15 Burst results for "Jill Kennedy"

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Sandra Shave Kernaghan NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals, They're still able to find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's Iemma Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Cory ER, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registers right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding up and highlight that in your collection, The collection of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston got the latest trend in pandemic distraction..

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Jill Kennedy John Michel Basquiat Kernaghan Sandra Shave Korea NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Cory ER Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"jill kennedy" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KCRW

"You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall Managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum, Korea's used to ride on the trucks that not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest an exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Boston's Museum of Colonel Hands Basquiat Boston
"jill kennedy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:29 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Scott Simon. Aftershocks. A memoir by Nadia Wuss who opens with an earthquake. Hears about it over the radio and over pancakes when she's seven years old, growing up in Rome with her sister. Being cared for by her father, whom they love. After their mother has left their family but has returned to see them. Just for a day. Well, she's passing through town. The earthquake is in Armenia a long ways off, but not yet a wuss who says My mind has a seismometer inside it. Aftershocks is her memoir of a tough, interesting multinational, multi racial upbringing at adulthood that ranges around the world from Rome to Kampala to New York. Dozens of stops in between. It's the first book from Nadia Wu Shu, a writer, an urban planner who joins us from Brooklyn. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. You say early on. It's always been difficult for me to say the word home with any conviction. Moving on was what we did. Your father was a U N official. Where did you and your family live? How many places s O. I was born in Tanzania. My father was from Ghana. My mother is Armenian American. And because my father worked for the United Nations, we went back and forth between the headquarters of the agency he worked for which was in Rome, Italy. Two different countries in East Africa, mostly so I lived in Uganda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and then also went to boarding school for a while in the U. K. You loved your father and having read your book If I may. I love your father. I'm glad, uh, on the last he died when you were 14 and Oh, this is hard to bring up with you. But your stepmother told you something that sounds like it meant it was Like it was meant to cause another earthquake in your life. Yeah, So I have a very complicated relationship with my stepmother. It still is complicated. There was a lot of tension and sort of competitiveness for my father's attention. And she I moved to New York when I was 18 for college and you know she would come and visit occasionally, and we had kind of a petty argument. But through that petty argument, she sort of revealed to me that my father had not died of cancer as I had always believed, but that in fact he had died of AIDS. And I still to this day don't know whether that's true. But I kind of decided that it shouldn't matter. But at the time, I think for so many reasons, it really was an earthquake in my life because my love for my father and my story of him in which we had a very open, honest relationship that I could return to was so important to me and this revelation, sort of Made me question that story, and it really did sort of set me off on a tailspin to sort of try to understand what what I could believe in what I could hold onto. If I didn't have that story reading the book, I had the impression that you might have felt that way because age might suggest to promiscuity in your father as he traveled the globe, which just didn't fit up with the father. You knew. And without giving anything away. I mean, if that was true, it's got nothing to do with his love for you and b. I. Yeah, I can see why your stepmother she can't hurt him any more. But I don't know. Somehow in her mind, she thought she had hurt you with that knowledge. Yeah. I mean, I think it's a very self centered thing that I thought in my story of my father that I was the most important person in his whole world and that he couldn't possibly have had a life outside of the life that he had with me and looking back on it as a grown up, you know, that's ridiculous. Of course, he had a life outside of the life that he had with me, and he did love you and your sister. Exactly, And he loved us so much and no revelation changes that, and I think that that's that's ultimately where I Where I came to and realize that no story anyone can tell me can change that love and that experience in that connection that we had with him. Yeah. Uh ah. A lot of this memoir is written from the confines of a blue chair that you got out on the street. How did that happen? Yes. So after that revelation, and I was also going through a break up at the time and really just going through a period of Depression and anxiety, and I would go on these really long walks around New York and on one of those walks on my way back to my apartment. I saw this blue chair and something drew me to it, and I dragged it home with me and then Ultimately, it ended up being sort of. Ah, ah, whole country for me that I retreated to for seven days while I went through this period of depression and anxiety but also sort of reckoning with this grief that I hadn't really dealt with. And yes, but much of that time sort of sitting in that blue chair. When you've sought professional help for what you even refer to his panic attacks. It strikes me that that's um, well, meaning people don't quite understand why it's not helpful to say it's not your heart. Don't worry. It's all in your head. Yes. Yes, I ended up going to the hospital because they didn't know what was happening to me. And I've actually learned since that This is very common for people who suffer from panic attacks the first time it feels like a heart attack, And you feel that something is definitely seriously physically wrong with you. But I do think that there often is that reaction like just calm down, you know, but it is very different from like. I'm just having a little bit of worry. It's a very different kind of much more physical experience. Jazz helps doesn't was interested to read about that. I like jazz to Oh, nice. Yeah, So my father listened to a lot of jazz and always did when I was growing up, and he was always trying to get me to listen to jazz and teach me about jazz and particularly the more avant garde jazz. I always kind of rejected because it's so dissonant, and it didn't make any sense to me. And my father would say hard to hum along with John Coltrane. You mean Yeah, exactly. And I would My father would always say you just have to listen differently. You know, It's like learning a new language, and I was like, I don't want to learn this language. But then later later in life, you know, particularly as I was going through this difficult period. The dissonance just made so much more sense to me in terms of how is experiencing the world and I found myself sort of drawn to my father's music and actually ended up marrying a jazz musician. So there's still that connection. My word. Your father must be endlessly delighted. I think you would love it. Yeah. Nadia Lucia. Her memoir. Aftershocks. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks So much for having me Mrs. Lovely when the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe Suddenly work under very different circumstances, with exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat. Made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers..

earthquake Aftershocks New York Korea Rome Tanzania John Michel Basquiat Nadia Wuss Nadia Wu Shu Scott Simon Museum of Fine Arts Boston Kernaghan Ghana United Nations Armenia John Coltrane Brooklyn writer Nadia Lucia
"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"jill kennedy" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"The jill kennedy his grandfather his secretary was was compact nick the the one who died you know meaning that how do they pick her at area at this time to talk about how i wanna remind you of of camelot an and all of that i thought dictators are good speaker but too soon and let's get on to don't bring a key hannity in it will bring a candidy in to talk about you know white privilege and hashtag meat do it's a kennedy let the democratic party's height was when the kennedys were in control so that's what they're trying to remind people are two more things could alenia the media will never will never give donald trump affair shot correct correct okay then we are always going to have a divided country c one of your themes on the blaze and on your your radio show is and bec because i do his show every friday is very upset that were in a social civil war that we're on civil to each other and if you looked at the tweets coming out of hollywood coming out of the crazy far left zone atlanta america it's fish unamir vile but as long as the media but it's going to lie about what's happening in the country and they are okay we're gonna have a divided is no solution to the problem is there i don't i don't think so i thought last night was actually very hopeful i i don't you know the media this media in the media's gonna do whatever they want but i think there's a lot of people in the middle of the country that are so tired of it and they and and they're they're worried about their country and if donald trump could strike that tone and see stay on that tone i think he could.

"jill kennedy" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The awardwinning honda crv civic and a cord good morning i'm josh kerns while wbz news our top story this hour president trump delivered his first state of the union address last night in which he accused the obama administration of releasing dangerous terrorists from guantanamo bay the president announced just before walking into the chamber he signed an executive order giving the secretary of defense instructions to keep open the detention facilities in guantanamo bay the state of the union was focused on issues like trade the economy and unemployment numbers the president also warned of the dangers of illegal immigration citing members of the street gang ms thirteen as reason for his border wall the president used several minutes of the primetime address to call for bipartisan immigration reform and to outline of fourpillar plan he introduced earlier this month which includes ending familybased immigration in recent weeks to terrorist attacks in new york were made possible by the visa lottery and chain migration several senators brought daca recipients as their guests boos could be heard from the crowd as the president spoke about ending that family unification something he referred to as chain migration will the democratic response to the state of the union came from congressman jill kennedy the third in fall river kennedy suggested that the country is more divided than ever since president trump took office noting the current administration isn't just targeting laws that protect americans but it's targeting the very idea that we are all worthy of protection hatred to premise proudly marching in our streets bullets tearing through our classrooms concerts congregations kennedy added the democrats you're the voices of americans who feel for sacant members of congress speak out against plans by fema to a halt relief supplies puerto rico san juan mayor carmen ulan crews says many people on the island still need food and water some thirty five percent of the island is still without power some four months after the hurricane struck mir crew spoke to reporters yesterday which he attended the president's state of the union address as a guest of new york senator christon jilin brandt wbz news time eight o two wbz's football coverage from minnesota is presented by bae systems the patriots.

honda football senator mir carmen ulan puerto rico san fall river jill kennedy congressman executive josh kerns bae systems minnesota fema new york guantanamo bay secretary president obama administration trump thirty five percent four months
"jill kennedy" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Was such a beautiful of a video of an olive branch by president trump am i wrong there no i think you're right and i think that the intention current policy back at it that you you say you know i willing to meet you halfway or in this case more than half number is the number four and above what the previous administration that down and on the flip side you know we we want money as you mentioned for for the wall on the border we want to entertain migration whatever it is that you know i think that is the intention unfortunately i think with the latest round of the government shutdown i'm not even convinced now that you're gonna see chuck schumer we're gonna see chuck schumer willing to fund the wall when he was 4 which problem for the democrats as well so you know i i do think that the attention but i also feel a lot of this has to play itself out behind the scenes i think it's very difficult to negotiate these things in public and i think people like lindsey graham are critical duct with this morning some as adviser professor political science at college versus the people will g joe kennedy disun john jill kennedy's grants of bobby he did his he he did the response a did you watch any of that by june i did did of course i did the purpose sorry the myth wait a bit jeez they would be did you watch the whole present speech in they knew stuck around to watch you'll get an eye on an exciting nigerian i i'm very exciting intrude on that and they're even if i wanted to get away you know your thoughts we we we were you work in last night i should go on saturday was i don't know if you're familiar what i do a lot and i twenty four which is the israeli station i i was there and then thales was it was fun so there are some bid people there but yeah you know you're a little but i wanted to watch you gotta go to it's like your homework so unlike joe kennedy kitties good he's great i love them it's kennedy is great but the acts on a did we see anything of substance let me be objective here well you know i think it really i done by the choice of the democrat i.

chuck schumer lindsey graham john jill kennedy bobby president professor thales joe kennedy
"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Thug white class jacobsen at least to carry briggs first virginia community bank mls go will this going waldman mr less mulligan you please give us a rundown and who will who we have on the air today we've got jill kennedy presidencial colombo bank cracked carleen shareholder admiral beano and company david johnson executive director see for eighty s and william hohmann principle at design cuisine let's get in our first guest kill kennedy president and ceo of colombo bag gil what is colombo back what are you guys doing goma banks say two hundred milliondollar a community bank headquartered in rockville maryland arrayed and where are you from originally from baltimore maryland how many brothers and sisters the i have one system and didn't you tell me earlier when we were talking the year older sister had an issue in east would have thought you were like the older brother what was that all about thumper sister is she is staff and ally yet i was the younger brother uh but in many facets and i became the older brother would evening he became the older brother what are you talking about i was the one that looked out for her in situations for example when a situations she would alba she had hearing aid she would lipread and that situation created items or situations where she couldn't understand what people for sang and you know when you growing up kids could be mean and i was the one they intervened intervened we would you lured from intervening on your sister's when you're older sisters behalf who is deaf what are you learn in that experience that has anything to do with building this bang called the colombo bank why was that was the you know what when you did that when it when i did that i always wanted to befriend other people so if they liked may than it was easier for them to like my sister then you mentioned earlier that um you have a daughter lauren talks about warren lauren lars my oldest child lauren has down some them the what if you learned from lawrence helped you build the bank lauren has taught me patience abbas a hard charge your until i had lauren and learn the.

briggs colombo bank admiral beano president and ceo colombo rockville maryland maryland lawrence virginia jill kennedy david johnson executive director william hohmann baltimore warren lauren lars two hundred milliondollar
"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Of commerce bug white glanced jacobsen lisa curry briggs first virginia community bank less go will thus going waterman mr as smaller can you please give us a that an who will who we have on the air today we've got jill kennedy he'll colombo bank correct carleen shareholder at ropy no and company david johnson executive director sepo eighty s and william hohmann principle at design cuisine let's get in our first guest kill kennedy president and ceo of colombo barrick you'll what is colombo back what are you guys their own glomma banks say two hundred milliondollar a community bank headquartered in rockville maryland right and where are you from originally i'm from baltimore maryland family brothers and sisters have once just didn't you tell me earlier we were talking the year older sister had an issue in east would have thought you were like the older brother what was that all about how much sister is she is staff and i forget i was the younger brother uh but in many facets i became the older brother what do you mean we became the older brother what are you talking about i was the one that that looked out for her in situations leading the example situations she would although she had hearing aid she would lipread and with that situation created items or situations where she couldn't understand what people were saying and you know when you growing up kids could be mean and i was the one the intervened steeply ravined we would you lurk litter via the on your sister junior older sisters behalf is deaf what are you learn in that experience that has anything to do with building this bang coal the colombo pag why was that was the you don't want when you did that when it when i did that i always wanted to befriend other people so if they liked may than it was easier for them to like my sister than you mentioned earlier that you have a daughter lauren talks about warren lauren lars my oldest child lauren has downstream what if you learn from lawrence helped you build the bank marin has taught me patience abbas a hard charge your until i had lerner and in florence the.

florence warren lauren lars baltimore rockville william hohmann executive director david johnson virginia lisa curry jill kennedy lerner marin lawrence maryland colombo colombo barrick president and ceo ropy two hundred milliondollar
"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The chamber of commerce thug white class jacobsen lisa curry briggs first virginia community bank mls go will this going waterman mr has more can you please give us a rundown and who will who we have on the air today we've got jill kennedy presidencial colombo bank correct carleen he shareholder admiral beano and company david johnston executive director c4 eighty s and william hohmann principle at sign cuisine let's hitler our first guest kill kennedy president and ceo of colombo bag gil what is colombo back what are you guys though goma banks say two hundred million dollar a community bank headquartered in rockville maryland low rate and where are you from originally i'm from baltimore maryland humbly brothers and sisters the i have one sister and didn't you tell me earlier when we were talking the the year older sister had in issuing eastward have thought you were like the older brother what was that all about sister is she is staff and ally yet i was the younger her brother uh but in many facets i became the older brother what do you mean you became the older brother what are you talking about i was the one that looked out for her in situations giving the example situations she would although she and hearing aids she would deliberated and with that situation created items or situations where she couldn't understand what people were sang and you know when you growing up kids can be mean and i was the one they intervened wien would you learn from intervening on your sister's when you're older sisters behalf whose death were you learn in that experience that has anything to do with building this vein coal the colombo bag while i was i was the it up when you did that when it when i did that i always wanted to befriend other people so if they liked may than it was easier for them to like my sister than you mentioned earlier that you have a daughter lauren pulse about lauren lauren lars my oldest child lauren has downs inland the what if you learn from lawrence helped build the bank lauren has taught me patience abbas a hard charge juror until i had lauren and larence the type of individual that is very loving doesn't see everyone's her friend she is with us just where does this loving thing coming the building of bank um you know obviously carrying four uh individuals uh she taught me.

admiral beano president and ceo colombo maryland lauren lawrence chamber of commerce jacobsen lisa curry virginia jill kennedy david johnston executive director william hohmann rockville baltimore two hundred million dollar
"jill kennedy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"jill kennedy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Jill kennedy professor reform ge capital group seven planner number la devil any are seven seven seven five two six six three seven fact rather a couple of weeks ago gave you a couple of these questions financial planners wish you would asqin when i see a headline like that when it comes to financial planner professor pla by light to turn this around and say financial planner should be telling you this without you having to ask but i know what they mean what they really mean this came at a us news by financial plan is wish you would ask wish their clients would ask them these are the things that financial planners should be telling you right up front or at least answering these questions that a couple of we did a few weeks ago i always how do you get paid that is essential you need to ask this question he needed tell you how they're getting paid do you think a lot of people do think i mean were you do but do you think a lot of outside advisers volunteer that information or is that something that's kept quiet because clients potential clients don't want to ask that i know some do volunteer the information i have heard that some using certain products will save and you don't pay anything he'll pay me anything as if the gentleman lady is doing it out of the goodwill of their heart and that officers sitting in his free and that's what they're going to work every day to give you advice and they don't get paid so that's not always affair there so there are those other typically those are in the unfortunately in the annuity sales have yeah they believe fix the narrative now doesn't mean that what what what what they're probably saying is that you're not going to write me a cheque right my name fee being paid to me i don't have to tell you about me getting paid because you don't write me check that doesn't mean.

Jill kennedy us professor ge capital group