35 Burst results for "Jewel"

"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

08:17 min | 1 d ago

"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"Moment. What were you hearing in his beats in his tracks that made made. You want to hustle this guy for a whole album. I'll tell you a little further so. After after Monster on Columbia. Of the day I was. taught me about a prominent law seat in how even though I had went go at I made the company money, and that's why they weren't none of modern it anymore and get back in the studio, and let's get another album going out this Sunday I no one ever told me this car the giant. Like, wait a second. It would have been better if you lost money. Yeah. Out Out our searching for what I realize it outcasts had was an amazing machine to put me out. Had I been ready with my own sound and identity, but what they didn't have time to develop another artist, as they were at the biggest mommy careers, and nor was it failed to ask that of of the you know what what what they did not have was someone to help me walk through finally Mike. Narrow responsibility to have is their responsibility here, Dope Shit, and with that, said L. Well before I got the ill at winning and in with Ray Murray and when Mary locking. We D is rhetoric. That felt light. what the GAL who became half of run, the jewels would have been doings, and the other half of the records belt on distinctly southern small slick in the thing that that he could do and that he is a hybrid enough. So you're you're just you're hearing a southern flow over eight boom as grind grind out track with is distinctly sounded. So Arabic plano's also puff I played six records plus three were what would become the prequel to like a run jewels type, MC three were suffered slick aesthetic. Impulse it. I'd like ball. Is I mean you really do both wail in Assay, but which would you like the most for me? And he looked at me and he said. Cheapie, and that was it and now this is six years later. Probably Ale, and when L. play the first beat. The second beat and the third. Avenue this I was born to wrap on ill he beats. No one was born to wrap lt beats like me, including Lt because LP is the greatest rapper produce on on earth so because he has to be recommended. Producer is the only thing that gives me the edge. I am born to wrap on his feet and then I just. Did I just had convinced him to do it? And Jason Demarco was in my Co.. James The markle. Jason was like buff that we'll find the money. Don't even worry about calling any other producers. This this win exactly as I hope to in I. Just start aggravating the shutout. Ale, Hey, how you doing there beautiful, be like a girl. And what are you doing? What are the lights and I just started? Well just nine now like man. We gotta do this and the next thing you know Jason, working out in the rest is history and I'm glad L. to chance because he had been brought by a lot of people l.. L. Isn't amazing, Dude and a lot of times, people will take that amazing male use it, and they'll abuse it, and I'm not talking about all musicians. We all know. People fucked us over charities and Shit. L. Is set passages. They wanted most giving loving encouraging dope wien so hours I was like man. This is what we're. GonNa go to the top I'm sorry. We facing this away and here we go years later. Just get just get started. I feel like the four record. Quadruple this was our without cornerstone, and we have appeared to bill now, and we'll see where we are fifteen twenty years going into rock and Roll Hall of fame. I mean I've seen you guys. Madison Square Garden so I. Know You can turn it out I'd say I saw you. Guys Open for Jack. White, and that was some some shit to see. Two guys walk on stage and hold that place the way you guys did how you. Out Moment man thanks down yeah, yeah. And you know when the rage tour goes. We're going to be doing that Shit Before their shell, too, because there's a as Like Jack. White is important. He's be but I'm still a black guy from. Atlanta so I. I was like. White L. Like yours. His big side can't fuck up. You can't get too high, forget you. Got It, I'm just. killed. That's that's just. That's just because when you're when you're born and raised in New York City. New York lay getting the chance to play Madison Square Garden I. Mean we literally have a song on our records inspired by the getting play Madison. Square Garden is is to some degree. You like well once I do that. I can retire. You know yeah. Yeah, and there have been amazing moments like that for us that really Let us know that We were on the right track in the sense that like the way that we approached our show. The waiter we gave gave to our show. once we never changed that like even when we were doing small club when we first started, and we were doing small clubs, and we were doing five hundred people, and sometimes it wasn't five hundred people, and sometimes it was a thousand people, but. A humble. Humble now it was a humble back now. Underground hip hop groups touring schedule. You know, but we never acted like we never. For us, it was always just like well. This is our stage, so we. We're going to play this shit like we're run DMC at fresh fast. We're GONNA play this shit like. Every time, and when when it came time for the for for us to actually get those opportunities and people started bringing us out to do stadiums. And Arenas. It wasn't much of a transition for us to be able to hold that down because I. Don't know I guess some people do things differently. Maybe some people give a smaller show for a small venue, but we always gave the biggest show that we could in our heads in every venue. It didn't really change when we got onto. That says it was I was like Oh shit. We can do this, you know. We then went on a tour with I. Mean of course we've done huge festivals and been in front of hundreds of thousands of people and you know, or but yeah. The Lord tour was also a big one. Lord Tours interesting, because that was our first strands whore of arenas, and we were the opening directly before a wonderful musician whose absolutely not in our genre. You know like absolutely didn't share a fan base with us so. She loved our music. She brought us on and we knew that that was. We knew that that was our sort of tour. Where we knew every single night, it was our job to turn an audience that and sometimes there was a lot of rentals fans most for the most part. It was mostly of course Lord fans. Who didn't really know who we were? Yeah, you had that first wave that was the first few rows will be. Our fans will like in the middle and back, but what was weird is that? There were so many dates right out there were dates there were dad daughter dates in there were just like young guy, young girl dates ad. When we came out and starts smashing, you could see the dads and daughters. You could see the girlfriend boyfriend you could see the women turn to the men and look at them like you. Motherfucker and the Gaza looking like hail bought a yes, yeah, so I thought you were doing something for me. They were doing something for you. That was. I must say that. That was one of the always watch the trial I noticed, and what did it even was just a couple dozen or couple of hundred some nights? It was enough for me to know that that that that that we're going places. Baby, we've. got. The only way, my sister, we're going to get to go see buck in Let let me with my sister love. ABC! Is If ice cube was? That would be an interesting pairing I think. I LIKE ABC.

Jason Demarco Madison Square Garden White New York City ABC Ray Murray Columbia Mike Gaza Square Garden Producer Cheapie Lord Tours DMC Jack Mary Atlanta Lord Madison
"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

07:36 min | 1 d ago

"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"Was a was a was a stylistic reference to one of the greatest duals of all over the hostile. Family Gambler, yeah, all tracks to their song language, which would which is which is just so cool to think because me and my you know I'm from New York from Atlanta. But the fact that was I don't have to explain might doesn't have to explain to me when we're referencing knows styles. That's the other thing I love. Run the jewels because me, and my just no styles and we really grew up being influenced by them and listening to them, not only the intellectual stuff, but also just a straight rap shit. You know the swagger shift so. You know. Yeah, that was a fun Janet. That's actually one of my favorites. Have, you ever had that dream where you're trying to take your business or organization remote, and it's super confusing, so you just decide to listen to a relaxing podcast instead. But then, when you're listening to that podcast here, vodka giant for their team or remote experts who can solve all your communication problems. You know that we're dream where you talk to an expert advantage once and they just magically put a plan together, so your entire work can easily work from anywhere, and then on top of providing their simple cloud solutions, unified communications and contact centers with full salesforce integration. Even sort you out with a video API that you can use to build video into your apps and websites to your customers can easily see you. Have you ever had that dream? It's so weird, but as crazy as it sounds now. That's an actual real thing that you can do. It's not a dream. You don't need to get into REMM sleep to make your business communication dreams come true. All you need to do is call Vanek now. We're talking. XFINITY X. by is more than just fast. It's Internet that gives you ultimate control. With the X. Y. APP, you can pause the Wi fi at the push-button. Can Your Internet do that? Learn more at extremely dot com slash X. by. Let's talk about another standout. Just the choruses look at all. These slave masters, posing on your dollars and Mike There's an episode of you Netflix series trigger warning where you pull out a a twenty dollar bill, and you deliver brief history lesson like talking about right now. Andrew Jackson and feel like this. Whole concept might have been kicking around for a minute you know. Crazy Shit. That was forever forever. Is that right? Yeah, the sleight mass all my dollars. Camera, obvious nighttime as a kid. You learned about slave. On, I mean it's is right there for you to hear, that's no surprise, but I think that the reoccurrence of capitalism slavery stuff is popped up my music a lot and I something I've had to contend with was being a capitalist and a business person myself, but I think it's often that run the Jews touches on in terms of money, but I I think for railroad can with the perfect threat to Seoul, the the three verses that we put on there all look at capitalist money gnarly Shit with it, but in different ways I learned business selling drugs. That's how I learned. It's out of. Religion Glossy I already knew. How to make a dollar grow you from selling drugs, and I've had to contend with the fact that for many of the my life that that that as a child I made this very adult decision at a time when anybody who had intelligence intelligence with assault, trust those too easy not to do, but to say to myself, when I'm castigating or or promoting the pushing things now am I a hypocrite and I've had to accept that that there's some things that Yehya after you become an adult. You have your own kids. It's six. You don't want us to know. The gas stations with fifty little dude selling trust. But you've been. You say it so I've had to I've had to reconcile those things. A part of this record for me was stylistically doing distinctly southern style, but at first I didn't like to allies, and I had just made us some trat rap, shit and I needed to all those minds to make it what it was philosophical observation of who I am relation the business being a businessman now the data exception coming from selling drugs the fact that marijuana although steel has black men and women and Brown people in jail for decades now now is a legal thing that my white homeboys Colorado, and California participated being legally and abundantly, so we lost an opportunity to take advantage of alcohol sixty years ago because. Because we will cut out. Let's not let legislation do that to us again and the fact that a casino longer run our country. You know it shows us that. Yes, in America Youtube can be anything in president included, but it shows you the mentality of the country that we are a criminal country. We promote criminal culture, and we whitewash or legislative to make it acceptable, but we are no more a country arousing criminals, and if we don't understand that in our relations of money, there is no road to improvement. Capitalism does for failing the most vicious and evil way and capitalism works like -ticipant or victim of it, and it is obviously disappointed by being even a compassionate caregivers I am -ticipant. I mean this is important and capitalism certainly comes up on this record comes up on on pulling the pin as well and and we can't really talk about justice any kind who certainly can't talk about racial justice if we're not also talking about economic justice. Right absolutely I. Absolutely yeah, absolutely I just left a meeting with a bunch of black panthers in a bunch of local organizers and one of the biggest things that was talked about an easy original guys were from the late sixties, early seventies, men, women, and a local organizers, men and women and people from the Music Industry and the net one number, one thing talked about was economic stability out self and last injustice in terms of from the government and corporations in terms helping my community lasso. And Mike. You mentioned Your Business Profile. You rent some barber shops. I think you were also read. You also have food trucks restaurants. Is that right? Yes, I own a growing alanna. barbershops called Swag shot my wife and I. we currently have three emission. The next twenty four months is to have ten more off to Serbs a prototype to hopefully grow into a regional and national chain much like Floyd's are Rudy's on tip about fifty euro restaurant called banking seafood with have partnered with the developer Noelle Kaleo out of out of Atlanta. Who's a business mentor, Friend and partner to to to to Raleigh's restaurant out and we? We started with food trucks whereabouts about second food trucks that we are two routes running and our brick and mortar business should be up in the next eighteen months. So you know I definitely I'm a kid from the neighborhood who who went back and be just post doing reinvest in the naval. Now you're governor in Georgia pushed for early reopenings. Did you reopen? You're busy, did not you did not? We didn't have still closed at barbershop. Just opened two weeks ago. The one downtown reopening with strict regulation out other two shots remained close because we. We wanted to see what the first thirty days would be like now downtown shop. We, as had no one's actions. Our customers healthy garbage healthy, so we got about maybe two more weeks before we decided. We're GONNA open without restaurant because we operate in open outside. Sutra our heart area. We've been able to keep our restaurant close. Although we don't have a brick and mortar restaurants, but people sit down is essentially you come in order you take it in your food and.

Mike There Atlanta Janet Netflix Seoul New York Vanek Wi Andrew Jackson assault Music Industry America Yehya marijuana Georgia partner
"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

07:41 min | 1 d ago

"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"Mike L. P., welcome to inside the studio and thanks for having US man although none of us are actually inside anything resembling studio. I'm in my living room elfi year. Where are you I'm just I'm just on a deck. I'm just on a deck. It's not a death, okay? Dj on this particular deck, but No, no literal would deck. and Mike. I'm in my God dining room. Nah I watched inside with African masks on the wallet chip. Nice obviously run the jewels four episode for a Yankee in the brave as she put it on. The first track has been received as one of the best albums of the year so far in most definitely an album that helps people whether they're listening like me on their headphones around the street. Cope with things right now, and how's that field? It's been amazing I i. You know it's connected with people on a level that we you know are blown away by you know. I think people love the music I think people I think the music is is is giving people, energy and I think that people are connecting with the spirit of the Dang, so I'm I'm honored man I'm I think that we just make. We just made music and we try. Please each other you know. Make sure that we feel like we wrapped. You know who we are and You don't know how people are gonNA. React to it, but we felt like this was a special record, so to to to how people react like that is is, is amazing heels damn good? Awesome hip hop. Shit like I'm loved it. Crimes and it resonates. On Levin at people are wrapping words. A missing all I look forward to get out on the road next year, but just the perfect phrases. It just feels a Of course a lot of people receiving it as a very much an album at the moment and I have to say that tracks like pulling the pin. Do feel that they could have been written by ten minutes ago, but I've read that the album was originally scheduled for release in April and it is after all a run the jewels out, and you go back to thieves from run the jewels three, and and you could hear music that fits this moment. You go back to early back. You know you go back to close your eyes. You can go back to you know I. think that we. The truth is is that. People are tune into that frequency right now, and and and but the truth, but like you said I mean this album was going to drop in April and We, made it in two thousand and nineteen. So you know this is where this is where we were at in our heads in terms of our art, and what we were looking on the things that we were tackling and. So you know. You kind of wish that someday. Those types of some of the ideas that feel really relevant right now will never feel relevant again. You know that's that's the hope you know me. And Mike can do to our version of the kid and play kick, step or whatever it is, we gotta come up with to like you know. Make happy music basically Those those things are connecting with people and more than anything. We wanted to give people something that just had life to an energy to it and a little bit of That we didn't want something that was. That felt like it was despair. We want something I've felt like. It was resilient something. I've felt like you know it could translate like. Puff your chest out a little bit like. Yeah, you know the you know. We see what you know. Some of the things that are going on and yet I. Don't think you walk away from his record. Feeling defeated. I think that you walk away from his record. Feeling Energy I. I hope you know no I mean I would say a lot of it is fight music right? Yeah, yeah, for sure thinking, man's fight music or thinking people's fight music as it were for sure but one thing that really resonates. I mean Mike. You've talked about this. You've talked about hearing from people who are out protesting that they've taken up that track walking in the snow as they march. Yeah, and that's such a strong record musically and wearily, but. It is a fight song on some level right it is enter. People have to understand fight into internal and external fighting is Donald Spiritual and physical fight. You know it is warfare philosophy, an ideology, good versus evil? It is absolutely fight song, and it gets. You motivated it is is really moves and dare I say his crump Kazaks. What boom in that Memphis accent and energy gays to what the feeling was? That out in you know so, but the world does get so cold. You're walking in the snow and people out. There have called me. The homeys call me from Tampa Saint Pete the home cars New York. COMMUN- from La. At different times with that record was playing as people protesting, so I'm very proud to have made up. The net fits the mood of the moment that motivates people and put the movement forward. Pay Moment for like you said it is. You nailed it when he said it's. It's it's. It's thinking man's five music because really. The fight that we are the way that we're fighting on that song. It's been particular as we're fighting intellectually against some of the concepts and some of the ideas that people are accepting. You know I think that there's an there's there's some obvious things that resonate really quickly with people like for instance, the clear thing about my who was referencing. Eric Garner's death and obviously that resonated really quickly, and very clearly with the moment of just very very publicly. Had you know everybody experiencing those words being uttered again in the death of another black man in America, but what me and Mike are doing through the subtext of that whole song is trying to challenge and really debate some of the some of the mind frame, and some of the intellectual positions that people. People are taking. That are allowing this stuff to happen. That are allowing our ideals to be compromised and that's what I think. Is there in the song underneath it all one when it finally you know once that shock of of there being something that sounds you know really clearly at the moment I think that there's something deeper there as well you know Mike. Saying you know never forget that you know. Your own you know by. Jesus was. Me Challenging the idea of being you know if you're a Christian and yet you somehow find yourself politically on the side of people who are caging children. then. Perhaps you're not as Christian as you purport to be to yourself and to others you know. You know so. It is a fight, but I think it's a fight for the hearts and minds of all of us. You know it's not a record that says go out and fight physically, although that's a result that can happen in in culture on that you know sometimes has to happen, but really that record is is a record of us saying like Hey. Let's take this to task. Let's fight against these ideas. If you really want to back up your, you know if you really want to back up your position, you know here's here's our arguments could. Could you know you know there's some production choices on this track? We're talking about walking in the snow. The really hit me. The more I listened to it and one in particular. You take that that channing noise that SORTA posse effect, Yoyo, noise out from the back, and it becomes a whole different track right because you. He was that sense of community, but you also lose a little bit of that fighting spirit that we're talking about right if you were to. If you were to take it out. If you were to take it out, so tell me a little. Little bit about how this track comes together like. Let's just talk about the recording the concept. How does this all Mesh which comes first? Has It happened this track more than maybe any on the album evolved like really far from what it originally was elements of what it originally was made it into the trap, but originally it was just one beat. It was a little bit more just straightforward all the way through. It was kind of just this soulful funky beat. We both lay down our our our main.

Mike L. P. US Levin Donald Spiritual New York Eric Garner Memphis America La Tampa
"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio

05:16 min | 1 d ago

"jewel" Discussed on Inside the Studio

"So this time out, I got to talk with LP and killer Mike of run the jewels who have made one of the hardest craziest and most politically charged hip hop albums of the year. Although actually you could pretty much say that for any year in which run the jewels puts out an album. That's still the early June release. This one which is called run the Gills. Four felt a little deeper coming as it did just weeks into the protest marches that spread around the country and around the world after the killing of George. Floyd by the police in Minneapolis run the jewels for has been rightly hailed as a an album that catches the mood of that moment in fact killer Mike told me that he's heard from protesters around the country who've taken up one song from the album. It's called walking in the snow as something of an anthem on their marches. Marches and in that track Mike Talks at one point about the TV news showing a man like him, that is a black man choked out by the police. While whispering the words I can't breathe. Which of course were the exact words used by both George Floyd this May Eric Garner six years before that, so the sand fact is that walking in the snow is a song that both describes a system that's been broken in deadly for a very long time and a song that feels like it was written ten minutes ago in reaction to what's happening right now. Is Killer Mike and LP told me run the jewels. Four was actually recorded last year. The original plan before the pandemic was to release the album in the spring, and for run the jewels to go out on the road with. The machine who were slated for a reunion GIG coachella now, l. p. comes out of the nineties underground hip hop scene in New York. He was in the trio company flow, and he was also a Co. founder of the crucial indie label Def jocks killer Mike is from Atlanta he earned. His nickname is a battle rapper and he made his recorded debut in. In two thousand, nine, a cut from the outcast classic Stankonia, the two of them began working together about a decade ago, when L. P. was slated to produce a couple of tracks on a killer, Mike. Solo album called rap music. Mike Kurd would elvia done and convinced him to produce the entire album and part of what their partnership in run the jewels. Is How the Internet is just about a race any space in between whatever we call alternative in mainstream hip hop i. mean we live in an age when music can come from anyone anywhere with her without a label and it can sound like anything around the Jewish. Track might be futuristic, or it might be an old school. Throwback might start out with some New York experimental rock, and then shift into a southern syrupy style on run the jewels four, the the guests include two chains and ferrall on the one hand Josh Hami from Queens to the Stein Agents Act Arocca from rage against the machine on the other, and this is music that does whatever it wants in the same way their. Their music doesn't sound like just one thing they're songs. Don't stay in just one place. These guys can move rapid fire from Shit, talking to heavy thinking with a lot more in between, there's a fair amount of humor on run. The jewels for the album is set up as episode. Four of a ridiculous fictional television show across between I. Don't know the a team in Dukes of hazzard. Maybe it's that cop show that the Beastie boys were starring in the sabotage video. Whatever it is, it's about two anti heroes on the run fighting against crooked cops, and it's called Yankee in the brave, which is a reference to the Yankees and Atlanta braves, baseball caps that LP and killer Mike Wear. But the the final track on the album is called a few words from the firing squad, and it goes somewhere more emotional than these guys have gone before. Lp told me about how originally he planned to put drums on this track. What you're hearing is almost what they started with and ONC- in killer. Mike began putting verses down in talking about the women in their lives and their core values. He decided against tinkering with it. I didn't want to take away from anything Mike was saying they want to take away from anything. I was saying overproducing it. It needed to be something that felt. Really clear and felt and felt really powerful because I think that It demanded it. You know what we were saying as Jamie and Mike needed to be front and center and needed to be heard so LP and killer. Mike talked in depth about that song, and they also talked about how they've tried to keep their businesses run the jewels, and also the other side businesses outside of music that they've started. Keep these things going during the pandemic. And most importantly about how and why they work together. Here's what else they.

Killer Mike Mike Talks Mike Kurd Co. founder George Floyd Lp New York Atlanta hazzard braves Yankees baseball Josh Hami Stein Agents Minneapolis Jamie Eric Garner Queens
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 2 d ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
"jewel" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

07:57 min | Last week

"jewel" Discussed on Popcast

"Is like Oh now you can just like have one song. It's the most famous person in America. which is all true. But the Internet as pipeline is not necessarily totally geared towards a young age there for everybody, and so run the jewels. One kind of becomes a case study in how Internet distribution and awareness can function for a group that is not necessarily trying to reach teenagers. It's trying to reach other middle aged people who are also on the Internet is a parallel thing that's happening. It's just something that bears mentioning because I think it's important for us to understand that. You and I and critics like us. We're constantly kind of like itching away at soundcloud or youtube or whatever Tiktok just be like Oh. What's a? What's a weird small thing that's happening? That could become a big thing could become really interesting. and. Here's something that's happening. Basically in plain sight. It's like people probably dowling this record at their day jobs, you know. And functioning in a very different way, yeah, it's sort of interesting to think about sort of this record is released just on the cusp of Lake, odd future mania and a lot of people credit that hm with changing the way that people think about using the Internet to connect with fans and it's there's definitely it's I. Remember being on twitter at the time and killer Mike just sort of like tweeting in real time. What was going on with the album him being like a? A Eh the album is done. And then they announced that it was going to be released one day, and then a few days before he gets on twitter, WE'RE GONNA release it tomorrow, and then it's released for free, and anybody can download it, and there is. It's definitely true that they are connecting with their audience the same way that these young up and coming kids grow up on the Internet are connecting were there's it is a certain level of savvy that plays into it. And it's still early. I mean again I want to reemphasize. Thirteen? This is not twenty twenty. When every record is free to everybody, obviously, there are streaming services, but there is something in that era twenty twenty thirteen rap music run the jewels first edition. About like we're GONNA. Release It for free. It's like a little bit of a I. Don't want to say defeat, but it's like a little bit of a concession. It's like we're not really like. Maybe we can sell this. Maybe we can't sell it. Who can say? It had a little bit of that had a little bit of that energy not to say that you know look maybe behind. Behind the scenes they're. They're like marketing genius and they totally understood in there like we're GonNa, follow the radiohead and nine inch nails path and look. Maybe that's all the case, or maybe it was like. Hey, we made this thing. We're GONNA throw in the world. Prayers up and see what happens I never got the sense that there was a p. r. machine behind the record. It's like the. The songs that I was hearing from the record they were released through blogs. This was like blogs were still thing why? You're like you're seeing the senior Meyer blog. I don't know who needs to hear this, but our P. to your blonde. You're seeing anybody's blogs. You're downloading directly from blogs. Just loose MP. Threes everywhere and now. was definitely the sense that they were just like like the mix tape economy hadn't vanished yet. People were still like going on Dat piff and releasing official mix tapes, and it was definitely this sense that they were sort of tapping in to the old head like the old hip Hashtag hip hop ed aspect of that of that community. They're like. Oh, we're just going to release this for three and whoever needs to ear hears it like whatever deaf, jugs! needs to hear it can can download it. There was definitely this sort of wait and see approach to releasing it. Now, we should probably pivot to run the jewels to which again I gotta be honest man I did not know run the to was pitchforks number one album of twenty four deed. Until this this exact moment, deny so so I guess I guess it's safe to say that. Between Two thousand thirteen and twenty fourteen everybody kind of arrived at the party, not to say the pitchfork as late Basque because it's not, but I'm just saying God forbid me for quoting from wikipedia page. He's upside down. But like there's a section on the wikipedia page were on the jewels to. That's just year end lists. To Billboard. Number, two complex. Complex number one. Number two. The Rolling Stone One spin one stereo gum one vibe to the wire eight. So, what happened between run the jewels one run the jewels to. They were able to connect with the the middle, the middle part of the slim shady in the middle part of their ven diagram. Over the course of that year I remember, they started doing shows together. They started to appear as a unit, and I think people who initially were skeptical like you in the initial going, those people were sort of one over in the course of the following months I do remember the record sort of steadily building steam on the Internet, just being out there and and fan sort of anticipating the next record and the thing about the next record. It is just such a crazy step up from the first record. It's they the production value is. Is Higher. It's way punch year. It's like the two of them are in their bag together. They started filling out the process, and it's like all of a sudden they it's like they had a little brainstorm session, and they're like checking off the the the things that they both agree on and the things that they disagree on, and it's like all right. We're going to everything that we agree on here. We're GONNA. Hit this, and then we're going to save you all this other stuff that that we hate and it's really just this colossal. Middle fingers up record, and they just go off in tandem and I. Think I think finally for a lot of people. It sort of made sense and this is why I say that these two artists aren't as far off as people like to believe is because there's there was always this sort of odd couple narrative going on between the two of them, but I like to think of them as there's this meme of like to bodybuilders like clasping hands, one's black one's white and it's like this person. Whatever on one side whatever thing on the other side? The hand clasping is like the where they meet in the middle, and it's like so you have lp sort of this this underground impresario at deaf jokes, and then you have killer Mike. This dungeon family acolyte an hanger on, and I feel like the sort of the principles of those two groups are as dissimilar as people wanted to believe they were, and so over the course of that year. You're starting to see these two. These two basis converge in shared interest, and then all of a sudden. It's like well run. The jewels represents this meeting of the minds best of both worlds China situation. Wow, that's okay. We'll watch the throne this Wabi. Anti through this. This is just destroy the throne. Burn the throne. This is the burn the.

twitter Mike youtube America. Dat piff dowling radiohead China Meyer official
"jewel" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

08:01 min | Last week

"jewel" Discussed on Popcast

"Record when I went back to listen to. It again holds up way better than I remember. That's an I'll just own up to that. I remember feeling a little anxiety about run the jewels in the early. Years is twenty, thirteen, twenty, hundred I remember feeling a little anxiety about run the jewels, because as you know as a critic, right, you wanna be kind of like relentlessly focused on novelty innovation forward thing gang, and I have always tried to gut. Check Myself Against Nostalgia, and you know that thing where like certain sometimes I'll talk to. People of my generation was a little bit older than your generation and people just be like. Like only only WANNA. Talk about Gra Zelda. You know and I'm like yes. I totally understand like result is good, but let us not get confused about that. Being the center of what's happening right now. There's one other thing that's happening right now, but so I was probably a little overly skeptical of run the jewels and this is just a good lesson for me and hopefully others to even be skeptical of my sculpture since. Because when I went back to this record recently, I was like discuss slaps. This is good. Yes, it's sort of interesting that you say that. Because I to my first impulse when this record was announced was why not just do rap music to essentially like? It's like if if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just just go back to that well and do that again because it works so well. I wasn't sure how these two would work as emcees. emcees sharing space so often we see two guys wrapped together, and it's just the chemistry is not there, and you can so easily be undone by that lack of chemistry, even when you have two great wrappers in sharing space together I, always like to think about this record sort of as the mix tape that precedes their album. It was definitely marketed as their debut album, but this record to me feels like them sort of getting acquainted with one another. Another as partners in sort of working out the kinks I think it's a great record going back. It's still holds up, but I still think they're building to this sort of colossal punch that is run the Gills to, and you can hear them sort of feeling each other out. It's like Oh, there's this little dance going on like I don't WanNa step on his toes I want him to get the space debris i. want the space to breathe can. Can I do certain things on the this? These songs that I would do on my own songs, because even though they do share some broader thematic similarities in their music. They do have very different ways of coming at them. If you'RE GONNA make a group right if it's not gonna be LP producing killer Mike, if you are a group, what is the ideology of the group? Why does the exist right right exactly and I think if you were? Seventeen. With another seventeen year old making that choice, that's a different question, but if you're in your thirties, making that choice, there probably should be a reason that you do this thing that makes sense and part of the reason I wanted to play. Is I. Think part of the reason is in a song like this which talks about? Police issues and brutal. You know it directly engages with the themes that obviously are not new to hip hop, but certainly are not at the forefront of the genre at that particular moment, so I think part of part of them as you say, feeling each other out is not just a rhythm thing, it's not just a cadence thing. It's not just a pattern thing. It's a thematic thing. It's what do we have to say that makes sense saying it side by side. And what are we have to say? That makes sense when we together say it out to the world, I should also just briefly I want to shout somebody out 'cause. Royals, been on my mind, and probably if I had not been doing the pop smoke story from a couple weeks ago, I probably would have written something about the record, but I just. That week ended up being very very crazy, but I wanNA shout out a listeners names won- he lives in Nashville and he wrote a very long email to the podcasting mail address and got me thinking about this again. It made me realize we come back to it for sure. Even though it was on the list I had to fast. Track it so out to you. Thank you for your note. You know I just thank you want. One is the reason for me Sheldon to be on the phone today. We appreciate you one. Thank you real real big spit! Get to circle back here. This is a decision. That, too. I don't WanNa. Say Middle Middle Ages. I try to be generational ambiguous myself. I don't know what Middle Ages exactly, but two men on the lower end of their middle age years making a choice, and and this is what they chose so again to circle back to when this first came out. To me, this felt a little niche, potentially a little nostalgic and I'm talking like bomb squad era nostalgic because I think we're going to locate what lp his sort of Qadri of of producers do. It's very much bomb squad influenced absolutely, and it made me as someone who is also on on the younger edge of Middle Age at that time. Think okay I'm glad. I like this I think I also have not mistaking this for like. Drake Drake is drake is what's happening right now? This something that feels very. This feels like a fringe thing. And it turns out obviously drinks very popular, but I was wrong about this being a French so just owning up to. It. I mean it's hard to believe or see this. This project does novel when there's so much history immediately packed into it right like here. Are these guys? It's as you said like these guys started this project. When let's be fair, a lot of rappers going out at this age like they're. They're investing in the. Robbers are done. It's just it's just the the fact of the matter, and so it's hard to be like Oh. This thing is going to work when there's so much riding on on you guys sort of rising above not only the expectations of of ageism, but also just these massive solo catalogs that you guys have created in different spheres of the rap underground, and so you've got all of these different perceptions looming, and you have to fight all of them, and that's really one of the impressive things about. Run the jewels as a unit. Is that they took this big gamble and they said. Everybody really. That's a lot of their records are big, everybody energy, and and they warn out. It says rainy. This is something that we don't talk about enough I. Think Think vis-a-vis. Run the jewels specific moment in arc of their rise which is. You know as someone who is paying attention to the ways that the Internet was changing distribution methods, letting people with less formal fewer former records connections break in much more easily through out the two thousand into the twenty tens we tend to think of the Internet as being a space that is freeing and liberating for the youngest creators it's it's. It's basically like Oh, in the nineties you add have a friend who had a friend who could pass your tape to somebody who works somewhere and you would have to you know just kind of really really struggle at these kind of small concerts to kind of insure way towards some kind of notoriety. And we think the Internet.

WanNa Drake Drake Nashville Gills Mike Sheldon
Finally, Albertsons Goes Public -- After Besting Krogers Performance

Business Wars Daily

04:02 min | Last week

Finally, Albertsons Goes Public -- After Besting Krogers Performance

"Well after years of trying albertson's than Asian largest grocery store chain has finally gone public. The company I planned to launch an IPO back in twenty fifteen, but ultimately postponed the offering because of retail market volatility, but even global pandemic couldn't stop. The companies go to market plans this time, not with so much money on the line. ALBERTSON'S IPO was expected to be a billion dollar plus event, but despite the strength of the grocery sector and the company's own strategic moves, investors weren't suite on Albertson's. The company's target price was roughly twenty dollars per share, but ended up selling for a discounted price of Sixteen A. A share by the time the stock debuted on the new. York Stock Exchange the next day. The price it dropped another three percent. The downsize deal was surprising. Albertson sales in March and most of April were up nearly thirty five percent over last year CNBC reports the company Jones Safeway Jewel OSCO stores among other grocery brands had been making innovative moves before covid nineteen albertson's has been centralizing its buying power investing in its private label brands. It's also remodeled stores to devote more space to growing fresh departments. The Wall Street Journal reports Albertson's also adopted smaller warehouses near existing stores to fulfil online orders faster. Same store sales were outpacing kroger the country's biggest supermarket player according to win site. Grocery business. Following the IPO Albertson CEO Vivek Shankman remained optimistic about the company's prospects. He pointed to market. Volatility is one reason for the disappointing debut. Stocks had fallen the day before the IPO is cove, nineteen surged. He told The Wall Street Journal and IPO is just the starting line. It's not the finish line. Things aren't much better over the number. One grocery brand kroger also enjoyed a pandemic. Pandemic revenue bump last quarter revenue, excluding fuel grew nearly twenty percent from the previous year that growth exceeded analysts expectations, but shortly after its last earnings call in mid June, share prices dropped six percent grocers were an economic bright spot. During the early months after covid nineteen swept across the nation. Many people stocked up on staples and hunker down at home, but investors aren't convinced that the. The. Sales bump from cozy home, cooked meals and stockpiles of toilet, paper and cleaning supplies are going to last much longer. Store margins are razor thin between one and two percent according to mercator. Advisory Group Research and expenses for additional cleaning, staff and safety precautions have spiked, but both grocers are gearing up in areas that promise growth. The economic downturn is made consumers more price conscious that. That bodes well for private label brands which are more profitable than national brands. According to mercator, research both grocery giants are strong players here, but kroger has the edge. It's private label. Division had its best year ever in two thousand, nineteen, topping twenty three billion dollars in sales, according to Progressive Grocer, magazine albertson's private labels tallied roughly half that amount in sales according to its IPO filings. Albertsons is ahead of the game in another important area online sales online grocery sales are poised to jump about forty percent this year core site research estimates. Albertson's has already outfitted to small fulfillment facilities to speed online and delivery orders. It plans to expand the concept Kroger has to. It's centralized distribution strategy according to supermarket news, but the retail giants face increasing pressure from mass club and dollar retail competitors together sectors outpace private label performance from Grocers for reports and their formidable online rivals to as consumers increasingly venture out into the world. Grocers are looking for a way forward key questions remain around how shopping change and whether grocers can find ways to keep ringing up pandemic lovers savings.

Albertson Kroger Vivek Shankman Mercator Albertsons The Wall Street Journal York Cnbc Jones Safeway Jewel Osco Advisory Group Research CEO Progressive Grocer
China Passes Hong Kong National Security Law to Crush Threats

WSJ What's News

05:44 min | 2 weeks ago

China Passes Hong Kong National Security Law to Crush Threats

"Hong Kong is a global banking center home to several multinational companies. It seen by the business community as a gateway to China was so much at stake. We're taking a closer look at the impact of China's new security on the region Wall Street. Journal markets. Columnist Mike. Byrd is based in Hong Kong. He joins US NOW MIKE WELCOME! Thanks very much for having me. Mike you're on the ground in Hong. Kong you are very much in touch with the business community. Put this in perspective for us. Just how big of a deal is this? The first thing to say is that we don't have a lot of detail on what is going in this low. We know that it will have rules on secessionist Atta. Choose to subversion of the Chinese state and to some vague implications. Abou- coming under foreign influence, but we don't know the straight detail of it. The actual text of the law has yet to be published, so it's difficult for businesses to make a firm idea of of what this is going to mean for them for the moment. Moment is a lot of confusion, and it's also extremely sensitive topic, because not knowing what's in that bill means that you don't know what will be illegal to save from tomorrow. What you may encounter legal difficulties from saying a lot of international businesses staying relatively quiet about that even now organizations like the American Chamber of Commerce relatively quiet organizations that have to be fat up until now been fairly critical of the idea of the national security, though a now being very cautious about what they say. Mike as you know as we've reported a top executive from banking, giant HSBC signed a petition supporting the legislation, saying it supports any law to stabilize social order in Hong, Kong and economic prosperity and development to have that backing from HSBC. How significant is that? I think hate be. Situation has turned out to be as a bit of a microcosm for war. The problem is for businesses more broadly in Hong Kong, which is a SPEC- signed up to the idea. The national security though they had an executive sign up to that was referred to in Chinese media in state media as sort of too little too late that that support was slow that it wasn't absolute that it wasn't clear from the beginning now. Hong Kong HSBC was obviously criticize full completely the opposite for signing the bill astle is very difficult to find this sort of middle ground position that businesses like hate pc, especially those with sort of one foot in the West and one foot in China. They've done really well in the past couple of decades in Montaigne and jewel role. It's now increasingly difficult to. To do the HAGIA species come under fire from both sides for doing it. It's likely to continue doing so, and that's going to be the case for other large Hong Kong. Business as you go companies like Johnny Matheson, which are really West and run by of had a big influence in Asia for longtime. They're gonNA find it increasingly difficult to straddle both sides. I WANNA. Point out at the time HSBC said it supported laws that will enable Hongkong to rebuild its economy and maintain the principle of one country, two systems, any indication from any companies, especially those that are based in the West that they will curb their presence or scale back their presence or future business deals in Hong Kong. You've seen some smaller organizations to that. In the couple of research firms here, but people mostly stray away from saying for a couple of reasons, one thing is if you have to do business in mainland China saying that you leaving Hong. Kong because of a load of the government of mainland China wants to pass is a bad look. It's not GonNa win you any friends in the mainland. The second reason is purely cost related. It's expensive to move people and if If it becomes the case that it won't disrupt Your Business Operations you've moved people. You probably lost employees in the process. You probably lost deals in the process for no reason. as a reporter is sold. Is Covering London during twenty sixteen businesses talked a lot about leaving because of brexit talks about the risks. Relatively few of them did precisely because it's so expensive to do so disruptive if there are any circumstances in which you can stay, you probably will. And Mike as a journalist who lives in Hong Kong who is very familiar with the business community. What are the lingering questions you have? What are the unknowns that need to be answered to get scope about the significance and impact of this decision. I think the honest answer is that we won't know enough about the little to know how Lafayette businesses until it begins being enforced you have lose like this in mainland China and it's the selectiveness of their enforcement. That really matters whether it's used as the Hong Kong. Government is broadly suggesting the Hong Kong. Government. He's very keen to stress that this won't affect most people that it shouldn't affect national businesses. Many businesses may not in a cynical way mind this of law, if it really just applies to political dissidents, if it's just used to crackdown police political dissidents, and that will be the same as many businesses finding mainland China, many businesses find. Find even in places like Singapore they can live without sort of thing, but the strict text of the bill may prove to provide situations for the Hong Kong government to pursue international businesses if they wanted to. So I think we'll have to see where we are in a few months time once the lawyers and who's being caught up in it. Who's being warned about legally? WHO's actually going to call? He's being prosecuted for until that happens is going to be really difficult to say the soda scope of the Law until it actually begins to fullest. Mike Byrd joining us from Hong Kong great to have you on the podcast. Thanks very much.

Hong Kong Mike Byrd Hong Kong Hsbc China Hongkong Hsbc Executive American Chamber Of Commerce Atta Singapore Asia Johnny Matheson Montaigne Reporter London
Bagged salad sickens 122 people in 7 states

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bagged salad sickens 122 people in 7 states

"There's a recall on a type of bag salad sold it a number of stores in the Midwest. It contains carrots, red cabbage and iceberg lettuce, a bag to salad mix. It has sickened 122 people in seven states and caused the 19 hospitalizations. The U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 54 illnesses have been reported in Iowa and 30 in Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska and Wisconsin have also reported illnesses. The salad mix packaged as Hy vee brand garden salads and distributed by high V Jewel Osco went all the grocery stores is contaminated with cyclists. Flora, a parasite that can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea and

Jewel Osco U. S. Centers For Disease Cont Stomach Cramps Midwest Diarrhea Nausea Flora Iowa Nebraska Wisconsin Missouri Minnesota Illinois Kansas
Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

Phil's Gang

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

"A bag grocery store salad has sickened more than a hundred people in seven states have bagged salad mix that has been recalled has sickened one hundred twenty two people in seven states and because the nineteen hospitalizations the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention says fifty four illnesses have been reported in Iowa and thirty in Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri Nebraska and Wisconsin have also reported illnesses the salad mix packaged as high V. brand garden salads and distributed by high V. jewel Osco and all the grocery stores is contaminated with Cyclospora parasite that can cause diarrhea stomach cramps nausea and

Iowa Nebraska Wisconsin Stomach Cramps Nausea Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri
Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

"The hi hi historic Mike Mike Rossi Rossi church are in are reporting reporting Atlanta no a that charges bags was home grocery to will Reverend be store filed Martin salad in Luther the NASCAR has king sickened junior noose more incident was than the one site hundred involving of the people funeral the circuits in for seven only the black states black man driver shot a and bag killed federal of by salad authorities a white mix police say that the has noose officer been recalled found in NASCAR has sickened we need driver one change Bubba hundred Wallace's twenty two people garage restart in stall seven at states Brooks's Talladega life and superspeedway because matters the nineteen had been hospitalizations there Reverend for at king's least eight daughter months the Reverend U. S. centers at Bernice no for charges disease king will control says be filed this and is prevention an all U. too says S. familiar attorney fifty J. sight town four illnesses and we FBI are special have here been reported agent in charge in Iowa because Johnny sharp individuals and junior thirty say in continue Illinois the news had to been in Kansas hide garage number Minnesota four behind as Missouri early badges as October Nebraska and and Wallace Wisconsin trainings is the have only also and black policies reported driver illnesses on NASCAR's and procedures top the salad circuit mix less packaged than two weeks as high ago rather V. he helped brand push than garden the stock salad car regarding series and distributed to ban the the humanity by Confederate high V. flag jewel at of its venues others Osco and all after the in grocery a general crew member stores for and Richard black is Petty contaminated lives motor sports specific with discovered Cyclospora the news needs Sunday Gabrielle parasite Martinez NASCAR that can contacted cause says diarrhea riots the F. B. aren't I. stomach which needed cramps said fifteen but nausea people agents and helping fatigue to the people track to investigate hi Mike Rossio hi Mike make us Rossi better people up no matter the race let's treat each other how we want to be treated as people I'm a Donahue

Cyclospora Diarrhea Gabrielle Richard Black Wallace Wisconsin Kansas Johnny Sharp Attorney Reverend U. S. Officer Martin Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Donahue Mike Rossio Atlanta Osco Nebraska Missouri Minnesota Illinois
Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a bags grocery store salad has sickened more than one hundred people in seven states a bag of salad mix that has been recalled has sickened one hundred twenty two people in seven states and because the nineteen hospitalizations the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention says fifty four illnesses have been reported in Iowa and thirty in Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri Nebraska and Wisconsin have also reported illnesses the salad mix packaged as high V. brand garden salad and distributed by high V. jewel Osco and all the grocery stores is contaminated with Cyclospora parasite that can cause diarrhea stomach cramps nausea and fatigue hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Iowa Nebraska Wisconsin Mike Rossio Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri Stomach Cramps Nausea
Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bagged grocery store salad sickens more than 100 in 7 states

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a bags grocery store salad has sickened more than one hundred people in seven states a bag of salad mix that has been recalled has sickened one hundred twenty two people in seven states and because the nineteen hospitalizations the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention says fifty four illnesses have been reported in Iowa and thirty in Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri Nebraska and Wisconsin have also reported illnesses the salad mix packaged as high V. brand garden salad and distributed by high V. jewel Osco and all the grocery stores is contaminated with Cyclospora parasite that can cause diarrhea stomach cramps nausea and fatigue hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Iowa Nebraska Wisconsin Mike Rossio Illinois Kansas Minnesota Missouri Stomach Cramps Nausea
All the Fine Girls Be There

Nancy

04:46 min | 3 weeks ago

All the Fine Girls Be There

"Shakedown tell us more so shakedown. This experimental documentary about a black lesbian strip. Club in Los Angeles that I. I came across a couple of years ago at an art gallery in Harlem when a friend and I were trying not to get stuck in the rain, and so he ran into this gallery, and we went up a flight of stairs, and in the stock room was documentary playing on a continuous loop and we immediately were entranced. Stand in the front and you. I got no money. Please go back there. I are I here I need money if you don't have hey. Move Back Bull. And it was just fascinating, because it was like these ladies doing some fairly unsanitary things with money. I mean. You. Don't know. Anyway shakedown. The club-mate started in nineteen, ninety six, and it happens every Friday for eight years where where black lesbian women could dance and Strip for other predominantly black lesbian women and he was amazing. And side note for documentary itself has had this kind of radical trajectory. It start out in the art world. which is how I got to see it invented. It just became the first not adult film to be officially released on Porno. And now it's streaming on the criterion channel, which is pretty cool, just classic. Would success story exactly? Well, you're going to tell us about how shakedown sort of came to be and what happened to it right? Yes, and so please Parker to get away. Okay so. The filmmaker who made shakedown is named Leela Wine Rob. was introduced to shake down a very magical easy way where somebody handed me a flier on one side, there was a girl in a cap and gown like from Ucla. And then on the back is all like dancers in thongs, but just like a row, but. I had never seen anything like that before, and then I went. SHAKEDOWN was different from the other L. E. Lesbian. Club nights at the time is much. Raunchier and served more hip hop aesthetic. It was a space that loved everyone that walked in its doors. Black, LESBIAN BI and Trans People. From the first night Leela knew she wanted to documented. I loved it. There was like younger darker faster. AMAS more sexual. The shows were more like you can do whatever you wanted. You kinda like also be whoever you wanted. Shakedown was in the tradition of black lesbian show nights. That's culture was really popular in the south. You know like in Houston and Atlanta and like shake down in the southern clubs were like really about like a high female persona. And there was nothing like that in La at the time, the young woman was offered a chance to build a dream. My name is Sharon Sharon Harris and I go buy Brawny D. Ron I am the CEO the creator of shakedown reductions shakedown entertainment. Exclusive. Ronnie was pretty new to the whole gay club scene. When one night at the other black gay club in town called Jewel's catch one, she entered a pageant called Mr Catch one, where which performers competed in their best seats and Ronnie got to lip sync the nineties. Rb Song. Where do you want me to put it? And I one with yet like a sash. They give you a sash. They give you a trophy. They give you a crown. your responsibilities after that is they give you a show to host. was used to public speaking because as a witness I. Walked to people's doorsteps in talk to them about the Bible, so when she said I had to host the show on I, said Okay and was stripped show I said great. For the next six months running emceed strip show at the catch. Then, one night and owner of another club was in the audience he saw the Ronnie had the personality to draw crowds and offered her her very own recurring night at his club, Club Horizon She could choose the music. The lights the dancers. It was all hers. So from then on every Friday night club horizon was Ronnie de Ron's

Ronnie De Ron Los Angeles L. E. Lesbian Sharon Sharon Harris Harlem Leela Ron I Trans People Rob. Jewel Ucla Parker Raunchier CEO Atlanta Houston
The power of the Black Lives Matter movement

On the Media

09:50 min | 3 weeks ago

The power of the Black Lives Matter movement

"We in wave one wave to if there is a low dose that mark an end because we're gathering of strength these questions we ask about corona virus but what if we understood social movement moments in the same way the death of George Floyd and the uprisings that followed can seem like the birth of a new social movement and the new host of possibilities disbanding at the funding police departments commemorating Juneteenth ads addressing the on going silent apart taped the systemic racism woven through the society and everything from voting rights to healthcare urban planning it seems as sudden as a lightning strike Alan Kwabena Frimpong is an activist and consultant with ad astra collective which provides tools to build social movements he says the explosion was ignited by what his group calls a trigger event or several of them the killing of George Floyd the pandemic the previous extrajudicial killings of black people these events where we can no longer be complicit with the conditions of the status quo that way in and then once the triggering event unleashes this long accumulating rage comes the heroic phase everybody's on the streets anything seems possible which leads you say to a honeymoon right people believe anything is possible that we've been dreaming of that we would like to see in our world a future without police without jails and prisons now that not only seems possible it's becoming possible so we thought that with the disbandment of the Minneapolis police department but the vote that was taken by the city council and so if in this space that possibility can live and then history tells us the honeymoon inevitably ends leading to disillusionment contraction you call it the women's March and occupier quintessential examples and likewise the first wave of black lives matter what's happening with the disillusionment sets in any time during this period we think we've failed that when the cameras turn off when there's not as much attention to the issues and mass media or even in social media we think that the movement activity has somehow ended but it hasn't it's that what is required of us as shifted or it gets to share in this phase of the cycle and it's a time to build strategy and to build organization to find unity around the issues and to figure out the infrastructure needed to be able to create the visions of the world that we actually want to live in an analogy might be that you light the grill the flames jump out of the cattle so big you could get singed but then fifteen minutes later you come back and all you see is a heap of calls but underneath it is smoldering the cycle does seem to reflect at least American history going back to the Boston tea party these kind of waves that we've seen this country has dealt with since its inception when you invoke the Boston tea party that history a card with the backdrop of slavery and the removal of indigenous folks we have to understand our ways of rebellion and Ryan I'm here in Jersey New Jersey eighteen eighty four of you have black people riding here in Newark because of the erection of what was then the school system and how black people were being locked out of participation there are the strength of events in our history that lead to these moments so let's call this the the second wave of black lives matter does the same pattern still hold I mean if this is the second honeymoon should we expect marital reality to kick and with a second loss of energy why wouldn't we we still live in a culture that upholds capitalism mmhm and that holds white supremacy the fact that we have people still talking about the reform of a police state I think it's indicative of that what feels different indicates the value of corporations who want to put out statements saying black lives matter so yeah we're and if you want to call it a second wave of black lives matter but the reality is that as we've talked about before the construction phase we really will have to ask the deep question what will be required of aspen organizer activist members of our communities to ship the material conditions are you in the process of trying to manage expectations show how the cycle works and say we're not gonna leave the news for much longer be prepared to build networks and continue to organize continue to lobby what we will need to deal with in this contraction phase is what are going to beat the alternative institutions that people can look to that people can trust and that people can believe in that show that the path to the new normal that we deserve and to me what that looks like is worker owned cooperatives credit unions to me the control of our public safety health care for all public education accessible to all those things would need to change if we're asking for the abolishment of police because what it requires of us then is to change our relationships with each other and build community with each other and that's what we're going to need to prepare for as this contraction phase comes to life and the question becomes what we choose to do that work we choose to build with people in our neighborhoods we choose to depend on them and create modalities for our safety reeking of other institutions the show is called on the media and I want to ask you about us and I'm gonna go back to occupy to do it when the protesters vanished from the public parks and went home sometimes chased away by police we in the media seized on that extra this is a sign of the movement's failure because its goals were too quixotic it's politics too fragmented and so what is the contraction phase of the cycle reflected by or influenced by the media characterizations when people are not in the streets anymore and there there is in this huge spectacle what is there left to cover America is so infatuated with the spectacle of its own violence and the trauma that ensues from may the disillusionment in the contraction of the cycle I think is a representation of what we tend to be stuck in in terms of our own habits we enjoyed the trauma of the story of the victim the perpetrator and the savior and the way we tell our views as from that have been jewel norm if so what would it look like to shift away from that and perhaps tell news that connects the dots then tells a much more nuanced and complex story that the viewers or listeners deserve to hear where people can actually show authentic stories about what is going on from a place that is moving for people that shift something for them that doesn't truncate in flag in their lives and to just these one dimensional identities there's a lot of what media frames and that then leads to some of the assumptions that get made about whatever happened to the much as whatever happens to the people organizing the rally is people are still doing that work but it may look different we in the media have focused on the tip of the iceberg the protests of the violence the repercussions but you have been talking of what's going on beneath the networks of people building power over time the organization what do you think we can do to tell the story of protest better folks in the media need to ask themselves why do we feel compelled to tell these stories in these ways what do we believe about our audience about what they're ready to hear and what they're ready to listen to we can then have a conversation about whether the human stories that need to be shared that connect the dots people think that somehow Minneapolis was just able to do this overnight but they have been in a protracted struggle for years to get to this point if media where to tell the stories of what it took to get there that would be a different kind of conversation that has different kinds of implications and the time that it would take to tell those stories with me the focus of the story is not just around making a profit but we would actually have to honor people's time contributions much differently than the ways that we do right now are they willing to shift as an industry to live into the kind of lives that these movements are demanding in the clearing for

Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

The Takeaway

01:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

"The U. S. Supreme Court delivers a long awaited and welcome reprieve to data hundreds of thousands of young immigrants in a ruling that for now shields those who were brought here illegally as children from being deported they include many healthcare workers now on the front lines of the fight against corona virus like jewels which tell you I'm happy I'm super excited I think you know I think I can do what I what I love to do what I wanted in my life the High Court determine the trump administration acted arbitrarily in trying to end the deferred action for childhood arrivals program NPR's Carrie Johnson says today's ruling came down to a five to four vote Chief Justice John Roberts and the high court's four liberal justices have handed the trump administration a major defeat the court majority says the decision to wind down daca three years ago he is subject to judicial review and the rationale offered by the homeland security department failed to consider key aspects of the program nearly six hundred fifty thousand people commonly known as dreamers have one temporary relief from deportation under daca the program allows them to work and go to school if they meet certain requirements and pass a background check many of them have gone on to work in healthcare in the legal profession and have given birth to their own children in the United

U. S. Supreme Court High Court NPR Carrie Johnson Chief Justice John Roberts Homeland Security Department
Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

The Book Review

03:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

"When I wrote this I my first book was basically a Beautiful Ahmad to those two ladies, and then I, did cover some of the things about upgrade my background, but I do not go into the depths of what I have gone into this you find trenches initial find trenches in his epistle of love to the important narrative of my life getting. Under upbringing North Carolina all the way to twenty twenty. I go to the decades of when I was at the top of my career vote. In sitting in the front row in. Daily experiencing racism, sexism ageism, all of that and I decided to I had to be very very raw, an honest within a degree, and I told the truth about many things that I never spoken before one being my sexual abuse in childhood. Then I told things that had never been told before about how I experienced racism in the world of fashion. As the there are two different books. occas of sort of a a jewel of book and I'm very proud that I is well because. Of How these two women shaped my life, and became very important factors in my life how they overlaps, it's women, one of African American domestic made for fifty years of her life at Duke University, the other woman a mentor. Editor. Chief evoke in the sixties, and then she went onto the museum. The Metropolitan. When she created the modern fashion exhibit is thanks to her that people now have major fashion exhibits in museums globally. There's not one that has not been influenced by the work of the. So, is there a point in that seventeen year interim between these two books where you thought to yourself, you know I've left something out, or I need to go back and tell a fuller story now. That was never a point like I always just say I had an uncle, said just keep getting up everyday. Just keep getting so I never thought about it in seventy years. I've gotTA write my second memoir. My Document Jerry came out in twenty eighteen the Gospel according to Andrei benefits by the second memoir, because the response of people the outpouring of love. From that documentary was so beautiful. The response I got from People Street. Some people would see the film in the audiences. Remarkable so wonderful, and he gave me the confidence to write the Second Watch. The second while was born from the document. Jerry and I saw the duck return. I loved it by the way I loved what Kate Novak did what we did as collaborators, and then I decided well I. Think I. should not my memoir a second I only. But it never headed for seventeen years I left out. I never thought that I was GONNA. Write another one. My agent David Vigilante took me around, and it'd be had meetings with different companies, different companies, and we got to Pat Buchanan at Random House, and that was one on Friday and Saturday what he called me and he said. Random House is ready to preempt all offers an idea and said well I'm GonNa do it I did it and I have never looked back

David Vigilante Jerry Random House North Carolina Duke University Kate Novak Editor
Baseball players say talks futile, tell MLB to order return

Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

00:33 sec | Last month

Baseball players say talks futile, tell MLB to order return

"Major baseball players told Major League Baseball owners that additional talks to start the season are futile the league should order a return to work the union's action could lead to a season about fifty games read of an eighty two which was initially proposed by Major League Baseball players and MLB agreed to a deal on March twenty six that called for pro rated salary that deal also gave baseball commissioner rob Manfred the right to start the season provided there were no travel restrictions and games to be played before fans a regular season ballpark it was also calling for good faith negotiations to play at the ballpark figure jewel sites each side accusing the other of not

MLB Commissioner Baseball Major League Rob Manfred
Coronavirus Travel News

The World Nomads Podcast

05:55 min | Last month

Coronavirus Travel News

"As the world dust start to open itself up to travel again very gradually, we'll hear from Chris Gills shortly. which includes stay towels on May? Call Gospel not so bomb voyage. It's all those stories of win. Trouble doesn't go so well, and it's based on the. Travel News I. CAN'T UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson Tony about the world opening up once travel ban to the UK lifted soon as possible government, there is working on a new plan, so the British holiday Mike is can travel freely around Europe from July, without the night to quarantine on their return I, think they calling it the European corridor, the covid corridor main Tom Spain has further eased lockdown missions Florida's Disney resort hotels will reopen this month and You Zealand his declared victory over Corona virus after its final covid, nineteen patient was given the all clear night coveted old in the country. Awesome, Las Vegas has reopened for business. Sort of kind of. Fighting in the opening of casinos isn't Simul have handwashing stations with water and towels and soap. Please use them at least twenty seconds and signs will suggest gets waged at mosques, the Renault. No shows nightclubs will sporting events. People from all around Italy can travel to Venice again while the nations are no longer required with mosques outside which Lycos makes failing Nola. Nice we'll have some more news from you as we go and we'll hear from about being stuck Hiroko with her. But right now let's to no attention to jewels and Christine the team behind. Don't forget to move there. fulltime travel bloggers from opposite sides of the world silence kickoff and find out how they may. So, we met when we were both travelling Solos through South America and we both decided to volunteer organization `Pisco Peru helping out after the earthquake down there, and we met while volunteering together and volunteered together for about six months, and then just continue traveling together, and that was back in two thousand twelve, so we've just continued the life of travel as a couple now and into a lot of places around the world. Yeah, this is this is life We made the transition. We started the trouble blog in trouble counting crash everything that's involved with that probably back. In mid two dozen took a few years to get started, but within the last four years. That's what we've been doing full time. Traveling around the world. We have a couple of biases that we like to to. Work out of our Bali in come back to San Francisco Melvin, but other than that way on the right full-time. Working Travel Yeah. It's a pretty pretty good offer now. It's. The travel industry is citing you blah. Don't forget to move. How's IT affected leering, come with a having forgot to move, but we're definitely not moving at the moment. With travel bicycling orbits stopping within a wake over here in the US it really just. Kinda pull the rug out from under old trips. We had for the rest of the planned. Will avail earn travel plans and pretty much just stopped on so all the troops, all the brands in the companies and destinations that we had planned to work with new coming six months old had to postpone those trips over the other hotness ships and stuff like that we had organized as well just as budgets became todor in trouble became a non everything just pigeonholed hold, and it's pretty much where we are at the moment, just whiting in Limburg for the travel industry to kick back up again, Gills thinking of. Other things to do outside. If this travel travel blog, or are you literally just waiting things to stop back up against? They can resume knife. Resumed life as normal. Yeah, we, we've always got. Something was working on something on the side We've been putting a lot more. Trouble podcasts, which has been good, because it's allowed us to continue talking about trouble in staying in trouble spice without having to physically travel, so that's been handy and we've got a couple of other business ideas. It will always floating around, but it's I. Guess Everything in general is a little bit uncertain at the moment. I'm kind of jealous of you podcast. Eighties cold, not so bomb voyage. It's all about the stuff that goes wrong on the rights. Then we've done a couple of episodes. We've shared stories of things that have gone wrong on the right, but as Jill said you. Focus your attention on your on your podcast until those stories. Where do they come from? So we tell stories that we find from France from other travel bloggers from stories from the news, all sorts of stories, books and movies, but all true stories of when things go wrong while traveling which we find to be, they make the best stories right. You don't come home and tell all your friends and family about the time that everything perfectly. When you're out traveling the world, you tell them about the time that your bus broke down or you had your cameras stolen or something crazy happened. Those always make the best stories, and we found that there with social media and instagram and everything. There was this skew trend towards the glamorous side of travel where everything is picture perfect and you're on a gorgeous beach. No one else is there and everything. It just looks wonderful, but everyone who's traveled knows that there's the other side of that where it's. You're hiking down to this beach in your sweaty and there's probably a million people there and somebody's trying to. To sell you, you know like that's just the real side of traveling, so we wanted to bring that the forefront and just chat with people about that and tell stories of when things go wrong in the road, because that's more interesting in our opinion,

UK Chris Gills You Zealand Boris Johnson Las Vegas Florida Prime Minister Europe Simul Hiroko South America San Francisco United States Lycos Nola Renault Tom Spain Corona
Treasure worth $1 million found in Rockies after 10-year search

The KFBK Morning News

00:21 sec | Last month

Treasure worth $1 million found in Rockies after 10-year search

"This morning a treasure hunter from New Mexico has revealed that his chest of gold and jewels worth more than one million dollars has been found tens of thousands of people began searching for the treasure ten years ago when a man named forest fan and now C. had hidden it in the Rocky Mountains this morning fan has announced that an anonymous man

New Mexico Rocky Mountains
Treasure chest hidden in Rocky Mountains finally found

Kim Komando

00:33 sec | Last month

Treasure chest hidden in Rocky Mountains finally found

"And the treasure chest filled with more than a million dollars worth of gold jewels and other valuables and hidden somewhere in the Rocky Mountains in twenty ten has been located that from eighty nine year old forest fan who hit the chest more than a decade ago and told the Santa Fe new Mexican that he did not want to give any clues to where the treasure was found or who found it only saying that the person located the chest a few days ago and sent him a photo confirming the fight fan posted clues on line in a poem in his autobiography hundreds of thousands search for the treasure with many quitting their jobs and some dying in the

Rocky Mountains
New Music previews

Bobbycast

06:10 min | Last month

New Music previews

"Welcome to. Episode Two forty seven. Where later on we'll talk about famous musicians, homes and To, do the story I saw one country post a whole story about Taylor swift multiple million dollar homes. They kind of walked through all of our houses. She has right now. which is pretty crazy, I think it's thirty million dollars in total. So that's what Eddie and I talked about in a little bit, so you WanNa, hang out for that, but the whole site is. Call. One Country Dot Com and they say. Does she live in New, York or Los Angeles Nashville or Rhode Island, but the answers all of them. And they go through her Nashville place when she first started to make money by the two million dollar Nashville place where she knocked out the wall and I know where this place is. It's right next to music. Do you know what I don't know well I don't know if they're that much, but do you know where Taylor owns? No I should say. Right near the radio station. In Rhode Island. She has a twelve thousand square foot beach mansion fayed seventeen point seven five million dollars for it. So she has all summer parties. Someone broke into and it. Is it I think so well looks like a fortress. But there is a lot of grass surrounding. It's you could get to like in new. York, she bought these two apartments, and not to wall out, and the modest third and knocked another wallowed. So! They. Have that dinner for twenty five million dollar. I guess it's more than thirty dollars. Because in two thousand fifteen purchase the estate of Movie Mogul Samuel Goldwyn for twenty five million. So they gives her to oems in. Nashville wants to parents an awesome apartment in New York a beach house in Rhode Island Mansion in California. Yeah, that's way more than thirty million dollars. Agatha her. so we talked about a lot of people that are dead and alive and their homes and let's. ETC So. Glad you guys are checking it out on. Fridays, if we put one up, we highlight a lot of music came out today Cain Brown shared a new song called worldwide beautiful. Here's a clip of that. Tell me I ain't GonNa Change. When I looked at was the number one song and all formats this morning on to come on and see where it was before we landed. Go through some of the other new stuff. Brantley Gilbert has a new song called hard day's check it out. Concern. Shoe shoe for. Tyler released only truck in town. It's a four song EP. So, we haven't heard from afar and a little bit. We'll try to get them on an episode a next week. Bobby cast. But here is a song called Heaven on dirt. S. Making. Let's see. Carly peers has cover of cowboy. Take me away I'm assuming this. Yup Okay here we go. ME. This girl is. Kid Walk. Yuck. Canaan Smith has a song called colder than you so here's some canes. Fast in. BLUE INK COLOR! Gone West Relief of Acoustic version of what could have been because we laugh. down. Abbas! Money on. Cable. So tell me about run the jewels. Hip Hop duo. They put out A. Early this week why? Because with everything going on the world. They felt it was kind of about that, so they put it out early, but it's just two days early albums come out on. Friday came out Wednesday. Also, it's been out a couple. Couple of that's. That's why I was confused. Okay, run the released their album a couple of days ago and This is called. with the money Sinus, the s the s with L. and Zach Della Rocca from rage against the machine. Here you got. Twenty twenty. Avenue. Yeah, that's him. He sounds good. Yeah, that's what I was surprised, but I was never really. Rap. Album. I. Forget to crew. As far as socially conscious views, it goes. Rage against the machine was a standard. And sounds contemporary. Yeah, that's what I was surprised by like. Well, that's him. When I was a teenager, we would listen to ragent. Singing about stuff that idea about at the time a lot of social injustice? That was their platform. For. A lot of different areas, but I mean the perfect group. To bring in now, that was saying the same stuff back then right, but to hear him just. In that song as a fifty year old school

Nashville Taylor Rhode Island York Abbas Twenty Twenty Rhode Island Mansion Cain Brown Samuel Goldwyn L. Eddie Brantley Gilbert New York Canaan Smith Agatha Los Angeles Kid Walk Carly Bobby Cast Tyler
Chicago - Robert Palley Charged With Hate Crime, Battery After Altercation With Woman In River Forest

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:50 sec | Last month

Chicago - Robert Palley Charged With Hate Crime, Battery After Altercation With Woman In River Forest

"Police say a sixty one year old river forest man is charged with felony counts of hate crime and aggravated battery after a racially charged incident at a jewelry store yesterday there were words exchanged between the two people inside the jewel store at a Starbucks and then as the white man walked out the black woman followed him and videotaped him asking him repeatedly do you have anything to say for yourself now do you have any do you have any then the the man man turns turns around around there's there's a a face face off off and and then then a a physical physical fight fight the the woman woman posted posted the the video video on on Twitter Twitter police police in in river river forest forest say say sixty sixty one one year year old old Robert Robert Pelley is charged with a hate crime and with aggravated battery in a statement the village president says we have no tolerance for hate in river forest

Starbucks Robert Robert Pelley President Trump River Forest Twitter
"jewel" Discussed on The Women

The Women

03:26 min | 2 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on The Women

"Shakeup working from home conference calls. You're still on me John with everything we have going on right now. It's never been more important to get to sleep. We need quality. Sleep is a natural immune booster and only the sleep number three sixty smart beds senses your movements that automatically adjusts your comfort support on both sides. Your sleep number setting so all those other things. We're doing to stay healthy and happy. Well they'll work better to and now during Memorial Day sale. Save a thousand dollars on the queen's sleep number three special edition smart now only seventeen ninety nine only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com. I like to do a quick fire. Lightning round at the end of the interview. It's called Truth Truth. We go light after we go deep. So here we go. I wouldn't ask you. What is one tip that you would give people who are learning to ride a horse breeds? Horses feel tension tightness. Relax and you just come into harmony with the horse. You'll figure it all out pretty quickly. You're a native and Alaska your grandparents on both sides of from Alaska. You've had two ton of experience with summers where the sun actually never sets. How does one handle the daylight of sunlight and Alaskan summer put tin foil on Windows for your single grateful? That's out right now. Did you choose the organ for that? Opening at the song opens with like this Oregon southbound and Really has a Bluesy feel. Were you listening to a lot of Blues Music Group? Listening to a lot of many genres of music are. R&b was one of my favorites. And so this record has a really strong seventies R&B influence. I haven't been able to show that side of myself or my singing. Wanted to push myself vocally and away people haven't seen before and I wanted things to have a really natural feel. I love the Oregon always makes me feel like I'm in Church So just felt like the right thing but that song so. This isn't a question but I wanted to end with Sharing something with you before I did this interview today. I got messages from some of my friends. Close like a dozen girls Friends of mine. Who wrote me about their jewel? Memories and a lot of them are still following your music. And we're all really excited for your upcoming album. One of them described this memory she had of belting hands which gave her comfort and feeling like she felt wonderful and her own awkwardness. Another said she loved how you appear to be more interested in being thoughtful rather than being sexy and another friend said that pieces of you was the first CD that she had bought with our own money and she felt like she was an adult doing that and she was an adult listening to it in her. Own World Something that was totally her own. And I know that I can relate to that and so many people who grew up kind of what this gift of having your music and your lyrics can have that too so just want to say. Thanks very happy..

Oregon Alaska John
"jewel" Discussed on The Women

The Women

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on The Women

"I don't think I'm alone when I say that. That album had a profound impact on girls everywhere. It came at the height of grunge and through the domination of Nirvana and ace of base and smooth RB GROUPS. This heart-wrenching lyricist a young girl. Who Sang exactly what she saw. When I told my friends I'd be talking to jewel for the women. I was flooded with text messages. All of them were calling what it felt like to hear someone singing about emotions heartache. And inequality exactly as they saw and experienced themselves pieces of you didn't chart immediately and after two years when jewel became Bob. Dylan's opener her. Single who will save your soul finally got played on the radio well since then pieces of you has gone platinum selling over twelve million copies making it one of the most successful debut albums and it's even been listed in the rock and Roll Hall of fame and Jill describes how songwriting really opened up. This whole new world for her was my first taste of vulnerability was my first taste in the power and the freedom that the courage to be vulnerable allows you welcome to the women are production of iheartradio. Myself rose read today. I'm speaking Joel Kilter. Originally from Alaska Jewel has released a dozen albums over two dozen singles and has published several memoirs. Her interests has been on her journey from homelessness to fame and over the past decade. She's focused on breaking the stigmas around mental health. Making resources in tools and strategies more accessible mental health has been. I BELIEVE OUR WORLD'S BIGGEST CRISIS. Because if you look at issues. That seem very unrelated. Let's say me too. In Gun violence or a opioid addiction and suicide rates or apathy. Environmental Pollution They seem like really different causes. But to me. The underlying thing. The elegant solution is mental health and during the Cova outbreak jewel has been raising money for homeless youth live streaming concerts in partnership with her never broken charity. Music and songwriting are still passion for her. She just released a new single grateful and has a new album. That's coming out. But her primary focus has always been very clear to her. I will do this if I make myself one. Promise that my number one job is to figure out how to be happy. Still my number two jobs to figure out how to be a musician. I spoke to jewel over the phone and I wanted to know how her pursuit her pursuit to write songs. And saying and just be happy where that really began and her adolescents..

Alaska Jewel Jill Joel Kilter Bob Cova Dylan
"jewel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

11:15 min | 2 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Bus Station. Detroit overnight not a great idea street saying in Detroit and I just made up lyrics about people. My Dad was a very good. He would improvise very well so he would do. These five hour sets. Nobody would be listening to who is like a drunk. I am Vets Club and so my dad. Entertainment would make up lyrics about people that weren't listening to us and so I grew up learning to improvise. So that's was my huge plan. Like play these four chords over and over makeup lyrics about people as they walk by and see if I can get money and slowly take whatever money I made gave it to the Amtrak ticket office and see how far I got by train and did end up hitchhiking and taking trains all through Mexico and just kept adding lyrics to the song and it became song it became will save your soul. Wow and you were. Were you by yourself on this trip or was this also because? I think I may be getting my chronology wrong but I know that at one point you had a boyfriend who was also. I thought in Mexico with you. Is that correct those a little later? So my friend Steve Pulse. When I was eighteen we went to Mexico on a writing trip and got on a crazy. Yeah crazy adventure. You were meant for me on that one. Mexico has been good for you for the hits. Actually Well Okay. So the look the other thing. I guess we should talk about in terms of the songwriting before we get into beyond. That is just that you've you've also spoken about something that we've talked about on this podcast with the number of of artistic people who seem to have found ways to deal with this and that's dyslexia. Henry Winkler just different people for for a writer for someone who's a big part of your life is song writing and writing journals and all the things that led to the songwriting. How did you navigate that when I was young? Obviously made school difficult. I also moved a lot. I think between the ages of eight and eighteen I counted. I lived in twenty two different places so it was a lot of travel which meant I was missing huge sections of school because one school starts a curriculum here. You know the say the second half of the year but by the second half of the year are moving and the school. I moved into already taught that part of the curriculum so there were big holes education. Which made that difficult and then you had dyslexia and it was really really difficult. I was really lucky though. That in eighth or ninth grade. I landed in Anchorage with my mom and there was an alternative school that had voluntary's much. Mallika college cereal to come and go and there was a philosophy class and I was terrible at reading but I loved the information in so much that I it inspired me to figure out. How does my brain work? How do I read? How can I make things? Lay Down on the page. I always wrote. I've written poetry since I was really young and I really fortunately happened to have some teachers like this philosophy class. Another guy in fifth grade notice that was a very creative writer but my grammar spelling and words were all backwards but he never. He never forced me to fix my spelling. He never forced me to fix my grammar. He really I some reason. Valued my creativity. I think that if he that one teacher had really just driven home like no you have to be great spelling it probably would have killed my passion for it so there were miraculous little angels. That somehow just helped me keep this interest that I had in expressing myself alive missing. Well so you mentioned after interlocken you relocated again this time San Diego with your mom and I wonder why you decide to do that. In what awaited you when you were there because it seems like that? That's another thing that just not your typical experience. My mom was down there. She was having heart problems and health problems and I went down there to take care of her. I loved my mom immensely. You know I never knew that my mom had decided she needed a break from having kids. And that's why she left. I always had a fantasy that she wanted us. But my evil father is the one who wouldn't let us see her. You know so I was very attached We did have contact. It was not normal. I have a book called norm. Never broken where I really go into the relationship with my mom. 'cause it's a lot. It's a very unusual and strange thing. I didn't realize my dad was much healthier way to my dad. Even though he was you know an alcoholic for a lot of that in physically abusive he actually was much more stable in a strange way. But I didn't see that coming that's years and years away so I went to take care of my mom very stressful trying to pay rent for both of us. It was a expensive place more than I could afford. All the money was going to win. You know scraping food off of people's plates where I was hosting taking toilet paper from restrooms. You know to be able to bring home and things like that and then ultimately a boss asked me to have sex with him. And when I wouldn't he wouldn't give me my paycheck and we couldn't pay our rent We both started living in our cars. My mom and I my mom and I ended up going back to Alaska and I stayed thinking this will turn around. I'll get another job and it just never quite did turn around and I guess you know it's just important for younger people. Maybe who are? Who are listening to this slender. Stan you know now thankfully we have something you know this whole metoo movement or whatever but at that up even as recently as the this must be like early nineties there wasn't a lot of recourse for you know to deal with a scumbag like that right. No I had no idea what to do. There was no microphone. You know there was no Social media there is no. Who would you report it to like? I had no idea. And when you're very low income it's just really nobody cares and you're not raised in a system that helps you learn how to advocate for yourself. So that was that you know. He didn't pay me and I got kicked out like that was just. That's how life was and this idea of of you and your mom living in your respective cars. I mean I think people if they have just a brief sense of of your biography they they may have heard about that that there was this period of of essentially homelessness. But I wonder if you can just clarify because I know you've made a an excellent documentary about it and there's all it's A. It's a lot more nuance than that. You were but let me just to explain how that wound up. Being the case that we ended up in our cars will just that it was essentially suggestion of your of your mother and for the idea of saving. What so that you can now feel your creativity that way or or or what? Yes so I was devastated. You know when I went into my boss so he we went and got burgers one day. He's like hey let me let me take you out to lunch and seemed really harmless and so we were eating burgers news acting funny and I was starting to pick up. You know growing up in bars you start to really see the signs and I was like what's going on you know and so he propositioned me and I joked it off. I really didn't think a lot of it. It didn't go badly. It was like yeah right never happening and we moved on with our conversation so I didn't think a lot about it. I was very surprised when I went in the next day for my paycheck news looking at his desk looking at some papers and he wouldn't look at me and I really didn't think a lot of it. It was like it wasn't a huge emotional blow out. He didn't respond the way. Some men can very violently. And very like you're like. Oh this is an issue so I was very surprised so I was like. I'm here for my paycheck. He wouldn't look up. I was like hey. I'm here for my paycheck. Never would look up at me. He never acknowledged me he just acted like I was a ghost. It was a crazy. Humiliating like mind boggling experience but I realized obviously the gravity of what was happening. My my rent was often late. My landlord was nice but he was like you have to pay your at this time. Raunchy getting kicked out. I knew that when I went in for my paycheck so I knew leaving there without my paycheck that that meant my mom. Who's ill and I are going to be kicked out. We have no prospects I have. No money saved this. Is it so desperately crying? I try and pull myself together. Get to my mom and I'm crying mom. We can't pay the rent. We're we're going to be kicked out. We have nowhere to go and her response was very funny. You know she was like let's just living requires that sounded like heaven to me like the stress of paying that rent. Every month was so overwhelming that the idea of having no rent and living in my car was like oh it was like the most beautiful fixed to me again at this point eighteen and so the idea wasn't to focus on my creativity. The idea was to get a new job with no overhead. Because that's the hard thing right when you need to pay a new apartment you have to have first and last month's rent and usually a deposit for damages. I didn't have that much money so the goal was to live in our cars. I'll get a job. I'll work at a job. Maybe for three months I crept living in a saddle born on a homestead and Alaska with no plumbing and an outhouse living in my car and San Diego honestly didn't sound that bad. It sounded like a relief to be able to save some money and I thought and three months. I'll get an apartment. I'll save up. That was the plan. And then your mom you say goes goes back to Alaska. You are staying with your in your car and I guess at that point during the daytime. It sounds like that's an and this is just a tease a little bit about this new documentary about mindfulness. But that's sort of when you discovered or maybe it was after something happened to your car that you made a concerted effort to be grateful for and focus on things that you did have. Yeah so I knew. Things got progressively worse. My Momma back to Alaska. I was turned. Have really bad panic attacks again? I started becoming agoraphobia. I was sick a lot. I bag kidneys so I kept getting infections. I didn't have the money to get medication. Didn't have the money for insurance or doctors. I often tried to just tough out. These infections which is very dangerous. I almost died in the emergency room. Parking lot of a hospital because they wouldn't see me because they didn't have insurance. I don't know if that was legal or illegal. I think that was illegal but it happened and I was so sick. I'd Sepsis so by the time I got there. I was very very ill. And I didn't advocate for myself. I was just so sick and I got turned away. I sat in the passenger seat of this little teeny beat up car. I was living in and I was just throwing up all over myself. You die of Sepsis. Luckily a doctor had seen me and I guess he suspected that I was really ill and I didn't know I had ups or anything. I didn't know those words he Came out and knocked on my window. I was covered my involvement and he gave me sample antibiotics. You know that they must have around the hospital and his card and he said I'll help you and so he treated me for free.

Alaska Mexico writer Detroit Sepsis San Diego Vets Club Bus Station Steve Pulse Henry Winkler Anchorage Stan
"jewel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

12:59 min | 2 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"That conversation Joel. Thanks so much for joining us on the PODCAST. We always begin with just a few basics. Where were you born and raised in? What is your folks do for a living? I was raised in Alaska and my family were pioneers. They helped settle. The state made out was a musician and a social worker and music was a big part of your parents. Lives to rate it was not you really were born into the viz so to speak. Definitely not the BIZ. But I was born into creativity. May Grandmother and grandfather left Europe just before the Second World War they wanNA to form a Utopian artistic colony of people that were escaping Germany. Nobody ended up going up there except grandfather and my grandmother who didn't know him exceptionally well but she knew she wanted to have kids in a free country so she gave up her dreams of being a opera singer and a poetess and went to Alaska before it was a state and they tamed the Wildland. It's an incredible story and she had children a lot of them in. Dirt floored log cabin and she taught them all to sing and to draw and paint and so all of my eight aunts uncles are exceptionally talented. They all write their own music to all of our holiday. Gatherings were very musical. Everybody just wrote songs. That's what everybody did. It was very normal to me and all of my cousins are very talented. It's really it's just sort. It is what my family does. My Dad's of the one that picked up where she left off he made a couple of records was hoping to go national when my mom left when I was eight. And so he and I. He t took over raising. Us and He and I became a duet started singing with my dad and my mom when I was five and hotels. They did dinner. Shows tourists like on the side. It was like a side Gig for my dad and then he and I became. Yeah this duo when I was eight and that was his full-time Gig. Pretty much We were singing in bars from age. Eight on and Yodeling was a part of that. Is that from early on. Yeah my dad taught himself to Yodel and I was fascinated with it when I was five. And he said I was too young to learn which apparently was the exact right thing to say to me to make me practice a lot and so I Practiced too so I could prove them wrong and yeah began yodeling. We'll preparing for this. I was reading everything I could find going back to the beginning about you and it was interesting. I I understand. There was at one point. A MUSIC PROFESSOR. Somebody who came up and said like this is not supposed to be able to happen right. That a child vocally is really. It's shouldn't be able to Yodel it that that young age right. Yeah my dad said when came up to him to show when I was very young about five or so and I didn't know how it was. Obviously she was wrong. I'm sure I don't know that. A lot of five year olds try really. Who would. It's a strange thing. I needed a psychiatrist. Not like a was were those kinds of performances in bars and hotels in the first experience that you were having doing music for others was that fund. Was that worked. What's what's your take away when you think back about those days. I remember being fascinated by singing because it felt like a puzzle. I don't know why I felt that way but I was very very interested from a very young age figuring out a lot of very technical things. I didn't know that word obviously. But that's what interested me about. It was like this puzzle that I kept having to think about all day to be like wonder how I do that. I wonder how do that. That's what really got me hooked. The performing was more nerve wracking. I wasn't a sin. Mcc little pageant kids you know that are just they're just so outgoing and extroverted and they smile and wasn't like that was very shy very introverted. I hated going on stage but also knew that was the culmination of all this practice that I enjoyed The first time I went onstage hiccups because I was so nervous. I had the hiccups while Yodeling. Which sounds ridiculous and everybody started giggling. I mean I guess looking back. It's cutesy a five-year-old Hiccup yodeling but I felt really mortified. Listen they're laughing at my serious practice now. One thing I gathered again from from this reading. Was that you from a very early age. Learned another part of the I guess the music scene that that you would see more of which is that you know you're getting encounter some some unsavory characters there. Some of you know I guess a bar. You'RE GONNA have all kinds of folks and you were saying I guess it's something you're able to talk about now because it sounds like you have a very nice relationship with Your Dad. But even at that point it was not all you know roses and sunshine or whatever. It was a tough from a very early age. You were seeing some bad behavior right. Yeah so nobody's ever one thing. Typically we're usually a lot of things we have great qualities and bad qualities. I learned a lot of great things in my family. My family's very bright. Beautiful storytellers charismatic. Highly capable they work hard and they pioneer but there was also a lot of emotional. Dysfunction is much as we inherit a genetic component we inherit an emotional component and it gets passed on generation. Only my dad had a very abusive childhood. He wrote a book called son of a midnight. Land that chronicles a lot of what happened. I love that book because a lot of people. There's a lot of debate about personality settling. How late in time can you change? Can you change when you're older? My Dad is living proof that you can the books just such a raw gripping look at abuse and shame and then repeating a cycle and then how do you heal from that in your sixties? But for me. When I was young you know my mom left which is obviously really traumatic. And then my dad had a lot of trauma and PTSD. Those words weren't known that I'm aware of Susil. Vietnam Vietnam Vet. What was interesting is when he went to Vietnam. It was calming for him. That's how hard has childhood was in his home. Life was. He realized he was in trouble when he got to Vietnam and his system was much more relaxed than it ever had been at home so my dad had trauma from his childhood and then again trauma from Vietnam he was part of the Ted Offensive. Sixty nine and some pretty gnarly stuff so when my mom left obviously could imagine trauma triggering and he's tried to drink to medicate which is very common and you're gonNA repeat cycles. You were raised by you. Know our brains with binary computers that are wired and as much as he didn't want to obviously when you you can't exist in a vacuum unless you learn new behavior in practice new behavior. You really aren't going to do well. So he and I had a rough relationship. You know a lot of great times it also a lot of really hard times. I ended up moving out at fifteen and I'd seen a lot by then. I've been parsing since I was eight. You know as you say in an Alaska bar is a bar and I guess one thing that is kind of a feel good to go hopefully counter some of the the. You know that you'd had already seen some things by the time you're fifteen but it sounds like it fifteen a you were known enough in in your community at least that when this idea of going elsewhere for some music education came about the the community. Kind of rallied behind you from from the way it sounds right I mean. Can you share how this place in Michigan comes on your radar private school and and just how it became possible for somebody? Who didn't have much money to go there? Yeah so I moved at fifteen lived really far out of town and a little one room cabin without electricity running water. I was hitchhiking into work holding down several jobs to try and get together and one of my jobs was cleaning random buildings. You know if somebody would let me clean their building and pay me. I mean thank heavens. This was in the really really early nineties when somebody would pay a fifteen year old. I mean but still happen but now it's funny. It's getting harder and harder pay kids for work. I started cleaning little dance studio and an out of town. Clinician came and taught dance clinic and so I asked if I cleaned his studio. Would he let me take dance? Class in exchange I had always been told was released stiff on stage. I was just like a little robot that would turn like. I don't know every four measures I would go all right rotate and he let me do that. I was a terrible dancer. I was not born to be a dancer but he found out is saying and he was at teacher. This fine arts school in Michigan. And he said why. Don't you apply for a vocal scholarship? Which was beyond bizarre to me something. I'd never dreamed of but he helped me get the application and so I had to sing. An Aria was a bar singer. I did not sing classical music so I learned to French oriented the best. I could and send it off and I got a partial scholarship. I got a five thousand dollars scholarship but I needed another ten thousand dollars to go and six women town. Several of my aunts took me under their wing and taught me how to do a fundraising concert so as my first solo show. I'd never written songs. I still wasn't writing at this point. Never ever sang harmony for my God. I wasn't affront singer so this was my first time carrying show much less singing that much lead. And I did all Cole Porter Songs. Because there is a gay man in me dying to get out love the Cole Porter. I remember for a talent show in fourth grade. I wanted to do love for sale and remember Mary uppers in the music teacher. Being like this is about about a prostitute. You can't sing a song for the fourth grade talent show but it wasn't lost on me on how beautifully written that was such a Cole Porter Fan. My aunts taught me how to go to local businesses and get a donations to able to auction off and my town sent me off to school. They helped me raise ten thousand dollars. Tombo debt was a guy who lives in homer and he really hoped and it sounds like you've literally in one interview from years ago as as a turning point just that I guess maybe can you share. Just some of what you began to do when you were there that has served you really ever. Since that was a pivotal year learning that I could move out learning that I could take care of myself learning that I could have more of a say in control over my environment. I was excited. I was looking forward to life. It was also anxious. You know I started having panic attacks at this time. Didn't know what those were. I'd never heard of him. When I went to school. My panic attacks began. I would learn to you know. Take myself out of class and excuse myself and go have a complete breakdown for anybody. It's had a panic attack. It's shocking and when you're sixteen you have never heard them and they don't trust anybody and I was Kinda shy leary kid. I didn't tell anybody what was happening. And so I had to start develop tools. I knew when I moved out. This statistically kids like me repeat the cycle. They're raised by. I knew I called it emotional English. There was an emotional language. My family learned and I didn't want to repeat that cycle but there's no school I could go to. You can learn Spanish in school but you can't learn new emotional way of relating to the world. I knew I was up against a lot but I was so curious about that. Could happiness be learned if it wasn't taught in my house nature versus nurture? If I didn't receive good nurture had I get to know my real nature or would I ever ever get to my real nature if you're nurture is that incorrect or whatever you want to say and so. I started taking notes. It was strange. So as much interlocken. Creatively was incredible. I took tons of classes. I skipped lunch. Doubled major double minor. I was making the most of my scholarship because I didn't think I'd ever get to go back guitar right. Yeah I learned guitar. You weren't allowed to stay on campus and couldn't afford to go to Alaska so I decided to play guitar and learn to St Sing and earn money to hitchhike across the country and hitchhiked through Mexico. Because I'm an idiot. This was just during just those spring break or something. Yeah so my first time I remember my dad shipped me down a guitar. I'd never played but he gave me one of his guitars. And I learned four chords a minor. See Jean de in that order and I had enough money to get to Detroit. My school was an interlock in Michigan. Anna of course met nefarious crazy. People on the Greyhound bus and started writing about it. I slept in the Greyhound..

Alaska Michigan Cole Porter Vietnam Europe Joel Germany Vietnam Vietnam Vet PTSD PROFESSOR Detroit Mcc St Sing Susil panic Mary leary Mexico
"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:10 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"Take a worth trump. The same I had turned to walk and go episode sign be like my Baseline Texas out. And but the thing. That's great so much rounded up picks quite you subtract. I WanNa tell kids. To man you know Shit Fuck music reviewers and who wrote what. Listen to the song yourself and see what you think i. I saw review this record. It's not our record. I don't particularly Abbas thinking. I got a DOE person. I don't have. I don't have much skin in the game but I saw review give a lazy review on a like an and I went to to rap lyrics a quote rap cold or whatever and I realized he had literally just read. The lyrics may be listening to song once and only highlighted Willie. What was in a bar? I'll just like highlight is the like what trip me out. Wild about their punk ass reviewer. Is He failed to acknowledged? Danny's Mr Ceremony Shadow. Which in the Nolanda sexual if you really got you. That's like to me that Ratner Sheer. I'm coming to you listening to you. Because I trust Joe Palca and you not even wrap nerve enough to know Mr Hall and then from a street perspective. The most honest thing said on their record was away. Danny said he had to get out of getting the rest. I'll just like you know what I'm saying. And that's what you lose when AOL hit a buck and triple lizzy flip reference to dad and the mom is like how to fuck you. Listen all fucking mines blow me and then flows are so interesting over the lead at its jazz at exact exact exactly freestylers with the beat. The beat made us find a pocket and everyone found a different pocket. It's three different styles with each verse. You hear the the beaten a whole different way. And that's that's that's to me. That's what's lost in the in the now of like man. It was so new and not on some super nostalgic. It was all better than it was just so new that it was fleeting. You didn't know if he'd be around much longer. Yes so you took all of series backs like not to the point. Articulo just to light. You'll you'll live learn. Let me learn because I don't know how like I remember K and I know you know they said this is going to be around farm workers this how many just making music how many years that I have to get the same lecture from people from old people tell me every fucking time I fucking. Anyone found out that I was doing this shit through my youth. You had to endure the lecture and that was that some guy who knew some older dude who just knew that it was just a waste of time. Trust me care in the pants pickup disco. I saw it. I lived through it. You know what I mean and you're just like no we even knew then we will. You're wrong you're wrong. It's a new form of fucking museum. Romy intelligent wasn't even music. 'cause we talk. Of course they still say that Shit. It's like that you'll try and say that ship and now and this goes not even gone for that like just goes everywhere right how to fuck you. Knock down some on Sunday smoking with your wife. Man. Thanks L. P. Killer Mike taking time away from making their new records. Talk to make sure to check for it. Once it drops. Wherever you get your music you can hear more of their work. Together as the jewels and their solo stuff by listening to our playlist for this episode at Broken Record PODCAST DOT com. And while you're there sign up for behind the scenes Lou broken records produced help from Jason Gambro Camilo. Bell and Leah Rose for Pushkin Industries. I Expect Kenny. Beats on Justin Richmond. Thanks for listening..

Danny Articulo Joe Palca Texas Jason Gambro Camilo Abbas Mr Hall Nolanda Willie Justin Richmond AOL Kenny Lou Romy Pushkin Industries Ratner Bell Leah Rose L. P.
"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

10:31 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"So he was one of the first guys that WANNA shine account of saying he and Kilo was created the meat and then we had other sweet success in effect. Like I say a shot I feel like Atlanta really gotta sound widow and is now with these are the people who set the ground for the happening. He had one call Piz e which. I've still try to do this style to this day and I have not been able to mass it to massive established He's like Boeing his own. That's why I'm frizzell. I mean that's Liz I. If you don't like it then I tell you catch a fleet and it was so it was almost like re in. Its in his lightness and candid with dead fucking seriousness of IT and Yet Kilo to me is the prototype for the creativity that is become Atlanta. You know what I'm saying. Who officially gave us out. Of course was out outcast but Sammy Sam Kilo success in effect. The heart boys Who DOES NOT GET ENOUGH CREDIT? I WANNA play in this ghetto mafia and I can say get on. My field was they. Were were post outcast right along like right after them but they had a record straight from the day that I still think you just want a greatest rap record worth I hate. You have to listen to commercials before music. They found a way. So these guys were from Decatur. If you know anything about Atlanta Atlanta's the city of Atlanta near you have surrounding areas to Cater College Park when that county so migos. County for instance decatur is Fujimori east Atlanta Nick area our agreed and they use the stutter pattern. Later I use stuttered pattern of my first single. Did go through the stuttered patters but you can hear some of this stuff. Primero pain stay down. Say the class size big leading. Think tank so talk so good blues the twenties. That's Atlanta man. We you know we've been been having fun along time making Dope Shit. I Land Atlanta's Ron. Shit Yeah you know what I love about Atlanta. Though it doesn't rush it in in a way that is been ram before it doesn't throw his tail around also say throwing his tail around your biggest kills itself every two three years and reinvent sale like if you look at it just means you have a progressive music scene no matter what on all levels progressive from from dudes like outcasts. You know to to even the St Paul's in the Rock music which goals do not a rockstar which goes into the snap movement which shoddy low does not get as proper credit. Not only was he a rapper. He was the person as as a as a drug game. Fina underwrote a genre music the whole snap it pops like he underwrote those groups much like Gucci does now Gucci deserves credit. Not only as a rapper but just as a mobile he really has propelled a lot of careers. Everyone I I heard crunch it blew my mind. I loved it. Cronyism loved my mind is one of the seminal cronk hidden. Really which one I ever hear. Wow I never scared from played accident. Hey Mike literally go drop that be. I used to watch your shows. It'd be like damn this shit records. I was jealous. Shit like y'all now. I never scared. We reacted a couple of times together. I I really enjoy getting past that moment. Not Like I don't love it but like as a musician I was always one of my markets. I cannot get enough I will have to perform. You know what I'm saying. Do you know how you always have records. You just pray. You don't have to perform anymore after a while. I'm not mad at it but I'll just like no. I just WanNa move every cycle of my career. I've been able to shed a couple that I mean. Here's the thing was super lucky to be in that position of people considered jams from different phases of our career. The important aloes but like I've never liked looking back. I'm all because it's always felt like a waste of time and may was is like I was always desperately looking for the next idea so there does come a point where you have to reconcile with that like you have to. You have to you have to become okay with your with even your your your musical output from your past you know like you have to make it again because it is a party is the sense like it's like the same way. It's like the same thing I'm learning about. What therapy is in other words reconciling with? Who were so that you can understand who you are now being cool knowing that. That was what just happened. It wasn't that you know like a real obsession guy like myself when it comes to music couldn't go back and listen to one of my records and hear a thousand things that I wished I had done. I do the same thing everybody I argue with scarface won't our first of all about he had like. I couldn't believe he's unsatisfied with his. That's also sign a why scarface as a thirty two year for Rear Nowak albums and style seems to be constantly progressing. Because I believe in being here we are. We're forty four and we still like we're here tweaking to like I literally for months. Eight adverse came back and tweak to bars and love that because it wasn't about diverse was about those bars weren't right amazing. How sometimes small details change your opinion of a whole thing and also how delicate when you do catch something and then you try to improve upon it. How delicate that balances and sometimes you don't even know and breathe on it wrong and it goes away and you know anyone who's been making who makes records knows that despite the fact sometimes that you might be able to get a technically better version of something that you did half the time if not more you just don't want to trade it for what the original even if there was something that you fucked up. I said a word wrong but the rest I can't. I'm just going to have to let it. Be Kurt. Really mean to say a mosquito. My Libido A. P. Dizzy Gillespie plays back one of the greatest of all time because immediately. It wasn't true not true. I but it was flagged faddish even as a kid and because I knew dizzy. Gillespie was here's one on our new record and it sounded so good. I didn't give a fuck to correct. It wasn't knives I can't I can't tell you whispered. It's an hour cash reference. It named members of outcast and it expanded. Oh he he he and I do not want to change cousins. I was wondering about that. No wonder because it's funny but dizzy. Gillespie plays the saxophone. More honest than saying that. Because it's just completely ally is. This has nothing to do with any. It's like no truth and yet you're just an everybody heard. It was like. Yep He does because you just said that shit so cool fucking dizzy. Gillespie plays the sad when we come back. We'll pick up with a discussion about killer. Mike and LP'S LYRICS. We're back with run the jewels you've managed to straddle A boundary between talking about serious stuff talking about political stuff and also talk about gangster shit in crazy hip hop ler. Yeah how how? How does it feel to to dance between the seriousness of the message? And the fun of hip hop and love of hip hop man. I it's it's one of the most liberating things to be allowed to do. Because I love my public enemy I loved my Nwea extremes and I love Biz markie. Yeah you know what I'm saying and be able to have a stout as Gangsta rap center in based Heavily revolutionary rap influenced by fee and parking and morality based in terms of southern leases. Like TERMS OF FACE. Being able to be that hybrid. It's been an honor for me. Because most people you get accepted as the character you portray or the part of the Eagle you personify and my main clause like your shots out because like your knee back back there but concepts maze like he. He never let me forget. He's like a lucky. 'cause you get to be you. He saved really people to solve this. What I am on record is really me? And that's not saying you know going out fucking founded fight with hundred cops but like I am rebellious by nature. I'm also a fucking total jokester and Shit talker and if we sat in this room long enough on board. I'm going to pick up a book and just read until I go to sleep. You know so I get to be the kid I actually was like. It was weird for me. Broin up being a kid understanding the economics of I want to go to the dance. I don't have sneakers. Sleepy knows how to make fake drugs. I can sell them in my uncle. My uncle's neighbor and doing that to get new nikes and the fate goal time for the dance doing knowing how to do that but still literally loving art like to the point. I go to museums in and literally loving rap music and unders like so getting the chance to beat that record for me. I appreciate the fans now too because I think most human beings are that complex and we don't allow ourselves to be publicly. We present whoever we want the public to think we are interpreters ads and we do not show our total or willing to shelves and or allowed to do it. I think that also for us me and might there are. There are there are only few advantages to being in your forties and still in the current music land. You know as a rapper. And you know we don't talk about it that much. Asia's in the big deal but what? It is is a collection of experiences. And we're we're we're at a point. I think will work with our.

Atlanta A. P. Dizzy Gillespie Sammy Sam Kilo Mike Decatur Boeing Gucci Liz I. scarface Cronyism Kurt Asia Cater College Park Fujimori Rear Nowak
"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

06:16 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"Music but also just seem to have seen here their their their cooler than most people. They see their better dressed than most people is still better dressed normal shed. And it's like I was like it made you feel like you could be a part of run DMC. It made you feel like if you tried. You might actually you. Might you could probably do that like yeah. I could probably put on that hat and and where that cool Jean Jacket and and those sneakers I like no way they ended up actually just Talked to DMC recently in an interview like this. And so ms he's great and he was telling me the wave it. They ended up dressing like that was. Because that's the way Jay jam master Jay dressed in real life. Yeah I heard. They saw him. And it's like he's the coolest guy we know him with infected us to you know what I mean and and this many years later but I it's always something I keep meets because I feel like that's how I want people who listen to our music to feel. I want them to feel not like were that. They are gazing at. Something untouchable that that they're to the hero. Two guys telling you about About the you know their lives that you couldn't possibly imagine being a part of I like the fact that Kids come you know. Hope that kids can kind of feel like man. We could be run the jewels. What I mean like these guys aren't flashy like these guys are. They're not above us. You know So I don't know that always stuck in and that just got me into it. That was guy me into thinking. I could be a rapper. You know like Oh shit. Maybe I can be a rapper. I mean I was rapping a ten so this is me at ABC. Drug a pair of adidas shells without the lace. That's great that's an amazing. It's oaks incredible my dad. My Dad got his future. No Louis No shoelaces now as a child. You're not thinking maybe I should walk. I might have to be able to walk. We'll be back with more from run. The jewels after the break hiring used to be multiple job sites. Stacks Resumes Confusing Review Process. But today hiring can be easy and you only have to go to one place to get it done that ziprecruiter dot com slash broken record. Ziprecruiter sends job to over one. Hundred of the Web's leading job sites. They don't stop there. With the powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans through thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience. Bites them to apply to your job. You can even add screening questions to your job listings so you can filter candidates and focus on the best once and right now to try ziprecruiter for free. Our listeners can go to ziprecruiter dot com slash broken wreck that's ziprecruiter dot com slash broken record slash. Biaro K. E. N. R. E. C. O. R. D. ziprecruiter dot com slash broken wreck ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire getting into debt is getting now is hard especially if you have bad credit school thankfully now there's upstart dot com the revolutionary leading platform. That knows. You're more than just a credit score. It OFFERS SMARTER INTEREST RATES TO HELP. You pay off. High interest. Credit card observed goes beyond the traditional credit score. When assessing your credit they actually reward based on your education job history in the form of a smarter rate up Sir believes in more than just a credit score. They believe in you over. Four hundred thousand people have used upstarts credit cards for meat to financial goals for yourself from the burden of high interest credit card debt by consolidating. Everything payment upstart see. Why upstart is ranked number one in their category over three hundred businesses on trust and hurried up star Dot Com slash broken record to find out. How low upstart ratings? Checking your rate only takes a few minutes. That's upstart dot com slash broken record or back with more from killer Mike. Nlp what was the first home. Grown hip hop you heard in Atlanta multo. Moselle was the first one module was the first one eighty two eighty three. I think works for the city or something. Now and people still showing love but Mojo again was like my mother style stuff. I mean the shit that he Was still more motorcycles. Rahim Dreams Dj Do they tell someone else? So then you get robbed. Environmental know any of these. I got you coming here then. You Got Shoddy. Who was a kid who was from Queens or the Bronx? I think he might have been Lebron's move down south he was on Luke records. Id Shot Yes S. H. Y. Yeah exactly so. Dj who later discovered again Ti and create a trap music was his DJ so took like fifteen sixteen years old after that. You got a guy named Sammy Sam. Who has a record calzone three? That's the May it's like school. It's hard core describes Atlanta INTECH. Went home glanced into that right now. Do you mind because I don't know it and I'd love to have let me just put up trying to find him a youtube to Sam e. It is yet it man the trying to record. This is the Hitman when I'm looking for who you plug it in. This is Sam Hitman. This dis dis and the records almost gotta just ice like what years this eighty eight? I came of credit. You got to be good and the COP by the grabbers. Stand back in the.

Ziprecruiter Jay Sam Hitman adidas Atlanta INTECH Sammy Sam Queens ABC Louis Biaro K. E. N. R. E. C. O. R. Atlanta Mojo Rahim Lebron Mike Luke
"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"Yesterday. What else young chick supplied the sweetest rain ton teased glided ZIP? It were foolish. The candle dreams treat things of interest. We get a onto a sofa. Drinking will be shocked. Shocked was genitive that fast you about he..

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:01 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"I don't know if you know that I did a jazz album. In two thousand fourteen was the first time and last time I had ever done it Which is not to say. I wouldn't do it again but it was. They stays these people step to me to do it. They they were trying to mix things up and trying to end on this Guy Matthew Shipp and And it was in Parker Matthew Shave and a bunch of sort of free jazz now Sort of titans and that. I don't think it was even. I did not have the skill sets and produce a JAZZ ALBUM. But they were like just wanted you your version. Yeah and so that was and it was terrifying and I was like. I don't know what I'm doing but I was like. Are you like to came out? There's moments on him and my father my father on it beautiful moments on it for sure and. I think that there is a like a that. They've got some really really seriously good reviews from like high end like jazz critic. Type Shit that I was like and then there were people I mean was very under. I think it was kind of under the radar you know but but for my career. It's something that if people been following me. They know that I did this. And yet is moments that that that are. That are really cool. I didn't know exactly what to do so I basically just went in and brought music and just told them. They'll just basically improvised to my music. That's truly jazz spirit. Yeah I mean they were. They were there anarchists. You know the the the truly anarchist like all those guys are as learning and as capable of like a form and like they're as as the highest level musicians but they rejected it years ago because they didn't think it was it was the it was the true spirit of of Jazz. So they were like we're GONNA get in a room and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA sort of spontaneously together create something and we're going to move off each other and that's the free jazz movement and so I was like. What do you do with a bunch of people who are already just Kinda like no rules and the only thing I could think of was? Give them rules so I was like all right well. Here are some standards. Like how the what was it was really cool. Gain your own man like yeah well. I tricked a minute. That's did I tell you about? It never told you about that. You wanted to tell the world you've told me about it. Although I like the story tricked my father and are being on the record because I was like. Listen Dad. I'm doing his record. I have no idea what I'm doing. Can you do me a favor? Can you record just off Cassatt or whatever you doing some cool standards some jazz stunts shit? That you you like that you think would be cool and And he did and and one of the SAWS that he picked. Was this really depressing. Fucking song that basically called. I think yesterday when the Moon was Blue Jean. That song at its. It's hearing your strength. Essentially estranged father saying this song is is probably one of the most like you know emotional things you can do it he's he. You know it's just all about regret you do have the version of him singing by any chance to really do you mean the original. No the DADS version. The my dad's versus the original before. So what I did was I had him do it. And then I chopped it up and then I had them play and rounded and I met. I don't know I don't know I'd be curious to hear the song. Yeah I'll play you. The version at an ended up being coast that the other day representatives. I do is get high when you work and I was like how I was like. Yeah Yeah I'M NOT GONNA lie rick. I want to tell you that they make you think I'm a good person is no right answer. That's why I figured stick field. Spirit me got halfway.

titans jazz critic Matthew Shipp Matthew Shave SAWS rick DADS
"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

10:00 min | 4 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Broken Record

"Run-ins jewels fast fast. Run run run run them. Snow mold run. The jewel stormed into hip hop with the big sound in two thousand fourteen and over the last six years. They only turns the energy in your killer. Mike and EL P want strangers to anyone following hip hop of the last couple of decades each made waves in their individual careers prior to forming the group. But there's something irresistible about these two guys from different ends of the hip hop spectrum coming together. Killer Mike's a brash. Politically charged rapper from Atlanta with a tight connection outcast and the Dungeon family and LP's a white New York emcee and producer mostly from the underground together. They've combustible energy as a rap about revolution. We'd or just boasting about themselves. They've also waded into the world of politics very meaningful ways killer. Mike was a surrogate for Bernie Sanders this last election and in turn burn intro them at Coachella just a few years ago. But I'm trying to say is this is a group that's hard to put in a box. Run the jewels fourth. I'm comes out soon. They spent some time recording at Shangri la and during a break one of the sessions the caught up with Rick Rubin. This is broken record liner notes for the Digital Age. I'm Justin Richmond. Here's one of the jewels. In conversation with Rick Rubin Killer Mike a Little late so l. p. and rick got to talk and I because l. p. was freshly stoned. The conversation starts in an unexpected place. What L. P. would do during the apocalypse so just a moment ago. You were theorizing yawn if if there was an apocalypse. Yeah Yeah I was. I always I always worry about life. My Poke post-apocalyptic career you know. Like what do I have to offer post-apocalyptic society and I don't know if it's much certainly not like brute strength like you know maybe I can you know and I don't I you know. I probably be just some sort of like subjugated gesture you know. Princess Leia chain Jabba. The hut you know like But maybe hopefully without a bikini on and survivors. Yeah just entertaining for food. You know what I mean just entertaining for your life and then I'm like well but then again but I'm I'm not really a musician you know like I I I I make music but like you know. I didn't follow through with the piano lessons at an follow through the trumpet lessons in the Saxophone lessons all of that. Should I try to you know? My father was a jazz piano player. He was that was what he did. And I try but I was like. I remember standing in front of the mirror with a saxophone and trying to play along to like run DMC Janse and I was just like I looked at myself. One Dan I was just like I can't do this at for this down like I get like this ridiculous. I look stupid and I just can't feel cool doing this like I need to learn how to make that. I need to learn how to make this music. Like I can't like I'm not GonNa make it with a saxophone. Are Your First Memories of music. Your Dad playing for sure. So would he play him house all the time? Yeah we had You know they lived. We lived in the West village until I was until my parents. Split up sobs there till about six and was in the seventies and it was parties. And you know like seventy s parents didn't give a shit they didn't give a fuck and I kind of wish. It was like that again but like they would have crazy parties. You know probably fucking doing cocaine and definitely drinking and smoking weed. Crazy are just rambunctious parties. People like Robert Chrome would show up to the to the parties and shit and I was just a little kid. My father had a piano and a little drum set grand piano trump set and a huge record collection and he would. He would have me. Sit down and play drums with wally while he he played piano for the guests. Amazing he's he's a he's a born entertainer. You know I it was and and and so it was that which was really interesting because I started identify it. It has a phenomenon later where I was like. Oh I get it like from a very early age. I had music in my life as something that you participate in. Not just something that you witness you know because my father and because there was a drum set because I would sit on his lap and play piano with him. It was something that you just did. You know. It wasn't like some like mysterious thing. That just happened something that that you that. I felt comfortable with immediately. You know 'cause it was the site didn't feel embarrassing or weird or like a stretch to try and make music eventually. When started trying make music? It felt like a natural extension of what you're supposed to do. And when you have that in your life Oh cool so lucky to have that it was and and and and and the other thing that I learned from him which was really something that I'd take seriously and think about all the time was that he I grew up watching him play in restaurants and bars. You know places where people didn't give a shit yeah that he was playing. Yeah places where people were ordering their chicken in the middle of you know. And he's sitting there playing really playing hard on and singing and like and I would. I would have to when I visited him. This is what I would see this. You know you know divorced parents who go visit your your dad and I would have. He'd have to go do these. Gigs inside sit in a restaurant drinking Shirley temples and watching my Dad. Basically just eat shit. There was something really uncomfortable and even sad about it. It's sad to me because I was on my dad's up there. These people are barely paying attention. And I'm here to watch my dad. Pleasant sat for him at all. Do you think well I mean that's kind of what what what my point is I feel like in the moment? It wasn't and in the moment he was. I mean it may be a little frustrating on occasion but in the moment he closes is and he'd play piano he'd like pull a melodic and do like a solo and he'd be singing and and. I knew that he was happy in that in that moment and I watched him do this over and over and I it was always always hurt my heart a little bit because I was. You Know My dad and he's singing and I want everybody to to pay attention or whatever but he needed it he needed to do it and it made him happy and doing that and and being able to piano with something that it didn't matter that it wasn't a career didn't matter that it wasn't like you know wasn't about accolades or wasn't really even it was. It was just that it was something he really needed. And I always held out with me because I was like a Man. If you can be happy just doing music like it really. It's a really good if you can find that if you can really find being happy just doing music than whatever happens happens with your career. Whatever may happen It would suck to to to for career exists all of a sudden. The music didn't exist so and that ties back to the apocalypse thing because I'm like well after the apocalypse Michael probably be like a warlord shooting for or just blow my brain into a computer. And talking like societies crumble. There's no more computers just like Bali and I'm just like wow I always think about. What am I talents? In a post apocalyptic landscape boxy right like I love. Let's it's like a court jester. Like it's not going to be muscle. You know what I mean I. Maybe it'll be brains but probably not like it's probably that's probably a delusion on my behalf and and so I'm like damn I better. I better pick up the instruments again. Quick because Shit is progressing. You know like I need to get back on these piano lessons because You know we might not be able to plug in the fucking drum machine. I guess that's what I'm saying. You Shit Bro. Yeah what was it? What records did you dad? Listen to He was a big fats waller fan. I was shit He's he's jazz had but he listened a lot of shit man. I discovered I discovered black music through my father. My father was a jazz man and all those records are all that vinyl and everything I was I would just. He would let me go through. Listen put him on the turntable. Listen to it. I kind of had my my free reign over that which is kind of amazing 'cause record collectors of usually they'll just smack you away but my dad was cool about it as long as I didn't fuck it up and a lot of the first chance I ever sampled or anything when I finally got my hands. On a sampler were from his record collection straight up the first thing I ever sampled and looped up. Was I remember Mr Brown? Remember Bob Marley Mr Brown from pre pre whalers. And but that was that was beyond the digging for samples. Do you think that hearing jazz at the age that you heard it informed the way you approach music at all? I'm sure it did I. I can only assume so I don I. I couldn't pin it down and tell you exactly what that was except to say that I just had an inherited appreciation for pretty good music. I mean like I feel lucky. I'm short us. Some you know the right. Now there's some some child who's who's being exposed by you know to the worst music possible by their parents. I I feel like that's that's luck of a draw. You know but I I mean I eventually did a Jasim..

Mike Rick Rubin L. P. Mr Brown Bernie Sanders LP Dan I New York Shangri la Atlanta producer Justin Richmond cocaine Bob Marley Robert Chrome wally Jasim Michael
"jewel" Discussed on Parklandia

Parklandia

08:03 min | 5 months ago

"jewel" Discussed on Parklandia

"When we visited jewel cave. It was an August Dan. We were driving to RV. Back East after being in Wyoming for most of July Our friend Kendall actually from Chicago he came down and flew out This was our neighbor that lived down the hall from us and it was just really cool because we just last minute he said. Hey how you guys doing and What are you guys up to? When can I join? You said you could join us after we are in Cheyenne. Just fly out and we'll drive back through Chicago and he's like Oh. I really wasn't expecting it to be that quick quick. And but he did it and it was just one of those really great times because we got to a lot of places in between the badlands. Mount Rushmore and NGO cave along the way yeah. It was a great a great time in altogether. It wound up being this really epic Americana Road trip I think all that was really missing was like Miley Cyrus Song Party. USA like blasting at full volume with our windows down. It really was their own little party. And we had a great time and there was especially nice to see Kendall again and Here's our first official guest in your V That we had a long like a traveling route. we've had people visit and see it before but no one really stayed with us. Like Kendall did It really made me feel like home again because we got to bond and just talking ketchup and this was like my best friend in Chicago like just go down into the the alleyway where his workshop was and I would talk to him. Just you know really relax and have such an amazing time. His company all the time time I wake how you you guys had hanging out in the alley. Oh Yeah that was the Nice Alley. It's not as creepy as I. It was beautiful. I mean it was remanded. Romantic in my eyes because the way that LOFTA set up. You know I mean when we say our Dream Loft. I mean it was crazy Kendall Kendall crazy with the okay yes And it was really nice too because this was more than a year into. RV`er knows about a year into our living. He was the first kind of friend to come out and like actually spend spend time and put the effort in which is like. It's about time not to like put pressure on her other friends and stuff and I'm like you guys we miss you and you. You missed us. You're constantly Tong. CMS US so how. `Bout you follow through and it's kind of hard though because like we are like like getting dark mean thrown at a moving target right. Yeah Yeah but I'm glad this worked out and it's definitely something we were needing and missing like you said and we had a great time visiting all these places together like we started in Cheyenne Wyoming coming at Cheyenne frontier days. This epic Rodeo and carnival which was spectacular and crazy and then going through rapid city and to Moines Iowa. And of course the this stop. They've decided to go book. RV Site in rapid city. which is the hub of the western part of South Dakota and accessible to all kinds of popular places like badlands and Mount Rushmore? Yeah I'm obsessed with rapid city of benefit times at this point and it's such a great place thriving there's so much to do there and and just the proximity to all these wonderful places is extraordinary hard to be. It's barely an hour from Joel Cave and the route to and from is also just superstar. You drive through the black hills and these sprawling pine forests and also these adorable historic towns like custer Kane. Yeah so Joe. Cave was our first stop on this trip. Because it's closest to the Wyoming border. We went on a week day. Didn't make any advanced reservations for any cave tours because as you can only do that on a first come first basis right there on site which is nice and it's fair. Yeah I think I actually prefer it that way because when we're at Carlsbad caverns together. I remember how unknowingly impossible it was to get tickets to most of the cave tourists because all the tickets had been snatched up like weeks prior up two months prior in some cases. Like I'm sorry but I don I don't make cave plans like a year in advance. Okay like I'm more of an impromptu caver I guess true yeah got to cave in the late morning and we were easily able to get three tickets to the door glanton tour which was a lot of fun. It was a real blast from the past. Yeah Oh definitely. I love any activity where I get to hold like this old time lantern turn Infield like a cave mining dwarf. Probably if I was going to be a one of the seven dollars I think it would be dopey. Let's be honest also. I think I'm I know currently as I'm recording. I'm wearing a hat that makes take dopey. It's like one of those like teal blue hats. It's a joke but it really is no but it's also worth noting that the tour is the only only offered during the summer from mid June through labor day and that's mostly because there is an unpaved trail you need to take to get to the store entrance with a bunch of uneven steps so I could see a gang really icy and snowy and so you just don't WanNa fall right. You don't WanNa be slipping down into the canyon. That's for sure but our tourist great. We got our tickets and we just had to wait around for about an hour before the tour started so we explored the visitor center which was awesome and had tons of information about the cave and the park including this shocking fact that you'll cave is apparently what's called a breathing cave meaning that air exits and enters the cave as atmospheric pressure changes kind of similar learn. How tides ebb and flow in the ocean? So I felt like I was walking into like Earth Slot. It was crazy we also learned a lot about the geology cave because all of those shimmering crystals didn't just show up overnight no not at all not at all most of the formation of the cave started with limestone deposited three hundred and fifty million years ago followed by more limestone in in sand stones. All of which were read it away during the geologic uplift as the black hills were farming and rising pathways started to take shape during during the Senate period as uplift continued and lowered the water table enough to clear things out and millions of years after that layers of calcium started to form along the cave walls about two point five million years ago. I mean it's a long time This is where those crystals started to form along with lots and lots of other cave formations like flow stone and stalactites and cave. Pearls in box works. Yeah and also a super rare K. formation called a hydro magnesite balloon. And and it's pretty much what it sounds like. They're made when gas inflates a malleable earth and substance. So essentially these were inflated when portions of the Cave for still delicate and pliable enough to be maneuvered maneuver by gases. Long Story Short. There's a ton to learn down there and not all underground. Apparently there was a major fire here in two thousand that burn ninety percents of the monument and he can still see lots of the remnants of those like ravaged trees in the forest surrounding the visitor center and along the road leading to the park. Yeah before we got here right never even heard of this fire or knew that happened. But it's like immediately in abundantly clear. Is You're driving theory Alex. Something happened and it's horrific. It was called the Jasper fire. It's spread to more than eighty three thousand acres of this beautiful black hills land. The park was evacuated of course enclosed for several days and National Park Service. Employees actually moved computers and documents into the cave to keep it safe just in case the visitor center itself wound up being untouched. Fortunately yeah this was also part of the reason why most of the surface was hiking. Trails were closed when we were there There aren't many trails but they are routinely closed because burn trees constantly falling on ninety days. And it's really early potentially dangerous. Yeah and also. There's really a huge difference between the this Jasper Fire and natural fires. That happened in this part of the country usually caused by things like lightning strikes. These actually have lots of benefits. The life cycle the forest because not only do they thin out. The forest so that trees are densely packed together competing for sunlight but fire adds nutrients into the soil that helps plants and animals. Yeah the Jasbir fire on the other hand was arson apparently by a Wyoming woman who was driving through and tossed a match on on the ground for some reason just to just to cause trouble or litter and then Brian the forest the ground. Who knows now when we come back from this short break we'll head underground underground at jewel cave.

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