2 Burst results for "Jill Hein Earth"

"jill hein earth" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jill hein earth" Discussed on KPCC

"Australian singer Helen Reddy, who died this week. Her biggest hit was I am Woman. They've reached the top spot on the charts. In 1972 it peaked is the women's liberation movement was making big headlines. It was the year the Senate passed the Equal Rights Amendment and saw Shirley Chisholm run for president. I'm Jen white. This is one woman here in numbers too big to signal No too much to go back. Is it all done up in down there on the floor? Yes drives can do. I am strong. On the next fresh air. Underwater explorer and photographer Jill Hein Earth has dived into underground waterways deep in the earth beneath a giant iceberg. She's seen hidden creatures as old as dinosaurs and witnessed scenes of surreal beauty. Her work is so dangerous 100 of our friends and colleagues have died in dives. Her book is into the Earth. Join us now on weeknights at eight on 89.3 kpcc..

Jill Hein Earth Helen Reddy Shirley Chisholm Jen white Senate president
"jill hein earth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:19 min | 2 years ago

"jill hein earth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Be sunny and cooler with areas of smoke highs. Tomorrow will be in the seventies near the Bay and in the eighties is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Our guest. Jill Hein Earth has one of the most fascinating and dangerous jobs on Earth. She's one of a rare breed of technical divers who explore underground waterways and submerged caves deep beneath the Earth's surface. Or sometimes, as you'll soon hear inside an iceberg. So many cave divers drown in these underwater catacombs, Heinrich writes that they can't buy life insurance at any price. She writes about her explorations, some harrowing escapes and the challenges she's faced as a woman in the cave diving community than a memoir, which is now out in paperback. Jill Heiner is also a writer, photographer and filmmaker who starred in TV series for PBS National Geographic Channel and the BBC. Her book is called Into the Planet, My Life as a Cave diver. I spoke to her last year when it was released in hardback. Jill Hein Earth. Welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with a reading from the very beginning of your book on a pretty Gripping experience you had in Antarctica. Sure this is from the prologue. If I die, it will be in the most glorious place that nobody has ever seen. I can no longer feel the fingers in my left hand. The glacial Antarctic water has seeped through a tiny puncture in my formerly waterproof glove. If this water were 1/10 of a degree colder, the ocean would become solid. Fighting. The knife edged freeze is depleting my strength, my blood vessels throbbing in a futile attempt to deliver warmth to my extremities. The arch way above our heads is furrowed like a surface of a golf ball carved by the hand of the sea iridescent blue, which would as your cerulean cobalt and pastel robin's egg meld with chuck and silvery alabaster. The Isis vibrant, bright and at the same time, ghostly, shadowy The beauty contradicts the danger. We are the first people to cave dive inside an iceberg. And we may not live to tell the story. It's February in the middle of what passes for summer in Antarctica. My job for National Geographic is to lead an advanced technical diving team in search of underwater caves deep within the largest moving object on earth. The B 15 iceberg. I had known that diving into tunnels inside this giant piece of ice would be difficult. But I hadn't calculated the getting out would be nearly impossible. The tidal currents accelerated so quickly that they've caged us inside the ice. We're trapped in this frozen fortress and I have to figure out how to escape. That is our guest. Jill Hein Earth from her new book into the planet. My life as a cave diver. Now, in the case of this dive into this iceberg in Antarctica, the largest moving object on Earth be 15 iceberg. What was making the water moves so fast that it trapped? You and your fellow divers inside this cave? Well in the ocean. You have significant title exchanges, but there's a lot of things that are happening around an iceberg as its melting. You get fresh water dropping into salt water, and that actually also creates really weird up currents and down currents. So there's a lot of environmental factors at play, none of which we could have predicted because nobody had written a handbook for something that hadn't been done before. So literally. Nobody had dived into the pockets the spaces in an iceberg before Yeah, nobody had ever attempted Tio Cave dive inside an iceberg, And this iceberg was not just the largest moving object on the planet, but it was the size of Jamaica. So when this broke away from the Ross ice shelf in Antarctica and started to make its journey north, it started breaking into pieces along fractures and crevasses that we were able to exploit and swim inside of To find tunnels within the ice and tunnels beneath the iceberg, where it had sort of tripped up on the sea floor. Right And I have to say I mean this chapter of the book. Even if you had never made it into the iceberg itself, Just the voyage on this boat to get there was really scary. I mean, you had some huge rogue waves. You finally get there, and there's a big opening a big crevasse in the iceberg, and you dive into it. And on one of the earlier dives before This one that you were describing where you become trapped. There was a big groaning noise above you, right? What was that? Yeah, we were, you know, diving beneath this iceberg, and we were well into these passages when I was hearing, you know, Cracks and pops and groans and all sorts of sound from the ice and In the moment I didn't realize what it was. But when we turned around to retrace our steps and come back out, we got to a point. Where we could swim towards the surface towards daylight, and I realized that the doorway the very opening that we had gone into to get into the iceberg had closed. It had been a cab Ng and a massive piece of ice had blocked the doorway out. So what happened? Well, you know the pit of my stomach first. What's just like? Oh, no. What are we going to do it and we, you know, worked our way around and in between blocks of ice and Found a new route back to the surface and I remember sitting there about 20 ft. Below the surface, just doing a hang for what we call decompression time at the end of the dive just to allow my body to react Lemaitre to the pressure. And I looked up and I could see my colleagues on a Zodiac boat waiting for us, and they were like high fiving and dancing, and apparently, it was much more dramatic from their viewpoint. Then from mine When that piece of ice cavern and block the door way nearly threw them out of the boat. And they were sitting up there. Assuming that we were dead. It created like an 8. Ft. Swell nearly capsized the boat. They assumed you were dead. So returning to this dive where that you began the book with where you and was that one other diver or two in this case? Yeah, on that dive, too. Okay to the right. The photographer was there from National Geographic. You go underneath hundreds of times of ice above you and then suddenly discover the current is sweeping you away from the opening and you can't get back. One of the things you could try and it was wait until the current abated ride. But there was time pressure. Why couldn't you just wait it out? Well, we were already deep. So we were 130 ft. Deep. And we're accumulating inert gases in our bodies that That will mean that the longer we stay the longer it's going to take for us to slowly stage our way back to the surface and do our decompression time. Otherwise we can get bent. And that's the bends that you want to just take a moment. Explain what that is. Sure decompression sickness is is. I guess The closest analogy is a soda pop bottle. You know, when you're down under the water, you're under pressure. Much like a soda pop bottle with the cap screwed on tight, so there are gases that get sort of pressed into your tissues. And when you slowly ascend back to the surface, you have to do that in stages in order to slowly relieve that pressure. Otherwise, you're just like that soda pop bottle. If somebody shook it up and took the cap off, and that can cause injuries, it can cause paralysis. It could even cause death. So every minute that we spend on the bottom trapped inside an iceberg. We have to account for that time and some to come slowly back to the surface. And when you're in water, that's 28 F. You don't have that much time before hypothermia kicks in. So we're struggling for our lives to get out of the iceberg. We're trying to get out quickly so we don't amass too much decompression time. And you know, we're worried about freezing to death. Just that well. So what goes through your head that allows you to focus at a moment like that? You know when something terrible happens. It's really easy for your mind to just explode into these like chattering.

Jill Hein Earth Antarctica Tio Cave Jill Heiner decompression sickness Heinrich PBS BBC Terry Gross Dave Davies National Geographic writer chuck Lemaitre Jamaica