Conor Knighton discovered. Wander the aisles of any Scandinavian supermarket, and you will find them loaded with liquorice liquor sticks. Licorice. Licorice. Licorice. Panders Chris fish sold in all shapes and sizes, if you're feeling creative you can make your own things skulls and coils black and salty liquorice, especially Sultan, quick. Favorite Scandinavian treat? But when I sat down to eat some. Felt more. Like, I had been tricked. Ooh, hoo. Make it so salty. Licorice is made from the liquid route glycerin glob, the twizzlers and red vines that we Americans sometimes, coal, licorice. Don't actually contain any liquorice at all the crucial. Sweet licorice is salty. The salty stuff is really important to this guy named people, and it's really strange to foreign us. You'll HUD below the founder of lecherous liquorice company based in the black fortress on the outskirts of Copenhagen, Denmark, microbes is the Danish word for licorice step in this building. It's definitely I've been driving around with the smell of the Chris for eleven years now. Eleven years ago Bulu opened his very first store in the seaside town of phonic. He was born on Bornholm a small picturesque Danish island in the Baltic Sea. This is paradise on earth when summer, and it's like this super amazing Ord moment is the sunniest place in all of Denmark, and the crowds of tourists passing through Boola. What chance to try out the Chris creations? The idea was action to create a recipe to and then just be in front of the actual consumer. Sample them to look in their eyes and see what do that I smiling they throwing up what he found was that he could get international visitors to try his product if he mix the liquorice taste with flavors. They were more familiar with. Okay. So what flavors? This is live Lou. Boeing at the factory back in Copenhagen. Leprous now produces licorice did in various flavors of chocolate. She this is more for me. You've got to hide it. It's something else. Like, there's also liquorice mixed with happen. Euro Chili's there's a caramelized organic slow cooked liquorice for connoisseurs their liquid syrups at sprinkles to mix in with other dishes, and you won't find any of this in the grocery store macrey has marketed and packaged itself. As a luxury. Good sold in small boutique when we have guests family parties or anything we got like the good, Chris. Yeah. When Danes like Patrick Nielsen by lack crease, it's a special treat at stores in the Copenhagen airport and the Tivoli amusement park. Danish employees try to convince curious tourists to sample a taste Dave grownup with do you feel like you're on a mission? Yeah. I do then you have to try this one. Some we have a soldier caramel. It's a flavor. Everybody likes that Chris just opened two stores into by. And it's now sold at Chelsea market in New York City, but it all began back on Bornholm. I call it the chickens. Of the Chris because it's every things start technical director. Take us has worked with below since the beginning helping developing recipes the packaging and the presentation or important, but liquorice is still at the root of everything if you give the time we can make the whole of the Chris. It's Sunday morning on CBS here again is Jane Pauley his tail based on a book whose author was first listed as anonymous maybe because back in eighteen eighteen stories written by young women wouldn't be taken seriously. But there's no question it's very young author created a classic. Roxana Saberi has chapter and verse on Frankenstein. We all know, the tail crack of lightning the mad scientist on holy creation, and that unholy creation, which became his undoing. Signs, monster has taken many shapes over the years. But it first came to life two centuries ago on these pages written by young woman. Barely eighteen years old. We have something that really gives us the Genesis of the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley's original manuscript is held at Oxford University's Bodley in library in England where Chris Fletcher is keeper of special collections from relatively modest that innings of five hundred copies of of this eighteen eighteen to what it's become now class. Really interesting story that story began two years earlier when it's author left England with her future husband, the poet Percy Bish Shelley they joined fellow poet Lord Byron at this villa for what was supposed to be a pleasant holiday on the shores of Lake Geneva. How much has this place changed since Mary was here two hundred years ago? Well. Not much at all. It's almost exactly as it was in viruns day down to the railings along the terrace. Well, the villas much the same university of Geneva. Professor David spur explains that summer was like none other almost perpetual, rain confines us principally to the house. It wasn't just the perpetual rain Shelley wrote in her letters. But if freakish volcanic eruption in Asia that shrouded much of Europe in cold and darkness. Setting the gloomy stage for gothic masterpiece. Lord Byron suggested on night, we shall each write a ghost story. And so the results of that famous. Contest are known are you saying if the weather had been fine that summer, we might not have a Frankenstein. I think that's I think that's quite probable the storms figure heavily Shelley's ghost story, which would become the novel Frankenstein published in eighteen eighteen her tale about a man made monster turn murderer has been translated into dozens of languages and mutated into countless adaptations and spinoffs. Ranging from slapstick comedy. Credit? Georgina Marston teacher Matic theater. Few comic books even songs. Frankenstein has taken a permanent place in popular culture. But this monsters often misunderstood a lot of people think that Frankenstein is the name of the creature of the monster. When in fact, it's the name of his creator, the creature himself does not have any another common misconception is that Frankenstein's monster is purely evil, but events marking the novels bicentennial portray him as a lonely character neglected by his creator. Inside he might have PC, but he just people joke. Give him a child's to show. Do you think they should be an talk Frankenstein at university? College london. Professor, Jack, still go says Frankenstein is still teaching us about science about responsibility. For example, as a researcher is doing ethical do have responsibilities full the things that you create now there are real tools. This all giving scientists the potential to enact potentially changes to life say shoud, we be editing the human genome, should we be trying to improve upon human nature. That's a question that we should have a say in during questions I posed by young writer two hundred years ago, she is dealing with Turnley relevant issues. Ticky late so them in such a. Invasive and fantastic way. Should we read the novel in twenty eighteen absolutely no more than any other time? As you may have heard NBC today host Megan Kelly show was canceled this past week following her lawn air remarks expressing acceptance of black face, it's a racist show business practice. Most of us thought was long gone. But as MAURICE DuBois is about to tell us black face has a long history in our country. And we caution you his report unavoidably includes many offensive and disturbing images. It happens. All too frequently often at Halloween, but not exclusively. They thought it was a joke. But they really just was not funny at all for example, two years ago in Maplewood, New Jersey, her daughter posted this photo of herself and a friend in black face, the two girls had no idea what black taste was or the history of it. The history of black face is long and complex and deeply ingrained in our culture. What was that lady? I saw you with this afternoon. That low lady Mewa. Even Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd blacked up. For more than a hundred years whites and then black performers wore dark makeup and created not only a popular theatrical form, but stereotypes that are still with us today. This makes you uncomfortable doesn't it? Absolutely. It does make me feel uncomfortable to talk about these things because they are incredibly disturbing and revolting Eric lot professor at the graduate center of the City University of New York says black face represents a strange mix of envy, fascination, desire and fear. Explain the fear part to me what what are these white performers? What are these white people afraid of they're afraid of black groups mobs rising up and taking the power minstrel shows began in the eighteen thirties and white performers used Burr. Cork or later black grease paint. Minstrel see eventually became the most popular form of entertainment in the country. Yes, I asked Margo Jefferson the Pulitzer prize winning critic to look at some images from the new York Public Library, this shininess of the black against the big white clown's mouth the hat the over long tail code mucking. It always gives me the jolt that racist history. Does black faces so tied to comedy to people enjoying themselves to people having fun that rattles. You still more? You seem to be enjoying yourself in John. I shura is white minstrel performers claim that what they did on stage was based on their perceptions of how black people lived some is came out of a genuine fascination with the music the songs, the dances, the performance styles of black people. But it's also weird jump. Jim crow was born along with other characters picked it as lazy lying or buffoonish. Remember, this was all happening before the civil war. Slavery was all about creating. Visions types stereotypes of an entire race of people as subhuman in every way by the eighteen sixties African Americans began using black face on stage. Why on earth would a black performer put on black face and demean him or her look this is the nineteenth century? They had limited options. They were expected to why because it made the audiences comfortable. You can be fascinated. You can be excited, but you can always feel superior in effect the black makeup on a black performer became a theatrical mask with many layers of meaning professor Eric lossing the mask, I think says the white audiences. You have nothing to fear. Go ahead. Enjoy yourself to black audiences. I think any number of things might have been communicated. Like, can you believe that these people are making me put on this mask? So they will be entertained. You know, in other words, it was kind of winking to the black audience, but gave black performers access to the stage. One of the biggest black stars to come out of the minstrel tradition. Was Bert Williams who wore black face from vaudeville to Broadway? It's clear that he was a genius of performer. But how did he reconcile performing in this demeaning, art form? He was very melancholy about it. He knew it was necessary for his career as all of their black performers knew it minstrel see on stage, basically died out in the nineteen twenties. But black face lived on in the movies. Mild in nineteen twenty seven Al Jolson starred in the pioneering talking picture, the jazz singer playing a young man who prefers singing popular music rather than his family's traditional Hebrew prayers. I. I don't wanna look at what reaction. Do you get? I totally understand. Have to weigh that in the argon comedies of the nineteen thirties spanky appeared in black face. Thanking a lot of trouble. Good here is that the gang doesn't realize that spanking black thing until they actually buckman. Great. So the gist of it is that you put black face makeup on anyone, and they become black, and that's supposed to be hilarious, and it's opposed to be really funny when they grow, and it goes on during the golden age of the Hollywood musical Judy Garland when he wants down the street and say, please. One day rolled out. Bing crosby. That's. Lesson. Fred Astaire and many others. All blacked-up. It's still in the culture. It is too easy. I think simply dismiss the history of black face as that racist stuff. And we're most of us are better than that. I don't think most of us are better than that. We are that. That's what we are. You know, some people say in order to move forward, we need to put this stuff behind us as painful as just upsetting that it may be any form of history that gets suppressed or repressed or erased out. It comes back to haunt. What's have to happen? Now is a discussion and knowledge of this charged complicated painful history. You may know actor Jonah hill from any one of his many movie roles, but he'll has a new role which prompted some questions from Tracy Smith. Says tissues time hold up. We're gonna fake ID's Jona hill helped make two thousand seven super bad one of the great coming of age movies. That's how I ruled that thing. I actually. And now, it seems he's made another one. A lot of time. We feel that our laws the worst. The film mid-nineties is about a tight knit band of skaters growing up and raising hell in mid-nineties, Los Angeles. Go back and forth on the and it's Jona hills. First time directing a feature were there times in this long process that you said what am I doing? Yes this morning when I woke up. The story is about Stevie a thirteen year old from troubled home who bonds with a group of skaters who introduce him to things beyond skating like cigarettes. So he needs to clean the smoke off at the local gas station before he goes home. I'm so sorry. I really it will never happen again thirty. And since it set in the mid nineties the crew has no smartphones. And apparently, no fear. Spoiler alert Stevie lives to skate another day. It's about growing up. It's about youth in about a time in your life. When your friends are more important than your family and when its unique friends versus the word. Movie is not his auto biography. But there are a few parallels. Jona hill was born in Los Angeles. The son of an accountant and address designer. And as a team he spent a lot of time on escape board. But he really wanted a life in showbiz. I accidentally fell into a sixteen year acting career that I- immensely grateful for. But but it was an accident. I was going to new school. And I was writing these one act plays there in when I would talk to actors, I didn't have good bedside manner. You I would be like why don't they sing it? Like, I want them to sit. And so I took an acting class to see how I'd like to be spoken to to maybe help my skills as director or writer. Hey, don't go in this breaking interim and that acting class paid off. Scare- scared. Early on him and made a name for himself playing the insecure loser. But after a dozen or so comedies. He was tired of everyone always expecting him to be funny. So in comedy, also it's like a lot of it's being mean to each other. And I don't I can't live like that. I'm literally too sensitive to survive. I think a lot of comedians don't make it because they have to pretend to be funny in life. Not always funny all the time. Boston. Impressive. So he started doing some seriously. Good work like in moneyball. Opposite Brad Pitt as the geeky numbers man on a mission to change baseball. Your goal shouldn't be to players your goal should be to buy wins and this role put Jona hill himself, you know, whole different league. Tom for best performance by an actor in a supporting role, the nominees are Jona hill and moneyball. It was his first invite to the big dance. And it wouldn't be his last you show me of seventy two dozen dollars quit my job right now. And I worked for you. Just two years later he had another big role with another big star. And another Oscar not you were nominated for two Oscars both ceremonies, you took your mom. What's mom like as a date? Demanding. So. She's great. I mean, she put up with a tremendous amount. And that is definitely my way of saying. Thank you whispering. Nice things in your ear. She's just talking to all the people. I don't want her talking. Culture, like kidding aside. Even as an Oscar contender Jona hill had his eyes on a different prize. So when you were on set for be a super bad moneyball wolf of Wall Street, you were the whole time kind of taking notes. Yes, I was in net. I was an annoying mosquito on everybody shoulder, and I I am so grateful for their their education. Do you think the third Oscar nomination for directing? I don't think like that. Instead like a skater learning a new trick. What Jona hill really wants is the chance to keep trying for you with this film. What is success that I get to make another film? All I wanna do make another movie. I love it. I love it so much mid-nineties like with my best friend. And when I say, I want to be back in the process. It means I hope get to have another best friend. A century. After a legendary British explorer made his name in Antarctica, a modern day Admira decided to follow in his footsteps his story from Anthony Mason. It may be the most desolate and forbidding landscape on the planet. Before he tried to cross an art deco alone in two thousand fifteen British explorer. Henry Worsley got some advice ever think you'll going to conquer the poll if you're really lucky. The talks will allow you in for snap show. But don't ever think you'll going to beach it trekking the vast frozen continent Worsely would say was like being an atom on an ice cube. This. This is big as Europe. Oh, yeah. Journalists David grand chronicles lease expedition in his new book, the white darkness. He arrived by the Weddell sea, which is part of the Alantic ocean. And then he tricked five hundred seventy nautical miles to the south pole. Where's lease inspiration? The alert floors. Here was another British adventurer honored on the walls of the explorers club in New York. And this is shackled who obviously knew Worsely revered so much sir Ernest Shackleton led three expeditions to Antarctica in the early nineteen hundreds Worsely a descendant of one of Shackleton's crew became obsessed with his adventures, I really believe very strongly in marriage note stopping individual dreams. Henry's wife Joanna wars leak and their children max and Lisa would write messages on his skis before his trips. Mex- encouraged him as you can see. Push us. That was mine. Come back to this safety, my darling. I didn't worry about him ever went. He was to student. Civil Henry a retired officer of the elite British commando unit. The SAS Worsely made his first trip to the Arctic in two thousand eight as part of a three men team reenacting shackled journey to the south pole. His face said, it'll you didn't open sees someone quite that haffey. He wasn't expecting to go back. I was expecting him to get back. Then toke tick seems to people it seems to grip and not let go it had got him. In two thousand fifteen Worsely plan to trip. No one had ever attempted crossing a thousand miles of Antarctica solo and unsupported any name. Underway. On November thirteenth twenty fifteen in a satellite phone message. The fifty five year old explorer announced he was off hauling three hundred and twenty five pound sled of food and supplies. Almost from the beginning. He runs into problems. Everything seemed to go wrong he found himself in one white out after another. He was pinned down in his tent, but Worsely pressed on and after fifty one days six hundred and fifty six miles reached the south pole. He sent this post guard home from the US research station there. I will never forget what you on woods. But in satellite calls Joanna began to sense something was wrong. He cried quite a lot. Hidden of done that she urged him to call to be airlifted out hit just said, I know I'm not gonna make it I will them. But please let me make that Cole on day. Seventy just thirty miles shy of making history. He finally did flown to a medical station. He called Joanna to report he was safe and having a Cup of tea the last time you talked to him. It was yes, Dr soon realized Worsely had Beck Tirias peritonitis, which is essentially an infection of inter-lining wall and the tissue of the abdomen. He went into septic shock and all organs begin to feel two days later, Henry wars -ly died in surgery. He was posthumously awarded Britain's polar medal also given to his hero Shackleton. His expedition flag was brought home to Joanna who in time went to the cold land that had claimed her husband didn't learn what he loved didn't. But you need it to be there. But I needed to Bela in her grief, Joanna Worsely had doubted her husband's love, I was worried that hey, loved them to the mall. You stay of black Fogel of grief for yet. When I can a little bit of that black folk I knew that I didn't believe that engine new the. Because. If hit loved them talked more than us. He would never have met the cool. There's a lovely photograph where he has written in the snow to take. And I have is. So that after he died. I actually it sort of it took my breath away. And I thought. Is the talk take his? Oh this year. We've been looking back at another year nineteen sixty eight this morning. Jim Axelrod relives an indelible moment at the world's largest sporting event. At the high museum of art in Atlanta, those arms Tommy's arms, but they represent all of our arms artist. Gwen Keno is offering fresh take on one of the twentieth. Century's best-known images Tommie Smith and John Carlos on the Olympic medal stand in Mexico City in nineteen sixty eight a moment frozen bias snapshot the salute has been flattened in his static. It's more nuanced. It's more textured more layered. Yes. And that's where humanity lies in the new ones. K knows it for to restore some degree of depth. And meaning are these casts of Smith's right on of oh king? Both the backbone of a movement and flowing wave of our turnaround for second. And just look at that man's face. Look at it. It looked like he's saying why you actually tummy Smith knew exactly why he and John Carlos were up there. Is that the proudest moment of your life? You better believe it, buddy. But it was one of the sad is moments in my life to it said that young men had to do that nineteen sixty eight remains among the most turbulent years. The king was shot and was killed tonight. Member in American history. Summer eight thunder of discontent as rumbled on the horizon of the nineteenth. You win the two hundred John takes third. You know, there's going to be this medal ceremony head to go. Because I knew I was going to use those. But I didn't know what fashion, and that's when John and I talked about the idea of a victory stand. Everything was Representative shoes the ideal of poverty. Black socks, of course. Power in blackness, the glove represented sacrifice and strength. The re in the hand the idea of peace as olive branch right hands up with the fist left. Tens. That's right. Fifteen years later any regrets. No way. No way. Which is why Tommy Smith is seen as a hero to so many because he and Carlos were banished from the games sent home. This son of a sharecropper this ROTC student at San Jose State. This multiple world record holder was shunned. He couldn't even find a job. Who's a moment of truth of me? How important was the moment. Nelson Mandela found it so inspiring. He had a photo smuggled into his cell on Robben Island. It is the most iconic sports image of the twentieth century sociologist. Harry Edwards tusk Smith and Carlos at San Jose State his Olympic project for human rights organized athletes, challenging them to take a stand. You had athletes who had the courage had the platform to stand up and say, we're better than this. We can do better than this half. A century later. Edwards advises Colin Kaepernick and others making their own stands. You didn't want to denigrate the flag no way wouldn't about the play. What was it about human rights came before the flag for those people who say it was a statement against the American flag in America. You don't do that kind of thing unless you love this country. Otherwise, why not just get my gold medal. Go and see what I can parlay it into hell with the rest of it. I think everybody is a young African American athlete known about John Carlos Philadelphia Eagles, Michael Bennett. And Malcolm Jenkins. I have that photo hanging up in my home to today's NFL players using their platforms to call attention to racial injustice does want every young person who sees the impact of tubby Smith and John Carlos. They have a voice that they have a place. But you gotta stand up stand up or. Take a knee Jenkins raised his own fist in a preseason game. This year, we is athletes now stand on the backs of not only John Carlos and Tommie Smith with all the athletes who've risked their careers to speak up for things that we're not just or not fair in our country, which is what makes Smith and Carlos attractive to both historians and artists this statue sits on the campus of San Jose State. Hang out here almost any day. And it's plain to see that. What may not have been understood in nineteen sixty eight is now powerful inspiration. It was the right temperature. It was the right tenor. It was silent. But spoke volumes. It was the right message. Factor. We're talking about a half a century later reminds us of who we are as a people. And what we aspire to be as a nation. I'm Jane Pauley. Thank you for listening, and please join us again next Sunday morning.

Jona hill Jane Pauley John Carlos Chris New York City Macy Joanna Worsely Jona hill Roxana Saberi MAURICE DuBois Jonah hill Tommie Smith Tracy Smith Gretchen morganson director Worsely Megan Kelly Copenhagen
1085: "Transaged"

No Agenda

2:51:15 hr | 1 year ago

1085: "Transaged"

"Race is Adam curry, John. He divorced eleven twenty eighteen this is your ward winning give on Asian media assassination. Episode ten eighty five. This is no agenda honoring veterans all around on Asian broadcasting live for the cap on the drone star state here downtown Austin Tejas in the Cuneo in the morning, everybody. I'm out curry from northern Silicon Valley where they're not acknowledging anybody, but stolid, I'm John sibor. Kills. Is that what they're doing and California? The only knowledge ING Stalin's Dahlan. No come on. You gotta be kidding. Well, yeah. I've kidding you. Okay. Good. I mean, I know I know they're kooky knowledge. Trump. As as the wannabe Stalin. I wish I could. I gotta go to some of these rallies and pick up some of these posters. I went to the rally. I went to the to the protect Mueller rally here. Yeah. Right after the show. Posters for me. Well, no. In fact, there were no posters. Everything was handmade. So this was although it was organized. Let me just say I went so I can see city hall in front of city hall from from our balcony to after the show, I'm chilling out. And on the balcony for second. Oh, okay. That's the thing. That's the the protect MU of. Yeah. Protect protect the FBI. I'm gonna go down there. And just I just kind of walked in between them. And I gotta say first of a lot of American flags. Lot of patriotic flag waving which is typically associated with Republicans in Austin, at least more right wing, white nationalist. I should say snow such thing as a Republican only Nazis. And so people are flying flags and everyone there looked like which I think is what what it was looked like they had the belong to a Facebook group. All yeah. We're gonna meet up five o'clock right in front of city hall. Lot of DNC spokes holes on the microphone a lot of Trump is not above the law. A lot a lot actually they and them they won't then they they there's a very it's just like the enemy is they rising the Republic very much. So they heard a lot of the people themselves. John I would say middle aged. A slight twinge of stress, but no one was unhinged. No one was going nuts. Well, but but I is it possible. The Dr people who'd like to go stand in crowds and just hold the sign. I notice a number of people and not even on a stick. Just hold the sign up with one hand and the and the standing there, and they're not looking at anything just gazing off into space, even as the as the crowd is dissipating just stand there. This may be thing that I don't know about your in the SIMS. It was an NPC who who's who's programming had just not not moved onto the next. Phase yet standing there Orangemen bad. So it was it was very demure. Not not your aunty fought crowd. It was like middle aged people who look very distressed because they completely believe stressed. Well, the yes distress, but it's obvious. They completely believe in some form of Russian collusion. Zephyr. Thank goodness there. We go. Anyway. So I didn't completely believe in everything. This actually have a clip regarding this home ascetic among those here have the crowd a lot of folks packed in here. Organizers say their message, no one is about the law. That's very similar to awesome. This. I think is Aaron tone. Jingle of sorry. The best. I can do is get no jazz to it. At all. I Donald Trump is not above the law above the law. You're right. I mean, there's no there's no melody there's no nothing. You can't itchy. No. It's not catchy at all. Our jingle people do better than that. And you know, they will that was videotaping within the last hour. Organizers said this protest one of many plan nationwide isn't opposition of President Trump's firing of Jeff Sessions and appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting AG and concerns they have of what this will mean for the special counsel's investigation. Given Whitaker has publicly been critical of Robert Mueller and the investigation prior to joining the Justice department. This protest comes as eighteen attorneys general this afternoon, including Washington AG Ferguson band together to sign a letter calling on Whittaker to recuse himself from overseeing special counsel's investigation depression needs to be confronted early. Because loss of our civil liberties follows the loss of the rule of law right now the rule of laws threatened it is threatened by a president who is afraid of being. Held accountable. This is going. This is going nowhere this this. This Trump is not above the law. It's just it's not working. It's it's it's not gaining any desired result. I think that just going back to racism with Trump now in the rotation. Maybe it will no not picking on him for this. He said he talked to back to some black re. No, you don't have the full Miette. Which by the way is everywhere today. Okay. The full Meam is he is racist because he puts down black female reporters, not one not two but three. And so this is what everybody is talking to us. I mean, we are. But this is now the racist Meam of the week, and we have proof that Trump is racist. Here's NPR NPR. The bastion of reporting on the radio, President Trump's feud with the media seemed to take some ominous turns this week that testy exchange with CNN's Jim Acosta, are you worried enough. That's. The other Kosta cost, of course, as you know, black woman being barred from the White House, then today another CNN reporter asked the president. If he wanted his new acting attorney general to rain in Robert Mueller, what a stupid question that is what a stupid question, but I watched you a lot US a lot of stupid quite reporter asking that question was Abby Philip a black woman affected. No. By the way. Not the I saw no footage that showed the reporter asking the questions, but friend PR, by the way, did you actually say, by the way of black report? A black woman says new acting attorney general to rein in Robert Mueller. What a stupid question that what a stupid question. But I watch you a lot of US Golota stupid. The reporter asking that question was Abby Philip a black woman effect. I mentioned because the president then went on to attack another black woman reporter April Ryan, it's up about somebody. That's a loose. Her. She doesn't know what the hell he's doing. He also, by the way, this is well done because the April Ryan, quote, unquote, attack refers to, you know, press conference where she wasn't allowed to ask a question. But they've they've melded these two answers of his together as if he went on right after that to say, she's dumb. You know what I mean? It's it's it's kind of a reverse with saw stuff we find the show. Yeah. In annoying. Yes, porter April Ryan about somebody. That's a loser. She doesn't know what the hell. He's doing. She also had choice words this week for PBS's Jimmy Alcindor, another black female reporter, some people saw that as in bowling, white, nationalist. Now, people are also. Racist. What's going on here? Now, here's something that he's new on NPR. I think they've figured out that they really can't sell it to themselves. Do they can't ruin their own integrity by ginning up? These types of theories say conspiracy is actually conspiracy because everyone's doing it that the president, you know, is racist. And here's the proof. It's he's he's very harsh towards female black reporters, but they can't really sell that to themselves. You know, talking about that. So they bring in the podcast teen didn't co host of NPR's coats, which podcast is in the studio with this hasty, and they have a lot of podcasts, and these people are necessarily on the radio to the kind of like, well, it was the podcast who said it, you know, it's not really NPR Jean Louis. What did you make the president's exchanges with reporters? Sorry. I think that's dynamite observation I think I've another create their own straw built in straw, man. Bring in beat the crap out of or not or have him say some crazy stuff. Well, there you go. There's an opinion. Is with us. So therefore you associated with us. And so therefore, you think the same way, and I've heard I think there's an may even be another clip from NPR today where they do the exact same just bringing a blogger co-hosting podcasters to NPR's which cast is in the studio with this. Hey, gene. Hey, Louise, what did you make the president's exchanges with reporters this week? I mean, it was interesting, right. If you look at their sponsors to emiss- Alcindor question. She asked us very legitimate question about rising, white nationalism, and whether the president's decisions what what what was the question, he wise, and by that wasn't the question. The question about rising nationalism presidents exchange up. This thing is wait until this guy gets the end of your spiel. And it's just boom, boom, boom, boom, boom one untruth after another but in the lexicon for him completely truth and completely valid with reporters this week. I mean, it was interesting, right. If you look at the response to question say what? Is interesting, right. That was interesting, right. She s very legitimate question about rising white nationalism and whether the president's decisions who identify himself as a nationalist was somehow contributing to that from using old tactic though from people defensive questions about race. Talking about racism is the real racism, you see I knew this was going to be problematic. When he said that's very racist question that apparently is very old tactic that racist use kit. Yeah. Racist will say that's a racist question to deflect from their own blatant. Racism course, actually, this was somehow contributing to that Trump using old tactic though defensive questions about race. Talking about racism is the real racism. It is not listening on a second this guy. He he has a little twang this. He is he black. I believe so, but she didn't mention it. And by the way, I think she should've should've mentioned his creed color race, whatever and hers because we're denting. Everybody. I agree. They should identify identify. She she should probably say, what her pronoun is. It's an Email signature. Don't worry about race. Talking about racism is the real racism. It is not listeners today was a little bit different Abby Philip as the president about whether his acting attorney general would reign in the Russia investigation. Now, President Trump is obviously said that that investigation is a witch-hunt suggested he would like his past attorney general Jeff Sessions. The spoken. Them. I'm so it seems like a legitimate question. Okay. But as we just heard the president also attests what was wrong with. They didn't resolve that. I might wanna point out. So how how what was wrong then what he said that it's a stupid question. I I don't understand. How is that racist? They don't resolve it. They just say black woman. He said something not good racist. Kosta who whatever you think of him. He he's not a black woman. That the president is singling out black women. I mean, it's really hard to say, right. The president has this tag Nick relationship with the press broadly on the other hand the context. This logic context matters, the president uses racially charged language and all kinds of contexts. Let's listen examples. French just sparring with reporters exactly there's you know, the fine people in both sides comment after Charlottesville races. There was the way he went NFL players who are protesting racial inequality in the criminal Justice system. This what did you say get those sons of bitches off the field? If I tell owner get that son of a bitch off the field that's Rasiah race as there's the Muslim ban says and the language around that night, which around that. Every bed. I've never a Muslim bell. Of course. Not. But that's what we call it. Now in on NPR. I'm sorry. It was the podcast remained a mistake guys. You know, they give them too much freedom. I'm sorry. We won't have Mont. Again, don't were April. Ryan who is one of the most prominent members of the White House. Press corps prominent what what what who does. She work for American urban American urban radio networks. Is that what it is? I think it's that. Rerun? She urban radio American urban radio networks, she joined CNN also as a political analyst. She's not she's not one of the most prominent White House correspondent, she sits in the middle of the pack. Not at the front were Jim Acosta gets it. She's not one of the prominent members look on. Trucking here. But I'm just pissed off this nice CNN clips is April Ryan to Trump. I'm not a loser should Debbie. Nice clip. And we do know that April Ryan who is one of the most prominent members of the White House press corps. She certainly seems to think that he singles out women and people of color in the press room. Here's what she said the CNN. You don't see this kind of exchange happening with white males. No, we didn't see that with Jim Acosta. Okay. As much as you do minorities. Meaning African American woman myself or women gene didn't be when the president speaks to reporters at the White House. He's of course, also speaking to a much wider audience. How does language like this play with his base? Well, we know they love it. We know that they're all right says from public opinion polls that base is especially skeptical of the news media, according to a Quinnipiac poll from late in the summer about fifty one percent of Republicans said that the news media is the enemy of the people. This is good. I have not. Seen this poll. I couldn't find it. But now we've moved it to a poll. I mean, the poll say is the news media. The enemy of the people did the poll say is the fake news enemy of the people? Now, you just doing polls and you bring that in. And then whatever Trump actually said doesn't matter anymore. We also know that from you know, years of public opinion polling that Republicans are conservative own racial issues. They are more skeptical of sort of fixing inequality through the government for or own affirmative action on policing. And so you have these in this case, you have three reporters who also women importantly who embody. Yeah. He's well, he's a millennial got these two demographics. They are members of the news media, and they are also white, very visibly. Not white in a press corps. That is overwhelmingly white. Overwhelming. So well, maybe the networks are racist. They're not sending enough black and Brown people and females and transgenders. Trump is nothing to do with him. No. This has to do when they kicked out was a white guy. Not white in a press corps that is older woman. White Trump is working on that. He brought down the white side by one so score for the black side. You should be happy weight has Perskor overwhelming. So and so in a lot of ways, they may be literal embodiments of the things that most animate some of Trump's base racist. Let's check out CNN significantly shorter clip. This is Kirsten powers, and she just, you know, they're not going to dwell on what happened more on her analysis. That was Abby Philip of CNN joining now, polka analysts powers and former Trump campaign aide. Michael Caputo cares. I'm just watching the president there. Philip business. Well earlier he it was on Wednesday the press conference he spoke to an African American reporters at saying her a question was racist. You know, some have said that there is a racial component to to this or the president's willingness to call African American stupid. Do you see that? Yeah, they do and he plays on racial tropes that go all the way. Did he call African Americans as a group stupid to a death would be just said do you see? I'm gonna listen listen again, let's roll it back. I missed that. If that's what he said, let's spoke to an aftermarket. Remember American reporters at saying her a question was racist. Some have said that there is a racial component to to this or the president's willingness to call African American stupid. Yes. Good catch. No, he called April. Ryan stupid. I guess you'd parse it. Anyway, you want he called women? He calls women's stupid. He calls. Black stupid. Black women African American women women under six feet tall. Do you see do and he plays on racial tropes that drops all the way back to the beginning of this country? And the idea all the way back to the beginning. That's right. That's how far back Trump goes with his raises black people aren't as smart as people. Oh my God. In the past had literacy tests for black people in order to vote. And I don't think is that true. Do we have literacy tests for African Americans devoting Dixie crash south? Yeah. I think that is true. Democrats by the Democrats could point and our past had literacy tests for black people in order to vote. And I don't think it's a coincidence that he talks about whether it's done lemon having a low, I q or Maxine Waters has a low. I q r LeBron James has a low IQ or now we're supposed to believe Abby Philip is asking a stupid question. I see. Okay. If you take all of those people together, I can see how they how they has. He said this about any white people Trump to watch it. Pez called any white person. Will I'd have to think about that. Ever said LeBron James had a low. I q. I think he's well something similar. I'm sure who knows doubting it. Maybe maybe we're wrong. Maybe he's singling out African Americans were being stupid. I mean when you put that list together, that's actually pretty convincing autres has a low IQ LeBron James Dru. Well, we know we know the Muslim band is. No. But we, but I know to buy into their bullcrap. No, he has I don't know about LeBron James. But he has said about Maxine Waters. He has said about Don lemon. So I'm just saying that if you put that list together, I can see how they come up with this with his thinking don't think it's a coincidence that he she even says, it's not a coincidence. He's actually accusing the president about whether it's Don lemon having a low. I q. Yes. I remember that. Waters has a low like, yes, I remember that he did that all the time James has a low IQ or not supposed to believe Abby Philip is asking a stupid question. This. There is a there's a conscious nothing to do with Q, by the way theme here. And it's frankly, it's right out of the white supremacist playbook. I mean, this is. Well, it's classic. It's classic white supremacists. Classic. I'm I'm very tired of this now. Is this is this what the mainstream the five is going to do? Now is this their track? I guess deliberation. James Stephan, again video that started up automatically. Yes. We used to do that a lot of pod show. That something to. Reason I care about this. Because this is a trick at technique where are you the Muslim ban trick? Yeah. He keeps saying over and over and over and over and over the next thing, you know, it's true. I think you said Mika Brzezinski stupid is LeBron James just been interviewed by the dumbest man on television. Is right out of a tweet the dumbest man on television. Don limited. He say he had low IQ or did you say is the dumbest man on television way. Said that about Don lemon, right? D- lemon. Yeah. But does that the same as a low IQ just the dumbest dumb TV guy? You're right. He says he so I'm not sure that, you know, saying low IQ is very very different. I agree. And you're right. If you call someone a bonehead is there, they have low IQ. No, you come a bone bone bone. Wait a minute bone because in Africa, the natives had bones through their nose, you're racist. Lebron james. Interviewed by the dumbest man on television. Don lemon. He made LeBron Looksmart which isn't easy to do. There you go. He says I like Mike referring to Michael Jordan. Which is kind of inside basketball reference. So did he say low? I I said they're the two of them were dumb. Okay. Not quite the same as low IQ Loye KUA she's been accusing waters of but she can have it her way in this regard. I don't think it's a complete generality because he said he likes Mike. Anyway, this is what? Syndicated, the Herald Tribune and Florida, that's I think this Washington Post. He Washington Post is on it over the past several days, Trump is launched personal tax against a trio of black female journalists. His verbal assault against black reporters candidates N lawmakers has renewed criticism the present employs insults rooted in racist tropes. That's where that girl got it from tropes racist tropes. What exactly is a trope trope is like a cliche, but it's an via somewhere between me minute cliche. But let's look it up. Yeah. I think that's a good idea because that is part of I mean, this this woman who was on CNN, she she really just read the Washington Post article, and that's how she came up with racist. Tropes. Trope is a figurative or metaphorical use of a word or expression. So it's kind of like one step removed from I hate you. Black people. Looking at this definition of trying to enter. I think it's like a. Call it like an old saying, no, it wouldn't even be. Oh, no. It's it's it's it's too figurative or metaphorical. I don't see how it fits in actually to be honest about it now. Strange, isn't it? Yeah. They like to word, I know still left likes the word trope. I've always had a hard time using it just doesn't ever sound good and like just sound of the word trip. So what what what good is it? It's like, you know, if we don't even don't even understand what it means. Why would you use it? But he has over the past several days. They know what it means. And I think the minis something that I something along the lines of what I said, which is kind of like a mean and a. Oh, okay. Got you. So blacks are stupid blacks have low IQ. That's the trope. Because it's it's kind of a mean a racist intimate me as kind of a generality on it. It's figurative foul ANSA. Well, according to the Washington Post just to add to it. He recently called Tallahassee mayor Andrew give him a thief. But again, you know, it's like black people thieves. It's all in this context. Low. I q person thieves these are all tropes that are racist. I mean. I mean. Yeah. I mean, I could build a case. Exactly. And that's what's being done. I guess they don't have anything else to run with now the rotation, and it's gotta come around. And they keep trying these different things. Nothing sticks. Part of the reason. Nothing sticks is Trump himself. He keeps tweeting weird things that make people off in another direction. It's like a bunch of ants. If you have a whole to answer, you get like, one of those lighter guns, you know, that from script. Oh that you liked barbecues with you push it down into the thing. And you start moving around and burning ants my aunt thing. And they watch him scrambling all over the place. That's kind of what Trump does what his tweets like throwing a like some kerosene on on the ends. And we know that's the wrong thing to do because you never wanted torch. The aunt that's taken the dead guy back to the to the mound. So I I have not talked about the national the I'm a nationalist thing because this is a fantastic. Mix of the Lear foundation mainstream media fictional presidencies. And real message meant to indoctrinate the people watching it. And this is Madam secretary which I don't think I saw the last season. Maybe the last maybe not even the last two seasons. I liked I liked halio. She's I've been well. I've been meaning to record this what I know clip you're gonna play, but it's like a really I find the show to be borderline offensive. It got really offensive. It wasn't in the beginning. In the beginning. It was different. But now we're talking before Clinton was running be the first the first female president or really the second as you pointed out in the newsletter. Yeah. And that's the fact by the way, just briefly tell everybody well during the before I talk a little bit armistice. Today's Armistice Day. Even though we don't celebrate it in the United States. We celebrate Veterans Day, which was a creation of the fifties. Because World War Two veterans were just back from the war. And they said, what are we cares about these old guys? It's gotta be about us. I know notice offensive, but is seems to be the if you look into it is what it was about to change the Veterans Day, and they still kept. I think a World War Two Memorial Day during the Woodrow Wilson administration when after World War One they tried to the United Nations. The league of nations was discussed informed. I think it ended up in Geneva. And it was gonna be the first example, and this was globalization era. Right. Similar to the one. We have now and that globalization era, which ended up in that war, which is the same way. This was going to end up. After the thing was over was one of these situations where all the you know that you Lisa guide. This is no good Gill or we don't have servants in our we lost. We lost the Butler. Some of the people that write for the newspaper been killed at this war that we told him to go to and and people came trying to steal our stuff. We gotta do something about that. So they formed a league nations and Wilson's job was to get the United States to join and this is going to be, you know, an organisation band. It's going to ended up like the United Nations useless at the time thought, it was a good idea and Wilson get a tremendous stroke that completely may unfunctional right? You should have been taken out by the twenty fifth amendment, by the way. No, Democrats don't work that way. So the just sound like a Republican, man. You don't do those things that doesn't doesn't doesn't you. People are going to bitch about me anyway. So, but it was it was strange to me that this guy could be incapacitated and the twenty fifth amendment didn't apply him. So that means it's never gonna play to anybody. So as wife was president. She just told everybody what to do. Surrogate? And she was she did a fine job. She couldn't she, you know, she could maybe communicate with them. It's doubtful. But she used the same advisors. Nobody wanted to talk about it because it was like, oh, God, the country's going go to know. Be fun finds out if if we gave a posthumous congr- presidential medal of honor. Yes. For her service as president just just to earn Hillary just to Hillary and put it on the presidency to same one that somebody said, we should just impeach Trump and put Hillary and. Kind of thing. That's fantastic. This is only recently explored by historians. Another salient point you added to the newsletter. Was that just before? What period was just before? Just after World War One before World War Two that they're the everything was borderless. No that was done before World War. One thirty years began around eighteen ninety right in earnest almost thirty years passport because I do research on passport you find they weren't even employed from about eighteen ninety two war as people get roam around aimlessly which allowed this one case from Serbia go shoot guy that Ferdinand douchebag guy that learned something about that today. Archduke Franz Ferdinand on was murdered on Sarajevo June twenty eighth nineteen forty in. His car is open car forty nine thousand fourteen. Do you know what his license plate was was a bunch of threes. No A for alpha eleven eleven eighteen. I don't believe that. Yes, go go look at the interwebs. There's lots of photographic evidence. Well, I'm gonna have to look at and it's just sounds to end this conspiracy that you know, he knew that it would be over. I'm just telling you go ahead. And look the the conspiracy about eleven eleven eighty. Shop out there. I don't think as shop fits unlikely that doesn't make any sense. But okay, I'll look into it saying, I'm not saying that aliens came here and put it down as like oh careful you'll be celebrating Armistice Day one hundred years, and it's just a coincidence. Anyway, Ferdinand was gunned down in this situation. And so they Austria declared were we're on Serbia and that blossomed into World War One. And right, awkwardly know people take sides. Oh, all right. So for some reason, I don't know why Austin take the brunt of the of the blame at the end. It was blamed on the Germans who were just got into it. I just by coincidence. I saw the sound of music that didn't know that. There was a twenty fifteen musical. They did in BBC. Did you mean the old musical was redone by the fifteen? Yes, exactly. I saw it. I liked it aided. Yes. Yeah. I liked that stuff. And I was looking good Broadway plays on Broadway stage. But when they're put on TV they're seeing out of the blue it's completely. And I thought to sing I thought it was the performance. His were week. Yeah. I liked it. The the actor who played the top dober-, Ville, whatever's name was what's the main guy? I don't know. He not d'urville obvious. I'm just kidding. But I thought he couldn't act. Well, what the reason why stuck with the actress who played Maria? I'm like, I know her I know her who the hell I still remember her real name, but she is dawn in east enders. Which is the the soap that's been running in the UK for fifty years like, oh, that's dawn. Okay. And then I kind of got sucked into it. I thought it was great. I liked it. Okay. But the question is did you donate to what will it was? It was donation point. Yes. I said see those people asking to donate a never mentioned the station named do. They know it's a package. They sent to all the stations of these same people begging for money. You don't even don't even personalise to the stage to the local station says the number below number below guests number to support your state local station this station this station. I heard him say that too. But there wasn't even a tote bag. I mean, it's just here's a DVD. It's it's so ineffective is so ineffective. They really aren't doing right anyway back to Madam secretary. And we'll actually I do wanna come back to Armistice Day after this little analysis of Macron and Trump, but this and I'd heard about it. I hadn't seen it either. In fact, I still have not seen it. I really enjoy not having seen this and hearing it because we're going to hear the fantastic acting talents of. We have Hillary Clinton, Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright all former secretaries of state in this Madam secretary. Terry Leoni playing I believe it was the premiere episode for the new season. It can be. Yes. Was or wasn't. Well, you believe I said can I don't know. Yeah. Go on you. Usage. I'm sorry. It's okay. It's alright. But this was clearly aligned with the messaging about nationalism with Trump saying, I'm nationalist and just blatantly stating this is not what it means. This is what it used to mean. You'll hear. Appreciate that. Time when people need to rally round. To consult with your predecessors. Did it all the time? So thanks for asking again. The president has asked me to give a speech after the signing ceremony to address the attack on the lighthouse. Heavy burden. Elizabeth the whole world watching you. Pressure. Thanks. Right. No pressure. Well. In the wake of a nightmare. Like this. People that they are safe because we are resolute in our efforts to defeat. This enemy. Did you should hold up vile and say this little bit could kill everybody in this whole room? That would be the way to do it Elizabeth resolute in our efforts to defeat. This enemy. This enemy. That I think we also have to remember that those who attacked us are resolute, and you will have to reassure people. Acting as freely bad but to. Was obviously they weren't going to do two takes. No. Well, now, I think they may it's cut together as what you're hearing. They may not have even all been there at the same time for all. I know, but this one shot Clinton, and I heard her a couple of times, I'll just mentioned this upfront. I heard her in a previous interviews that we've played with cash wisher, and all these whatever she was doing the lesbians tech. She kept saying there's it's very simple E pluribus Unum out of many one news. She's been repeating this for a while. And now, we know why? Start that. I think we also have to remember that those who attacked us are resolute, and you will have to reassure people about their safety. You can't remind them that we do have the world's greatest military to protect and defend that as great as our military power is has not we're all real strength. Lies. Our strength lies and our core. Democratic values in our constitution. I was a little girl in London during World War Two. When the Germans were bombing. I learned later that Twee my grandparents were murdered by the Nazis in concentration camps. So the threat of nationalism is not just a theory. Okay. So this is very good this Madam Albright who I do believe. Indeed, she is old enough to have witnessed the bombings. I think that's probably historical. By the way, you hear how Hillary Clinton sounds exactly the same as when she's not lying. She's just a monotone. It went to not acting. I mean this day out of people who I remember years ago Hillary she's going to be the next president. And the great thing about her. She's a wonderful one of the greatest public speakers. Talks to everyone is two years old. Concentration camp. And here we go with the nationalism to threat of nationalism is not just a theory. I went through it once and I don't intend to go through it again. So she saying that she was bombed by the Nazis, and that was nationalism. And she doesn't intend to go through nationalism. Again, she makes quite a shortcut. Nationalistic threat is really expanding. More and more countries are being caught in this trap contagious. His split us apart that makes us more difficult to deal with the issue, and it becomes even more. I don't know. What is you man? Is it makes it more difficult to deal with da issue be by being nationalised? And by beaten, by the way, Trump's definition of nationalism is America, I the French by the way, hugely French. I I've people friends of wars by the Rennell. You don't buy the Honda a friend of mine lived in France for like five or six years, and he bought a Honda Civic. All he got was grief from his neighbors because he didn't by French francs. Yeah. Right. But but this is this is not even about that. This is just about saying when when the president says, he's a nationalist. He's actually a racist. That's all that this is. And it's two minutes of it. Makes us more difficult to deal with the issue and becomes even more contagious. They attached what has made America crate and still does. And that is our diversity look at look at us. The attackers wanted to destroy that to you you white folk. The is there too. I was condi there too. I believe she was. Listen, I think what we're all saying is talk about what unites us even at this moment of peril. Remind Americans of our nation's original modest something that I think about a lot, and which seems more important today than ever pluribus out of many one are you're so right because. All right, Hillary, depend on each other America, Americans all Americans all Americans. Jess where we go on where we go all maybe Condie wasn't if she would have jumped in on that one. I thought she was now do you want to the actual age that she made after this advice? Condie. No, no, the the fakes Madam secretary. So she got this advice from Hillary from Madeline and from colon. And then she did her speech. I cut it down because it was too long. Of course. Thank you. Hatchery minister daily, your courage in termination, made humankind safer from the second greatest threat. It faces. What isn't even greater threat than nuclear weapons? That which makes the use of them possible. Specifically the blind hatred. Can have. National existential threat. Nationalism is not just bad. No, it's not just Nazi. It's the existentialist threat of our time, meaning extermination of all of us. We're all going to die because of nationalism. We wanna be clear nationalism is not the same as patriotism. Wow. That did the dictionary change. Let me just check this second. Nationalism. Definition. Okay. Now n- patriotic patriotic feeling principles our efforts patriotic to me. Miriam Webster, maybe doing the long one. Devotion to a nation. Okay. Doesn't say patriotism. The definition of patriotism will look the definition of patriotism K patriotism. Definition of patriotism, the quality of being patriotic vigorous support for one's country. Sounds like nationalism. Yeah. The Cording to the fake Madam secretary. It no longer means patriotic. Nationalism is not the same as patriotism. Version of version of patriot. What's the what's the dictionary term for that? If it's the opposite. Antonin, antonin. Yes, it should be listed as an and him in the dictionary. It's not perversion of patriotism, just at the definition of perversion, I need to. Version perversion, the altar alteration of something from its original course, meaning or this is the perversion perverting it she. Yes, exactly. That is the perversion by saying it's no longer patriot. No longer synonymous with patriotism. Yes. Ration- of something from his you, original course, meaning or a state to a distortion or corruption of what was I I intended not intended last week teeth. All right. Let's continue distortion misrepresentation. Falsify -cation travesty misinterpretation misconstruction twisting corruption. Subversion. Subversion is what we're dealing exactly. Exactly. Belief system. Tacked promotes the idea that inclusion and diversity represent weakness. Oh god. National air call. Hello. Hello Hollywood foundation. Norman Lear speaking the only way to succeed is to give blind allegiance to the supremacy of one race over all others. Nothing could be less. Gotten in the past. Seventy million what hold on what the because we lated ourselves to World War seventy million to World War. We save people's asses. What? Look what 'isolation to World War One. That. Would I say? Yeah, there's isolationism there. We had nothing to do with that war. But we went over there. I point on the newsletter. Why why what was our who was picking on us? But it's worse. She saying because of our 'isolation ISM, which by the way, you can't on one hand say it's about race white nationalist about. Anybody who's not the race? And then all of a sudden say look what happened with ice elation as well. That's about countries not participating you can't have it both ways. It's either nationalism about your national country nationalism about the type of people you have in your nation. It's not both. We're maybe it is in this world. Yes. This was done to confu. -oday couldn't really come up with the consi-. This doesn't work. No. He those piece of propaganda that was pretty much in my opinion junk poorly executed, it was all Lear foundation written all over it. When I first saw this thing. I. Lazy not to clip it weeks ago? Actually saw the whole the whole episode. I watched it. Yeah. And I thought it was borderline sick. And I think it's offensive. I mean, how stupid do they think the public is? Okay. Well, well. My last show about a prop ten and prop six in California properties would have given you some tax money back, but nobody in California once they wanna be taxed and prop ten was gonna put rent control, which is a leftist idea at the base give it back to the local towns instead of having the state run it, which they do a poor job of which is classic thing. You should vote for. But because the real estate interests came in and told all these dummies all no, no Bill is bad. Okay. I'll vote no. Let's finish this up. Could be less than arrogant relation has gotten us in the past. To seventy million. Can we go back to start times fear? Contagious. As much as ending credit layer war. He's what today. Never decide for comedy our common values. Common decency. Recently, our nation's founding motto. You said someone reminds me recently hills E pluribus Unum. So they're they're pushing her campaign slogan. I think. I don't know why she saying this continuously, but they push it in twice in. This piece have something twenty twenty. Colonies became. All. People everywhere to this gorgeous. Governments legislate tolerant. Okay. Say just one more reiterate one more point. I are salaciously as a didn't get us killed in World War One and World War Two. It's our app negation of isolationism and saying, no, no we're going to get involved in all this stuff overseas, which the founding fathers, by the way, specifically said, no don't do it. But we do it to the point where now we're stuck because if we are 'isolation ISM didn't get us over there. It was are dropping the idea. Yes. Now, it's too late. Now, you're starting now world's policeman. So I think another lie, although I couldn't quite figure out what the Genesis of. It was is this idea that Trump. I'm so tired of the Trump didn't want to do the wreath laying ceremony because of a little bit of rain. And you know, the tweets were just filled with what an asshole men were shoulder to shoulder. Millions of them in the trenches for weeks on end in the rain in the mud and are stupid as president can't even raindrop balling on his head. Meanwhile, once I saw the wreath laying thing, I'm like, oh, no wonder did you see all the photos of Merckel and Macron they're walking in the meadow. Hand in hand, she's nuzzling up to him. I'm not kidding kisses him behind his on the back of his cheek. Who wants to be a part of that visual? Here's his little press clipping of it as being the scene of triumph and shame in two world wars on Saturday for the first time, we'll to French on German Lee returned to a clearing in companion forest inside the replica of the train wagon, which the ominous ending world will one was signed to Hitler tech. The French threat nineteen. Nineteen full before destroying the site. Micro angle unveiled a plaque. I'm signed to guestbook the wagon was rebuilt along with the site off the will to in part in homage Tamara shellfish the great roles supreme allied commander start to focus also at the site which holds powerful symbolism for the two nations once face rivals. And now unites is the driving force behind the union partnership. Macro non-medical seem to be saying that would remain a tunnel long after they passing please. We all know, the next war will be French France and Germany, it's always the same. But I think what was overlooked possibly is that, you know, Trump probably had his meeting with Putin while everyone was at the ceremony. In fact, there's another piece just a piece of video where Putin jumps out of the lineup runs over to Trump shakes his hand. Thumbs up goes back. You know? Oh, yeah. Yeah. They got something going on. There Bruin on something. But the irony of all of this as we celebrate peace one hundred years, the armistice of peace world will one. It was the war to end all wars. The irony of it is was really being discussed was war stuff. Yeah. I mean, right. Trump is on the plane, then apparently Macron says somewhere. Well, we gotta have our own army here in Europe. We gotta be you know, we can't always trust the US little more nuance in the French version, but you know, with Russia, China, whatever it is we need more war stuff Trump than immediately starts tweeting saying, well, this is rude since we're paying for everything you frog and then they sit down together. And again, you gotta listen to what Trump saying I think what happened is he had a quick chat with them by the Macron is touching him the whole time. He's he's patting him on the legs. On the arm the whole time. It's you know, which that's actually when someone does that. It's but maybe they're great buddies. I don't know. But it sounds it. Sounds to me like the conversation went something like this. Yeah. Okay. What I meant to say was. Yeah, we're probably going to buy more stuff from America to beef up our side of the equation. I think Trump is there on a weapons call. I think is they're selling. I think he's trying to think. Okay. Macron you wanna buy pretty sedate the whole time while he was doing I have the CBS rundown of this which is minute forty fourteen. Trump meets Macron. Yeah. Here that because the full audio our from vetted on Twitter about the president of France, the two leaders brushed it off. We Jane is traveling with the president. We have become very good friends over the last couple of years. President Trump in president Emmanuel Macron put their good friendship on display with the body language to prove it. They also found a common message to tamp down there ongoing conflict over defense spending. I do sure for them from views that we need to Mitch beta Boden Sherie within NATO. I forget what you say about that minutes before landing in Paris. The president needed president mccrone of France has just adjusted that Europe build its own military in order to protect itself from the US China and Russia, very insulting. Mr. Trump was asked about the tweet getting along from the standpoint of fairness, and what it to be fair. President Trump the first lady. He attended a social luncheon with their French counterparts, but they scrapped scheduled visit an American cemetery, citing bad weather. Meanwhile, the president continues to deal with the backlash over acting attorney general Matt Whitaker who will oversee the special counsel's investigation into Russian meddling. Now. That's a very dishonest report. I mean extremely dishonest. I'll play you the actual audio from that meeting between the two Macron is groveling. Didn't sound like like he was groveling in that report. It don't. Not the impression we were given from the standpoint of fairness, and what to be fair we wanna help Europe. But it has to be fair way down the burden sharing has been largely states. The president were saying the fencing. The defensive and he understands that the United States can only do so much insurers to the United States. So we've rebuilding military. We just had approved seven hundred sixteen billion dollars the year before that we have seven hundred billion. So we're almost completely rebuilding our military with the latest and the greatest and we want we just want. We wanna absolutely be there. We wanna help you actually want to be there. What the bids or whatever? But different countries have to also help that's only fair, and I think the president we've already discussed this at the person, I pretty much agree. I think we were together in putting. You what? As issues talking about the thirty of April when America the Brits and the French bombed Assyria Huber against women. And then we will together immediately Snape council, but it's unfair to the European security today being assured just the United States, and we need a bit of wine. I do believe that we need more Europe in this. These more European defense, not take this bird. What prison Trump has to be one of the one of the state of the United States. He doesn't ask France Gemini on of your finances. That's why I do believe that we need more investment. It's exactly what we do in France. It's the first increase the defense full gear. Would we? We need more. He's CBS report could not have been further from what was said from the truth saying the president's right. We got we're upping our budget. We're going to have more stuff. It's not fair that America is is paying that. When Trump needs help. He doesn't call us. None of that was in the report. Nope. And this surprises. You. No, I don't think I have the clip there was a like two or three rallies ago that the president did. And I I don't know if I just forgot to play it or, but there was someone had a medical issue medical episode, and you might have seen Trump actually stopped stopped everything stopped the rally rally, and it was a good five maybe ten minutes, and then near the end, everyone was reasonably quiet people. Start singing amazing grace. It was really beautiful moment for like. Holy crap. Are they singing and it just kind of swelled up from nowhere? And was very very it was it was a nice human humane experience. I mean, even I forgot to play the. We're so not used to that. But there's nice by omission. Sometimes it's so slanted. What's be it? That's that's the trick. Omission is the best way to do. It really is well mission is what the the right has always bitched about the conservative is that it's not that the people can't do reporting as what's and it's not what they put in. It's what they leave out. Yes. I'm gonna take it right to. I'm gonna take your right to what my biggest complaint is what they're leaving out. Which is young Kim. Yes. You know, young Kim apparently has been around for a while. I think. Yeah. Well, she was I think chief of staff or I think someone sent us a note that she'd actually been she's his he had been in in congress in two thousand fourteen. It's not the first time. Joe cheese enough to figure out we go you quite a book of knowledge day. But I'm pretty sure that. But anyway, what y'all look her up, and you tell the story about young Kim worth that. It was that it she. No, I've got some clips, okay. No. State legislator. Okay. And she was the first Korean American to become state legis. All right, then she went to congress got ya. Gotcha. Wasn't in congress and became a state legislator. Nobody does I I hear you. But she, but she was not mentioned, in fact that all she's has yet to be mentioned. In fact, finding another peculiarities everything on young Kim icing clip. Will they talk about this shields and Brooks? Here. It is Shiels Brooks thirty three of thirty four women replay. This little just little short clip thirty three thirty four women elected to the house for the first time, or we're Democrats. Thirty four. No, no. The thirty fourth is Carol Miller. She's the Republican if you go to roll call which is serving the public says nineteen fifty five is great. You know, the great congressional following operation. Meet Carol Miller, she could be the only new Republican woman coming to congress next year. The GOP's only woman so far will represent west Virginia's third district, and they have a picture they liked to promote this woman. She's one of those old older women that has like kind of the bleached kind of the burns and Montgomery burns from their Simpson's kinda skin white. And she she has. Sunglasses and a hat. She won't even wear some bronze or anything. But then let's raise the outrage. Not even wearing bronze or well. The people if you look at this picture of her. It's like, oh, yeah. I know that's a white woman. I'm going to read you the first line of this of this article about Carol Miller. Among the thirty three new women elected to the house this week. Only one is a Republican status. You know, the thirty three memes is in plain. I realize it with the books and shield, Cody. Now, this is taken further with democracy. Now refuses to talk about it. And and the thing that I've also noticed that there's a another woman the kids they keep talking about the two Muslims who got. Yes. Who are these two Muslims? Are they both in Minneapolis or Minnesota? Or is it just play the two Muslim women diversity clip from CBS from our last show. Diversity was perhaps the biggest winner in this year's midterm elections which saw record number of women run for office. Jim Axelrod introduces us to to from the class of twenty eighteen. Election day, marked its fair share of I the stories of two particular trailblazers may well carry the most power that is if you're taking their measure not by where they finish their journeys. But from where they started we got waiting. We have been waiting. Minnesota thirty six year old he'll on Omar became the first ever Somali American elected to congress here in Minnesota. It's a cold state, but the people have worn far, and we don't just welcome immigrants, but we send them to Washington. Malia she and her family fled the violence of civil war when she was eight after years in a refugee camp in Kenya. She immigrated here when she was twelve learning English in three months. Go four mystery politics in the years that followed in crowd to the able to bring my voice out twenty seven year old Democrats feel was ear is the first refugee ever elected to New Hampshire state house. Her family, flip ghanistan and the Taleban twenty one years ago spent ten years in a refugee camp before making their way here. She studied the dictionary at night to learn English one thing younger generation could do is the energy that you have you want to be as good for. Seniors and young people working families. These days are politics clearly can frustrate and. These two winners provide a much-needed reminder our election still have the power to inspire now. They never mentioned she's there. There's your Muslim women and the specific thing they never mentioned is Rushie to Leib. Another young Kim that nobody wants to talk about this just more than one young Kim. Well, I'm saying somebody that's been obviously blackballed from from coverage. She is a radicals radical this telly woman, she's from Detroit, and they don't and she's new she's a bench east. So they don't even mention her for some hearing the name. Yeah. That's proof. They don't even mention the only democrat Jemma, Kratz socialist. That's well, she's in the AFC camp. Yes. Yeah. Another marginalized. Well, she can't even get paid to good apartment. So. So let's let's go to leave which is spelled T L E. I be and with this go the to leap intro by Amy and tell me tell me the kind of the earmarks of this little celebration, some of the other stuff about this woman. You'll get a kick out evening palestinian-american where she to to lead in Michigan and Somali. American Ilhan, Omar in Minnesota became the first Muslim women elected to congress where she Khalib don't even mention the Afghan woman from New Hampshire. This is all segmenting. It's unbelievable to me. Really? Democratic socialist who supports the Palestinian right of return, a one state solution. She also supports Medicare for all fifteen million dollars a fifteen minute. Fifteen dollar minimum wage. I think fifteen minute minimum wage is better Shing ice. The child of immigrants Lee has spoken out against the Trump administration. Travel bans, this is Rashida to leap celebrating her historic victory. Glued. Glued to the TV. My grandmother. My aunt my uncle propel city. And watching. We've got some Ronnie women in the audience. I here. Do the same. Family district. Every single day who I am Palestinian Merican in two thousand sixteen. She did to lead made news when she confronted then candidate Donald Trump at the Detroit economic club. She got up and shouted have you ever read the US constitution? She was taken out by security. She was removed do use the proper war. Faking out. She was removed. Ball replaces that old hack. The gist senile far John Conyers now aging, jeez. Yes. Okay. Yes. It was useless. Well, the last decade. Yeah. So so she gets it doesn't interview with her. And she has a bunch of interesting things, I think are worth playing. These are all short clips because they're just I mean, she's already full of herself. She's you know. Let's just let's just put this in perspective for second. So this is DS a democrat socialist of America same as Alex. Andrea Cossio Cortez who has been completely sidelined marginalized. Not is also not mentioned in many of these news reports the way we expected because she is of course, the the the shining light the hero. Dan. I believe is. Yeah, she stands for the same things. It's Medicare for all free school for everybody know, boarders? No borders. Gotta go. No ice, right. Yes. Okay. Even be stepping. Now. She the difference between, of course, AO see and this woman and the other woman and some of these other people is that. Referring to young Kim. Young Kim was the state legislature. Rush Shida is also state legislator that moved up. So that makes you know. It's just. Justice donut. Just twenty minutes. So so let's say what she's already got her mind made up of bunch of things she hasn't even stepped foot in office yet listen to her on the what is she going to do? But she impeach impeach Trump. Try to impeach President Trump. Let me guess the answer. Let me think see I think she would say she wouldn't just say, yes. Say as soon as possible first order of business. Yes. I truly believe that he's obstructing Justice. It is very clear that something is wrong within our own government. You can like the man, but I tell you I know you like the rule of law about more and in America, there is laws that we all there is laws. There is laws. Baby is laws. There is many. That we all should equally be held accountable to and I can tell you very strongly that this is not political for me. I mean, he could be a democratic president. And I would still say the same thing obstruction of Justice. And as an attorney myself straight, the Democratic Party or the democrat party what what is the democrat party? So why she saying democratic president? If she's a member of the democrat party. It's it's pretty much saying he's used is just flipped around. I don't like it. I mean, he could be a democratic president. And I would still say the same thing obstruction of Justice. And as an attorney myself, I can tell you when we start kind of turning our heads in letting a little bit of things slip by like what we've seen the last few days. We are jeopardizing our democracy. We are jeopardising that accountability. And that balance of government. That's there that is so critical for us live in a free country. We cannot allow him to. So this is very typical this response. Nineteen seconds left. It's not no examples just saying things has she said yet enemy of the people the press for press freedom. That's gotta be in here this process. That's weaving. And I'm very much willing to start investigating and leaning towards that. If he has anything to do with Justice in it pretty much sounds like he is trying to sway this investigation and trying to make sure that he protects himself instead of protecting our own country. Way to go. Where's she from? Michigan detroit. Michigan. Detroit's let's hear you will Conyers. Jeez. Yeah. But I mean that kept electing him. Let's listen to what she says on Pelosi you'd think that she's going to support Pelosi. Well, if Pelosi doesn't seem to be supporting her so I would say, well, you support Nancy Pelosi who's just announced she will go for the house speakership. I'm really so much focused on the other women of color. I mean, I don't know if you know, it's not just me on Omar. But some of the youngest members of congress beautiful colors of women are coming into the United States Congress from Yana. Hey, Yana to Jonah to Deb Haaland to the beautiful cherise. David's we have such an incredible class that coming and I'm so focused on really not lift him to lean on each other to making sure that we are able to serve the families and the residents that believed in us back home, very effectively. Now if I were doing an. Anti anti democrat party. News reporting the way, I see it on television about Trump specifically. Whereas he was dancing on the graves of those who didn't do didn't want his support who didn't support him, the never Trumpers. Look what's happening with the never Pelosi's with the DS as they are. They're not being danced on their graves because they won worse. They're being Nord. They're being what you said compartmentalize being shut out completely from the party. And these are the exact people that diversity is supposed to uplift. And so we want to focus really on that in focus on making sure that we have a seat at the table that we can truly be heard not just displayed is like, oh, look our caucus now diverse freight now put us at a table where we could actually have voice where we can actually feel like we can make a difference in a lot of the issues that we feel is critically important for our families back home. In other words. No, no. She does not support Pelosi. No. I have one more where she tries to explain. What democrat Democrats socialism is my favorite question. Yes. Yeah. I'm sorry. This is. Yeah. Yeah. Democratic social some there. Explain what democratic socialism is. Yes. For me right now in Detroit. This means. It means I have fought so heavily against corporate tax breaks, especially because I've seen our clue schools and in Detroit closed down. I mean, close to sixty schools have already closed down in the city of Detroit while we're channeling public money. You know, these are our own taxes into a hockey stadium. The Redwood Red Wings hockey stadium. Downtown Detroit sixty percent of the funds that went towards hockey stadium that Krivel onto schools. We're talking about four hundred million dollars away from schools into an adult playground a four profit industry that to me is completely unethical. Immoral and for me, it means living in a just fair equitable society. And that is not fair when you have billionaires in corporate welfare line when our children are still hungry. When our when our schools are still underfunded where I can't even get our fire hydrants, some of our neighborhoods fixed are I can't. Even understand right now, the lack of resources that we have to deal with the increase in concentration of poverty. Many of the neighborhoods. It's it's wrong. And and truly to me against what I what I believe is the role of government, which is should be about people not corporations. Okay. Well, thanks for at the end there about people not corporations and fire hydrants. Well, I didn't learn anything about democratic socialism about people not corporations, which is the Berle might again. A trope trope trope. Before we take a break. I I saw one of our friends yesterday. Okay, friend, you introduced me to many many many moons ago in the beginning of the no agenda show. I got a I got a tweet on Friday. Is it a female? No, okay. I got a tweet on Friday from Roger mcguigan. Oh, yeah. Roger, and he's he was in Austin the final show of his sweetheart of the rodeo album the fiftieth fiftieth anniversary tour, they said they want you come by. I gotta tell you when when when one of the birds tweets, you, I think that's cred. Little bit. Brought to Gwen man. Actually, not just Roger Chris Hillman. Marty Stuart there were doing. This was very interesting show. That he did very bluegrass and everything, but he says hi, by the way. Back when you did you go to the concert. Of course. I did. We went backstage Camilla was there we hung out a little bit. And the thing with Roger is. You know, he text me like okay got back back to these passions for you will call. Okay. We're walking over there yet. We're getting there. I'm here. He's like he's he's the star of the show. He's standing by will call Freddie to take us back stage. And you know, who talks tectonic talks like this is very software soft-spoken when he speaks. Anyway, great time, you know, it was just fun to fund that see again, he's seventy six now. He looks pretty good. He does what he exercises bicycles. You don't think Votaw going on? Not really you think. So I would doubt as possibly he's smooth minutes faces. I'll look I'm fifty maybe at a grind. Grind. What is this face? Does this procedure called the grind? Anyway, he did give me one great idea which I wanted to share because this may be our ticket out of here. Mine for sure. It gets my ticket out of this godforsaken gig me stuck well, maybe maybe I can work into it worrying about it. So here's what he says. He says they have been around the, you know, he doesn't like the fly. And in fact, there were hop in the van and driving back to Florida last night and the van and. We've been around the world for free and Camilla starts. Explain how this whole thing. Works is the cruise lines. They've been on thirty cruises first class around the world. And here's how they do it. They sell Roger McGlynn lecture forty five minutes to lectures during the during the whole cruise. And then all your food and drink and everything for free. I'm like, this is all you could do this so easy. But yeah, you Roger Gwynn you tell the store you pick up guitar, and you you play tambourine men says no PowerPoint, and you just tell stories about the music videos, play some music videos, and you know, tina's going. Yeah. You put that presentation together. Like, this is a great idea you could do it. And he says that the audience is just about cruise taken age right now. Yeah. I think so I think this is an exciting prospect. I think you should go for it. And with that I'd like to thank you for your courage and say in the morning, John. John. Ps for centenary divorce. Well in the morning, Adam curry in the morning. into all the boots on the ground feet in the air. Subs in the water and the days and nights out there in the morning to the troll room whenever we fire of the bat signal goes out through. Goes out through the tweets and the mastodons everyone. Russia's off to the troll room. No agenda stream dot com and good to see everybody there. Little slow today. Trolls good to have you. Also in the morning to let me see I believe it was Mike Riley. Brought us the art work for episode ten eighty four complex instrument. The title of that. This is the Joe Rogan alien hard work with Adam curry, inventor of the podcast and Bob see Doyle's some tech guy, which got big laughs people like this. Art is very funny funnier pieces that we've done recently Tina Tina was flying back from Chicago. And she's I listened to show. I really laughed when you played the Bob see Doyle, it's yeah. Yeah. What'd you think of the history of podcast I fell asleep right after that? Yeah. Somebody somebody trimmed it and put it on soundcloud. Oh, they did. Yeah. I haven't seen that with some original. Art says a history of podcasting by Adam cool. So be on the lookout. All right. We have a few people including super night Kirk from the Happy Valley one hundred one thousand one hundred eleven dollars eighteen cents belated, congratulations on the eleven years and take you for your service. There are too many eleven's today not to donate to the number one podcast in the universe. Please. Keep up the great work and stay this sin. Stay sane in the mornings or Kirk from Happy Valley jingles note. In the morning to Cirque. Thank you very much fantastic. Eighteen there. See? Yeah. For each year. The name of the eleven donations. Not like a sack of sticks that we had originally. We had a name for eleven eleven eleven. Right. I wanna mention it. Now. Peaky project. Mention the second part. But I want forget this is also. Eric she'll and his wife d is anniversary because they will everybody in the family like JC was married on twelve twelve myself. Maybe we're married on eight eight and Eric is married on eleven eleven which is Armistice Day. Well, congratulations. Oh. But the kicker is which I could have put it in the newsletter fide known because I'm, you know, I'm not somebody tell me some of these things you barely know your grandchild's name. Point is is that this is their eleventh anniversary on eleven eleven. Oh, man. That's fantastic. Yeah. So anybody big fan of Eric. She'll and I'm sure there's a few note. You'll at no agenda nation dot com. She'll at agenda nation dot com. Fan. He's Levy eleven eleven eleven eleven you've got eleven's everywhere. L though, it didn't show up in the donation amounts, necessarily, Milton Cuevas in Noblesville, Indiana, five hundred dollars, please use this donation to establish Jim Acosta Doda cost me, Jim fund. This guy is in serious need help little jobs Carmen American team jingle for my mom and goat karma. We can do that for rescue mission. When the world is threatened the world needs help calls on American. And that's the store jobs, jobs and jobs. That's for. Services under hawks baragan, Barron of the Alps from Zaandam. Thirty three thirty three cents kisses to sound like a Nazi drill instructor to get this accent who you are. Three thirty three thirty three. Keep the show going guys issues. Cushy is. Said kisses was cushy is kisses Kush is the baron of the ALP Zander from Zaandam. Brian Malinowski parts known C mail for note. Oh, okay. Well, I have no right here. Good. Plan to head. It does happen once every few months. GM jets longtime Boehner first time don't have been listening. Religiously says early twenty twelve when I had a two hour commute to work twice weekly. When this when people listen that's terrible commute coincidence. I think not the media deconstruction you to have done is completely changed the way I've you media and world events, the no agenda show is my only source for news as I ditch cable. I hear a lot of people say oops, sorry. A lot of people say that too. Sorry. Yes year, a lot of people say that they ditched cable. No, they say that they use no agenda as the primary source, and I'll say that. I think in general, you know, we're still obviously is certainly in in this time since we deconstruct media. We're very beholden to the US media. It's a lot of Trump Trump Trump. But if I opened the European newspapers is a lot of Trump Trump Trump today as well. But yeah, I think get you get failure. Jayme australia. I think we give you enough to to get by and hang out at the water cooler at at your coffee clocks, I think so. The camaraderie, you both have mixed with the playful bickering coming Audrey for not only informative but entertaining show. I'm hoping the show continues for Infinity. Yes, please do not confuse professionalism with camaraderie. This is something I always wondered about John. But I've never heard in the many years that I've been following him. John you use the keyboard layout that your uncle created or get any royalty checks for those that shoes to use it as their primary. Keyboards the direct keyboard of your own call. Relatives named Voracek. Okay. So was the classical composer? I guess I have handed is goes over an active. No, I don't I find the problem is inconvenient. If you go from machine to machine to machine and you want us somebody else machine. You get locked in learned to divorce Accu keyboard, no early type. I mean does anyone use a divorce keyboards? Here's. Yeah. There. There are still use a really. Oh, yeah. Whereabout? Thanks for all the work. You both put into the show jingles, sawing noise. Eyeso- of the ISIS beheadings her head is gone, and my little girl and a little girl. Ye karma. Oh, by the way, PSE says I love hearing the zephyr passing updates. There's the one guy. I don't know what he's talking about. Sawing? I have I have something for them. What was the other stuff? He wanted done the ISIS. Beheadings sawing noise there with her head is gone. And then little girl. Yeah. Okay. Well, I have some variation. He'll be okay. Connected to the. And the ankle connected to the shin and the sheen connected to the funds connect to the. He's old to get looks like that's kashogi. Her head is gone. Got karma. I don't think it worked. Well, I don't I don't know the sowings. I don't have anything that's titled saw. Anyway, I think he didn't ask for what he should have been getting which is a d douching that we can digitally. Brian also contributed to three four five six and then last on the list with to social executives. Jim Bennett in Toronto Toronto two hundred thirteen dollars and thirty one cents. I just received. My green space force t shirt in the mail spaceport fantastic space force a genuine tactile Representative representation of the show. My right wife rolled her eyes. When I put it on. Who cares? She's long gone. What are the other hand all want their own shirts? Dude. Did he just throw his wife under the bus or she actually gone? Maybe she left the room. All right. Get the kids a space for two t shirt. No agenda shop dot com, which is nice. Because the way that works is the artist gets a piece of the sale. The guy the space the guys at no agenda shopkeepers third, and they give third to the show. So it's fantastic. Give us money once in a while. Why don't you give him a just a karma for keeping his marriage together? Yeah. Relationship carbon for sure. Carmont than. All right. That's it for IRA executive is we have to producers today execs that we have three. Wow. Nice. Okay. See Kirk bills and Cuevas and sir. Sandra hawks baragan bearing the thank you for being our executive producers. And of course, are associated executive producers just like Hollywood these are real credits. And when you get a real credit, you can usually get other gigs with it. It's strange hot works or you can just just say, hey, I would producer. Hey, baby, a producer. What do you want to drink business car with saving pick up chicks? Dudes, whatever you're into we'll be thanking more people fifty dollars in above in our second segment again. Thank you so much another show coming up on Thursday. You never know what will happen, but we do need your support. And again, thanks to our our associate executive producers for show ten eighty five dot org slash a. A go over to your wife and. Propaganda formula formula is this we go out. People in the mall. To start this part off with a little side sideways clip. This is the kind of thing, I think would've got a lot more attention. If we didn't have Trump as president. And there was a slower news day people were shooting each other in the state of California wasn't on fire as as it is every year. Yes. Last time Malibu burned on was ninety three. I remembered not that this is new. Chinese robot anchor? Yes, I think I'm in Trump China has developed a virtual Anka to deliver the news watch this. Hello, everyone English. Official intelligence Anka, this is my very first day in England this agency, my voice and appearance are modelled on Jiang's owl. A real Anka with sing wall. That development of the media industry calls for continuous innovation and deep integration with the international advanced technologies that was exciting. What do you? What do you think sort of absence of personality? Absolutely. No charisma, and they didn't even pronounce seen walk correctly fought of you. But my point the point is that they can work tirelessly twenty four hours a day difficult contract negotiations to get through as well, no vacations, but how would they do with Huma break does because it would have to be a single Inca two of them together would be able to interact basically, repeating what's being texted in someone's writing in the text. Well, you had to go into FOX business news to get a clip of this. I find this to. That's Farnese on FOX business, isn't it? No. It's not true that they had to go ahead. Another clip of just like this one better a stoop. This is the stupidest thing I've seen. Why is this a great story? I think this is the future. There's a very popular robot woman in Japan. I can't remember her name. But. I thought it was Correo thought it was Japan could be could be. Yes, she's just a virtual character. She sounds very believable as she looks believable in that you have it. You know, these guys keeps doesn't want to admit to this. You know, these news readers, it particular. Very expensive readers. Yes. Yeah. The irony of these guys get millions of dollars a year most of them. Yeah. Most of them. And get some Louis just have some schlub is right in the copies. They're not right in there. All right. Let's step back for a second. Let's step back for one second because a couple of things going on here. Also had a clip except I only had the clip of this stupid thing talking hold on. Did I even pull the clip of it? Maybe I didn't. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let me just here. Mike, maybe the same. Hello everyone. Official. This is my very first day in England is agency. Okay. So this is being touted as a an news reader. No. He's just CGI this as you point out in Japan or career wherever it is is a very believable looking CGI. Representation of a female presenter on television. This is not a this is nothing. This is like a cartoon. It's a better version of coasting as a. Being touted as as an a news reader thinks being touted as a I. But I think the I think you're right that they want this to be the future. And the irony is is that all these talking heads who just read a script. I don't think there. I will never lose my money. And currency stop right there. Do you? Remember the era of the overpaid disc jockey during the morning commute hours that used to be like in the sixties and seventies. They make in the sixties and seventies they'd make seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, which is the criminal about seven million dollars today. Today's money. Some eighties nineties. We're still making that kind of money. Sure. Yeah. Oh, yes. Happen to them. Well that went away when the internet came in. I think it went away before that no no up until two thousand certainly an in P one markets. I'm talk some radio talk with you morning show. Guys were making a million bucks. Adam Corolla, that's why he could go start a podcast 'cause he's making millions doing the afternoons on kiss of MLA, and that was not that long ago. So, but it certainly it certainly became a lot worse. Just because of you know, more ways to get your top, forty music and more ways to be entertained. This is this is the problem with everything. So these prices have gone down dramatically across the board on all cabling. Al Sharpton is probably the last guy to make a lot of money. But yeah, the irony is not lost on me. But eventually, I guess people want some humanity. I don't I don't think this will ever work. I've really I just don't see it. And I think more importantly people want. To hear you mess up. Something I learned very early on. I was obsessed in my when I was nineteen just start on TV. I wanted to get the I want to do it. Exactly. Right. Weren't using prompters. I've memorized my lines. Might my the first couple of years. I was doing television. I would memorize what I was going to say and. I noticed that. If I. Flubbed? And if I made a joke out of it or somehow fix it wasn't to embarrass people like that more than they worried about a flood. They didn't care so you have to build that into your AI to make it human. People want humanity. This is not I do not. Write it down in the book. I don't think this is gonna this is not the future is not the future. A lot of things robot side on this one. You take the robot side, what isn't our future? Is this story say that an Amazon echo may help prove who kill two women in Farmington, New Hampshire. The victims were found murdered in a home on Meteo road back in twenty seventeen. Police arrested. Timothy Vero for the crimes investigators believe that the entire tack was recorded on the victims Amazon echo in the kitchen. A judge has now ordered Amazon to provide any audio recordings from the speaker Varel has pleaded not guilty of the case. Well, this'll be very interesting to see if this thing recorded anything because it's only soup host to record. After a wake word is issued. And so there's probable cause for some reason looks like the judge is just not technically savvy. Maybe that's got convinced easily that there's probable cause there's a recording of these murders. I mean doesn't seem probable, but if there is recording. Then then we have some issues. Well, what would you do your Amazon into legal team? Yes. Hello ends a lot. What how this was presented to request was was it a subpoena. Was it a just a request that judicial requests? What was it? What would you the legal team here the legal Gower there? What are you going to say because you know, that Jeff Bezos if if they are recording everything you do they don't want that out the Stafford county superior court presiding Justice, Stephen M, Horon compelled, Amazon to disclose not only the audio files, but any associated data such as what phones were paired to these smart speaker. That's may be connected to the January twenty seventeen murder of Christine Sullivan and Jennifer Pellegrini. So the judge ordered any any and all recordings and L data from this talking tube. Gonna deal with that lawyer. How am I what I'm Amazon's lawyer? If the judge compels me just give it up. Why not because there's a worst publicity? You can get them. Eases thing is listening to everything you do. But it's got I don't think it is microphone. Oh, I don't think. So either a microbe because it's too much. Why save all the stupid data? But it's got a microphone array that can pretty much pick up anything within a couple of. It's good at that. But I just don't if there's recordings of that. That was then then there's definitely a problem. What's the trigger word for it? Alexa. Yeah. You can set Alexa, or echo, the Lexa or. One of those. I say Alexa. It has. I think everyone has a program for Lexa. You can only do Alexa echo as far as them or Amazon can call it Amazon. What do yours you had one? What happened? Well, I had the one that I built and you've got very annoyed by it. Because it was terrible. It was slow. You're the one that got annoyed by not me. Okay. Sure. No. You said it was too slow. It was taken too long to do what it had to do. And all the rest of what did you just take the other stuff and just toss it? No. I still use it. I use it at home. I use it for a to take notes and lists. And it's. The new one the new the Microsoft NYC R O F T, which is open source, and it's not it's slow. That's the problem. It's slow because you know, it's it doesn't have the resources of Amazon behind it. It's a it's running on a raspberry pi. So it doesn't shoot out to the cloud and get processed by a million cycles per millisecond. So takes a little bit longer for it to give an answer. But still the number three things you use it for turn the lights on turn the lights off to the shopping list. And how old is somebody? That's all we use it for. All right. Sounds like something you can use it for. I have a couple of clips from the K Q E D or kick the PBS news hour, they have shields and Brooks is this more political stuff about America. Well, not all of it. Okay. 'cause freely. Tired of these assholes the whole time. It's complete debilitating. And it always winds up with us saying guys are idiots. Hey, a thousand eighty five episodes. We've had a good run. John. Dial your plan tour. Already. I'm already on on the Pacific Princess on the Lido deca probably run into Lille. Who does a lot of those? Okay. Oh, maybe this is not such a great idea. Then anyway. So I'm watching shields and Brooks. Yes. A little political because these guys are nuts. But yes, but there's some oddities in here. I got one. I wanna know if your game play this clip this Shiels Brooks weird intro. He may remember there wasn't election earlier this week look yesterday. Lisa desjardins. Our political team did a wonderful breakdown. Looking at the new congress, you call it a generational change. Okay. What was so weird about it? Well, there's too weird as one that was an August Orbis clip that you played. Yes. I know I can eat that. No good. We're open source. I found that cognitive cognitive dissonance. Structure that bothers me 'cause it doesn't make sense. And I can't I know how to resolve it. But she says last Tuesday, as you know, there was an election, but LIZA DVR Dan talked about the election with report on the newcomers the use of the word, but let me listen, listen, again, you may remember there was an election earlier this week. Look yesterday. Lisa desjardins. Our political team did a wonderful breakdown. Looking at the new congress, you call it a generational change. I could that also just be a word. She inserted just to get her because she was laughing. I think she ad lived. And then she went to get back to the prompter she's here ago. But I think it was just it wasn't a script in my mind, though, she couldn't use and what you should use. She's she's she's not even as good as that AI from China. That's what you want. Didn't you have shields in Brooks's another? These are all short is nineteen seconds. Ten seconds. This is Brooks saying that he's most alarmed by Ed. Why would anybody be alarmed by what he just bought to say? And Brooks who's the democrat who's supposed to be a Republican. But he's a democrat. Shields is like the progressive democrat who's supposed to be a democrat most alarmed by with shields this shields not Brooks. And he's alarmed by everything. Well, he's left. He's crazy left. Is most alarmed by was the president's announcement that it was a great victory for Republicans Republicans lots more seats than they did under. Ronald Reagan Choi, W Bush, both of whom accepted the fact that the party had suffered a shellacking. And I I was particularly struck. He never mentioned Obama. Of course, it was shellacked. But he's who was just a large by this. We have to go back. And remember that Trump was kind of raised by Norman, Vincent peel, the positive power of positive, positively the bad thing, you know. I don't I'm not quite getting that they hate him for being positive. All right. Here's another one. This is the irony statement. And I want you to listen to this. And tell me exactly where is the irony that is claimed and I think I think that the victory David I disagree on this. I think it was enormous personal victory and political victory. Financy Pelosi really do any she she was the one who passed healthcare in two thousand nine almost single-handedly the party paid for it in twenty ten and I honestly in twenty eighteen it was the issue. Yeah. I don't know where the irony comes the IRA. Not irony. It's in the word, ironically, no, knowing by the way, that people do these sorts of things. Well, irony is very misunderstood as as a term. I think I used it correctly earlier when I said, the irony of celebrating Armistice Day and talking about war and. And. Very good example. That's and I thought I had to think about it. Because iron is just thrown around. It's so ironic, isn't it? Which is used for surprising. Disappointing us for many things. But irony. Yes. It seems to be just kind of a word use for no good reason. And then the last one I'm not gonna play there's more. But then gonna play this was another dismal little longer. But this is Brooks this time. It is Brooks who if you remember all the during the run-up to the twenty sixteen election. He would be the guy. I had tons of these clips we'd say, oh, well, Trump's got a twenty five percent base. Noah's everybody gets into the general election or the next level. He can't get more than twenty five percent. No path. He no path. And he can't get more than thirty five percent this limit. He can't get thirty. Well, I'm not worried about him winning the presidency because he can't get more than forty percent. He's always got these like these percent things in his brain that he's got a new one. Okay. Let's try it even noted that the demographically there were huge shifts with this new Kip Lutely, but they were largely in one party and not the other that is. That's a fair assessment. David what do you make about looking forward at our biggest and strongest two parties one path is clearly moving towards more representation of the general public one not so much a couple of things I Donald Trump seems to Walden in Waltham self in with forty five percent of the electorate, and so he's built some pretty strong. It's hard to see people leaving and coming in a second. It should be said that for all. There was a Blue Wave or a huge surge in turn out for the Democrats. There's also a huge surge in turn out Republicans, and to me that is basically the white working class saying, we're still hurting someone may have to Kevin hearings and things like that. But life in real areas is still marked by huge numbers of men outside labor force. You've got jobs that are part time in the game. Konami you've still got a lot of economic strain in those people just came out because they're still hurting. Now, Ken this party get out. Side that forty five percent. I don't think so. The proclamation. Okay. So the forty five percent. He's just pulling that what's the point? Here is just pulling out of thin air limited. This is basic theory for the last two years you can't win because the only forty five percent. And then this case. Well, okay. All right now, let's please. Allow me to present you some unhinged. Clips about politics in America because you're playing intellectuals who are saying nothing, which is humorous to us. But no one that I know watches Brooks and shields anymore. You. I think these guys. Relatives chart. I think these guys are just they've talked themself out of relevance in the people that are being believed the true bastions of of honesty and truth are late night talk show, guys really, I would say Bill Maher. But how about Seth Meyers? Let's have look at Seth Meyers as he takes a closer look at the Democrats taking control of the house. Democrats closing message primarily about healthcare. Trump on the other hand tried to scare people with racist conspiracy theories about the migrant caravan what was the conspiracy theory about the migrant caravan. Did he have a conspiracy theory or did he say? Quite a conspiracy theory being a theorist myself. But okay, let you slide headed toward the southern border. Trump's advisors pleaded with him to talk about something else like the economy and Trump tribe but admitted he found the subject boring, and what job numbers we had today. Did you hear? Did you? Well, we'll go into that. They all say speak about the economy speak about the economy. Well, we have the greatest economy in the history of our country. But sometimes it's not as exciting to talk about the economy. Right. That's that's talking about the economy. He didn't say it was boring either. Seth Meyers just said he thought it was boring. So he plays this whip saw clip. Anyway, did you hear well, it's not too bad? 'cause I'm not gonna tell you. I'm sorry. I'm missing that humor. That's the president saying the economy is boring. Do the economy is your number one job. Oh, no. No. No, no, no, no, no. You know, the economy is not your number one job at all check false. Oh, hold and defend the constitution. Shut up. Seth meyers. All right. Let's go to MSNBC. That's where we found Michael Moore with what's our buddy, not Matthews and Matthews. It was on the MSN BC Christmas. It was a stop the hammering guy. Oh, the O Donnell. Larry. Larry. Oh, all right. Let's listen to Mike. Go more. Absolutely. You're so right to say that in your right, imagine if we hadn't won on Tuesday night. First of all, I think there were so many people anticipated that possibility after what happened in two thousand sixteen I heard that pharmaceutical companies rashly developing antidepressant, just for Democrats democratic. That actually brings up point where was all the revolting and the the demonstrating and the rioting and. I think everything would pretty peacefully. Didn't it the midterm elections. There was no there's no fracking. There was nothing going on others. That thing you went to. That was after the election. There's no rioting anywhere. And it was all calm. Okay. So it seems good. But yet, the Democrats and everyone on the left had to have antidepressants and take drugs. Fr- freaking. Fortunately, they don't. They don't need that. Now, they can go back to the law tastes Pacino's. Exactly. Go back to you Kappa Chino's. He's actually saying it right for for for for their medicine this little purposes but seriously, though. You're you're all week. This is so critical. It's going on the Justice department because what you have. Now, we already had a constitutional crisis with Trump's behavior prior to the election. We know that just he doesn't know what it is. But he's gonna there's only one way he can go we've already had constitutional crisis. We're all going to die. So what do you do when you're already at peak constitutional crisis with Trump's behavior prior to the election? We now have a constitutional crisis within the constitutional price. We have a constitutional crisis within the constitutional crisis. It could not be any worse crisis within the constitution. Prices. We now have a state of emergency within the state of emergency. God grab my AR. Fifteen. This has she ever explained what he's talking about. I think try. Yes, thirty seconds. So give it a shot very dangerous. We live in a country. Now, we're an American the window bar and kill twelve. People can go into a synagogue and kill eleven people can go into a Kroger. Looking for black people and kill black people. This. We are in a very very dangerous situation. All of us have to be up and active. We have to be on guard, and and and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, if you're recovering tonight and watching seriously, I would do anything for you. I would I would literally donate a rib for you. Although by ribs and white not be might say. Up your whole body. I'm just saying he's really on a roll. I mean, the jokes just one after another that we've got a lot of things in front of us here a lot on our plate Lawrence. But the people are going to be heard and they're not going away just because they won on Tuesday night. All right. So what he said was nothing absolutely nothing. But yet they keep up. Did at the end will you can keep going. But he says we gotta keep going for twenty twenty. They're gonna be heard even though we won what he says the people are going to be hurt. Even though we one is that I mean, you'd say that would be the again, this is cognitive. Listen to the end again. What is it? What is it? You want? But you're used to. But you get the trophy dissect we've got a lot of things in front of us here a lot on our plate Lawrence. But the people are going to be heard and they're not going away just because they won on Tuesday night. They're not going away. Just because they won. I understand your confusion, but it gets better in the civics lesson. If there was a way to do the map where we actually built the map and showed by population. How large this area of the country by population? You would see the bluest of blue hill. Need sunglasses are so much blue on the screen on the map. Now you need to blue blocker glasses. If we actually. By the size of its population. Not the size of how many acres state has to. He believes that the Senate. Somehow is the Termine by the acres acres. They have this was an election. This is people are oh got the Senate. Yes, they have to set it. But that's because that's that's not a democratic election. One person one goal now because we're also not a democracy, you do where a constitutional Republic. True democracy. No doesn't mean that Delaware gets the same number votes. In the Senate as California with forty billion people live there. If it was a true democracy. The Senate would be proportional to the actual numbers of of the country. So says two houses for they'll. But he just he just skipped over that. He feels the Senate should be the same as the house. You take the Senate throw them away. That's the way to solve this just dissolve the Senate to fix that. We have to the electoral college, we need to have preferential voting systems where you vote your first choice or secondary. So we'll get a more. I've never heard of this the preferential voting system where you get to do. Well, if this is not this guy, I wanted to be this lady's implemented that years ago, you have to do a one two and three is that a good system. Well, ends up with for example. Dianne Feinstein a democrat running against the democrat. Right. Right. Right. Right. Right. Well. We'll be hearing more from Mr Michael Moore. But the series of clips I really want to get to. We don't want the. This is the you don't want a democracy pure democracy because it always results in a majority rule. Mob. Rules. Yeah. It's very bad. Very that's why the Republic works. So. Well. Away at it says Senate, Delaware. I find that. Actually, that's kind of treasonous in a way, you can say whatever you want. But the keep saying that it's, you know, we're not a democracy. We'll no we're not. But make it sound. Like, it's such a stupid ideas. We're pretty well. And then all this. This is the same group of people like the woman who's now the congresswoman from Michigan. Or congressional Representative which is the way that like to sit if. From Michigan standing up have you ever read the constitution getting thrown out of a meeting? She group to tell you read the constitution, you understand why they doing it this way. And to have you read the constitution, Michael Moore that would be that would be the question. I very much enjoyed an I as I have been doing for the past few weeks the Bill Maher show this weekend Friday. Did you see it? No, I don't even bother anymore because you're on that very good. Very good. So this was a rare occasion when you have two comedians Bill Maher, and then the special guests that the panel didn't get the same treatment as Barbra Streisand with their own little set and everything. No, just sit at the at the at the table next to Bill, Sarah Silverman. So here you have to comedians and went to comedians when it doesn't work in. They're both trying to be funny. And what happens is they are bombing consistently because they're not they're not on the same wavelength. I think that he was on her show because he mentioned I don't think these clips, but he mentioned it somewhere any oh, I had such a great time. But I think that somehow they shot their wad together. And you know, what I mean? Right. It just doesn't work. It's like they're trying to be funny, and neither is funny. And it's. Rindge worthy. Which means it's perfect for the no agenda show. Congratulations. You got your walk. Your walk your star on the walk. Welcome to the club. Have one. Gary busy. You're kidding star. Actually, gary. See I think what happened here is. She said I got a joke about my Hollywood star start off with that. I don't think she was ready for him to crack. The Gary Busey joke, which I'm sure he does all the time. When he talks about a star to think is where it went wrong. Bill where antisemitic crime is that fifty seven percent since this dish bag is taken office must be fucking Hitler. It is not lost on me that I am very lucky that I get a star. And I don't have to. So it on my clothes. The crowd turns. Just like it's funny because it's true humor. I think it's they love Sarah Silverman humor. Thanks. Yeah. There's two Jews are disagreeing over the joke. He did not like that joke. He did not think it was funny. And you know, just kind of went downhill from there. One good thing though, I must say about Trump is I never thought I'd even say those words. He has sort of broken down certain norms that we lived with for a long time that didn't really make sense like extramarital affairs. I mean, I was arguing that in the Clinton days. It doesn't really matter. That's private it doesn't if I remember these cheats on his wife is you're going to cheat on the country. No make any sense to cheat on your wife all day long and still be a good president. We've had many did. So we didn't care and it was good because it's just it's private yet. He had stormy Daniels on two weeks ago for it in tire interview at the beginning and said, she was she had done a great service to the country. So that's a little stupid. But this one this next clip worked very well. For me, this again solidifies that there is an an anger brewing predominantly, I think pretty much only among the left, and maybe it's only people who are a member of a leftist party, and the there's so much anger. And so many things have been brewing up that people start to cuss a lot everywhere on television. And you know, and I think maybe the last show of the show before when you say certain word when you swear it's not just the word that comes out. It's a release of energy of frustration can be a number of things. But you know, it's a physical thing that actually got serotonin shooting around melatonin. God knows what's flying in your head. When you do that, your pupils dilate your pores open up. Now. Listen to this another one language Beto said, I love the fuck out of you guys at his rally ears ago that would have been a big deal because he said fuck nobody gives a fuck. Glenn people use fuck in a positive way. That's how my girl. The my dad says fuck every other word, but he's joyful guy. I'm fucking lucky guy. You know, like. Joyful, and I think that's nice. I don't like when Trump says stuff like stupid and loser and stuff like that to me. That's you know, I'm not the word police he can say it. But it just says so much about himself night. We all know he's really kind of at this arrested development at about eight years old. I have great compassion for him. If it if he wasn't hurting people's lives. But those are words that children's say before they learned that those that they're not nice words. You know, your loser. You're stupid. It's bad karma. What about shit? Okay. I do have a theory smoke. So you would say shit. I everything goes out the window wants him sitting here. But I think. But we all of course, on this show on on where I'm onto we can say shit fuck Thuat. But I mean, what is wrong with these people? We're now minute and a half into this. Really have to figure. But the rest of the country on television. We just and everything we accept that. The words shit is obscene that it's a swear. And it just means poop, it just means crat. There's no reason it should be considered obscene or a swear at all. But we don't question things that are just the way they are. And I think that it's a an example of how it's so funny any progress because we don't question anything. Nobody says why is shit bleeped on TV it just means poop? They're totally missing the entire point of this. Because it's an interesting topic. I think it's interesting how language is changing. And how how swear words are being used more and more. But all they can do as well means go poop seriously cringe-worthy last one. But that was a pretty amazing thing to get thrown out of the press room. And also to to have a pretty wasn't thrown out of the press room. We're talking about Jima cost up. Run out of the denied re entry as hard pass, whatever that means is hard pass was confiscates. They wasn't thrown out. But that was a pretty amazing thing to get thrown out of the press room. And also to to have a press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders present a. Suck use. What's suck? You bus. The Greek God or something some it's dumb. Another another dumb Jo-. I didn't mean that say we're both losing it. But he knows that it's submit a doctor tape like now, wait a minute. Is this really claiming that the video that went around that that was edited doctored? And that there was no physical contact is that what he's really saying. That's a meme. Go on Infowars exactly came from info wars. That's they get their news from info award stand. That's the mean. Yes. -tarian government. You know? I mean, it's it's he it not even dog whistles anymore. It's full on. Racist voice. You. It's not suddenly doing it right in front of our fucking bad words, you've got a president who's shit and we've become accustomed to that. So we're for that. So that's it. That's that's what's happening to the people used to be funny. Yeah. That is problem. No, it's a huge. They're obsessed and they're weird. The very obsessed. Yeah. Let's see what else. Do we have? Oh, yes. I did want to mention this before we take another break. Someone gave me, and it was a blog was a blog post may say. Any it was an alternative theory on the plastic bands that we are seeing straws utensils cops. What else do we have that's banned? Plastic wise. Mostly bags and straws. Yeah. This is this is from the organic prepar dot com, if that'll tell you anything, and it goes through a whole list of countries who have an states who have banned plastic bags, and there's a lot quite it's the plastic. Water bottle plastic water bottle. Yes. So we know about the dangers of plastic. But the question is in this is what they're trying to answer is why is there such a push to ban plastic. I would say it's like an agenda twenty one thing because you know, we're getting plastic. I mean, what we're being told is plastic is seeping into us. We're pooping plastic plastics everywhere. Plastic is bad. I mean, we've had plastic in our lives since the graduate. So you know, the plastic stuff around. I don't think we're dying from plastic. I don't really believe that all the turtles are in jeopardy of a straw up their nose. So these guys have theory, they have a theory. What is the number one use of plastic that people have on their? Almost at all times. And some naked. No, no. When you're when you're in the world, not when you're home, not when you're naked when you're out and about doing your business like most people, do what is the number even people who have no job have this plastic gray on credit cards? And the thinking is if we can get people fed up enough with plastic, and then we could get them to get rid of their credit cards. We bring in the chip. It's a stretch for me. I like it. Yeah. The plastic water bottles are a little more concerning than is different. But the this is more about the BPA point of view, which is from the amount of leftover plastic you have because people don't reuse these bottles. Yeah. But that's not what that is not the mean, the me MS were killing animals pooping plastic. It's not water bottles. It's turtles fish, the big plastic floating island, which is water bottles again, I know, but. I'm just saying I like this as a theory. Yeah. Well, I understand why. I like it. Well, it's not like companies aren't doing this people are doing this this company that did it. Yeah. And I think there's a couple of American companies that have done it and people think it's fantastic. And I did a quick Bing search, and I they tried this in twenty fourteen in two thousand nine how your credit cards affect the environment. I'm just reading some. Some headlines here plastic cards, not so fantastic for the environment making credit cards, landfill friendly. Why cards retailer see green alternative to gift cards? Is it green card? There's a lot. They've tried this for several years. I see two thousand nine two thousand eleven two thousand fourteen let's see if it comes back. All right. I don't think it will. I mean. I don't think it will get any different than what we've been witnessing so far minor could be and subtle. Couldn't approach could be. It's not gonna help. I liked it though as an idea besides that, I think that because of this clip to worry about plastic in the ocean oceans heating up it should melt, the plastic and environmental news. The world's oceans are warming at a much faster rate than previously thought. That's according to a new report in the journal nicer, which finds that oceans have absorbed sixty percent more heat during the past twenty five years than previous scientific estimates. Scientists say this will result in excel A-Rated global warming as the heat is released into the atmosphere. Making the target of holding global temperature rise below one point five degrees celsius or two point seven degrees Fahrenheit, even more difficult to achieve unless urgent global action is taken it's been interesting. Reading Dutch news wants this report came out where everyone said, oh, we we have to stop. To one point five degrees. The Netherlands certainly the political class and the elites went all in. Yep. We've got to do this was shutting everything down. They already have pretty much banned gas for usage in homes for heating or for cooking. No new homes will be built with gas connection. That's off the table. That's just done in the whole country. Why? Because it's bad for the environment. I'm telling you idiots over there. It's the socialist kingdom of the Netherlands. And then of course, people while we have to do something. We've got to hurry up. We only have until twenty thirty to get this all done. So let's lose use nuclear. No, no, no, no, no nuclear it. Just it just it doesn't work. There's a huge telling you all the experts are saying it costs too much it takes too long for to eventually make any sense financially. So we yes, yes. Percent of France. I know I know. And people just, you know, of course, then we get documentaries. Oldest look at your noble, again is that what you want people to you want that kind of noble energy. Do you wanna die? Do you wanna be fried? Now, let's have some wind wind and sun. They're gonna have to start buying energy from Germany you watch. Maybe this whole thing's a scheme to buy energy from Germany. Joe? Imagine all the do. That'd be fun. But it more than a few people think for show ten eighty five. Jonathan denison. Or actually this goes back to Aaron D young stop in Dortmund. Young stop youngster. SSD? She said she is. Probably the he. Yeah, you're right. Jonathan Denison hundred eleven dollars that was one hundred four five Jonathan Denis one one one dot one one of black baron, Scott, Barron of north Georgia. One one one dot one one was Scott who asked me to play at the end of the show. Was the bagpipes the flowers of the forest. Yeah. I think we should do that. Okay. I'll play that. Dr Jeff one one one one of these Armistice Day celebration donations, sir. Cuss media one one one wanted meniscus. They name and location j Kincaid Kevin make Laughlin viscount of Luna. And that's the end of them. Call one one woman at a big, no, no. In a mediocre. I didn't see any shout outs to the US Marine Corps, which I know we have a lot. We have a lot of service personnel in the producer stable many Marine Corps, which they celebrated what two hundred and forty seven years yesterday. Yeah. Yesterday today, the newsletter just put it in there. We have one hundred dollar which is the other opportunity because it was one hundred ten of Armistice Day. We got three people. Sir. Don of teens Ville Oviedo Florida do named Peter in New York City and Jackson Butler and level end, Texas. So that was another dud. So I guess nobody cares. We'll Hamid Ali baba Wani eight oh eight but they do care about boobs boobs. Always a winner. Thanks, dude, named Muhammad Ali David deer slayer, also boobs douchebag for too long. I should do douche. Yes. We do. St-? Kermit the end von glitch gut night of the vector realm seventy Morton cured in in sober Denmark. Sixty nine. Barron. Mark Tanner, six seven eight nine six seven eight nine Whittier, Robert Bruckner fifty were fifty dollars level already. Now. These are just naming locations. Fifty dollar donors, Robert Bruckner. Brett, yo in Kansas. Maryland, Kimberly Redmond in Toronto. Toronto canada. Jonathan Farish liberal, Kansas. Richard gardner. Parts known Luigi is Richard. Yes. You're quite sure drew mode check and El cerrito right up the street from me, ROY ten -have in Pinnock or. Netherlands. Get Robert decant deca from Fairfax. He might have skipped him rubber deck and Virginia. I'm pretty did, sir. Allen bows. And oakland. Last. But not least Kyle Meyer is Atlanta, Georgia. That's it will wishers for Armistice Day to consider a holiday a lot of people. Take today off take Monday off, right? Yeah. But they're off the three day weekend up there. Well, I don't know where you're going to go and California's not on fire. Burn clear lake is still okay. And Barry is still working. So you're safe though. Right. You're okay there. I hope so. Well, what does that mean? How far is fire from you one hundred miles two hundred. That's not that far. I don't think it's gonna go to one hundred miles tear does like twenty thousand acres in two minutes. He has a big state drove out MRs is the air pollution. I mean, you have the wind does not the worst of it. The wiz smoked up the area where you have like you can't see the sun the air Pollution's, really bad, and I had to put up the really bad. I mean, it's you can't see Jesse San Francisco from here, which I normally can barely see can't even see Alcatraz, and is all spoke from the fires which is blowing down this way because it's got a reverse winds normal wind comes off the ocean. And so I to get the heap filter out in my old electrostatic precipitator. Well, which is a nice piece of gear to keep the house air fresh. Do that. Anyway, just. Yeah. You should you should definitely do that. I saw. Steal on musk tweeted, tesla s ninety and model X have custody. Great Heff filters were happy to help. Take a battery car into a fire. That sounds like a good idea. Yes. Well, thank you to our producers who supported this show episode ten eighty five it is, of course appreciated. It is how the system works. No advertisements. We've talked about a lot of things on the show today thing the topics that cannot be discussed in a what would be deemed a brand safe environment. It doesn't exist on the show it's dangerous show to produce. And so no one whatever you want to advertise. We wouldn't be able to do it. If we if we did we took advertising anyway. So we just don't do it. We've been doing it for eleven years at works. Thanks to the help from our producers. You heard our executive associates earlier. These are producers who also come in under fifty dollars many of them because I want to remain anonymous. But also, we have subscriptions. I. I implore you to go to divorce dot org slash a and please support us for next show, which will be on Thursday dot org slash and a cancer request or f- cancers. Jobs, jobs, and jobs. That's for. Carmont? Stand back because today is November eleventh two thousand eighteen birthday listing one birthday Peter nuclearized happy birthday to smoking. Hot wife. Monica. We couldn't agree. More Berkeley, everybody. Here's the best podcast universe. No nights, no titles. No nutting. I did want to mention because the guy's been in the news. The guy I know quite well in the Netherlands and. He kind of although he's been around longer than I than I when I first met him when Anthony Robbins, really cropped up. I would say what's that ninety fair to say that that was peak peak. Spatial guy. PF peak Anthony Robbins was nineties. I think he had the fire walk and everything and I had the tapes probably early nineties. Yeah. To this guy. Emile Audubon this his name. He I I became aware of him in in the Netherlands as the Dutch Tony Robbins, and he had the same thing. Fire walk and he had pictures of him in Tony Robbins. And he's. Kind of bit like kind of he's more. He's like Tony Robbins. But also a little bit like Trump to be quite honest the way he sometimes talks, and this is just a funny guy. And every every so often he he's like a media bomber. He'll pop into the media with some outrageous thing that the whole country's talking about and certainly in the Calvin lowlands people eventually, yeah, that's just that's just a meal. He's nutjob. But I always liked him. Very interesting points when I was flying helicopters. He was like, yeah, we should be able to land right in the middle of Amsterdam. He would just media bomber. And the media just loves to go towards him. And it became it went from showing the guy as something that somebody who something interesting to say or different slant to he's a nutjob. And of course, that's why I was attracted to him. And he's been to my house for dinner. I've been to his house. I haven't spoken to him in a long time. But he showed up on the international stage this week. Everybody was talking about him. Washington Post wrote about him BBC did articles on everyone's talking about my guy a meal, and I think this time he really bombed the media good gender ISM is increasingly a part of American life. Now a man wants to be trans age. I'm talking about a meal random band. He's asking Dutch corps to legally change his age from sixty nine ninety nine. I feel I suffer on the my age. I am really foot nine again. I would have a baby again, I will. A new car again, if I have H again, I've hope again, I'm new again, the whole future. Is there for me again? I'd like this. I heard about this too. I didn't take a clipping it. But yeah, I thought it was pretty funny. I thought it was it'd be interesting to see how it just like self identification self identify as you. Forty four forty nine year old. Yes. Or just self identify as thirty year old. Old are yet thirty what you don't look thirty. Hey, but hey, but thirty but but ageism is real it's very real. And if I were able to change my age, I'm in a weird spot because I'm kind of in the middle. But you take someone like a meal who sixty-nine if you can say, you're forty nine again, you will get jobs that you wouldn't get and he doesn't look sixty nine to be honest. He looks you know, fifty okay, forty nine. Alone insurance. And there's lots of things that, you know, health insurance if you have a different age if you can legally change your age, and why wouldn't you be identify with the thirty year old identifies? As a woman, I have a penis, but identifies woman. Okay, we'll put on your driver's license. If you can change it you can change these biological things. Why can't you change biological age? Yeah. I like it. I of course. Yeah. Me too. What would you identify as? Twenty nine. Okay. You look beat for twenty nine. Do travel. Done a lot. Jersey heaven credit. Eight and they are you could Pri board. I'm in. I do have no agenda tip. Actually, they no agenda. No, no, no agenda travel tip. Okay. Yes. There is a new rule. And this starts December twelfth that. American Airlines, not the not the one airline, but all airliners will allow passengers with nut allergies to pre board. So they can wipe everything down. I'm thinking hell, yeah. I got a nut. Alex. I'll show up with a with the medical mask with gloves. We have to pre board. I have a horribly. Have the allergy? You don't have to wear the mass. And this is what I want to be in front of all the other pre borders. I wanna wanna be the guy really in front before children small chilling smoke smoke down here. If you go to these, you know, the kind of the hippy dippy places to go shopping a bunch of people in there with these masks. So when I saw the first time, I miss not as bad. I don't know. Maybe it's bad for some people have asthma. But when you see it, and these mass do don't do have to they can't really do much because spoke particles are too miniscule. But you see for some I saw that. There was some sort of an outbreak of Boll Berkeley. Yeah. Yeah. Did you did you see the the new Planned Parenthood ad? No. To you. And I were talking about this yesterday. And you really have to see if you maybe just being it. And it's not about the audio. You can keep the audio off. But it's it's a thirty second one. I think actually the long thirty five seconds for some reason. And it shows a close up of the most beautiful beautiful infant come. I saw this ad. Yes. So I'm looking at it. Now, you see this beautiful kid. She deserves to be loved. And then that's just the show it again, you're looking right into her eyes. And the cutest smile ever. And you know, you're in love with this kid, and then the next title card comes up she deserves to be wanted. And then it goes black and the kid comes up again. And just the is in love with this kid and then cuddle card comes up. She deserves to be a choice. Yeah. And then this the hashtag stand with p p for stand with Planned Parenthood and team, and I were talking this is the. Action fund, by the way, this is not is not the out for the for the five. Oh, one C four. It's the lobbying organization, and and we're looking at this and saying, you know. I think depending on where you are in your mind, or I don't know if it's necessarily if comes down to pro choice or pro-life, I think that's a little too strict, I think there's middled ground in this. But. You look at it. And I looked at this ad and went oh my God. These people are killing babies like that. That was just my initially. I'm not I'm not a pro lifer necessarily. Choice approach choices important. But that was my initial response for for for never thought that by the way seeing the ad, but apparently some people and put you in that group saw the ad differently. Yes. Well, then they blew the ad. Well, no, I was going to get to the point. I was going to get to was. Who is this ad for? That's kind of how I dissect it because the baby is a white baby. I believe the number one client of Planned Parenthood is black or Brown. I may be wrong. But I think those are the statistics. No. I mean, maybe maybe a myth. Well, they made a choice. They chose a very very white blue eyed baby and saying this baby should be choice. I dunno. I think they're pandering towards. It confused the hell out of me because. Yes. Well, let's also mention that right now, the Democrats as they did before Trump's election. If you remember when we did the show like I'd say three years ago, we talked about this because we were kind of taken by it. It was the move was to get all women to hate Republicans. Yeah. And we had a number of the Matic shows that showed evidence of this which was of hate on the Republican. So that all women with the female perspective all women would should should vote democrat, the Republicans are evil women haters, and this was that they maybe they're cranking that idea again, they could try to get the white woman to vote democrat. I don't I don't to me. It was very confusing white woman that's me identifies a forty nine year old white woman. So I'm trying this go. For I thought this is airing on TV, though, isn't it didn't get banded. Did. I know of. Didn't work they're saying. But the way the ad reads to me is you have a choice. This this baby. You can have this baby. When you're ready for this baby. And you don't need to have this baby. When it's not convenient for your life, or whenever you're ready to love a child of your own that I think is the intent of the ad. I don't know. Does it really work? Worked for me. But bring it up probably doesn't work. No. I'm gonna go along with the you know, if you can't if everybody is this is the problem with doing this symbolic kind of like Alan the blank type of ad. Yeah. It's just they're always like this. It's like well you fill into by gilded in wrong, whereas ice cube. He makes it very very clear. Lord, bring the dole when crazy. Few what they killed you alone alone. Arrest arrested credit is. Sticks. Arrested arrested. Arrest of president arrest. I think it's pretty clear what he's trying to tell us. I think that's a little more. You know? That's that's hard to. I can get this this. I understand night. Got it this one I understand. Wow. Yeah. We'll have so little respect for the country. Yes. It's pretty funny. Now, let's we were talking about. I think we had. Ongoing discussions of the southern strategy. And how the party switched the big switch. Yes. I think I have a jingle for that. You do a jingle. I think so. I didn't realize you. You were going to bring it up. Do something here at the end. Anyway, tell me what you thinking about. And I'll look for the Pat Buchanan clip, which I promised discusses because he was in the Nixon White House, and he discusses the so-called southern strategy in what it was not doing what it was doing it who is the racist who weren't into. None of this ever. Lot of the stuff is bit exaggerated largely by democrat. Inclined history professors and people that pushed their agenda on this poor hapless student who doesn't get a real clear picture of things. And I thought it's as line not real long. But it's long enough that I thought it's something you'd particularly like because adds to the narrative of this discussion. I was wondering if you can give us your thoughts regarding whether president Nixon had stuttered strategy. Clearly we wanted to we wanted to win it all eleven southern states nineteen sixty six campaign to dips. George Wallace should against lifting. And described that in my book, if you read the book, the libel against Richard Nixon, it said us racist tactics to win the south that is full. The Democrats would your Wilson re segregated the federal government carried all eleven southern states fifty yard put cactus Jack order Texas on his ticket. Tax. If your put a clansman on the supreme court fifty I put Jimmy birds still chilling on the supreme court with blocked anti lynching law. So for decades, the Democratic Party used the issue of rage to maintain the solidity of northern liberal southern coalition. What apple was at least Evenson states. Wallace carried the same state athlete. Stevenson care against Eisner. Because Evenson which until guy in foreign policy. David. Ticket. John sparkman of Alabama was a signer of the Dixie festival which called for massive resistance to integration and resistance to these court decision senior in high school. So the Democrats were that we wrote in that piece column I wrote Knicks four dick Nixon when shells it should look. To the Dixiecrats to squeeze the last out of political to add fruit of racial injustice. Nixon voted for the Civil Rights Act of nineteen fifty seven sixty nineteen sixty four sixty five sixty at a date at the. At once. The sound was desegregated. Showers table naturally. The south. If from its conservative convictions straight into the can. But only if he was desegregated. So I think I mean it's alive. Happy to take that went on in taking it on that book liberals wining and complaining wind and complain what if DR? They are all confederate states every single tiny ran all four times. It's good clip. The problem is anyone who was interested is just going to is will glaze over. It's it's so much easier to say, hey, they all swapped and the racist are now Republicans you don't need to say any more than that. Every time. I hear one of these been playing these long clips about this for forever, people do some glaze over. I don't think everybody does can listen on the show. I don't of course, not our producers. But the thing that got me I didn't realize because I was a democrat at the time. And my dad was a big Adly Stevenson support as he was a union guy. And he was a democrat which old, you know, the Archie bunker type which all all Democrats, and he he was a big fan of Adly. Stevenson, even though he's running against Eisenhower who's I can not like that guys like a war general, you know, the whole thing, and he kept saying that the reason Stevenson couldn't beat. Is in Hauer was because of he was perceived as an egg head I ever heard the German. And head which is he looks like he's got one of those egg-shaped heads not as bad as some people. But you know, he's bald. He's got a he's very intellectual. He was like demand. These very soft spoken. She listened to some of his old speeches there on YouTube. But I didn't even think about the fact that he had a racist vice president pick you'd think about it. That's the same thing. Did when you put Johnson on the ticket? Yep. Had to. There's a little extra piece to this southern strategy story, and I found that on Netflix. It's tricky dick in the man in black, which is quite a story of Richard Nixon and Johnny cash. Who performed at the White House, which was a big deal in in fact. I encourage you to watch this besides being Johnny cash. Just fantastic. Great story, apparently Nixon put in a press release. And he said it part of his strategy is let me get the south. I need Johnny cash Johnny Casta perform at the White House. And so that was part of the strategy, which is never mentioned. I, you know, I didn't know about either. Really? And then he put in the press release Nixon did that the president has requested Johnny cash seeing okay from Skokie and welfare Cadillac, which I mean talk about some dog whistle especially welfare Cadillac. Probably no one knows the song. But it's about someone who's on welfare, which I think was severely frowned upon. And the kind of a joke songs one day. I'm gonna drive down pick up my welfare check in my Cadillac, which is kind of a sneer at people who are on welfare Johnny cash not perform either of those songs instead he sang what is truth, which is kind of a haunting song pretty much telling the president you've got to help the youth of America understand. What is truth you've got to get the truth to people, and it was only this was two weeks before Kent state for the whole country went ape shit. And I was watching some of that footage. It seemed like it was a little worse back. Then john. I mean. Yeah, we're seeing crazy stuff online, but people are on the streets beating each other each other's heads in like a lot. Yeah. Is it just my perception? Or is it was it? More violent on the streets. I didn't go to the store and get beat up when they had these these demonstrations which were mostly antiwar demonstrations kids, get drafted and go Vietnam, they didn't want to because it was anyone who would knew anything about the war newest kind of a hoax not a hoax, but it was a real war. But it was it was a reason for being there were dubious, and they didn't as John McNamara later revealed in his autobiography even administration's the Johnson administration and later Nixon, but mostly the Lyndon Johnson administration. They all knew that they shouldn't be there. And they couldn't figure out how to get out. Face. They wanted a a dignified ending say. An honorable we got to claim something we can't just leave this constant comment about the Asian cultures. And they're terrible because they always day Roche. So they're more worried about saving face than they are about anything. That's us. That's we do that. I say you are. Yeah. Yes. You worry about saving face by as much as any Asian culture ever has in the Vietnam wars, a very good example of that to the travesty of all of this. And the thing I remember growing up certainly the first five six years when it came to desegregation to me, it was the school's really black and white kids. They couldn't go to the same school. And now, okay now, we're all because I was alive at this time. And now, we're all, you know, desegregating black and white kids in the school. And now we're in two thousand eighteen almost two thousand nineteen and here we are where we're trying to segregate getting whiteness out of the school. I got a confirmation on Humboldt university. From an anonymous person who works there for obvious reasons. I just wanted to let you know that I also work at Humboldt state university. And I also received the whiteness Email several times about whiteness, microaggressions training. So I can assure you it is not a hoax. The topic is taken very seriously H issue. And at least in my experience, the average student faculty staff member will hear conversations about whiteness on a daily basis. It has always seems to real to me. I believe that these decent people with good intentions, but they have bought into the idea of negative whiteness hook line and singer to the point where you can almost see the guilt on their faces. Obviously to keep my job. I shut up and keep my head down as much as possible. But it is getting very strange. I am a little paranoid. So I chose to not even right? You from my HFS. You Email address? This is very bad when teachers disagree with what's happening in in a place of education, and the just shutting up and keeping their heads down and had to write a non of us notes to the no agenda show from a different Email address. That's how bad it is. Universities, drew. And then we got I know you saw this note from Rachel Adam John, my daughter goes to preschool gives color names to classrooms this year. She was entering the white room. But when we got an Email from the administration that they no longer thought white inappropriate color name, given the schools efforts at inclusion and diversity of the room is no longer called white. They change it to a different color. The white room. No long, which of course, is the most inclusive. Color of all, it's all colors, isn't it? White is everything and black is nothing makes it even more. Crazy. Democrat. The old switcheroo. We do have jingle for it. Okay. So. Yeah. That's what people have been taught. And it's just getting worse. And it's and it is people who are now just around twenty three twenty four. They're they're they're the they're the ones that got hit. I with this nut stuff. It's really truly ninety five ninety six you're born around that period. That's that. These are the ones that have gotten all of this weird. I think it goes before that. But we know for sure I think you can go back it up a little bit. Because get the table. I get my millennial table with the new and older millennials. I'm talking. You know, the Zimmer's will the humor's for sure. But I would say that some question about this which between the parties to this group and the oh, yeah, it was like. Table about that. No. I get a lot of people say, yeah. Still people who are behind on shows. We'll say, yeah. Yeah. I don't know exactly where I was taught. But that's what I was taught. And of course, no one can back it up with a text book, which is always to. Taught wrong. Okay. Kashogi or hush shook t the United States will no longer refuel Saudi aircraft that are conducting stripe fishes over Yemen. And Saudi officials made this announcement on Friday now the Saudis say their military coalition requested this change because they've improved their own refueling capabilities. Oh, yeah. Okay. That's very coincidental. So I wonder I didn't have time to look into it to see if you know what this means. I mean, we just taking our guys who are refueling and putting a different uniform on them, or you know, is what is actually happening. But this was one of the big gripes people had about our involvement with the warn Yemen. Yeah. So that's over any gripes. Well, that seems easy. Then. Sounds like. Yeah. It's not going to stop the complaining. No down away when just doesn't pull out of Yemen. When and how much do they have to be beaten up? This all stems back from the who these kind of kicking out our guy from the running the place was running it into the ground. And of course, now they're getting bombed smithereens on. Yeah. They hate to these. Apparently, I think our government does to definite hate over there. I want to get this, by the way, this is the idiot mosque. These guys are tried to blow up a mosque. They blamed Trump. Meanwhile, attorneys representing three Kansas men, convicted of two thousand sixteen plump to bomb a mosque and murder Somali Muslim refugees are arguing trumps hate filled rhetoric should be taken into account and resulting in more lenient sentence. The lawyer say their clients face life sentences were supporters of then candidate Trump in a court filing. The lawyers write quote, the court cannot ignore the circumstances of one of the most rhetorically mold breaking violent awful hateful and contentious presidential elections in modern history driven in large measure by the rhetorical China. Shop who is now our president. Nice and good read. He nailed it. Very good. About right. The story. I've been following. This will be the last one for me as crackdown on cigarettes could go one step further. The Washington Post reports as soon as next week. The FDA is expected to announce a ban on the sale of most flavored e cigarettes in stores and gas stations across the country. The FDA has called teenage use of cigarettes and pedantic. Most vaping products are flavored and study show teenagers are attracted to flavors agency is spending nearly sixty million dollars on an education campaign warning kids about the dangers of e six though vaping e cigs may pose a less of a risk than smoking tobacco. The FDA says nicotine and e cigs can negatively affect a person's brain and overall health. The Washington Post ads that agency will also impose age verification requirement rules for online a cigarette sales as well. A couple of things the reports were very similar. I had a number of them about this. Some reports actually start off by saying at the time where cigarette sales are record low which is not good for the big tobacco e cigs e cig go go into any school and say, hey, man, you got an e cig people look at you like you like your moron. They it's called vaping. They're using e cig for very specific reason to make this seem like heaven, the FDA weasel in on an unclassified substance nicotine is unclassified. I learned is this. It's not classified as any drug. Unless you know better which you might. I would probably just from 'cause you can go to Walgreens and buy nicotine. You can buy patches and all these things, and they're just over over the counter, they obvious. Classified. But. As as I've been following this is tobacco. Who has a problem? Their main cancer stick product is at an all time low in sales. They see this thing exploding. They wanna have the government regulated. And the government's doing it, by the way, I think a lot of kids they they have vape the jewel would be the top one they use. But they don't call it an e cig this is really bugs me keep saying e Sieg E C vape. They by vape liquid with no nicotine, you can buy. I mean, it's very common. There's no nicotine in it. At all the reason kids are doing it is a it's oral fixation. It's an obsession. And it's cool to do be takes very little work flip the cartridge and put a little THC in there. Which is another reason why people do it. But it's this this whole idea of the government, regulating, some flavored juice. I I think it's wrong. Killing a whole cottage industry. And just handing it's going to be a million dollars to get each flavor sorta scam. Yeah. But big big tobacco doesn't care. They won they want. They want to take over. The using leveraging the system to their benefit corporate Bennett just want everyone to notice that how it works people over corporations. Yes. Yes. A oh. See here. You know? Right. I'm good. I'm good. That will be ladies and gentlemen, the next show. I may be coming to you from the lowlands or maybe finally I'm trying to get the meat up part done. This is the reason I'm going is not for the meet up, but I'm hoping to get it organized. But I will let everybody know. As soon as I know. Joe maybe a meet up in the lowlands. Maybe one of the UK we'll have to see. But you go in there for them. Anything to get out of this gig. Yes. Reminder. We will be playing the flowers of the forest for a couple minutes for all the veterans. I think of course of my grandfathers both of them and all service personnel. And I'm coming to you from downtown Austin, Texas Seema region. Six in the governmental maps, it is the couple of the Jones star state in the five in the common law condo in the morning. Everybody. Silicon valley. I'm John we return on Thursday from somewhere right here on no agenda. Remember us at divorce dot org slash N A until then. Hobo dot org. Slash.

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