35 Burst results for "Jet Propulsion Laboratory"

NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter on Mars Sets New Speed Record in Third Flight

The Oil Patch

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter on Mars Sets New Speed Record in Third Flight

"Top story. Another record for NASA's ingenuity. Mars helicopter fucks is Kathleen Maloney has a report. Ingenuity is third flight on Sunday went faster and farther than the craft has ever gone before, even during testing on Earth. Morris helicopter Rose 16 ft, then zoomed down range 164 FT almost half the length of a football field. It reached a top speed of 6.6 FT per second ingenuity is team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, calling it nothing short of amazing and saying it demonstrates critical capabilities that will enable the addition of an aerial dimension to future

Kathleen Maloney Nasa Morris Jet Propulsion Laboratory Football Southern California
What is the Mars Rover Helicopter Really Doing?

Ground Zero Media

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

What is the Mars Rover Helicopter Really Doing?

"On ground zero. We're very happy. to Give you what. I call bedtime stories for grownups. And that's exactly what we're doing here because it just seems to me that we are Certainly you know in a time where Some of the best stories all they come out of conspiracy theory they come out of You know just discussion of things outside the box. Most conspiracy theory is fueled by a desire to see. The universe is ultimately intelligible and the bargain. Being that these things can make sense. But only if you believe in a pervasive totalitarian cover up now one of the biggest conspiracy. Theories is always been the cover of activities in space and their relationship. Our military has with possible extraterrestrial encounters for some time. Now there's been an attitude of malice towards the government in the military with regard to what is invading our airspace now. This is in gender to cloak and dagger attitude that has lingered after the cold war with regard to cover ups at roswell. Now we have men in black. We have that attainments at area fifty one. We have the belief that the new space forces all about alien warfare the future warren spaces however the conspiracy theories of a cover up are now being dissolved because science is advancing toward the competence of alien contact and biological signatures being discovered another planet mars. Especially because you know of course. We all know that monday last monday nasa the ingenuity mars helicopter became the first aircraft in history to make powered controlled flight on another planet. Now the ingenuity team. The agency's jet propulsion laboratory and southern california confirmed. The flight succeeded after receiving data from the helicopter via nasa perseverance. Mars rover now. People have asked why we need a helicopter on mars and of course well they need to get aerial views of the planet and some speculate. The secretly nasa wishes to get aerial views of extraterrestrial artifacts ruins or even wreckage been may have been left behind by extraterrestrial civilizations

Roswell Nasa Warren Southern California
NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter Makes First Powered Flight on Mars

The World and Everything In It

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter Makes First Powered Flight on Mars

"Says experimental helicopter ingenuity rose into the thin air above the dusty red surface of mars on monday making history nudity in her first flight powered aircon to another planet flight controllers at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory in california declared success after receiving the data and images relaid from the perseverance rover. It was a brief hop just three nine seconds and ten feet above the planet's surface. But still the first flight on mars ingenuity hitched a ride to mars on perseverance clinging to the rovers belly when touchdown an ancient river delta in february

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Nasa California River Delta
Nasa Successfully Flies Small Helicopter on Mars

ABC Radio MELBOURNE Programming

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Nasa Successfully Flies Small Helicopter on Mars

"Just a few short years, drone aircraft have been steadily changing Our world is they're being put to use for military security and civilian purposes. But now they've begun conquering space, too, with NASA's first test flight of a tiny helicopter It has been launched from the surface of Mars. Humankind's first powered flight in an alien world now promises to be the start of a new era in interplanetary exploration, Nick Green reports. Slight control, confirming that we have DVR from ingenuity. It's the size of a tissue box and a long way from home, not to mention a sizable to do list to check off before it could touch base again. With ground control. It messes Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California takeoff climb, cover descent landing touchdown and spend up. But after a 39 2nd mission And a few hours to rely its messages to Earth. Use finally reached a team of scientists anxious for confirmation that ingenuity his mission to master. The skies of Mars had been a success, Altimeter data Confirm that ingenuity and perform the first leg of a card aircraft. Another planet? Yeah, this flight was all about proving that it is possible to fly on Mars. Of our grip is the tiny helicopters chief pilot. So to that end, what we had instructed ingenuity to do was to climb. Altitude of three M. Over there for a little bit, about five seconds. Then make a turn of about 96 degrees. Cover for another 20 seconds and then go to land again in the same place that it took off from And that's what he told ingenuity to do. And it did exactly that, And it did it just perfectly

Nick Green Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory California
First Test Flight of Mars Helicopter Ingenuity Set for Tomorrow

Leo Laporte

00:28 sec | Last month

First Test Flight of Mars Helicopter Ingenuity Set for Tomorrow

"Planning to fly a small helicopter above the surface of Mars for the very first time early tomorrow. The flight was scheduled for last weekend but had to be postponed after a rotor spin test failed. £4 helicopter named Ingenuity is now scheduled to take off a 12:30 a.m.. If it works, it'll go up to about 10 ft, where it'll hover for 30 seconds, then returned to the planet's surface. A live stream will begin at 3:15 A.m. is the helicopter team prepares to receive the data down link at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, where ingenuity was designed and built a

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Nasa Pasadena
NASA Rover Drops Ingenuity Helicopter Off on Mars

Space Nuts

01:51 min | Last month

NASA Rover Drops Ingenuity Helicopter Off on Mars

"Let's go back to mars and talk about this this test flight. That's coming up soon for ingenuity. The news i hear is that they have dropped the helicopter from the belly of the based perseverance and it is getting ready to be ramped up. Almost literally exactly. That's right a tweet. From nasa jet propulsion laboratory. Which are this was the weekend. I liked very much. It said mars helicopter touchdown confirmed. It's two hundred ninety three million miles or four hundred. Seventy million million kilometer journey aboard nasa perseverance and it with the final drop of four inches ten centimeters from the rovers belly to the surface of mars today next milestone survive the night. And that's because as of. I think it was saturday. The ingenuity helicopter has been now relying on. Its own power for the heaters that keep the electronics war because until then it was taking power from perseverance itself now tell its own and so it relies on the batteries the internal batteries and the solar panel which sits on top of the the two rotor blades. So hopefully that will keep going. Well the heater apparently keeps the inside. The about seventy degrees celsius forty five degrees fahrenheit because the temperature on mas drops to way way below zero it can be as low as minus ninety celsius about one hundred thirty minus hundred thirty fahrenheit. So look i think always going well. As far as i know. They've checked out the solar panels and we haven't heard anything to the

Nasa
Plans are in the works for a Venus Rover

Innovation Now

01:02 min | Last month

Plans are in the works for a Venus Rover

"Jonathan souter is a matrix engineer. At nasa's jet propulsion laboratory and a nyack fellow. The venus rover is one of the visionary ideas currently being funded for study by nasr's in of advanced concepts program. Nasa innovative advanced concepts or nyack is both a program which funds individuals to work on new space innovations but also a community of innovators which re imagines the future of space exploration. The programme seeks innovators from diverse and non traditional sources. People with far-reaching ideas. Jonathan's prototype may never make it to venus but the technologies developed by his team and other nyack fellows could change the future of aerospace. I really wanna be part of the team that makes new discoveries that either right scientific textbooks or makes the history books i also love the involved things that push the limit of what's possible for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Pulley

Jonathan Souter Nasa Nasr Jonathan Jennifer
NASA's Mars helicopter carries a piece of Wright brothers' plane

The World and Everything In It

01:09 min | Last month

NASA's Mars helicopter carries a piece of Wright brothers' plane

"The mars mission for nasa is working toward another first flight. Milestone that of its little helicopter. Called ingenuity nasa spokeswoman. Laurie gays talking about the work of the jet propulsion laboratory. That jpl small team of nasa helicopter experts assisted jpl embarrassing but ingenuity comply in marzieh's super thin atmosphere. Right now they're looking at april eighth for the big moment and this first flight will pay tribute to the original first flight. The wright brothers flight one hundred seventeen years ago over kittyhawk north carolina. Nasr's martian helicopter holds a small swatch of fabric from the nineteen three right flyer. Engineers tape the material to a cable beneath the helicopter solar panel and this is not the first time one of these historical fragments traveled a space. A different piece of the wright brothers plane flew to the moon with apollo eleven's neil armstrong more than fifty years ago ankle landed racket twain crank quality. We copy on the ground. He got up on the guys about the blue. We're breathing again. Hike a lot.

Nasa JPL Marzieh Laurie Nasr North Carolina Neil Armstrong
The Mystery Of Houska Castle

Unexplained Mysteries

04:52 min | 2 months ago

The Mystery Of Houska Castle

"The most famous legend about host castle says it was built over a gateway to hell if that's true. Unfortunately there's no way to prove it. The question of whether a fiery afterlife exists is better left to theologians and philosophers but host gay isn't the only place that allegedly hides a portal to the underworld take for example. The stole cemetery. Otherwise known as america's most evil graveyard. It's a burial plot in remote. Kansas on the surface it's a bleak creepy looking necropolis. But according to legend it's much more just beyond the graveyard an abandoned church looms over the headstones and grassy walkways. Perhaps at one time it was elegant and beautiful but any hints of its old majesty have long since faded away by the nineteen nineties all that remained or a few crumbling brick walls without a roof. The church is significant because it supposedly sits atop a gateway to hell local legends says that in eighteen fifty lucifer himself emerged from the underworld afterward. Rumors suggested satan would rise in the graveyard twice a year. Once at midnight on the spring equinox and again on halloween and for decades locals apparently gathered for parties to watch the devils entrance only to be disappointed year after year when he never showed but while there may not be any satanic sightings inexplicable events have happened around stole cemetery in. It's church for example even though it doesn't have a roof the house of worship is said to always stay dry. Even when it rains people have reported seeing floating lights shadowy figures that vanish into nothing in rings of flame that appear out of nowhere these fires hovering the air. Even though there's no visible fuel source to keep them let you may be tempted to visit stole and see these phenomena for yourself if so you're out of luck rowdy. Crowds in supernatural enthusiasts. Repeatedly caused property damage forcing the owners to close the cemetery to the public in two thousand and two. The property managers demolished the church. It wasn't structurally sound and as far as we can tell. This destruction didn't unleash any demons upon the world which suggests the stories were just add stories but stole cemetery isn't the only alleged portal to the underworld in sunny southern california the la suburb of pasadena secret that surprisingly dark. The aptly named devil's gate dam was constructed in nineteen twenty two control flood waters coming down from the san gabriel mountains. The structure was named after a nearby odd-looking rock formation that vaguely resembles a horned devil face but before the dam was even built dark myths and legends suggested this stony shapes weren't the only demonic influence in the region in the nineteen forties. A man named jack. Parsons became convinced. That the devil's gate dam held other worldly power today. Corson's is famous for being one of the founders of the jet propulsion laboratory but he was also an occultist who belonged to alastair crawley's mystical secret society or does temporally orientalists. If you're interested we've covered croly and order tempe oriented extensively in our show secret societies but for our purposes. Here all you need to know is crowley was an extremely controversial occultist and magician once labelled the wickedest man in the world and he allegedly referred to the devil's gate dam as one of the seven gates of hell giving cronies association with the area. It comes as no surprise that parsons is said to have performed magic rituals at the devil's gate but some believe persons may have opened a portal to another dimension or to the afterlife itself. This sounds difficult to believe. But there's evidence to suggest that something strange was happening in around the dam in nineteen fifty-six a thirteen year old boy and an year old girl both went missing while biking through the area.

Castle Kansas Devils Satan America San Gabriel Mountains Alastair Crawley Croly Pasadena Corson Parsons LA California Tempe Jack Crowley
WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | 2 months ago

WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

JPL Kim Z Nasa Adam Zina Mike
NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 2 months ago

NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

"Scientists have been thrilled by this stunning video images to perseverance rover has sent back from Mars but they're also pretty pleased with the audio they're getting that is the sound of wind on Mars recorded by microphones on the perseverance rover and courtesy NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech and wall alone it's hardly a striking is the landscapes we've been seeing the head of the entry into sent camera team Dave gruel says it's still pretty amazing close your eyes and just imagine yourself sitting on the surface of Mars and listening to to the surroundings so the gentle world that happens in the background that is the noise made by the rover but yes what you did here ten seconds and was an actual wind gusts on the surface of Mars and grew explains that words important to something engineers keeping the mission going can use basically detect the health of of moving systems gears and actuators and things like that I'm Ben Thomas

Dave Gruel Jet Propulsion Laboratory Caltech Nasa Ben Thomas
NASA's Mars Perseverance Rover Provides First Audio Recording on Mars

The John Phillips Show

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

NASA's Mars Perseverance Rover Provides First Audio Recording on Mars

"News for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. NASA is releasing video from onboard cameras that captured last week's landing of the Mars Rover named Perseverance. The video was stunning crystal clear, high def Movies that captured the so called seven minutes of terror as the probe descends through the thin atmosphere to land on Mars. Nearly two dozen cameras were on the rover, but so were two microphones. They recorded the sound of a gentle breeze flowing over J zero Crater. The mikes are off the shelf store bought items that are not expected to survive the harsh atmosphere very long, but engineers hope they will exceed expectations. So far, everything else has. I'm

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena Nasa
NASA Releases New Images of Mars Taken from Perseverance Rover

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

NASA Releases New Images of Mars Taken from Perseverance Rover

"Is sending back the clearest high resolution color images ever from the surface of Mars. A desolate rocky landscape. Scientists at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here in California are studying the images of rocks to better understand what they might be made of. JPL's Colleen Wing says the rover landed perfectly and appears to be in great shape. Now that we've landed, we're going to do a series of hardware. Check out just to make sure everything's functioning in the coming days. More pictures sound and even HD video will begin rolling in like stone. ABC NEWS LOS Angeles An

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Colleen Wing Nasa California Abc News Los Angeles
NASA's Mars rover Perseverance successfully touches down on the red planet

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

NASA's Mars rover Perseverance successfully touches down on the red planet

"Rover has landed in the past. Our perseverance touched down safely on Mars, where it will look for signs of ancient life, among other very cool things. And now the $2.7 billion spacecraft is getting a close up. Look at the Red Planet. With some engineering help from a Queens native Gotham's reporter City Pereira has the story. Vishnu Streeter grew up in Rego Park, where he was fascinated with watching airplanes take off from LaGuardia. His grandfather, a civil engineer who built trains and dams in India inspired him. Now he has co engineer these Super Cam, a scanner that can examine rocks and minerals from 20 ft away to reveal their chemical makeup. That's something I will cherish for less of my life having to have touched and worked on. A piece of hardware that's honest way to Mars. The 27 year old helped build the craft at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

City Pereira Vishnu Streeter Rover Rego Park Laguardia India Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory California
Perseverance rover set to land on Mars

Here & Now

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Perseverance rover set to land on Mars

"I'm Lisa Mullins at this very moment, and NASA spacecraft is about to go where No spacecraft has gone before the perseverance Rover is set to touch down in ancient crater on Mars. Scientists hope to find evidence of life beyond our planet Alexandria, which sea is correspondent for Nature magazine? She's watching along with us. And if you'd like to follow the mission's livestream, go to mars dot nasa dot gov. You can hear Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California in the background right now, acceleration. Alexandra, tell us what we're hearing right now in the background, and what's going on on Mars way are right in the middle of what's called the seven Minutes of terror, And what has just happened is the spacecraft that's been flying from Earth to Mars. Has entered the atmosphere slow down dramatically, and it is just deployed its parachute, which was a huge thing to get it to slow down and get it to land on the surface of Mars. Let's listen in to look at the surface car velocity. It's 145 M per second and an altitude of about And Klum, 9.5, kilometers above the surface. So you can hear it's coming in. It's it's on the way yes. It's on the way and you can see on the images on the Web site. Those who are in the banks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are applauding. Is it still in the midst of this seven or now? Probably five minutes of terror, or does it look like we're free and clear? We've got about two minutes left to effort actually to go down. So what should be happening right now is that this spacecraft is being carried down beneath the parachute. It's slowing down. It's approaching the surface. Pretty soon it will detach. They'll be some thing called the Sky Crane will fire some rockets to slow it down and we should be on the ground, hopefully in

Lisa Mullins Nature Magazine Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alexandria Pasadena Alexandra California
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 3 months ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
NASA's Mars rover Perseverance is in the home stretch of its journey to Red Planet

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 3 months ago

NASA's Mars rover Perseverance is in the home stretch of its journey to Red Planet

"When you do the landing on mars it has to work perfectly the first time and so we have to just do our jobs perfectly to make sure that that happens. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Andrew johnson a technologist at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory serves as one of the managers for the guidance navigation and control system on mars twenty twenty when building the system. The team conducted tests to make sure the hardware could survive launch and its transition into the vacuum of space and during the spacecraft's seven month journey to mars. Andrew and his team have continued to check the camera high performance computer and inertial measurement unit that. Make up the navigation system on cruises. We can make sure that we can collect data from the camera. And then we can collect data from the i m you and that the computer can do the processing it's required to do but certainly we can't test out exactly what we're gonna do during landing but we can make sure. Each of the pieces works correctly and now andrews team is ready for entry descent and landing on february eighteenth as mars twenty twenty touches down

Andrew Johnson Nasa Andrew Andrews
Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

Innovation Now

01:23 min | 5 months ago

Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

"Nasa is increasingly using artificial intelligence to help code and read peto. Bytes of data collected each day. Now those same. Big data techniques are revolutionizing biomedical research. This is innovation now. Nasa recently renewed a research partnership with the national cancer institute extending the development of data science to support cancer research. The early detection research network or e. d. r. n. is a consortium of biomedical investigators who share cancer related information working with nasr's jet propulsion laboratory in california. The scientists use the same computer software used to study a star or planet and recognize how the readings from different instruments relate to one another to study statistics from anonymous cancer patients. Working together since two thousand. Jpl and fdr n have discovered six new biomarkers approved for use in cancer research diagnosis. By the food and drug administration. The biomarkers have already been used in more than one million patient diagnostic tests worldwide. While nasa proves their big data science capabilities biomedical researchers correlate information collected about cancer improving early warning detection. That benefits us. All

Nasa Cancer Peto National Cancer Institute Nasr California Food And Drug Administration
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:05 min | 7 months ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Any same thing so I get on it and he's like you won't miss all the stuff you said Michael like you all Miss semi-colon. Then I'm still co-developing ally in Java and Python to. Beginning and I'm going back and forth and I'm just like, Oh my God, it's so it is so bloated I can't stand this anymore like Oh this waste for stupid curly braces and this is just a waste and then also one thing that python does is it almost makes you think more executive like in a way I think about that it's bullets. The reason that tabs there is it's like bullets it's indent this it organizes your thoughts in just a more natural way whereas the structure in Java and other more verbose languages is imposed through like you having to sort. Of. renumerated. But this is a life I mean over the years what we have in an ID now didn't exist before and actually the way I learned to program and maybe you and I still think a valuable skill as I still go into the I instrument the code I don't even use the buggers because they really sucked back in the day when I learned I mean maybe was there and other things but the weren't that great and so I still guess what people instrumentation in any language and printing stuff out and values of your variables works independent of any debugging. People look me nowadays to, and they're just like, oh God he's still do again and it works that wanted to be hyper efficient. So some of these basic constructs but again, like the tooling, the ID's and all of that eventually supplanted I think python is a natural evolution of language. Everyone tells me Julia the next thing actually my p. l. people at j.p programming language walks who are just amazing. Sometimes people award I got Julia Julia Julia. Is Great. It came out of the dirtbags data program. I was a part of that I know all the people that MIT that made it and tastic it's growing it is now python python has now become it's not just scientific. Cool. It's enterprise and python is I really think it's the plan to Java. In many ways and Julia, maybe the next thing but by then I don't plan to be programming Dari. Maybe sitting on a beach somewhere. That's the goal or effect. All right to other things I wanNA, talk about we'll get a on time here but just really quickly tell us about a couple years ago. I read this book called the Panama Papers and it was rocking the world. There's so many people who had been doing shady things through offshore companies and whatnot, and there was a guest someone on the inside that dumped gigs and gigs of data that exposed a bunch of folks. I, don't remember the details well enough to go into. It was a big deal and some of your projects were involved in sort of the discovery of that right else about the yes. To the key was. Tika and that was a really interesting time. We were right in the middle of the Darpa Mex- program, which was to build the next generation of search by that I was mostly exclusively in technology development. It was pre-. It I had moved into it yet and I was finishing out my career really in engineering and science and leading a team of real rockstars. The Best of the world, some of them who are building and have built Siri outed apple in their future things right now some of them. Who have been bought by apple for huge company values, talent buys people really they just went in and changed the world in search every I worked with Darpa programs, which is why love Darpa so much in NASA Darpa work. Well, together, I look around the room and I'm like Oh God I, just fan boy geek out on all the people that are there I worked on Darpa project as well and at the same feeling. Yeah that's so awesome and so we should talk about that line. But so yeah. So I'm sitting there on x and Mex- my big goal was to build out Tika to evolved ticket for the next generation not like all AI. Today although we're in the process of really a and Tika and it's construct. But it was like the first step into ai beyond just statistical information retrieval, which like teak. So what does he gets the digital Babel fish the way I describe it as teak is just like fish from the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy, you put it to your ear. You could understand any language FICA, you give it any type of file format, any type of file that exists on the Internet that we know a fourteen hundred plus file types more peca. Will extract out the text extract out Meta data from the file, and it'll tell you information about the language of the file, which is basically everything you need to do something with the data in the file and it incorporates all of the major third party parsing libraries that are free and open source to get that information out and uses all the standard data models and this and that, and so what we were doing during Max is we were evolving Tika to. Support. The Non Standard Types of content you know the easy taxed and the other things. But when you get an image instead of just getting meditated out, get out who's in there do object recognition and tell me the people, places, things, dates, times, and other things that are in those images, videos and multimedia formats that was the goal of medics, and so we were significantly building out teak at the time there so much action going on the open source community well. We had this guy. Matthew Korenaga's Anglia up and Mike. Oh who's this guy he had built not we had a bunch of people building teacup interfaces into other programming languages and so he did that he contribute it and we start talking to him starts asking us these questions telling us he's part of the I C I for Jay or international consortium of Journalists Cool we start looking it up and then boom Panama papers drops and we're like holy S H use..

Julia Julia Julia Tika Darpa NASA Darpa executive Michael apple Panama Papers boom Panama Matthew Korenaga Jay Anglia Siri Mike Max
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | 7 months ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. . A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. . You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. . Two hundred milliseconds of latency. . There's different kinds of latency out in space. . Right? ? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. . So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. . Some of this ai work that you're doing. . It sounds like it might have some <hes> lakes Ai I. . Hope. . So and we think it does too. . So Michael, , basically the work that. . We're doing for your listeners. . We have a project that we've been investigating now. . So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. . I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, , which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. . The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, , Rovers, , new fad but yes, , for pre. . That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, , , we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, , and that one is about. . So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. . Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, , you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. . Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, , twenty s the perseverance, , the launched it's the same size. . So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. . So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. . Has Been. . So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? ? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, , Hey, , we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, , you know and things, , and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick . Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. . We've got smart engineers JPL. . MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. . However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. . MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. . And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? ? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. . Yeah. . Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. . But yes, no, , , and that's the challenge. . Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, , which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, , we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. . This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. . Now, , they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. . But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and , so because of that, , we were only use things that are what we. . Call radiation hardened, , which means that when it gets up there in space, , a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. . They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, , the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. . Smart this big. . Potentially smart you know and it is smart. . They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. . So the I is human in the loop even more. . So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, , Hey, , you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. . So anything you send to Mars you, , gotTa. . Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. . Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. . They're asynchronous ways. . There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, , but it's still it's eight minutes basically, , and so because of that, , there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. . If you haven't seen it, , it's called the seven minutes of terror. . Closer to eight. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's a great one. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's for the entry descent and landing. When . they landed MSL curiosity, , they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, , Hey, , what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, , which is great. . But yeah, , normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. . Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, , which are camps by the wheels, and , it's Mass Cam, , which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. . If I told you that today, , they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The . next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. . What if I told you tomorrow? ? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. . GP. . Like chip that is radiation hardened. . It's a big government project. . That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, , which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, , which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? ? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. . Why are we doing that? ? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. . Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

USC La football JPL Chris opio professor Michael US Santa Clarita Dr Neil Med Vitovich Jay Bilas EPA jbl hp Doug cutting T. C. H. Carbon Observatory
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:43 min | 7 months ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"He pulled a couple of other people that he was working within and is like Oh God. The floodgates are open weakened develop again, and then I just let them take the idol. I haven't done anything in years but the projects alive today because of that, and so you've gotTa capture absolutely is scarce resource like you said, motivate what was that Rsa at. Video about like purpose motivation that's such a great way to capture it to the same thing. So absolutely so these days you're over JPL and you have some really interesting things going on there your the first principle office in the area of data science. What's the story there to JPL has this thing called the principal designation, which basically are somebody that's normally been there like fifty years when so I'm joking no one killed me for that police, but it's been there for a long time and usually our principles are in we've got the founder of Hyper Spectral Their Guy Rob Green, argues the founder of the field of hyper spectral science. We've got people who explore the guy who used to be the project scientists for the square kilometer array huge billion dollar international project of ground-based sensing, looking at the cosmos an answering the tough question that has so much interesting stuff in terms of how much dated has had some of the folks on from a strategy on their talk about that it's kind of like you can't put in hard drives it so much data. Type of problem. So Yeah Oh God seven hundred terabytes per second to in the twenty ten to twenty fifteen timeframe. That's two, thousand, sixteen even that's all anyone ever wanted to hear from me is that I had some referal involvement in that and they're like talk about that you know a but we've got the guy that was the project scientist founder of that JPL. Those are our principles usually and so yeah. So in twenty fourteen, they gave me that title because they realized that in data science allow lot of the stuff data science was becoming something that basically we were developing a maturity, a skill set and capability and JPL actually needed to go triple down. And quadruple down on that and so what it means is that all the experiences they have I talked to people like your podcast Michael and others I sit there and talk I needed to talk and evangelize to that JPL and so that was the recognition I was an individual contributor still then I basically just would tell people here's all the stuff with data scientists it science it's math. It's around that time I wrote a paper in nature called division data science to and and you know people like me don't normally get paper in papers in nature. Yeah. That was a big deal and basically I was thinking a lot about data science and how you'll like. This I had this dichotomy in education. At the time I'm a computer science software engineering person who after about a decade at JPL learned hyper SPEC mud sensing why western US water matters cared about the cosmos s k. and I haven't thought at times about getting masters, degrees but kids kids, mortgages and other things. Other interests gotten away, which is important. But I was sitting there thinking how many of me Jpl make it to me high being there for ten years and any software engineer that we hire five years at JPL before they learn the lingo and it's really hard unless they only live in it or what we're seeing at the time was an emergence of. Atmospheric scientists or PhD Computational Biologist or whatever who learn python believe it or not could write code understood what logistic regression was whatever, and we had this emerging class of them. As data scientists they wanted to share their code they wanted to they want to work with the software engineers as opposed to really in this is going to sound ages away, but it really isn't but as opposed to sort of the generation before who didn't want to share their data. They wanted nine month publication moratoriums to them. They wanted to file a patent instead of making open source code and things like that, and they're still the evolution of those folks into the new. Generation today but I was looking at that sort of alcohol supply chain in the education community for data science and I was asking myself what's better? Is it the python person highly skilled in deep discipline domain that their software engineering code isn't that great? But if we pair them with a Master's PhD level software engineer, they clean that up and then over time they'll learn it like you said, everyone starts out with python but doesn't mean anyone's going to contribute to their code you know, and so I was actually seeing more on the atmosphere science side of people and Python. Now, being more useful in data science, and so that's really one of the questions. I was asking that nature paper and one of the things that I still don't have an answer today but we've seen different I'd say momentum's and it's not just a jpl in how we source the talent and the same is true today with a a agendas and things like that. Well, I think one of the really interesting questions is, do we need more software developers or do we need more experts with software development capabilities? Right? You hear the politicians and policymakers go on and on like we need to teach coating because we have all these coating skill gaps and whatnot and I think often at that level, it Kinda gets portrayed as to what? We need is more computer science graduates. Right. But my theory is what we need is amazing biologists, physicists, doctors, lawyers who can take whatever they do in really amplify it with a little bit code and I think that's why Python is. So powerful is hyphen is one of these special languages where you can be affected with a very partial understanding of even what it is or what it does. You don't even know what how to create a function and you could be useful in python under percent under percent. Agree that was the conclusion of my nature vapor at the time and I'm trying to be diplomatic but let me say something controversial maybe degenerate cliques. Yeah. I completely agree with you and it's heresy in my community where I originally come from but I don't read transactions on engineering anymore I'm sorry I don't only stay in the software engineering community and computer science, and so for me I've I've noticed the same my direct experience in both building big suffer projects for big big national and international things and sourcing over hundreds of people at JPL and in consulting roles and other things I've come to the same conclusion. I completely. Agree with you. Yeah and that's not the discount computer science degrees I think it's A real important role for goods offer developers with all the practices in place there but I don't think we need and times of those I think the value it'd be better if we brought everyone or into that camp rather than growing at in that isolated camp though, yeah totally, and you can relate it back to the twitter Hashtag campaign the learn to code and why it generated so. Many I think hate on both sides of the political out with that you know when the challenges with that you know we're GonNa let's talk about this. We're going to have a big there's GonNa be a skill gap and people ask me about this all the time related to ethics and other things. So as for your listeners after all the software development in job and big data and whatever..

JPL software engineer founder twitter PhD Computational Biologist US Michael project scientist Rob Green principal
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"The time wanted us to do our final projects in notch and so mine was a really simple syndication or RSS. And by the way for your listeners, I'm going to get to the python part. I. Just have to tell you that. So you can make fun of me because I started out in big big hardcore, Java. So I got into notch. I built the RSS Sparser for feeds for news feeds. That was my final project in my search engines class during my PhD and I contributed too much. And I got involved in Apache. The Apache Software Foundation were had just moved to and I started talking to Doug and all the other developers and I became friends with them and I became a niche committer. The funny part was my academic cousin at UC Irvine because it's all in the academia, there's like who's your advisor? He's like Dad, who's your advisors by your GRANDPA cousins and uncles? On the academic side, one of my cousins was Justin EHRENKRANZ was the president of the Patchy and my academic uncle was roy fielding who was the founder of Apache and so I had this sort of Apache connection without even as well as rest the whole idea, the rest architecture yet Royce famous for that. So you see Irvine during the mid nineties, which was like the decade before i. was doing it was like the place to do software in a big software gooey and multi architecture development and architecture and stuff like that dictator ran the group and anyway Seattle eat a bunch of all stars. He had the guy who invented Argo Yo Mel, the guy who invented web down the Guyland arrest the guy who did the component connector architecture stars. So those are my ancestors academically so I'm doing search engines and whatever I've got this connection anyways to justice Roy who are telling me get involved in open source and unlike cool. Okay. I could do that. Let's and so I started contributing to notch and not eventually became do yeah and so then you became spark and so I'm in the system I'm playing contributing I got into search engines that was really became passion because I was I was building. These big data systems that JPL for mission science I was like we need to use this Java stuff and all this ecosystem, and we need to scale and do all that. So the fighting was here's the python long winded answer you asked me how did I get into python in about two thousand nine after I had led teams done this myself built three mission ground systems on John we proved all the naysayers wrong. Can't do it. You know got to be sleepless blessed. We did a ground system on Java. got. Tired of Java. And I was getting shoved down my throat then and that was like everybody has at some level in their career one or two or three eras of their career and my second era beyond early programming was really Java, and so then my third era was python I mean by started to get involved I went away from missions. I got involved in technology development and I started going to government technology development and the early two, thousand, ten to twelve. During the Obama Administration. There was the big data initiative and they. Funded a bunch of programs, hundred million dollar investments and things in big data and I was toe in some of these programs standing alongside them with people like Peter, Wang Travis Olifants, and I started to learn in fact I, even funded them during a program called Darpa Mex-, to grow what became what was continuing Olympics at the time a smaller company out of thought what became now Anaconda, and so I started talking to and then Peter Sitting, there telling me Oh Chris Screwed, Java. Yeah. Java. Guy Sitting amongst all the. I can just hear I hear Peter say in that as well. Yeah. What are you doing? You're messing around her. Peters tell me he's telling me about bouquet and he's like, Oh, you know number and all this, and I was like you guys got you got your own foundation numb focus Andy Farrell and I became friends and easy to come talk at Apache Kahn, which was great. They never invited me to pie data or anything I. Did them. But yeah. So I got involved in that and so I said I can do this. Walmart. Time go deep and learn, and so really probably circa twenty thirteen. The big thing for me was I created Tico we'll talk about that later but that was my big thing in Java besides hit all this and so in two thousand, thirteen, twenty, fourteen reported that the python and I did that with a guy named Brian Wilson at Jpl and that was my I can go deep in do python and deliver something of value to the python community, and so the around them, that's how I got involved in Python and that's how I'm there now to do machine learning and other stuff. anyways, I don't want to dominate but yes, that's of the answer. Well, two things first to get a call from jpl out of the blue in your Undergrad or a master's degree program say, Hey, why are you just drop in and just do some work on like cutting edge space just down the street like that is incredible ride to get such an. Opportunity and I I think that's really neat. It's a big time, Opportunity Michael, and for me the thing I like to tell me but I've learned a lot of JPL twenty years there. A lot of people will give me a God, you've been here for twenty years. I said Yeah I'm just sort of entering mid career twenty years jpl JPL's made career i. Want. To run a mission you've got like, that's a twenty year commitment fifteen year commitments of dimes out dude you're. Right and so you can see JPL I, tell people this. You can see the people that are going to be there for five years, and you can see some of the people that are going to be there, and by the way we like those five people to will get whatever we can. We can talk about that later out of whoever you know our mission is space and hit me in two, thousand, three, two, thousand, four the big thing was the spirit and opportunity twin rovers. The first three or four years of JPL. It's awesome and you're just like, but you're young and you don't know in pre sheet space and everything else and so I was like, oh? Yeah. Maybe I'll go work at startup. Yeah. After this and it hit me in the Mer over Mars exploration rover Spirit and opportunity and they send them and they land and I saw the landing I stayed up at night I watch nasty was just my wife and I at the time in our new house, we bought our first house and I had Bought my first fifty, five inch TV that if you compared to the TV's the thin ones now it was like as big as my living room and I'm like, yeah, we're as own cooling unit, its own cooling in it. Oh. Yeah and so he's sitting there watching it and then Arnold Schwarzenegger comes out east the Governor of California and he shaken hands with my friends some of my friends who I worked with on some of the Senate on Mike I'm like I know this is amazing and and everybody, and then it's like the JPL. You know when we land and stuff like that and so the yeah that that's when I was like, Oh, I worked there. That's awesome. Yeah, and I knew I was going to stay there you know. Yeah Really Cool. This portion of talk python to me is brought to you by Leonod whether you're working on a personal project or managing your enterprises. infrastructure..

JPL Peter Sitting roy fielding Apache Software Foundation Guy Sitting Irvine advisor first house UC Irvine Arnold Schwarzenegger Seattle Guyland Apache Kahn Justin EHRENKRANZ Obama Administration
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Chris, welcome to talk by me a Michael. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here and hi dear listeners I. Almost don't know where to start there. So many things that you have done in python in the open source space that I think is going to be really fun to talk about. But I think, let's focus mostly on space and JPL and that, and then we'll get to what I think will be surprisingly a large impressive list of interesting things that you've done and we'll start a conversation there. But before we get actually into that, let's just start with how you got to buy. Yeah. Well, it's a long story I came. From the Java World Rerun the Clock Maybe fifteen or twenty years ago and I grew up in a trailer in Santa Clarita it's about an hour north of La and Let's see. My childhood was super interesting. But anyways, I became a teenager I tell people I. Think I had my first longer than five minute conversation with my father when I was a teenager when you know my brother who was out hanging out with the ladies and being an extrovert, I was an introvert he asked me to read the paper with him the local paper, and so that was nice I had longer than a five minute conversation with him at that point. And so yeah. So it went from there I played sports in high school I went to Saugus High I was five nine EPA until my sophomore year in staying that height throughout everyone else got taller. So they got to play football I didn't do something else. You know I had a I had a four point six GPA the only reason I didn't have a five point. Oh, on a or scale was they didn't have honors football so I decided to go to computers now at the time and so I went to USC couldn't afford it. Himself painted off right now and when I was there. At USC are sitting in the computer lab one night and as my sophomore year, any money in job was like midnight and an email came through a place called J. p. l. not jbl the had place J. P., L. Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a real nice gentleman Dr Raskin was looking for US computer people to help earth scientists understand earthquake data and other things, and so I went for an interview I'd never been one from four Internet company called the Iowan Dot Com that was my only other experience basically building video games in Java applets for thirty five to fifty, five year old demographic of people. Online Poker Games during that era. So I mean, that was nice. That was that was on the west side of La I got to be near the Miracle Mile I learned where UCLA USC person you really need to learn that she can have really feel the rivalry, but it was a beautiful area over there by mid Wilshire anyways jpl was a nice change. It was closer to USC in where I lived at the time Jpl's about maybe fifteen twenty minute drive into northeast La. And you'll see and so yeah, I got a GIG JPL and I was like a computer programmer I was doing pearl he hp, you know other stuff building websites and databases it my sequel for scientists, and so I did that for maybe I wanna say as an academic part time and eventually as an employee for three or four years, and then I got sucked into the Real Hardcore Java community I was working with folks on technology projects for databases even. Worked I've worked for a project Jay Bilas doing work with the National Cancer Institute we're putting together data for cancer detection because a lot of the stuff we did remote-sensing could be applied to that, and so yeah, I mean Jonah was big at the time and my trick was trying to figure out how instead of using CNC plus plus to build science missions than I. Eventually Start Working on those at work done in our science mission called orbiting Carbon Observatory. And I had to figure out how to use John I. Wanted Us job I refused to you C. plus plus I didn't know it right. But I was like God you know go ahead God. I've gone through the same stages not with Daba with dot net just like you know what I know I could do this see plus plus but I'm really over just all the being in the hoops in the age faults at all the stuff that I just. Don't care about anymore. You Know Oh my God. Same thing I had NACHOS for operating systems that was the Berkeley Sorry Stanford little tutorial project on how to do it I learned multi programming and memory management but who the hell wants to do that regularly and I was like Java Fermi being shoved down my throat let me except in the simulate. So yes oh, my Gig was my big thing i. cut my teeth on and became kinda known at. JPL. I forced US basically use Java implemented ground data system, for Osceola, the orbiting Carbon, observatory two, thousand and five, and so my trick their ways. Okay. All the prior Earth Science missions say took in ten years, ten gigabytes of data and they ran on order in terms of their processing their daily processing for jobs to produce data maybe tens of jobs per day produced that ten Gigabyte over ten years and so opio was basically okay we're going to take. You into the realm of ten thousand jobs per day daily workload, and then it was going to generate one hundred fifty terabytes of data in the first three months and so so I actually looked at the C. Plus plus system that we bill before to do this and I was like it was tied to a database it was tied to like I don't WanNa say but I, think it was like it was tied to post grocer couldn't run without a. Database running all the configuration was in a database it was like single processor everything else and I was like this needs to be completely rewritten, and at the time my head hung around at USC to get a masters degree and I had a really inspirational professor. They are during my master's Dr Neil Med Vitovich who ended up becoming my phd adviser who got me into research and I hung around for the as well and so in my PhD that I. was doing at USC I took a search engines class and I got really into this thing called touch in U. T. C. H.. Right and you T. C. H. and it was the creation of a guy named Doug cutting who is the guy who created Jean scene and eventually things like do and all that whole ecosystem and my professor at.

USC La football JPL Chris opio professor Michael US Santa Clarita Dr Neil Med Vitovich Jay Bilas EPA jbl hp Doug cutting T. C. H. Carbon Observatory
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Is because we work with the PLA's now who was responsible for training this is a doctor who obviously must've gotten some studying from somebody world yeah that that is really fascinating because you know waited to get all of this knowledge to basically keep thought China's conventional yes somebody train the guy he was he was trained at the at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Celtic No Way we trained in I was a doctor Theodore von Karman the Hungarian airspace scientist who was very full professor up at Celtic and he accepted Chubb insurance Shushan as a PhD candidate and became his mental and and it and as it turned out this week but the shades of brilliance was such that doctor brown common basically fast track shouldn't into into the most secretive army Air Force programs that would not to exist at the time Michael we're gonna take a quick break we'll come back and talk more about your latest work rise of the red dragon how far are they advance scene and how serious is it Michael's website is sexual politics dot org linked up it coast to coast AM dot com we'll be taking your calls with him next hour here on coast to coast AM so we will be right back with Dr Michael cell you might to the something the you may see loading and it running through it will be right.

PLA China Jet Propulsion Laboratory Celtic No Way Theodore von Karman scientist professor Shushan Air Force Dr Michael
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's how you but super cool like so many, an all women, so many Mattis women doing cool. In the engineering department there. What a fun job. It was. It was awesome. I probably would would still be doing that for them. But then I found out about an opportunity at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. So is over there, working for like, the solar system website, and NASA space place, and stuff like that. And that was I was doing that for them when I was on with you last time and your background, is, is it in any of those feel no love that? I love that. And so, did you have to kind of self teach as you were working on doing all this outreach? Or was it mostly like, because it was elementary level stuff that you're pretty comfortable with it's funny because it was I mean, I just have a background in chemistry and biology. So it's I have the fundamentals to get all that stuff. Like I have the scaffolding sort of. But no, I was like, wait. We don't know Honey moves Saturn has thought we knew that. So was I got to learn on the job. It was amazing. It's really cool. Those are the best kinds of jobs, aren't they where you're like really pushed outside of your comfort zone? And then you find yourself being better for having done it. No totally. I learned so much Turbie from all the engineering professors and so funny like coming from a science background, when sometimes I would be talking to what that what they do. And I would assume that they were taking like a science approach to it. Like I was talking to somebody who was researching how would pickers are able to smash their head against something so many times and not give themselves brain damage, and she wanted to see if it could inform helmet design. Tells you that I was like, oh, so do you get like a bunch of woodpeckers skulls and just smash them into stuff? She was like, no. Like we, we, they basically got one would pick took measurements and took all the densities of the bones, whatever. And then they built a replica out of materials that have similar properties. Whatever I was like you're an engineer like okay to your science is showing, they're not just pull rising. Actual would Becker skulls in their lab every day. Are there any beaches, the biologist comics about woodpecker skulls? I did a video for Turbie about it. It's also. So after you left NASA JPL, you have you been more focused on, like Pir freelance work. Have you turned your sites? Back to Beatrice, the biologists more. Her view had other other gigs here and there, then I went to the natural history museum. Oh, I forgot you worked there for a while. I remember being there for some event and be like, oh, you're on staff here. Yes, I was like the science writer for the research and collections department. That's so cool such a cool thing. It was like I just learn just got to learn every day at work while it was there. It was the best jelly. That's really cool. Job. It was awesome, cool. So so how long were you there couple years years, and it's been an interesting couple years? I had a kid, she's like two and a half. I've had some, some health conundrums at guy of cancer or anything, but how health issue than have totally taken away from all my stuff managed to write this, this book, we're gonna talk about last year. I took I took time off work and just focus on that. I didn't do anything else, which was a total. I for me, I've always been working and doing Beatrice stuff and then doing freelance on top of that. So I've always had like three things at any given time. So should just actually quit everything else. And just read a book for four months was amazing. But isn't that like, honestly the way to do it? I feel like when I talked to people on the show and lots of the interview subjects that interview subjects. That's such a corrosive lots of simple..

Beatrice NASA Turbie Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mattis Becker engineer cancer writer four months
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Latino USA

"Sylvia. Acidy was one of the first in her family to go to college. She was also one of the first and few Latinas to ever work in NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory today, she's the CEO of the girl scouts and recently. She published a book for young adults about her life. It's titled path to the stars my journey from girl scout to rocket scientists. I I spoke with her in September of twenty seventeen this week. We revisit that conversation. We'd see where we talked about her trajectory from less cruises to Stanford to NASA and how the girl scouts played a role in all of it. CBS? Welcome to let the USA. Well, thank you very much. I'm so excited to be here. You are from New Mexico. Yes. And actually right on the border, right? Lozada's cruces. New Mexico some years of our lives. We lived in kind of basically, Spanish, speaking, body'll, dirt, streets, and everything. So, you know, but that was my life that was our community, you know, and I loved it. Can you talk a little bit about that? I mean, you kind of throw it out there, you know, dirt streets. Come you know, I mean what you're talking about is is a bit of poverty. Yeah. We live paycheck to paycheck. Let's just say for a while. And there were couple times at my dad lost his job. So that we really rough moments and that figures in very much of what happened in in my family life is that you know, living in that area. There was an epidemic that went through that area and my younger sister. Unfortunately, it was one of those. It was struck with meningitis and kind of changed her brain with high temperatures, and she became special, but more special in the Special Olympics kind of way, my mom realized that in all of Las Cruces, the only place that there was a meningitis epidemic was in our neighborhood are dirt street neighborhood. So it took her a couple years and working really hard and convincing my dad, but we moved to a different part of town where the streets were paid. I saw girl walking in my neighborhood, and she was going to a troop meeting and she invited me to come along. And I didn't want to go, and we are in front of my house. So she said go ask your mom and back, then my mom had seen. I'd gone become, you know, been a very outgoing happy girl. And now, I was closing the door. Locked I wasn't happy. At all my mom was excited that I was interested in doing something. And I was surprised, but she said I could go, and when I went into the girl scout meeting, I just fell in love there were girls like me girls doing things that was ordered. It was calm. I was just so excited about it. And I felt like light in life came back. So this very sad. Circumstance of your sister, getting sick actually, ends up leading you to interact with the girl scouts. Absolutely. And you know. I mean, if your sister hadn't gotten meningitis, you might not have interacted with the girl scouts. I know my life would have been a very different thing. You know, everything changed as a result of me being in girl scouts. So there's two other major pivotal moments from girl scouts when was cookies and the other one was earning my science badge. So I'm sorry. This is lines patch. I have a science patch. Yes. This is what it looks like. Yes. So my signs. Patch tells my girl scout story, so it's got your name. Right. And it's got like, you know, what's I called? Well, it's God the atom Rocketship a rocket ship. Always got pie us got Dar's. The stars are because my girl scout troop leader saw me looking up at the stars. And so later when we were deciding what badges earned. You know, my parents would see me looked at the stars. And they never thought about we'll so how can you, you know, Sylvia's got an interest in science. So it was just oh you looked at the stars. But my troop leader thought what you you're looking at the stars. You might be interested in science. So why don't you earn your science badge? And I said I wanna earn a cooking badge like all my friends because you know, I was a young girl. I wanted to be like my friends, but she kept encouraging in telling me, you could earn your cooking badge. But let's your science badge..

meningitis New Mexico CEO NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Sylvia. Acidy NASA Stanford CBS Las Cruces Sylvia Lozada USA. Dar
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"It's from a TV show called track down that was in the nineteen fifties. Nineteen Fifty-eight Robert Culp, a competence man, named Trump comes into town holds a tent meeting and says, hey, there's going to be an asteroid is getting hit and you better build a wall to protect your home's protect your family. Protect your city now in a remarkable coincidence. It's also an interesting side to note that when President Trump media speech tonight at twelve oh seven AM today. The day the President Trump delivered his speech about the need for a wall. There was a giant asteroid four times longer than a city bus and it buzzed by earth at twelve. Oh, seventy AM the asteroid dubbed by NASA. Asteroid twenty eighteen why Q two came within a dangerous approach of the planet. Nasa, a California based Jet Propulsion Laboratory reported this fly by. The asteroid reached its closest possible distance of the planet today so-called earth, close approach is what they call it. This is the first of two incredibly close encounters this year, they'll be another one in February. Of course, people will be watching to see a dozen hit the planet. There have been there have been people saying that there is a chance that it could. But the chances are slim scientists are confident little miss us. But once again, we have to look for sweepers and other things that may be in the night sky this month, millions of people across America and western Europe will also be able to see the rare super blood moon, which will be total lunar eclipse of the wolf moon, and it's will happen on the two year anniversary of President Trump's inaugural, which I think is interesting also the anniversary lends itself is some peculiar synchronicity. I just want to let you know that Trump was born in the night of June fourteenth, nineteen Forty-six within fifteen minutes of a total lunar eclipse seven hundred days before the state of Israel was established. Trump was the first sitting president to go to the wall in all. Jerusalem, by the way. Trump's lucky seven's, of course, add up he was sworn in as president on January twentieth. Two thousand seventeen he was seventy years old seven months and seven days, by the way, the speech that he made tonight was just over seven hundred days and his presidency presidency. In fact, if you want to be accurate with the number seven hundred nineteen days, the Trump made the speech about the wall. And how important is we need the wall not declaring a national emergency. I guess he felt he wasn't necessary. I don't think it's necessary either. But if he wanted to he could do this. So that he could utilize his his powers as president. I mean, there are things that when you're in a state of emergency, the president can do I mean, he can overrule congress he can over. He can do a lot of things when there's a state of emergency declared a lot of people were regretting that he didn't declare a state of emergency. I think that he's using common sense by not doing this. I mean, he's still could I mean the government sheet being shutdown of. Course is debatable is whether or not this is being affected, but we have to look at the historical coincidences of what a wall means to a people see them to us. It means protection keeping people out keeping intruders out for others. It. It means something else. But historically speaking politically or not it is a sign that civilization feels that it's not protected enough fit. It somehow feels that something horrible is going to happen to them, and it will happen. If there is a hole in the border or somebody gets through over the border that city intruder or someone to be considered an.

President Trump president Robert Culp NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Israel California Jerusalem Europe America congress seven hundred days seven hundred nineteen days fifteen minutes seventy years seven months seven days two year
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"This is Jeff sauce threats. And Jeff says Chuck you'd have butchered my name. I like to clear the record it sauce spaghetti interests like syndrome sauce Terance. Thank you. Thank you. Jeff phonetically clarifying your name. Here's what he wants to know. What is the average age education of a NASA employee is the demographic getting younger or older over the years? So are we attracting people to NASA, by the way, we all saw the video of the launch and return of the first stage in the SpaceX rocket and you see mission control for SpaceX biz. Nobody there over thirty one old far forty in the corner looking around like this everybody else who's jumping in Holland. I think I if this thirty five I'm so they that skews young it looks to me it does K young. And if you look at our NASA centers, which we have nine NASA centers plus are federally funded research and development center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory make ten. Treatments. In in the loop. I you still struggle. I almost always will. To roll on. But more about the F RDC. The average age is about fifty to fifty six depending on the center. Now part of that is because we have people who who don't want to leave. You know, they love what they do. They're still productive. We've had scientists who are still, you know, writing significant papers in their eighties. So that does tend to hurt your your statistics on the other hand, you know, in the sixties just died at age sixty kind of. So we people who don't like to retire. Smoking. Day was a big part of American dining. Every holiday thing everything. And then when you did have him you had spam? Spam was food. And he's a. That you're eating emails that you. I'm sorry. So we've also had periods of time where the federal government has hiring freezes on. And so and and NASA downsized shuttle program ended so all of that's combined to make the federal federal workforce older, and we need more younger people in there have a hiring freeze. But it applies to NASA brain freeze not. Not. Good, exactly. Plus. No, no, no. It's a brain freeze because you're not you're not bringing in fresh, fresh brain blood, right. Visa, the those those those resources are being allocated someplace else most likely Wall Street. Right. And and the other thing is though, you really want that mix of ages because we've got people who really know how to land on Mars in. You know, we have people who know how to keep humans up in space safe. So you need that kind of wisdom engineer, the fresh blood coming in that's going to carry that, full culture. We're fresh blood who is not biased by how you always did do it can be open to a new idea. Exactly. And that that need for innovation is something that we worked on a lot over the last couple years at NASA. How do we ensure that were the most innovative fifty year, plus a old agency, you really do worry about are you being the most innovative and NASA worries about interesting, I know the genetic because it was founded the same week. I was born nineteen fifty eight a feel the pay a lot of people feel. Feels that lack of innovation. Nasa. The message is..

NASA Jeff sauce federal government Jet Propulsion Laboratory Holland Chuck engineer fifty year
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A lot of us on the on the media side. We're we're wondering whether you're going to have to cancel this mission. I mean, they were they were going to miss the launch window, and they did yet in the interim. They were able to repair that that sites. We've got to a point that they could attempt to another launch this year in two thousand eighteen and you know, every twenty six months old marches in the right place to launch. And that's why they missed that first window, but they were able to get it done. So this mission kind of went from an innovative something never done before. To all my gosh, is are they going to be able to fly it now that we've built it to? Yes. Now, it's this huge success on the red planet and you use these stars to navigate. To get this thing to the right place as well as not incorrect. Yeah. So they have star finders on the cruise stage on the way out there to make sure the also launched on the proper directory at that time in that that window that I mentioned earlier where Mars was the closest that it would be in that that kind of part of its orbit to make this journey only a few months rather than years or so and then on the way in they did have some trajectory maneuvers to kind of fine. Tune that that approach during during the long cruise to the red planet may bring in now Elizabeth Barrett. She's a science system engineer for NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the insight mission. She joins me from JPL where mission control is in Pasadena, California. Elizabeth great to have you. Thanks for making the time. Hello. What was your emotion? What were your reactions? The moment that that Lander touched down on the surface of Mars overjoyed watching the descent come down was a little nerve racking in the final minute. They're just hoping we made it. That planet wanting to see all those years of hard work pay off. And I actually got to experience it with our science and instrument p members who've devoted years to this mission and her looking very much forward to the return. We can get from it. So seeing all jump up and celebrate that landing was a great moment. So there is tremendous innovation on this Lander..

Elizabeth Barrett Lander NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena California twenty six months
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Jet Propulsion laboratory says the Mars mission streaked into the planet's atmosphere at twelve thousand miles per hour. Slowed by retro rockets and giant parachute insight made it seventy seven mile descent to the ground people around the world watched it in Denver people gathered at the museum of nature and science for the crowd of the museum of big payoff. A few tears people marveled at the moment of the triumph of technology hundred million miles away took six months to get there. And that's like putting a basketball shooting a basketball from Los Angeles and making it in New York City. The insight was built by Lockheed Martin and water to Kenya. The company changing its name for the data Lockheed Martian for the kids on handed. The museum a thrill was awesome. Pretty good, so cool. Jerry Bill KOA, NewsRadio vehicle belonging to a missing air force academy. Cadet was found at longs peak trail head in Rocky Mountain national park yesterday can't cadet candidate Mike at Thais was last heard from on Friday. There's no information on his plans on where he was going hiking. If he was but the weather on longs peak on Saturday was poor with significant snow accumulation search and rescue teams plan on going out. First thing this morning to search for Thais. Rangers are asking for any information would like to hear from anyone who might have been in a long speak area since Saturday morning, November twenty fourth, you know, maybe they had contact with them talk with them saw him going certain route or trail Kyle Patterson with Rocky Mountain national park pretty nice week ahead today. We had close to sixty fifty nine degrees with lots of sunshine. Most of this week is fairly warm. We start to cool off again by Friday CBS four Lauren Whitney Broncos and Bengals on Sunday. Next update. One thirty. I'm roger. On KOA, NewsRadio eight fifty AM and ninety four.

longs peak Rangers Jerry Bill KOA Rocky Mountain national park Mike Jet Propulsion laboratory Lockheed Martin museum of nature Denver basketball Cadet Kenya air force academy Martian Kyle Patterson Los Angeles New York City Lauren Whitney Broncos CBS
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"On your mind and wanna talk about four to four twelve sixty. All right. If you were not able to watch or listen to historic moment, right before one o'clock today, our time, I'm not really sure what the local time was for the event because it took place on Mars. The landing of the newest Rover that NASA Santa up JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory about six and a half months to get there. And they called it seven seven minutes of terror and seven minutes of tear because the time the delay for win insight. Could have sent a message or an alert saying I'm broken or I'm I'm behind schedule or you know, we pulled over for a lot. It takes about seven minutes for the radio signal to get from Mars to Pasadena. So whatever you're hearing. Now in Pasadena happened seven minutes ago. So your chance to correct or impact. Whatever insight was experiencing was gone. So you just have to trust. All your math. All your arithmetic was good. You know, you didn't misplace a decimal point. So insight was approaching Mars. I recorded this right before one o'clock because I thought it was interesting. Science reports sudden change in Doppler. Visions are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Album..

Pasadena JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory seven minutes seven seven minutes
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"England. Twelve eighteen right now on WBZ, overcast skies. The temperature of forty seven degrees right now in Boston. Good afternoon. I'm Mike Macklin top stories we're following. Now. A Senate hearing on the recent gas explosions and fires Miramax valley underway in Lawrence today. Columbia gas executives promising Massachusetts, Senator Elizabeth Warren that everyone displaced by the incident will be back in their homes by the sixteenth of December. The Amtrak is Joetta high-speed train from Washington to Boston stock for five hours outside of Queens, New York, all due to a power outage. President Trump's campaign advisor George popadopoulos reports to prison today they'll serve a two week sentence for lying to federal authorities during the mother investigation into election. Interference will NASA could make history today, if its newest Mars endeavor land, successfully on the red planet. CBS's Jamie Yuka says fingers crossed the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena first job will be to take a photo of the planet surface. Once that happens is going to get very loud in here. People say it sounds like the winning touchdown of the Super Bowl when that happens and the spacecraft will be very busy over the next Martian year, which for us means November of twenty twenty billion dollar inside. Lander is scheduled to touch down this afternoon. A group of good Samaritans Russia's into a burning three decker in wister Wednesday night. They saved the lives of the families living there for the rescuers were north high school students. They were driving past the house around eleven thirty in the evening. They spotted the smoke seeing you Jordan Parker, Johnny the worst, Johnny Graham gazette. They split up each one of them taking a floor. I went to the second floor and.

Boston Johnny Graham Senator Elizabeth Warren Mike Macklin Jet Propulsion Laboratory Miramax valley President Trump Jamie Yuka Massachusetts NASA CBS Jordan Parker Senate Lawrence Lander George popadopoulos advisor Pasadena
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Gift of mazing. We're on a mission a podcast of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, I'm Leslie Mullen, this season is all about the insight mission to Mars like the international space station. The insight Lander has a robotic arm, the robot arm is also tricky to us, and as we'll hear later, it's lead to joint benefits for folks back here on earth. But today story is not just about insights robot arm. It's also about the person in charge of building it. My name is a tribute Elena, and I'm the instrument deployment systems lead on inside insights robotic arm is called the instrument deployment system because its job is to take scientific instruments off of insight Lander and put them on the ground. There are also cameras on the arm to help it see what it's doing having this arm performance tasks correctly is crucial because if the instruments aren't placed on the ground incite won't be able to achieve its mission. The goal of insight is to understand how trust rep on. It's awful to understand our terrestrial planets form, you have to go and look deep beneath the surface you have to look at the core of the planet. I talked to kids why you guys are gonna dig all the way to the call. And I said, no, we just going to do an old fashioned medical check-up. Right. You go to your doctor. The have the stethoscope put it around your chest. All your back allowing Connecticut, read your pauses. What did they do take your temperature? So inside is going to do that inside is going to take. The heartbeat Omar's. So for the doctor to be able to do that, the doctor obviously need a hand to grab stethoscope oyster, the monitor the doctor need is to know where to place it. And this is what the instrument diploma system is to instrument deployment system on insight as the hand of the doctor the arm of the doctor, the fingers of the doctor and the eyes of the doctor..

Lander Jet Propulsion Laboratory Elena Leslie Mullen Nasr Pasadena Omar California Connecticut
"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on Bad Science

"It but but i don't know like they got from probably the ocean into the atmosphere and then just worked their way up there again controversial because the russians or the controversial because there hasn't been repeatability like that nobody else has done these studies and checked it it's also like there's my out it's in space it's like all this there's radiation there's all these other considerations that well maybe you test it out a few times do the same study and then like i iss good break whatever you're doing yeah okay well well funny funny enough enough i used to actually work and astro biology you used to do was we win or was that before swaps from either the space shuttle from kennedy before it went up to space and then we would try to a figure out which microbes are there and you expect when you're spacecraft goes up most of the microbes will get killed just from the uv but some of them do survive some of them have you'd be resistance and so those are the ones you have to watch out for because if he ever want to colonize something like mars or another planet you wanna make sure we don't bring up earth microbes woo planetary protection i was jpl yeah so cool so wait what does that the jet propulsion laboratory feel saying what's this planetary protection perfection well we're going to anyway let's start more romulo in actually planetary protection office so it was a seattle stroke biology group that you know yeah their job is not contaminate other planets if we can while so they'll like the insight lander that was just launched was likely baked or bombarded with uv radiation to kill anything on that side of it yourself it gets to mars it doesn't accidents in contaminate mars with earth bacteria great i hope we do the same thing with earth i feel like we're contaminating it consta all the time yeah kind of possible not too well since we're on such a dark known i guess that's no i do wanna i do want to ask you about fusion and fission and then radiation being waste because i read a little bit about that and then i was like okay i'm gonna stop myself tammy will tell me maybe trays we'll tell me so the difference you mentioned it earlier between fusion and fishing self asian is you take a heavy element something like the tony uranium and you break it down and when you break it down your again liberating mass because what you break it into then ways a little bit when you add those things that they little bit less than your original piece dead and so whereas fusion is taking something small and pushing it together to make something bigger okay similar processes except that fission in a way is a little bit easier because with something like plutonium in naturally wants to break down it's not a super stable element and that's why in a fission reactor the kinds of nuclear plants we have today that are today you do have to worry about things like runaway an overheating because essentially you just have to have enough mass to get the reaction going and if it's too much or if you're generating too many neutrons than it will run away whereas with fusion in order it's so hard to get started you have to put so much energy in it initially to get it started that you don't have to worry about runaway because you can always turn off your lasers cut off your original energy source deductions do you mess with both or you fusion we are we are on the net yes so screw vision those guys are listening or you don't mess with that what you said it was messier everything's so messy with yeah that's true it's not easy it's messier better word okan stuff flying everywhere and alpha particles gross disgusting the rest of the day it's like the dirty dirty parts of physics okay sweetie so let's not mess with that you mentioned and i'm going to say this wrong probably do tear them yeah did i say yeah you got it all cramp their learning stuff from this podcast look at you that's true i mean that's kinda the point here so there's part of this which is fiction and part of this which is nonfiction in star trek they have impulse drives which is a fiction part which obviously does not exist but that's how they travel around in space supposedly it's not a light speed it's slower than light speed but they use cheer him fish no.

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"jet propulsion laboratory" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"A company called beyond limits a i artificial intelligence aj aglet is our guest and i'm telling you this is going to be an interesting topic because one of the great drivers and in the news talk today is a round technology around artificial intelligence so really odd story which is hard to be with all the crazy news that we deal with all the time but that under printing was happening because there's so many shifts in a technological and business paradigm shifts that are happening that are being driven by artificial intelligence aj welcome to the program tells a little bit about beyond limits i thank you for having me beyond is a pirating artificial intelligence company with a unique legacy from nasa space program really mainly nology technology that was developed to support that's his jet propulsion laboratory as you know jt l is part of the nasa community and they focused on the exploration of the solar system and beyond those are the folks that basically said these fullbody nations explore bars saturn and other planets in our solar system how did the limits get started we launched a company in two thousand and fourteen we lost the company as a caltech startup company caltech is a prestigious school on the west coast but they've managed the jet propulsion laboratory which is a part of the nasa community and interestingly in nineteen ninety eight celtic brought it and new presidents who wanted to make the hallmark of his administration to nology commercialisation at the island was the.

aj aglet nasa community caltech