14 Burst results for "Jill Levine"

"jill levine" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

"Heard. There's a big part of me that wants to believe that this man left this encounter with jesus and was transformed into a new person because jesus saw him. The man was seen and he was invited to follow. Jesus he was invited to be transformed. Jesus knows with this holding this man. Back and jesus names it for the man. I referenced earlier. The difficult words of jesus written by dr. amy jill levine. And she has this beautiful piece in her book. She says this sell all you have cannot be an address for everyone and jesus does not tell everyone to engage in this type of divesting to do so would be both immoral insufficiently attentive to people's needs when jesus carefully looks at each o- bus when jesus looks at us and loves us when jesus sees us what does he see. That's holding us back from living into faithful. Life's for god. Maybe it's not money or possessions but it's something we each have something that jesus sees. We believe that. Jesus sees us and invites us to abandon those things and to be transformed. Come follow me. Jesus gives a an opportunity to be transformed not only to live his life in a way that is faithful and according to what he is called to do but jesus also gives this man an opportunity to transform the lives of others by giving out of his wealth it's a two fold transformation and it demonstrates just how connected we all are to one another when we are like jesus when we see each other lives are transformed when we take time to look carefully and love our neighbor. That's where we share the love of christ and it's difficult. It isn't easy it is a convenient. It may not even always feel very natural to us for the disciples this charge to give up everything and follow. Jesus seems impossible. So i want us to in this morning. Rereading verse twenty seven how we ended. Jesus looked at the disciples carefully because he sees them and knows them in. Jesus says this it is impossible with human beings but not with god. All things are possible for god. There's a reason that in our church mission statement love god in serve others come i. It's only when we love god and serve others that we can truly transform lives. It's only through god and loving others. That lives can be changed. That life's can be made knew that what seems impossible can be made possible through god. May we each spend time this week. Thinking about what god sees in each of us. May we spend time seeing those around us and being fully transformed their christ. While you pray with me oh still speaking god. Throughout history in the wide world you have gathered people around your word to instruct and inspire we give thanks for all who have received your vision and shape diverse in faithful community is to follow in your way. Continue to open that vision to us that we may become transformed by. The renewing of your word in our hearts enabled us to grow in love and understanding for one another create in us. Oh god clean hearts and minds let us join with you in your suffering and your triumph. We desire to be your children and we claim these blessings in your name. We thank you for your son. Who taught us the prayer. We now pray together. Our father who art in heaven hallowed be thy name die kingdom. Come thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever man..

Jesus amy jill levine
"jill levine" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

08:07 min | 10 months ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

"God made the words of my mouth and the meditations of each of our hearts be pleasing to you our rock and our redeemer a man. This morning we are concluding. Our stewardship sermon series. Talking about finances can sometimes be a sticky situation. It can be a sticky subject here at christ united. We want to talk about finances because we believe that giving matters that the way we prioritize the way we prayerfully consider our gifts really matter it matters to us it matters to the church and it matters to the larger world because our gifts are used inside and outside of these walls. I am thankful for reverend reagan gillanders. She preached for us here in modern worship last week on the second portion of our churches mission serving others and this morning we focus on the last bit of our church mission. Transforming lives so if you're following a home up following a long at home. That's loving god serving others. Transforming lives some of you may know and maybe some of you don't but i just completed a six weeks study that i lead on dr amy jill. Levine's book the difficult words of jesus. Dr amy jill levine. She calls herself. Aj because she's very accessible duh. She is an orthodox jew and she's a professor of new testament. I would argue. She is an expert on the new testament and she brings so much to reading about. Jesus from a jewish is stand point in this study over the past six weeks and a group of wonderful people. Some of you who are out there shoutout. We looked at six different sayings of jesus found throughout the gospel and together. We talked about what we found. Difficult about those passages and how even though they were challenging we could still learn something from them are very first week together was the exact passage that we all are about to read together. This morning and spoiler. It's a difficult one often in churches. This passage is called the rich young ruler but only enough that term is in ever used altogether in scripture in matthew's version of the story the man is referred to as young in luke's version. He is called a ruler. It seems as if over time we've merged all these versions of the story and we've created our own own the rich young ruler to some all of them together in our version today from the gospel of mark. You will notice that like everything mark does he keeps his description of this man simple. We're going to be in the tenth chapter of mark and we're actually just going to read it all in one chunk this morning hear these words from the gospel of mark versus seventeen through twenty seven as jesus continued down the road. A man joe here that a mad. That's the only description that mark gives us. A man ran up knelt before jesus and asked good teacher what must i do to obtain eternal life. Jesus replied why do you call me good. No one is good except the one god you know. The commandments. don't commit murder don't commit adultery. Don't steal don't give false testimony. Don't cheat honor your father and mother teacher. The man responded. I've kept all of these. Since i was a boy. Jesus looked at him carefully and loved him. He said you are lacking one thing. Go sell what you own and give the money to the poor. Then you will have treasure in heaven and come follow me. But the man was dismayed at the statement in win away saddened because he had many possessions looking around jesus said to his disciples. It will be very hard for the wealthy to enter. God's kingdom jesus is word startled disciples so jesus told them again children. It's difficult to enter god's kingdom. It's easier for kimmel to squeeze through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter god's kingdom they were shocked even more inset to each other then who can be saved. Jesus looked at them carefully and said it's impossible with human beings but not with god. All things are possible for god. This is the word of god for the people of god. Let the church say thanks. Be to god. This is a difficult passage for a number of reasons. It's hard to read. Jesus saying that. Maybe there's more to this whole following thing than just following the commandments. Commandment this guy has followed since birth for any of us who feel wealthy. In any sense of the word it can be challenging to here. Jesus say it will be very hard for the wealthy to enter. God's kingdom the disciples themselves are even startled by this proclamation so much so that jesus actually repeats it the bible this book. It's full of difficult passages. it's full of passengers. That can be difficult to understand. When we're reading. It can be difficult in our cultural context. It can be difficult depending on what lind's were wearing as we're reading it it can also change. Just whatever mood. We find ourselves in as we read. Scripture many of us may be familiar with this particular passage. Maybe we've heard it in a stewardship series or just in a sermon. in general. Maybe we've been in a study where we look deep into the translations and all the scholars difference interpretations this morning instead of going so deep into all the different ways. You can read this. I went us two zero in on one verse verse. twenty one. it begins with this. Jesus looked at the man and loved him. I really enjoy disney princess movies. Even though they can be super problematic especially as an adult looking back on some of the ones. I watched as a child. But there's something magical about the music and the characters in the story that just draw me in every single time. I'm also a pretty big lin. Manuel miranda fan. Some of you may.

reverend reagan dr amy jill Dr amy jill levine Jesus Levine Aj mark united luke matthew kimmel joe lind disney princess Manuel miranda
"jill levine" Discussed on The Bible Binge

The Bible Binge

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"jill levine" Discussed on The Bible Binge

"Each is magic because it just feels like a really cool podcast episode of the end. If the lectures like six hours. I felt like i would have dipped out because there's natural stopping point but the twenty four thirty is great Taught by dr. amy. Jill levine She's a university professor of new testament. Jewish studies fresher jewish studies at vanderbilt vinnie school And college of arts and sciences. She's also affiliated professor at cambridge She graduated high honors in english religion. Smith college Where she was ninety commodity and she earned her phd at in religion from conversely. I wanted to say all those jamie right. Because if you if you look this up and you're like i trust you knoxville. Also read the reviews. You'll see like she's at a three out of five and that's primarily because guys like dan talich sixty nine and big daddy dog ler eight eight eight think. She brought a political slant analysis right. She's just analyzing the bible so Maybe you think big daddy. Doppler also cambridge. I don't i don't know his life. Maybe he's also professor. But i tend to go with the person whose whole life is this text as really and a lot of Academic our scrutinizing it but it is It's not really dry or boring. She is a fascinating storyteller. And i love Some she talks about some of the things that we've tried to pull out imbibing jeb. So but way better And she also advances that knowledge. So i you know. Even though we've talked a lot about the stories. She advanced so much knowledge. So i absolutely love it. That's good so so you're saying this would be a nice accompaniment to your english degree and my sociology. Women's studies agree. Exactly perfectly her thankful. Okay okay so. My favorite of the week is a book. It is the book win. Thoughts and prayers aren't enough by taylor shuman. Now we know taylor because of the internet so yet another thing that the internet has brought us I the book has the best cup one of the best covers. I've ever seen on a book. It is so good and then second taylor. Shuman met on twitter years ago because she had a really fun sense of humor and she was also writing really thoughtful in meaningful post about gun violence..

Jill levine vanderbilt vinnie school And c dan talich cambridge Smith college amy knoxville jamie taylor shuman taylor Shuman twitter
"jill levine" Discussed on Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

"Hundred mistaken also. They banned from over there as a filipino. Be what advise. Would you give to aspiring basketball players. You know it always helps people internally you want to play this game you were hard at. You got to be air to go through the difficult times of failure to succeed and that don't in that means like if you don't get it right away dental mean you give up and update desk departed party. Be willing to give it your all until it show you. That is probably not but you got the lease willing to go through the grind in the hallway and in the coaching. To seem out rateable player. You could be deal. Have children that I mean because of course if you're a basketball player the first thing that people will tell you if you have and do you have You know do. They have any intention of following year. Your footsteps in sports where my daughter my daughter she don't on she just likes. He went for business band but she didn't wanna play no ball. They're my to my nephews. They actually do play. They play basketball right now. Pilots year stuff in our trained a lot of the young kids. And then also i have a lot of those kids in my basketball camp. Right now i see and do you have any message for your fans. Supporters and family. You know for me like all the people that have been there stuck. Be my whole life and career fans that follow me that i've met from venezuela Greece quarter rico philippines. All countries it. I played in a mess of great people. it's beautiful times in those countries up late in In on the distal justice support from fans that enjoyed and watch the ball me. Like i love him. thank you know for just you know as many people just you know love what i bring to the table and just to just win and enjoy doing. Enjoy what i'm doing. Okay so i mean. I know after taken a lot of your time. And they're very very happy that you gave me support portability to actually talked to you since you are considered as one of the best players i mean in. I mean in the history of basketball that have never played in the end in the nba. Yep you are. I mean the respect is there for you You know the people always remember you as one of the best players to have played the game now Thank you again. I know this wraps up the episode for this week. I want to say thank you. So much mr ronnie feel We are grateful for the time that you are shared to us. I wish you everything. Well that you do and i hope we can do this again soon. Anytime just reach out to me. I don't mind just let me go in our comeback on which you know jill levine's fans have any big lull time but you know i had a great time day. I really enjoyed it on us in our best hotel That's.

basketball venezuela rico Greece philippines mr ronnie nba jill levine
"jill levine" Discussed on Come to the Table

Come to the Table

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Come to the Table

"I used to believe wholeheartedly that. Had To vote. Republican if you're gonNA vote at all, which I honestly didn't voted for the first time in two thousand sixteen. At thirty six years of age, but if you're going to if you're gonNA vote than to. Vote Republican is what you do as as a Christian on. Thankful to have learned otherwise I never could quite reconcile that with what I actually believed about Jesus. or especially about? The socio economic inequity that exists in the world and never could really reconcile. That still can't really reconcile it. But I'm thankful to say that in my. Of the last twenty years that I've I've slowly, but surely shed most of the conservative thought and belief that shaped who I am. But I'm trying really hard to hold it in tension in. Say like that doesn't mean it's bad. It's not all bad. I'm not. I'm not I don't regret. That's how I grew up. it served a purpose, but but I'm thankful that purposes. Accomplished or been achieved so. What! We're I. THINK WE'RE GONNA. Come back to that second, but the next question is what faith other than your own has had the greatest impact on you good. I would say for sure judy is on. I'm utterly fascinated with. All things Jewish and have been for a long time, so a huge part of my deconstruction and huge part of my. Just personal enjoyment over the last fifteen years or ten years at least have been around learning the local geography, learning or studying biblical geography, studying somewhat Biblical languages I'm a language person. I love languages. Languages happened to be very difficult, but Any sort of context research I, just really really love it, and it is transformed the way that I understand who Jesus was and everything that Jesus said that the Bible says. to read those outside of through through any liens other than Jewish Lens. Really, takes away from what's actually there I think and so. On utterly fascinated with Judaism. You have you heard of the Amy Jill Levine? She's A to. She's asking atheist. She's Jewish which he writes prolifically about. Christianity the New Testament. She's not not a believer in any way, but she does this she does her kind of her. Big Argument is the book I'm reading right now. It's called the Misunderstood Ju. It's about Jesus and it's in there's there's an interesting that you say that because. We have a comment at the moment is a. Diving into that and trying to understand Hebrew using strong's concordance and trying it's been. It was the catalyst for this guy had on before Alexander John. Shy started talking about almost from an anthropological standpoint sort of a instead of a historical standpoint or the anthropology in the culture, and that in the what was going on there in what those things mean kind of in these translations you start to simple things, psalms, proverbs, province, fishy, Old Testament stuff that was translated from Hebrew. Somewhere along lines gets right. It was only get it over here on. Know Twenty twenty. It's is really odd. I. What does that mean, but then when you start to your certain dive into that you start to understand the context and culture, so stand the. Also becomes a back to words and stuff of that since pros even. The Bible, especially old. Testament Mean translation can lose it so quick right, not just the context, but just the beauty of it right..

Jesus Amy Jill Levine Twenty twenty Jesus. judy Alexander John Shy
The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
"jill levine" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"His website. Dr Brown Dot Org Mike before before the break you were talking a little bit about the volumes that you've written. I have them on my shelf referred to them quite frequently with regard to the objections that Jewish folks have to the same that Jesus is the Messiah one of the objections is if Jesus the Messiah. Why don't we have world peace? What would you say to that I? I would say that. The work of the Messiah. According to the Hebrew Bible is in two phases and the first phrase he had to come and die and rise from the dead before the Second Temple Oh was destroyed and then the message will go throughout the entire world rejected initially by the people of Israel but going to the gentile world and ultimately when Israel real does recognize him as the Messiah he will return and establish peace honors show. I would argue that. Based on the Hebrew Bible there are two phases to his work work. Judaism is looking for the second phase without the first face. But without the first phase there can be no second phase now Jews obviously are monotheist monotheist. But there is a bit of a plurality in the old testament in certain areas for example in judges. Six you Kinda have to ya ways in judges six and of course. It appears that Jesus appears in a pre incarnation state particularly like say Isaiah six and maybe some other areas. Maybe with Joshua speak to that a little bit Mike Their believers in monotheism but did they recognize plurality and the God head they would not define this plurality to them. I am To say that there are two powers or that they're they're different dimensions of that can be defined as person anyway within the God head would be idolatrous for for them. It is as specialist. Judaism has developed a very strict monotheism hand that says one Goblin got only explain these other passages more with manifestations of angels and things like that however within Judaism mystical Judaism you have the the the fear out these various emanations of God a ten different aspects of of his person. That do bring out a certain plurality and you you could argue that Second Temple Judaism and the time of Jesus recognize more of this had more exalted. -nology had an angel midtown Tron. who was so? Oh Hi in lofty that that he could represent y'all way and things like that or that there was even a concept of the Messiah where he was more divine but this would be one of the biggest issues that Judaism has with Christianity. The idea of a trinity or couch try unity or God becoming a man or a man becoming God to traditional Jew that would be an idolatrous beliefs in my volume censoring Jewish objections. Jesus I really argue. For God's odds complex unity in fact if folks go to my website Estrogen Brown dot org and sign up to get my emails. They'll get a free e book seven secrets of the Real Messiah and one of these seven secrets ideal with God being complex in this unity is as part of this. How can the invisible God be scenes if they go to asked Archer Brown dot org and just sign up for emails? Then they'll get that many book. which will kind of introduce them to some of these other subjects when you say complex? 'cause I know there's a lot of listeners going what I thought God was simply doesn't have parts so how in a sense got nature simple. But yet he still has a plurality to it in with regard to the Trinity. Have you done much writing or thinking about that topic. Oh yeah absolutely. It's a major part of volume two of answering Jewish objections to Jesus I get it into it in real kosher Jesus from which we took those seven secrets of the Real Messiah for the for the book. I speak of Goddess Complex in his unity as a way to try. Try to reach Jewish people. Because if you say plural or plurality or try unity or anything like that then to them you're not saying monotheism so how can God be visible and invisible. How can God be transcendent an imminent? How how can God look? We have the New Testament telling us. No one has seen seeing God right. John WanNa i Timothy six and yet got a scene so that's why I say he's complex unity so saying he simple as approach it approaching approaching it from one aspect of Christian theology saying he's complex. His unity is my way of trying to explain how he is three and yet one how there is no separation ratio within the God head yet. There is distinction of persons within the God head to me that is complex and yet ultimately one we believe. God's nature is simple yet ED. We manage his nature manifest itself in in ways that that appear to be complex as you would say like for for example. I always think of a light. Going through a prism you see light coming through the prism on one end and it comes out in all different colors on the other. We're kind of on that side of the prison. We're all the different colors others are coming out. So we see his attributes. We see his love. His justice is knowledge is his all the attributes. We can see separately but it's still one being on the other side. They may be one way of looking at it but let me go back to some of these questions. I have on Judaism if we can mike and that is what did Jewish wish scholars think about the evidence for the resurrection. Do they deal with it at all your average your scholars not thinking about it. Any more than your average average Christian scholar is thinking about the life of Buddha or the claims right Mohammed. Those who engage in the discussion of the the most radical cull of them as is the Orthodox Jewish scalloping the peed of deceased. Some years. Back he wrote a book on the resurrection of Jesus claiming that it really happened. A banana did not mandate Jews believing in him as the Messiah. That's extreme view. Yeah other otherwise there'd be questions about what we even know about out. Jesus how much it ancient writings even tell us They they would look in in a a more skeptical way of of aspects of his history. The city for a religious Jew. There'd be no possibility of Resurrection They they would look at Matthew's Gospel where it says you know. The Jews had this account count. You know the body being stolen and they'd say look they're all different explanations there is you schoenfeld arguments the swoon theory. That Jesus didn't really die that he appeared that he died died he just swooned and then when he came back he just revived. There wasn't a resurrection. There's there's one Jewish dow now who's written a massive book. Trying to debunk every argument about the resurrection. Dr Gary Habermas Probably Number One authority on this has interacted. Some of this looks like he's GonNa be a multiple series on it but it would try systematically to deny that there's any concrete evidence by the way I have a book coming out Beginning of March called Resurrection Investigating Rabbi from Brooklyn a preacher from Galilee event that the changed the world and in the book I talk about this ultra-orthodox Rabbi Abihu Brooklyn. Many of his followers thought was the Messiah when he died they thought he would rise. Of course he didn't they say here's the Messiah with spiritually so I- contrast that with the the New Testament mentality of disappointment the criterion of embarrassment that you know so for sure though is like a bunch of feathers over ah and when he rises. They're shocked so if we can show that. Those accounts are really really does give credence to the resurrection accounts especially they were written by Jewish believers. In y'all way so why would they invent it. Any scholars deal with that. That question these are Jewish writings in the first century. They they would I mean they come from different angles that there is belief in the resurrection. That was present at that point and they apply to cheer that some even in claim that there is some Jewish traditions that the Messiah would die and resurrect but that's very disputed based on just a couple of obscure texts But they they wouldn't deny that matthew was a Jewish believer in your way and he's remained taste. No they fully understand. Look there's a Jewish annotated New Testament commit that came out a few years back. Amy Jill Levine and other Jewish scholars. Put it together. Where they they're doing Jewish commentary on it fully Lee recognizing that this was initially Jewish sacked fully recognizing that in its origin? This was this was another Jewish that was part of the Jewish community in the first century. must be read and understood. Is that some say that Paul is one of our best witnesses for first century. Jewish belief of the sources there. Yes it is more and more recognition mission of the importance of incorporating the New Testament in the study of early Julius. Well we just got a couple of minutes left. Mike and I just want to ask you some questions that our listeners could ask their Jewish friends to at least get them to consider Jesus the Messiah or anything they can ask them. Yeah I recognized that your average Jewish friend. It's not religious doesn't know the Bible well may not even believe in God so you may want to start with them like you do with everyone else just about God and you believe in God and things like that then you want them to. You WanNa deal with moral issues. What do you think of the Ten Commandments? And things like that. Maybe that'll carry a little bit more weight even for a non religious this Ju she wanted to show them their moral. Need you think that you know the the laws is from God or it'd be believe some of the commandments to try to show them that but then explain to them. The need for redemption emphasize. No Templeton it. So would you ask those kinds of questions of you could say you know. Have you ever looked semes- yanic prophecies. Most of what prophecies. What are you talking about? But prophecies are very intriguing to people. You mean this was really laid out in advance and and if you could get them to read Isaiah fifty three whatever Bible they have access to religious Jewish translation free. This does this sound like why. Ah Extraordinary how no no no no I want. I don't WanNa read from the New Testament Old Testament tested. Well somebody changed it. No you get your own Bible. Look at that and then try to open them. Up is what you see that it says we would reject him. You see it says that he die in our place just just like the animal. Sacrifice took our place it. He died in our place. I so you WANNA I get them. God Conscious Sin Conscious yes and then from there savior redeemer conscience and then from there if you can say hey. Why don't you want to read Matthew? This is written by by Ju- do about the Jewish Messiah or Paul was Jew. Or you know Jesus actual name was used shoe and his mother's name was Miriam. Were you aware of these things and try. Try to open their eyes up so that they realize okay. I'm not a Jew. Even at a nonreligious most still feel. It's important to be Jewish and we do have certain traditions. Our ancestors died rather than deny these things so preserving Judaism for many Jews.

Matthew Isaiah Israel Mike Paul Jesus Dr Brown Dot Goddess Complex Joshua Dr Gary Habermas Mohammed Trinity Archer Brown Ju Brooklyn John Wan Miriam Amy Jill Levine
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

14:12 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"What would you say are the the major ways in which the Jewish annotated new testament relates to and is different from other Christians study bibles that have the the new testaments the core of the text and why do you think that these differences matter it isn't the only annotated New Testament seriously considers names and describes the full Jewish context of the New Testament it is the only one that adduces later rabbinic material and not simply by citation of Texas but also quoting the text itself because we don't presume that people would have saved copy of commissioner or a copy of the Thomas at hand it is the only text that flags issues where Anti Jewish interpretation has been a problem it is the only texts welcomes Jewish readers by explaining Blaine in Christian terms? Christians themselves would be familiar with it is the only texts that provides data on Jewish festivals on Jewish history the period on Jewish reception of this material and so on in particle people to do this is most other annotated new testaments commits Barnett stands alone and new testaments but the annotations are part of the larger Christian Bible and because of limitations in space such you testaments can only be several hundred pages long because you have include the entire old has major Hebrew Bible in that single value so that sounds like a very simple technical issue but is lots of implications Scholz. This is a stand alone annotated new testaments and as such we really have the room to do all the things that we think are very importance that Aj just mentions and also proportionately our innovations are able to be longer and that's three clued food much more information and different types of information in the typical Landau -tations in other new testaments stale completes Biblical Study Bibles not to mention all the bacchus. If I mean that's actually a great segue because I wanted to talk about some of these essays as we obviously can't discuss all of them but I was hoping that we could discuss the two essays that both of you wrote Mark You wrote your essay about the relationship of the New Testament with the Tanakh as well as with rabbinic literature so I'm curious. If you may want to say a few words about what it is that you think that we gain from putting the the New Testament within this literary context context. I think that many Jews when they approach Judaism have an understanding that the rabbinic period the media follows the biblical period that you go from the biblical period to the rabbinic period to the nevil period to the renaissance the life of the modern period starkly that is not true. The latest book of the Bible is probably recited way. This book of the Hebrew Bible Liable or Tanaka is probably the book of Daniel from the second pre-christian century. The mission is codified what say very early in the third post Christian Century so that leaves us with over three hundred years of a bland and in order to understand the progression of Jewish history of Jewish on Jesus properly we need to fill in net material or fill lynn that period between the Hebrew Bible and the Rabbinic period and the New Testament is what are the most central ways of doing that again. There are other sources spiral. Alexandria is just see US various scrolls. There are some books from the Apocrypha in some deep Sudan arguably the most important way filling in that material is through the new testaments so in that sense what really Toronto hunted by essay is have the New Testament period testament itself functions as a bridge again in that saying jeep bridge but functions e bridge between the difficult period and the period of such because I do consider myself it has starion and I'm interested as I starring in Hell ideas change over time having the New Testament as the resource for seeing how these ideas change over time in this intermediary period is very important for me that was really the focus of that assay because then you see that the rabbinic period is not something that is totally new and revolutionary but that many of the things that you have the rabbinic period are already seen in some form already in the New Testament itself. I think part of this whole project of looking the New Testament as a Jewish book so to speak is to think about how it is one data point or a set of data points that we have in terms of understanding the development lament of Rabbinic Judaism of Judaism and Leeann antiquity if we think about this period of three hundred four hundred years if we had nothing from the year sixteen sixteen hundred to two thousand will you know will be understand that I think that when we look at the ancient period and I say this as a modern historian you know there are so many gaps that the more more that we have to study into learn from we can gain a lot from it. I mean I was also hoping that that. Aj maybe wants to something about your say as well because I think that you know if we look at what Marcus dealing with this is a literary project right. This is dealing with the history you know I think that part of what you're engaging within your say on Ariza misconceptions about early Judaism you know has a really profound impact not just in terms of historical knowledge but also in terms of a real world impact because of the way in which the new testament is interpreted predict every interpreted and perhaps sometimes misinterpreted by many people who gain a false understanding of Jews and Judaism from it as you you put it many Christian religious leaders. I'll just quote from the essay you say that they that they often quotes trip Jesus and Paul from Jewish context and depict that context in false and noxious stereotypes you know so I think what I'm wondering is when you look at this long list of misperceptions which you detail in this essay. Why do you think that these misperceptions arise is out of the text itself and why do you think that these persist over the centuries and even sometimes to the present sure well? That's like asking why stereotypes exist exist I. I have a list of ten if I had more work higher workout. I'd have a list of twenty or thirty or forty. problems continued to be perpetuated aided in every year. There's a new problem that POPs up where somebody gets the context wrong. Why do these things happen they happen for several reasons for example? They happen because it for a number of people Jesus has to be the savior and he saves not only to return a life and he saved from sin but he's he's the poster child for Social Justice. So what a number of Christian readers do they say well. If Jesus comes to tell us what justice means that he must be correcting something that's wrong in his Jewish context in consequently consequently Jesus becomes the inventor feminism amid of first century Judaism did epitomizes misogyny or Jesus Bents Pacifism omitted Judaism which is all about militarism violence or Jesus Bench Universalism omitted Judaism which is xenophobic or Jesus cares about healthcare omitted Judaism where if you're sick you're you're looked at as simple and all of these are just incorrect stereotypes designed to make Jesus look good in designed to promote the Justice Liberation Theology which I personally like because I like that you're using the Bible to diagnose political issues uses this negative trope of Judaism fairly frequently Louis because it's a very easy way of making your justice case in other cases because of modern stereotypes of Judaism for example the Jews or somehow interested in controlling the world in all Jews are rich in we should be so lucky transpose those modern nationalistic antisemitic stereotypes from the nineteenth century on up back into the world of the New Testament text accordingly and in other cases people will take certain verses in the New Testament white literally and conclude food well because Jesus calls the Pharisees Hypocrites Than All Jews hypocritical or because Jesus calls the Pharisees lovers of money which is a standard impacted in antiquity therefore Jews are all interested in of money or because Jesus complaints about some Jews who were concerned about external practice rather other than internal repentance that therefore all Jews Quad Nici are interested in materialism and external ism and can only pair it but have no creative aspect so we've had two thousand years worth of negative stereotypes about Jews and Judaism. It's not surprising that those get rid back into the new testaments and because some of them actually derive from interpretations of the New Testament. There's feedback loop continues. I think the major reason the stereotypes continuous tenuous because in a number of cases people can't even hear them they simply take them as warm in the same way that when I was a kid when we children we're acting in a rambunctious manner. My mother would call out stop acting like wild Indians. I mean today that sounds horribly racist and it is book back in the late fifties which is nearly sixty S. Nobody recognized the racism. So when I swab needs errors that people make I am not accusing them of being anti-semites in fact. I don't think they are the problem is that they don't hear their own negative stereotyping but the cool thing is once it's pointed out to them. They do do and most of them are able to self correct after that right I mean I think it's interesting because it brings me to the final essay at the end of the book which is by Ed Kessler Dr which deals with the New Testament and Christian Jewish relations specifically you know he deals with three areas dealing with super session anti-jewish teachings and then the the ongoing ongoing development of Jewish Christian dialogue and I think that when we look at your essay for instance a. j. you know about a misperceptions misunderstandings endings that I think that you're hoping that this volume will help to correct in. What ways do you think that this volume of the annotated New Testament can contribute to the development of Christian Jewish relations today as well as into the future we gave a lot of thoughts to the order of the essays and having that essays the final final essay he's very intentional some lays it overlaps a little bit with Aj's essay and drive some of the points that she just need the home in a slightly different way a one of the things that I get Kessler emphasizes is just how important it it is to be honest about? What did these text there are super cessionist texts within the New Testament and and we need to call them out on doesn't mean we should follow them because we can justify them? Perhaps we became explained. Damage should explain them within a historical context but we need to call these problematic techs per day. Are something else staff that particular essay ties is really traces Jewish Christian relations in particular star goal all contacts begins the distant past moves to the near past and ends in some hopeful full hopes for the future. We're doing this podcast. A few days after a woman was murdered in synagogue right outside of San Diego by one supremacist so it is difficult to be hopeful all the time and I they can really do need to recognize that despite our best efforts letting people realize that certain texts are problematic in have been the cause for Anti Semitism the can and should be bred dealt with different play so we have half problems. We need to recognize these problems but both of us alongside people like Kessler who were working very vigorously elite toward better Jewish Christian relations are working very hard on making all cleared as aware of the problems that exist and really building toward a more hopeful future correction that we hope this tech can provide on the other aside. I've heard from numerous Jews that Christianity is nonsense that it took pagan religion that it's a misunderstanding of Judaism it has nothing to do with ethics. It has only to do with belief and all sorts of other negative stereotypes about Christian origins and Christian practice and belief so so in the same way that we're interested in correcting Christian misunderstandings of Judaism were also interested in correcting Jewish misunderstandings of Christianity There's there's enough bigotry to go around. Everybody has baggage and it's this volume can continue to allow Jews and Christians to have better better understanding of each other and through understanding usually comes respect. That's all to the good will thank you. This is really interesting. Thanks for taking the time for this really really.

Jesus Aj Ed Kessler Dr Mark You Barnett Texas commissioner Scholz Landau Sudan Blaine Daniel Thomas Leeann Tanaka Alexandria jeep bridge Toronto Ariza
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

12:39 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Different. The emphases are different. We're looking at not only at literature contemporaneous with the New Testament be at the Dead Sea Scrolls Josephus Filo text from the Su- depicts NBA archaeological information but we're also looking at rabbinic literature not as background but to say gee how have Jews within traditional national Jewish commentaries addressed some of the same issues that are being addressed in the New Testament at this new and it's fabulous yet and a lot of what is new which should not be downplayed is having all of this material available in a single value you in having it all available in two different ways by which they mean Indiana -tations at in the large number of essays in a single volume simply never been general for and never been done in a way which it seems to be so accessible. I mean I I think the accessibility is is critical. I mean when you look even at the essays right and you think about who wrote each of those essays many of them are a distillation of the monograph that that person wrote on the topic and what we have here is an entire library of scholarship on ancient Judaism Judaism on early Christianity on the New Testament boiled down into a single volume that somebody can pick up and and flip through and that is this is I think a really phenomenal thing to have as a resource okay well. You're welcome I mean I feel like we've talked a lot about the book but I wanNa look maybe a little bit at the because I think one of the interesting things that you do in the in it is not just the notation the introductions to each each of the each of the books of the New Testament and you know this is really useful for people who are getting a sense of tax to are not familiar with it and also who perhaps want to answer similar kinds of questions about each of the texts about who the author was what the context was so on and so forth each of these different texts also presents different challenges and opportunities. How did you try to contextualize the New Testament passages and discourses on how did you contextualize these different books and these different passages this differently depending on what each of them are doing in particular you know when we look at ones that have been a source of anti-jewish hatred or misinformation you know in sentiment intimate about the Jews? How did you approach this this project of contextualising in annotating the New Testament on the book by book level and also about looking in different passages we don't we don't apologize protects and we explain them away and in some cases are entertainers simply said this anti-jewish material we can pause it what the historical circumstances were that gave rise to that material but we also have to deal with in terms of how we understand it by the same same view there's material in the shared scripture that say Anti Canaanite or anti Egyptian or anti Persian Empire Babylonian this is what religious religious texts do and we need to be aware of the problem? We are aware of the fact that for many readers this is the first time that the reading the new testaments were reading it in a serious manner synergy make general recommendations to sue are authors about what they should include in gear introductions actions issues such as the authorship interpretation of the text waiting. We're was written and it just said testing tax require different sorts of introductions from the perspective of Anti Judaism the the most problematic Gospel is the gospel jar so it's no surprise that Adele Reinhart's is pointing for Judah has a whole section on John Nance Judaism so we're aware of the fact that for all the readers this is or should be a significant if it can't issue so unlike many other introductory new testing values we probably do concentrate on those issues a little little bit war both in the introduction and particular annotations but we try to do so in non apologetic there are problematic passages the new testament as they are problematic passages in the Hebrew Bible and rediscussed that I hope they're in a fashion I mean were there any particular challenges when we look especially at books like the book of John When we when we think about the source of the Anti Judaism over the course of many many centuries where there any particular challenges that you've that you've faced you know. How did you try to resolve them when you looked at these this these texts that passages that have particular anti-jewish bent or or approach well? I don't think resolve is the right word. I don't think you can resolve something. We'll take Jewish. I think you have to name it. You can explain it as best as you can but it still remains a problem in the the same way we don't resolve say slavery in the United States. We can explain how it happened and why it was perpetuated but you don't resolve the question. Oh you bring it to bite you flag the tragedies that it is caused and then you ideally find some way of saying I need me to acknowledge this as part of my history and then move on yeah so I release the freeze colon rather than resolve that so to give a very specific example because you asked the question bad John One of the most pragmatic versus is John Chapter Eight Verse Forty Four for your from your father the devil and you choose to do your authors desires. He was a murderer from the beginning and does not stand in the truth because there is no truth in him. When he lies he speaks according to his own nature for he's a liar and the father of lies is now that is a highly problematic verse which Adele Reinhart's cold in her notation and says it's on this I is the source of the Association of the Jews with CNN that remains prevalence in antisemitic riddick discourse see introduction and a very much help readers of the Saul you will only be dead particular sentence which calls at disperse chief fees three carefully that as antisemitic because that would have been inaccurate but rather as a source for anti-semitism and then I would hope that people would go to the page that she has deals with John Anti the Anti Judaism and explains how he Jewish person can write these particular notions which became the a source for anti Judaism and yeah I mean I think that that this is a fundamental challenge? The flipside of this as well is that that that when you are putting the New Testament within its historical context and in terms of its particular elements which are the source of Anti Judaism there are other texts which are much more Jewish so to speak you know so for instance looking at Matthew as kind of the counterpoint to John. This is the most Jewish so to speak of the four gospels so I think one of the things that you guys do there which is very interesting is that in addition to calling out the sources of of Anti Judaism but also you really emphasizing the ways in which there is this connection between Judaism Christianity in terms of the the way in which Jesus is portrayed and the way in which also the different contexts of the different authors might lead them to have different approaches towards Judaism. We have to be very careful here because we actually for the gospels at least or not clear on what the context is the gospel writers do not begin their text by saying hi. My name is and I live at such and such a place here's my background my ethnicity my community and here's what my mother's name was part of doing. Gospel study is a bit of a circular the argument we read the text we pause it the author in the audience on the basis of the text bread and then we interpret the text on the basis of this audience and author. We've just posited we we talk about. Matthew is a very Jewish cost because it sounds to US Jewish then we have to figure out what does it mean to sound Jewish but we also know that Matthew was the most Popular Gospel among gentile how followers of Jesus in the second and third centuries so even when we talk about Jewish Gospel bad itself is a controversial comment was less just to explain a little bit it sounds so Jewish because of the extent to which it quotes from Scriptures of Israel or the incipient Hebrew Bible and the manner in which it quotes which is very similar from the manner that is attested in DC scroll documents. It's that are more or less contemporaneous with the New Testament and in later rabbinic documents so that's what I think makes Jews who have some knowledge eligible cereal much more comfortable with Matthew. Did they do with the other gospels. I do think Matthew Matthew the author is coming out of some sort of Jewish context because matthew the author not only knows the scriptures of Israel Barry will also post biblical interpretation that we find find other Jewish non Christian sources but that doesn't tell me to who mathew was writing we don't know whether Matthew was writing to some small enclave of other Jewish wish followers of Jesus or Matthey was writing to what might be called the FTC a universal the assembly in the name of Jesus across the board it it would not surprise me that Matthew had gentle substantially in mind as the audience I mean I guess one thing to think about here. I think when we think about the project of annotating and contextualising realizing these new testament texts there are a series of different contexts that we can think about the historical context of the authors who they were I'm not be possible to really know exactly what they were but you know what their historical environment was like you know who they were likely trying to write four. We can also talk about contextualising sexualizing the packages themselves how they relate to the other contemporary texts of time when also to to the TATA into into the Old Testament to the agent and other sort of versions of the Bible part of what I what I would like to hear you say a bit more about is why does this context text matter. Why is it so important to put the New Testament and these texts within all these various contexts the context when it comes to any literature is actually not necessary for comprehension? I mean we can understand a novel without knowing a whole lot about the historical background. It's just that we I understand. It's so much better. If we know we're in went into home it was written Shakespeare can be understood by folks today but if you know a little bit more about history three at the time but it's a whole lot more profound my friend been Widdrington his it is a methodist biblical scholars want to say that a text without the context is just a pretext for making it say anything you want and with the Bible that certainly the case super will open up the Texaco say here's what it means to me and that's fine. There's nothing wrong with that but if they knew what it meant to the people who I heard it they would be able to enhance leading and that's why content okay so I think maybe I want to shift gears a little bit so I guess one thing that I'm really interested in is the way in which take new testament relates to differs from other New Testament study bibles. One of the key differences is that the new testament does not include the old testament right. That's one of the key differences but also putting it in terms of this different kind of a context that you're doing it from a Jewish perspective..

Matthew Matthew John One Jesus Adele Reinhart John Nance Judaism NBA Indiana United States Shakespeare Saul CNN Widdrington Judah TATA John Scriptures of Israel Israel Barry mathew FTC
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Of creating quote unquote Jewish version of the New Testament the Jewish annotated New Testament does not the same thing as a Christian initated Old Testament the Old Testament for the church the Tanakh for the synagogue in granted these different canonical orders would different books that stuff is shared material and throughout the centuries we have had in effect Christian notations of the Old Testament mark. We've had many any of them recently. Almost all academic study of the Hebrew Bible Slash old testaments was released study of the Old Testament for the Christian perspective. We have had infect Jewish annotated studies of Jesus in Jewish annotated studies the Paul since the enlightenment. Some of them were apologetic. Some of them were polemical juice have pretty much always commented on material in the New Testament what we wanted to do is do not as an apologetic and not as a polemic but in academics trying as best as we can to get a sense of the history and a sense awesome the literature so this is a text that's not designed with some sort of ideological drive other than a concern for mutual respect and understanding and we're really going back to visit Schefters Union sues because Abraham Geiger was one of the founders of that movement's. It's route very significantly on the new testaments. It is true that we are the first people to complete complete Jewish annotated new testaments but various books such as the book of Matthew have have been looked at by huge scholars of previous eras. If you look at the essays in the back in being a little bit simplistic listed here there was serious Jewish interested in new testaments for a long period of time the hull costs the show on the destruction of eastern near Destruction Eastern European jewellery it made people extremely suspicious of Christianity and and then the Jews really pulled back from that for a while with some exceptions the greatest exception the United States with Samuelson San Miguel in the Middle Second Part of the twentieth century and then as a result of your changes dinner standing of rabbinic texts. It's the understanding of how universities were structured. I think something that we did not talk about yet is how remarkable it is that Ej as a Jew is Teaching Protestants divinity school all of those changes culminated in the production of the Jewish annotated these estimates and again part of the way in which he phrased the question suggested that we have zero sum game aw that either Christians talk about the New Testament from Christians perspective or Jews talk about the New Testament for me Jewish. I don't think either of US sees this as zero sum game the opening up or the Christians less with eastern Orthodoxy but certainly within Roman Catholicism in the various Protestant movements toward listening to Jewish scholars over the past couple of decades has really been remarkable a number of our commentators do teach in predominantly Protestant divinity schools that that openness needs to be appreciated and I think it also fits fits with the earlier scripture material shoes who's studied what Mark Studies primarily who studied genesis through who study is certainly read Christian commentaries and Christians who studied this material generally works by Jews so why not move that that mutual respect up into new testament materials as well. Oh Jews have been publishing academically on the New Testament Samson Mel was the best example here from the nineteen sixties but even before that Joseph Klausner in Israel writing on on Jesus of Nazareth so we're part of a much longer tradition of juice studying the new testament then some listeners may be aware of I mean I think one of the questions here then is when you put yourself within this long tradition of Jews studying and writing about the New Testament what is new here. Are you just just in a certain way synthesizing the scholarship of the past hundred or hundred and fifty years asking what's new is like going to your average academic and saying Jay have you come up with a new idea or you just repeating stuff that was set one hundred years ago I mean I didn't mean to imply that would come up with something a new so to some extent were repeating stuff that we have learned from our teachers but the different focus gives rise to new insight. The package is.

United States Abraham Geiger Jesus of Nazareth Joseph Klausner Samson Mel Paul Schefters Union Jay Matthew Samuelson San Miguel Israel Ej one hundred years fifty years
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

16:00 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"We know when we speak to our undergraduate classes for example. There are certain technical. We tend to avoid because their students have no clue what we're talking Huma for me. My ideal audiences my mother-in-law who was born in Williamsburg. She's smart but she doesn't know anything about Jesus so I figure if I can explain stuff to her. You're in a way that makes sense to her. I will have accomplished my goal and that impart how we formulated some of our annotations so it doesn't sound all highfalutin scholarly scholarly. We're talking about the catalogue concerns regarding Sotirios the payroll we talk in normal language that somebody can understand and during this coming back to the basic question I think our readers al-Rida reserve very able to understand that is originally a Jewish book that became the basis or a base for Christian religion books that start as is being central in one religion can become more central and differently interpreted in another religion. There's nothing terribly hopefully surprising Beth's one thing that really interests me. I'm very curious about what the reception has been clearly in a certain way. There's been a positive reception because you published a second edition in particular one thing that I saw was they recently the two of you had a visit with the pope to talk about the book actually and so I'm curious you know sort of what the reception has been like an and what the reception has been like from different communities thinking about just the contribution that the volume and and how they how they receive it initially was perceived as controversial and I must admit that I did not think get would-be controversial and maybe that was naive on my part so soon after was published article in The Washington Times that said as follows donated bibles usually don't make headlights but the Jewish annotated new testaments the title alone is enough left to provoke a spirited discussion has created quite a stir was really on both sides and this really relates to the questions kids that you began with Jews felt what are we doing. This is national Jewish book had could even put the word Jewish in the same in title as New Testament. Some Christians felt that we were taking as shoes we were taking back doc the New Testament and taking it away from the Christian community. Obviously both of those positions were wrong. I think that the vast the job of readers understand why those positions were wrong but still there are some people who felt that way that they were people who said as much Gotcha even before the publish just based on the tidal so there was some initial frustration I think when people started to read it they he realized what he was trying to do and it was felt to be much less controversial filled to be more important. I'll give the agent chance to talk about the role that has had with the Christian community built within the Jewish community. One of the things that has been incredibly gratifying is is any number of people who've come to have said that as Jews they're starting New Testament study groups and in typical Jewish style style style impaired learning. They're studying the text together. Clearly is beginning to have an impact on the the Jewish community as shoes start to read. That's blaming litigated talk about it. From the Christian side will come back to the question about the pulp. It's being used across the Christian spectrum from Evangelical to Liberal Protestants to Roman Catholics to members of Church took Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I get letters all the time for ministers or people involved in adult study groups based in churches as to how helpful will the text has been people are using it within the Christian community also for personal devotion because they say it's pointing out to them material in their texts that they had never noticed noticed and never realized so that on a personal level on a congregational level it enhances the meaning of the text of the Individual Christian at the same same time it prevents sermons from going down anti-jewish tracts or sermons that had in the past used Judaism is a negative oil in order to make Jesus Jesus look all bright shiny and what we've made clear in this text is that Jesus quite fascinating on his own and one does not need a negative Jewish foil in order to make him look worthwhile. It's also done very well in classrooms including in seminaries and divinity schools as a requisite book for say introduction into the New Testament. I think that's fabulous. Finally I've been doing numerous clergy workshops clergy get copies of the Jewish annotated and then we go through the standard mistakes that Christian clergy had made about early Judaism not because of bigotry but because of ignorance fixed those mistakes mistakes and then hope Christian clergy see in a more rebound in historically informed way just interesting. This ancient text is how better to understand Jesus how better to understand Paul because if we get the context wrong we're going to get Jesus and Paul and the rest of this New Testament figures wrong as well. It is worth noting that the volume also has over fifty essays to my mind the most important essay it is the one by Aj which is called bearing false witness common errors need about early Judaism which attempts to correct act many of those errors and I think that this volume can really play a major role in how Christians understand understand the new testament especially if they start with that particular yeah. Actually I really want to talk about that. I hope will come back to it but I think that what you just brought up here as well as this important way in which of volume like like this one can play a role in dialogue between the various religious communities and this briefly back to something that I mentioned before which is that I just find it so it's so interesting and fascinating about this idea that that you ended up having a meeting with the pope to talk about the book the program with the Pope was part of a longer program facilitated by the Gregorian University here in Rome so not only did we get this special audience where we were able to present send him an autographed copy but we had a formal discussion extremely well attended on the importance of Jewish entertainers and that Rome has embraced race. This text is just phenomenal. The pope was terrific. He told us it was an important book. He told us we needed to continue our work. He could not have been more gracious use the fact that he accepted this work that we were invited to the special. Audience really does indicate that from the Vatican addicts perspective. They understand how important this particular work is is the type of a stamp of approval understanding the New Testament estimates in its original setting as a Jewish fuck and understanding and appreciating the Judaism of Jesus and Judaism awesome of Paul and I hope that the fact that this was sending such publicly we'll beat encouragements for others within the Roman Catholic communicating getting beyond to consider similar perspectives. I mean it was only fifty years ago. The Roman Catholic Church officially decided that the Jews had not been the wants to murder Jesus right so it reflects kind of a sea change in a certain way the acceptance of this volume that really highlights the way Liam which people should read this text in without getting anti-jewish views of it right at the same time they don't sacrifice the particulars of their own tradition so the bullying has enormous respect for various doctrines that work the churches weather's Trinitaria or the idea of Jesus both fully human in fully God all of that stuff stays in place and what we're able to do in some of the bacchus is explain how those particular doctrines developed so going back to something that you said before mark about the role of volume like this in terms of dialogue in one of the things that's very interesting to me is thinking about the way in which the Bible all of its different forms and you know the Jewish Bible the Christian Bible so and so forth becomes a point of contact between different groups of people. Oh between Jews and Christians you know so on and so forth by different cultures you know we just did the episode with Robert Alter where we discussed his translation of the Tanakh not of the Jewish Bible and one of the things that we talked about in that interview was the way in which Bible translations over the centuries have been points of of cultural contact or inflection and hear what's interesting when you look at the Jewish New Testament is it it's also meant to be point of cultural contact but you chose to we use the standard translation the new revised standard version the then Aris fee but with a new commentary annotation to go alongside it so you know when we look look at this project of reframing and reinterpreting taxed. What's the difference in your view between using a commentary to do that and using using translation to do that project? Let me start with this one I think both. Aj Nyerere very practical people we realize is that no translation is perfect and we realized that the NRA the is an imperfect translation. It has certain advantages ages it was done by scholars. It was done by good scholars. It was done on the basis of the Best Greek manuscripts manuscript that were available at that particular points by people who in studying the text carefully in Greek that is not the case for all translations of the new testaments it is more literal than paraphrase so all of those features help today they can be a useful starting point for this particular value. We did think very very briefly you'll know more than a quarter order of seconds having people to their own translations or modified the translations for for each of the books that they are writing on a had that been the case the volume would not have been done. Yes because retrieves is leaving these folks would have taken a tremendous amount of time and then it would have been tremendous amounts of unevenness between the various New Testament books because each person translated a book in her or his away so we really did need to start with the best Standard Bible translation and that was the inner city with that said if you read almost every engage the authors of the entertains are suggesting ways in which the translation could be better or could be different or or there is a certain ambiguity in the Greek that they're bringing. Yes so this way we were able to be both practical and to highlight Sushi problems related needed to Bible translation nine. Just give you a quick example. were speak. It's wrong epistle of James which has probably probably the least amount of information about Jesus that throughout the New Testament in James Chapter two. There's a reference that says if a person with gold rings in in fine close comes into your your gathering place the the inner city translates that term is assembly but the underlying Greek is actually synagogue which in the Gospels Whenever Synagogue shows up its synagogue but why here today Translate Assembly so we're entertainers able to say wait a minute the underlying Greek term. I'm here is synagogue and this epistle may have been addressed to Jews who gather in synagogues but they just happen to be Jews who were gathered in the name Jesus we needed translation translation that everybody agrees is a good translation and at the same time we require invitations that will bring out particular Jewish new nuances that may have been alighted alighted in the English translation. It's very clear that the translation is not perfect and translation action could be right right I mean but but one of the things that I find very interesting about the choice to use the NRA has to do with you know not just the practicality but also the possibilities for reception by easing standard translation one of the side effects of that is for the Christian audience who may already be familiar with his his translation. It's a tax that they already know your annotating in a different way but it's still the same text essentially where we could get copyright clearance yeah because they know it well are highlighting particular problems in the translation and can get something especially important that we were able to. I mean one of the things that also is really interesting in this goes back to what it means to create a Jewish version of the New Testament. I think that when we think about what that means I think that if we look at the history of modern Jewish studies kind of broadly speaking from the nineteenth century onwards words you know one of the contentious sets of issues. was you know who does this tradition belong to you know this is the case of looking at Jewish studies and the figures fish physician to students who were sort of pushing back. You know this is the eighteen twenty s they're pushing back against Christian scholars who they believed were taking kind of a a proselytizing approach studying the Jews you know there's also all sorts of issues regarding super session ISM and the way in which Jewish tradition you know has been adopted did historically speaking by Christians of you know basically all kinds talking about sort of adopting the Jewish tradition as the precursor Christianity Janati even we look at Biblical Studies People Salman Schachter others as well looked at biblical criticism you know as an attack on Judaism certain ways you know he called it higher anti Semitism and all of this I guess along way of saying that when we look at Jewish studies the history of Judaism Biblical studies as well well there are a whole series of contentious debate about who this all belongs to the whole history of the debates about the historical Jesus also fits into this as well about all of it can become very contentious especially when one group is studying the other some curious how this fit into your thinking about the Jewish annotated New Testament and your your approach to creating a kind of a Jewish version of the New Testament because I think that if we think about the development of Christian Jewish relations over centuries in decades and this this can be produced today this reflects very much our current moment you know I'm curious how the history of these kinds of debates about the way in which one group studies the other affects the way in which you think about this idea.

Jesus Paul Aj Nyerere NRA Rome Huma Williamsburg Gospels Whenever Synagogue James The Washington Times Robert Alter Beth Gregorian University Salman Schachter Latter Day Saints Roman Catholic Church murder Trinitaria
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

13:45 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Thanks for listening in to our conversation today day with Amy Jill Levine and Mark Butler about this volume. The Jewish annotated do testament what it means to have a Jewish version of the New Testament and how we can effectively understand the new testament within its historical and social context and why all this matters in terms of scholarly developments as well as the relationship between Judaism and Christianity today so high mark and hi. Aj Welcome to the podcast happy to be with your Jason. It's a pleasure to join you as well. I was really glad to take a close. Look at this volume and I'm really excited to discuss it in depth. I I think it really makes an important contribution and a number of ways where I think it might be useful for us to start is in terms of just thinking about what it means to have a Jewish version of the new testament so to speak. What does it mean to have a version of the new testament that is the Jewish annotated version so to speak and what did did you want to achieve in producing one in terms of both scholarly terms and also in terms of how the public approaches the New Testament Testament as well the volume in some senses? This accidents is in some ways a follow up of the Jewish Bible breath which I co edited with Adele Berlin I enjoyed co editing gets a tremendous and I was Lee for follow projects. They said that I'm still not sure at this. Seriously or is a bit of a joke to Donald. Krause is the Executive Bible Editor Extra University as you press him when when are we do Jewish New Testament as a follow lock and he thought about it actually thought about it for a couple careers and then he came back to lean said yeah the people at Oxford the that is secreted idea but obviously since your specialty is Hebrew Bible you really will need to pair up with a scholar of the New Testament then he suggested working with. Aj and that's how the project started where did a follow up of the Study Bible and indeed if you look at the two volumes sticks to each other you'll see that they're very similar covers and that is not an accident that really does represents the way in which belongs to get the idea of Jewish annotated New Testament fits in with other types types of what might be considered Niche Bibles said their Orthodox Christian studied Bibles Roman Catholic Study Bibles Evangelical Study Bibles african-american Study Study Bibles there is a gop T Q. I Study Bible in that sense. The Jewish annotated New Testament is a specifically targeted on the other hand hand. We want this volume to reach more than just jus. The New Testament is part of Jewish history and we want Jews to be aware of that Jesus was Jewish. Paul was Jewish the various Mary's World Jews but we also want Christian readers to be aware of the Jewish context in which their movement took shape and we want them to be aware aware as well of the select New Testament passages which because of select interpretations gave rise to quite horrendous anti-jewish in antisemitic antisemitic views this pick up a bit more than age as saying sel began by asking the question of let Jewish Sheen's Jewish entertaining new New Testament it does mean that the entire volume is by Jewish authors it means that the two co editors. Aj Ni- both Jewish. I wish it means that it says have is. Aj just said is one of its intended groups of readers choose so a term that I I use is that also impart was efforts to create a safe new testaments that Jews would feel comfortable reading because they would know now that it was edited by Jews in that the contributors Jews unlike other new testaments it did not start from Christian theological. Oh position it was not intent on proselytizing people send another aspect of its Jewishness just freeze it a little bit different Weeden. Aj Justin acid- released to this problematic term of Jewish background for the new testaments who were there many different ways to study the new testaments out. It's certainly is a Greco Roman balking in some sense in it also is a Jewish book. These are two mutually exclusive ways working at the New Testament and this particular volume focuses on more than many other volumes under so-called Jewish backgrounds lenses the new testaments which is that I hope you'll reach there are other so-called Jewish studied bibles out there but they're written by Messianic Sti Jews and what they're trying to do is attempt to convert Jews to Christianity what we want to do with show enormous respect for the Christian tradition but recognize is it as something distinct from our agenda is by no means an interest in proselytizing although the number of Jews actually thought that's what we were doing right. I mean that's that's interesting. The idea of creating a version of the new testament that Jews might feel comfortable reading because they don't think that they are trying to be converted birded so there you have an interesting way the major audience but did you not also hope that Christians would look at it as well. Oh absolutely in fact act because many of us are sensitive to places where textual interpretation can lead into anti Jewish or anti Semitic us in cases cases where we knew the texts had proven to be problems in the past in preaching and teaching we pulled out little gray boxes on things like the blood cry in Matthew Chapter Chapter Twenty seven his blood be on us and on our children and said listen these texts have been used to harm Jews be careful. Oh Dear Christians when when you preach and teach this not to lead your congregations or your students in such a way that you would inculcate a reinforced anti Jewish attitudes Yup Jason in the way in which you asked the question he spoke of Jews as d major audience they are a major audience but they really are not God be major audience. Jews are a significant audience but Christians who were trying to help better understand the book that is so fundamental to the Christian religion are very significant and in the audience for us as well and of course we had to play balancing act because these are two difference by in large mutually exclusive audiences I say by large because Aj a few moments ago raise the issue of missing Jews and each audience required different issues to be extricated or were the same issue to be excavated slightly different vantage points. We're also sensitive to the variety of Christian readers that we have so we're that might have a particular resonance within the Roman Catholic community we'd have different residents or a different understanding or say Evangelical Protestants or a particular Baptist Church or in eastern Orthodox Church so we had to define terms across the board and Jews may have no clue what Eucharist means in Christians would have different definitions so we have to put in a separate article on what Eucharist means says sometimes called communion meals. We spent a lot of time defining terms sued the Jews who would be familiar with terms like shampoo for young kipper those needed to be defined for Christians and for Christians who would be familiar with terms sounds like baptism. We needed to define those Jews. you're talking about a very difficult and very delicate balancing act reaching different audiences dances who don't always speak the same language as well as who have different interests coming in Jews might be interested in origins of Anti Judaism they might be interested in what was Jewish life like time a Christians and I've worked primarily within Christian context because I am a new testament estimate person primarily. It seems to me that if one claims Jesus is Lord and Savior one would want to know as much as possible about the place where he lived in the time when he lived in the people to whom he spoke and all of that is is that Jewish setting so we can influence a Christian love of Jesus at the same time we can inform juice about what is going on with Jesus of Nazareth and why is it that certain Jews are proclaiming him to be more than savior and at least donated the first edition of the book and was still teaching Brandeis where the majority of students were Jewish so in the way that EJ add a Christian audience brings her minds. I I had a largely Jewish audience and but of course we've both been teaching for decades so we're love aware that value we have the same issue that we have in classroom of a wide variety of these people who are using the buck for a wide variety of reasons and we try to be sensitive to these different groups as we might be to go back to the the the initial question that I posed about. What does it mean to create a Jewish annotated New Testament? People probably speaking don't always think about the new testament that is a Jewish book. It's the holy text of Christianity certainly not of Judaism right so what does it mean to create a Jewish version or a Jewish annotated rotate version of a book that is not usually understood or placed within the context of Ancient Judaism rather within the history of Christianity problem. It's a problem how we define define our terms Christianity itself but even that word suggests that there's a separate entity apart from Judaism called Christianity look Jesus is Jewish and Polish Jewish and Mary Vaga when is Jewish and they're all juice and there is no formal distinction between Judaism and Christianity is two quite separate entities so what we have to do is reconfigure in fact the way we tend to think think about how the New Testament functions within its own historical context how it took shape in the first place says the same thing a little bit differently. One of the major juror academic issues in the study of early Christianity is cold to finding the parting of the ways windy talk about Christianity a separate entity in Judaism would set important for us to go into various answers he are but everybody agrees from who scholarly perspective that in the late first century or even dying largely early second century the period that we're talking that for the production auctioned the new testament the ways had not yet hearted in one way of seeing this is that the word Cristianos the Greek word for Christian appears only four times in the entirety of the new testaments so clearly the people who are involved in rhyming this book do not see themselves as a separate religion although the term gets quite cumbersome when we're careful we talk talk about this group is Christ believing Jews. That's really what they are. We both understand that this is something that's very surprising in Tiffin even ways to members of the Jewish community and members of the Christian community and we see part of her job in writing essays days in working on other people's annotations in bringing this point home time after time again because they simply he is a true historical points that we think it's very important readers on both sides of the divide to understand as well lowest possible three times in the New Testament not for seven extra book right. I mean you just increase percentage. The text financial right right part of the the challenge here is the way of which the New Testament is understood by scholars and the way that is popularly perceived most people who are picking up a copy of of this volume of Jewish annotated. Do Testament are not scholars right right and so this fact that Jesus was a Jew you know all of his contemporaries who were involved in Jesus Movement or Jews and that that there was not yet quite this divide between Judaism and Christianity you know for for many years after the death of Jesus. This is an idea that many Christians are engaging with but that you know is not always at the forefront of the discourse within Christian communities part of what's interesting about this volume is the way in which it's bringing bringing in what has been for many many years the scholarly approach to a much wider audience to thinking about the New Testament and we tried in the entertains -tations not to sound too academic..

Aj Justin acid Jason Jesus Amy Jill Levine Mark Butler Executive Bible Editor Extra U Jesus of Nazareth Adele Berlin gop Oxford Donald Weeden Tiffin Krause Paul Lee Roman Catholic community Mary Vaga Sheen
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Annotated New Testament has four main components. I the text of the New Testament itself using the new revised standard version translation second an introduction to the gospels and acts and onto the epistles and revelation third introductions to each of the books and extensive annotations to the text and finally there are over fifty essays says on topics including the historical and social context of the New Testament Jewish religious movements of the Second Temple period Jewish practices and beliefs beliefs the relationship between Jews and gentiles and Jewish responses to Jesus of Nazareth Paul of Tarsus and Mary the the mother of Jesus throughout the centuries the Jewish annotated New Testament as we'll discuss highlights the historical and religious context of the New Testament as has a set of Jewish texts that is to say texts written about Jews and in many cases by people who are themselves Jews knowledgeable in Jewish theological traditions and textual interpretation throughout history too many people have forgotten or consciously ignored that Jesus was a Jew as has we're all of his first followers or they've sought to instrumentalise this history for political purposes. There has been of course a great deal of serious scholarship up on the New Testament over the centuries but the new testament has also been at the center of sometimes violent debates between Jews and Christians to it represents a particularly interesting though sometimes problematic texts especially when we keep in mind that several passages have prompted dangerous anti Jewish stereotypes and narratives narratives at the heart of centuries of animosity at the same time one can point to the changing dynamics of Jewish Christian relations especially after the Holocaust in part through Christians as individuals and as church communities and communications trying to come to terms both with what the New Testament says about about Jews and how those texts have been interpreted in a certain way part of what I think is so interesting about the Jewish annotated New Testament is that it is very much a product of our time a synthesis of the newest academic scholarship first of all and it also represents the possibilities of Jewish Christian relations today with this history and context remind I think mark. Aj have done something remarkable to present the new testament in scholarly readable and accessible format format for Jews without any kind of aim of proselytizing indeed. They're both themselves jus. It's also a valuable resource for Christians and indeed for any readers who will want to better understand these texts and the historical and social context and especially for religious leaders who want to be able to better understand and teach about Judaism Jesus his followers and Christian origins in the first and early second centuries of the common era the annotations and essays distill generations of scholarship on the background and meaning of these texts their contexts and the reception and ramifications when necessary they confront those passages is that have been a source for anti Judaism and as a result the book prevents a useful resource for students scholars as well as teachers and religious leaders in situating the New Testament within its historical context the volume demonstrates how and why the New Testament matters in terms of our understanding thing of the development of Judaism in the first and second centuries and also why and how this context is critical in terms of comprehending the emergence merchants of early Christianity and the parting of the ways between Christianity and Judaism. If you enjoy this episode I hope they will share it with a friend you can find the show notes at a transcript of the episode at Jewish History Dot. FM Slash New Testament.

Tarsus Mary Aj
"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"jill levine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Bible on topics including metaphor the nature of Biblical historical texts and gender issues his many books include the Jewish Study Bible which he co edited with Adele Berlin how to read Jewish Bible the Bible and believe her you're how to read the Bible critically and religiously and the creation of history in ancient Israel among many others Amy Jill Levine is university professor of New Testament and your studies and Mary Jane Worth in Professor of Jewish Studies at at Vanderbilt Divinity School and the College of Arts and Sciences. She's also an affiliated professor at the Center for the Study of Jewish Christian relations nations at Cambridge and she's taught at the pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. Aj's books include the misunderstood Jew the church and the scandal of the Jewish Jesus the meaning of the Bible what the Jewish scriptures and the Christian Old Testament can teach us co authored with Douglas night the New Testament methods and Meanings Co authored with Warren Carter short stories by Jesus the Enigmatic Attic parables of a controversial rabbi entering the passion of Jesus and most recently the gospel of Luke Co authored with Ben Within the third Mark Aj as to tremendously prolific scholars of the Jewish Bible and the New Testament have deep knowledge of the historical Oh context of the New Testament as well as of how it has been interpreted over the centuries together they edited the Jewish annotated New Testament in twenty eleven van and they subsequently produced second expanded edition in two thousand seventeen. The Jewish.

Study of Jewish Christian rela Professor of Jewish Studies professor Adele Berlin Mark Aj pontifical Biblical Institute Amy Jill Levine Vanderbilt Divinity School Israel Warren Carter Meanings Co College of Arts and Sciences Luke Co Cambridge Douglas