19 Episode results for "Jet Magazine"

Nothing Is Wasted

Worthy Worth It and Priceless

07:12 min | 6 months ago

Nothing Is Wasted

"Hi, everyone this is tammy owner of worthy worth in a priceless in today's podcast is title nothing is wasted. So when I was five years old, I used to always be in my room always talking to myself I've had. A radio known I radio I used to have like a a cooking show or you have a talk show and I used to have guests in everything and he never heard of it because obviously he was in my imagination, but it was I was in my role and. Into twenty fourteen. I started doing youtube videos. And obviously, I was in my house in my room talking on camera as one part of it. And my whole life, I've always loved music. And so much so like. I don't know how old some you might be but if view ever remember the jet magazine and the jet magazines in the back, they used to have Like the top ten arm be songs or whatever or albums in with my cousins and stuff used to do is they would either just tell me the title and then I would just tell them who sang the songs like I've loved music my whole life. And Twenty, fourteen again I started. That's when I started the worthy worth priceless podcast before that have a different side wasn't a podcast. It was the worthy worth in priceless blog. That's my at the blog. And? on their. To actually be a little bit different It showcasing music so I was showcase play different songs or something like that, or I would make like a list of songs for whoever listeners was just to give them like some insights on two songs fast or into this year which twenty twenty. I created when I created my book. Love in relationships I promise you I'm going somewhere all this I created my book loving relationships that is on Amazon right now undertaking me seven's long story short. Okay. in the book there's playlists in the book. To help you with your relationships or whatever just different types of situations. And fast forward. And just a couple of months after maybe like within the same month I started making playlist on spotify. A muff later month or two later now I have a radio show. On the station head and on that radio show obviously, there's music that I need playlist four. So if you look at everything That I've been through. God allowed me to use. The. Good and ugly. To. Give you guys inspiration. He allow me to use me talking in my room. To now, I am talking. Through a camera. On for videos. the radio station talking from there and I'm talking to you guys on Pike Gas. Also with the music. Is like, I said I love music my whole life. So. From the music. I was able to use that music to make list for you guys on the blogs. Then make playlist for you guys to help you guys and your relationships too. Now, making playlist that I can use for the radio. If you look at that whole thing as an example, it will show you that nothing that I've ever did in life was wasted. It may seem pointless. Maybe, if you're, you know you're an adult and you might see your child in the room. Playing be pretend or dissatisfied third but the thing is God is preparing you. You just don't know how he's going to prepare you. So the thing is like I said I've been talking basically to myself for since I was five years old. And so God has been preparing me for what I'm doing today and I had no idea for it. So I gue- talking to you guys or whatever I'm not. Uncomfortable door next because I've been doing it my whole life. And that's how it is for you. You may not know how God is GonNa move you from one thing to the next. I was just doing that stuff as a kid just using my imagination not knowing that years later or decades later basically, that's what I'll be doing. I didn't know like using the music or just you know giving you guys play lists that one day I'll be using that playlist for my own record label or Sire my own radio station, and so that's the thing you never know what God is using. So do not devalue anything that you're going through because God going to use it for the greater good one one way or another everything will work out for you. You don't know how God is going to move anything and. Dole allow anyone else. To make you feel as though what you're going through is pointless or what you have done in life is pointless or anything because God will use everything nothing with God, is wasted every opportunity. He will use every mess up or what you might think is a mess up or mistake. God will use it. There is a lot of things that I have done in my life that may not have been the best things or. There have been things that have hurt in my life but. Has Allowed me to use every situation that I've been through good or bad to encourage you guys. These encouragements are not coming just out of the airline goodness Oh, that's something nice to say these are from my experiences where I've seen someone go through it out or is like I said I experienced it myself. So at the end of the day, nothing with God is wasted. So don't think that thing that you've been through your talents or anything will ever be wasted. God is GonNa use it all to get you to the next level for the good everything. So I always know that God has a plan for you don't give up on yourself because God would never give up on you. Always know that you have worth you have value your necessary to this earth know that you are worthy worth it in. Priceless. Thank you guys for your support. Thank you for listening to this podcast and until next time. Bye.

jet magazine twenty twenty youtube spotify Pike Gas Amazon Dole five years one day
Black from the Past | Honoring Phyllis Hyman

Shades of Strong ? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

10:21 min | 6 months ago

Black from the Past | Honoring Phyllis Hyman

"Hey guys welcome back to another many saloon of black from the past where we're preserving normalizing history by shining a light on black women up forgotten but have made a significant impact on the black female experience. Last week, we highlighted the amazing Mark Carter and her contribution to the female experience. If you have said Miss them episode, it isn't never too late to check it out. So hop on over there and they can happen say. In the meantime, who are we leading this week netting? Talking about US man she's a singer so. I'm the women that I'm going to be bringing forth there. It's pretty easy to tell what? Oh, the that's somebody that. Wanted to talk about because either. Singers or artists or whatever. It's like, Oh, here she comes some singer. US This some artists that's just the way it is but we're gonNA talk about Phyllis Hyman and a lot of people do know her but honestly I don't feel that given her talents and given just the the impact of her discography and everything I don't feel that she's gotten the shine that she deserves and it's just kind of it's bothering me and my home girls. It's me I am my homegirl me. I wanted to. Earth and when I was looking at some videos of her earlier. And looking at some information about her I started crying because. I was I was hit so hard by just the feeling of loneliness that I felt she had I've watched a number of interviews that she had over the years and in one particular interview and you can find this on Youtube. Of course, it was with Ebony jet magazine and she was talking about how she has she had had a lot of emotional ups and downs. And how she didn't really believe that there were any really good things in her life and that they're the friends close friends that she had. They had to kind of belief for her and that was what? Kept her going in a different interviews. She mentioned that issue wanted you know she's a woman right and she's beautiful woman choose over six feet tall. She was very statuesque and she was. Very beautiful. But she was mentioning out sugar wanted to date and she wanted to have a relationship in that having relationships have been difficult for her. She mentioned that it seemed like men especially when they if they found out that she might be interested in them. It was just like it was kind of dead in the water like they didn't know how to. Interface with her. and. So there was there were in different places, different sources where it was where she was mentioning that she was lonely and how she had struggled with not feeling like she was good enough like she was talented enough. She didn't feel like she was pretty enough. She didn't feel like she was thin enough. And you look at this woman and again she's gorgeous and her talent is off the chart she has she had such a beautiful beautiful outer voice was so. Creamy and smokey, and just this is had this richness to it. A lot of times when people think of toys is I think. The first minute comes to mind at least in like our generation we think of Anita Baker obviously she's amazing and like Chardonnay and Mike. Yes. Also, there are other women to Phyllis Hyman is one of them and she had this amazing talent and she did these songs that shouldn't classic. They really should be are be soul classics like old friend and I can't stand living alone and she did Betcha by Golly. She did what you won't do for love in. Good and I'm thinking this woman is so beautiful and she's got this kind of talent. In her songs are amazing and she's going through her day to day feeling lonely and feeling like she's not good enough. And, yeah I just broke down and cried because I had forgotten how she died. I was like, don't you got? Should I or something I? Know she was young she was just forty six she my she was my age. When she died and I had to look it up because I had forgotten it was suicide. She died in nineteen, ninety, five by suicide and she had written a short note. To her loved ones and she in the note, it said I'm tired. And Like I. Love You. Those of you who know me I love you. And I just I just broke down, I couldn't I mean this emotion just came up just welled up in me and I just cried his I'm like. That feeling of loneliness? I could feel like. She had olives. All disliked gold. That was her and she felt like it wasn't enough and she felt like she was alone. And it just broke my heart so. Yeah. That's what I wanted to say about her and again like I said I don't feel like you know some people might listen to this and in disagrees I girl I left will you tell and Mike, and that's Great If that's you. That's awesome. But I just feel like again it's like bothering me and my girls that you know she's not getting the shine but I feel like she's And that's the whole purpose of black pastors that some of these women don't these women don't get the shine that they deserve and she Bilas Heimer was a beautiful voice and we actually just talked about school days. In. In Monday's episode and I, Rish on, we're online where she sang in that. Yes she did. Yeah I read somewhere where she did. I know what she's saying she. Were the scene where they're doing the the good bad hair. That's the scenery. So Phyllis Hyman is singing when they get to the Jiggle Boo part one of the Jacob. Parts and I just keep that word but that's what it is. One of the girls that was singing that it wasn't actually hurt was phyllis. Hyman. Tell like you. Hear it. It's like oh my gosh is gorgeous. Okay. Had to find a movie once. It's on the clicks. Your is it on ethnic. Euros. What's up? That's tonight I'M GONNA have to go. Love Movie. So today we are shining a light on Phyllis hyman because she is amazing. So, we just want to shine a light on her on a wonderful work that she's done and saving. Love you you are not. Forgotten. Got Forgotten. You are not forgotten in cautious may amazing contribution to the music world and to us. NOTHING MS. Netting. This is to way more again than I do but. Like yeah, she she's made she made a huge contribution to the music world genetics still listening to her songs I don't listen to music. Early really. Dumb. Jest. Serious I. I. Really Don't have the time I hate to say that but I don't want. I was want to work every day. That was really the only time I listened to music a lot. But. Now, if I listen to music is because I'm trying to pick myself out of some type of bomb but I don't listen to music every day but I'm going to go and look listen to some phillies haydn because. I I WANNA I. WanNA catch a foreign summer on former her music. And just you know re familiarized myself with some. Time. After. Listening to this episode of black. Front pass, day you to do. They're also found a line Nettie where someone had written her biography and it's available on Amazon and I'll put it in the show notes for you. Guys is entitled strength of a woman and it was written by Jason. In cooperation with the estate of Phyllis Hyman. Worked with their state is probably a pretty accurate version of her story so on yeah. Definitely. Ticket out is on Amazon and we'll put a few links to summertime means E in in the So. Because if you haven't heard her like thinking about some of our younger listeners, there's a possibility that they haven't heard her and if you have your just retreat. Definitely check out helpless shine a light on on her share share the episode for people who may have accidentally forgotten a better think yeah. reacquaint themselves the power. So yeah definitely. Thank. You guys tuning into black from a pass if there's somebody that you would like us to shine a light on. IT IS A. Shaved Dot Com and let us know and we will do our best to make it happen. All right. We out of here guys next week by time.

Phyllis Hyman US Amazon Mark Carter Youtube Ebony jet magazine Anita Baker phillies Bilas Heimer Jason Rish Mike Chardonnay Nettie six feet
Brandi Davis

Revision Path

1:02:15 hr | 5 months ago

Brandi Davis

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring but struggling to find diverse talented candidates? Then we have something that can help our job board head on over to revision wage jobs to browse listings or to place your own this week on the job board. Underbelly is looking for a product design director in Salt Lake City. Typical Harbors is looking for a user researcher for their search and Discovery team in New York City or Ann Arbor, Michigan. If you're looking for remote work 36 creative out of the Greater Boston area is looking for a senior designer. Brave Achievers is looking for design students forgo create USA an ofi design training program for black American Youth and burn Camp is looking for a mobile applications developer. Company stop making excuses on your efforts and post your job listings with us for just $99. Your listing will be on our job board for 30 days and we'll spread the word for you about your jobs are diverse audience of listeners. Make sure to head over to revision path.com forward slash jobs for more info on these listings apply today and tell them you heard about the job to provision pass get started with us and expand your job search today revision path.com forward slash jobs. You're listening to the revision pan podcast a weekly Showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers web developers through in-depth interviews. You learn about their work their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host Maurice cherry juice. Hello everybody Welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host Maurice cherry and this week. I'm talking with Brandy Davis a creative director in Chicago, Illinois off. Let's start the show. All right. So tell us who you are and what you do? Hi, my name is Brandy Davis. I am a graphic and web designer by trade. I am recently entering into the apparel industry we're going websites for my Niche is small businesses. I love helping small businesses and entrepreneurs create their branding and get their sites off and running and able to be profitable for their businesses. Nice. Now before we kind of get more into what you do and your background and everything. I've been doing this check in with everyone this year back of the pandemic. So, how are you kind of holding up during this time? I I'm starting to balance out. Thanks for asking. I'm starting to balance out when it first started that first month was very tough wage literally work came to a stop and understandably. So everyone was scrambling trying to figure out how to shift their business models from events and different song. Things I think stuff started to sort of shift a little bit better for me. Probably around May or June right now. We're starting to wear like on an upswing. So we're starting to get more clients that are looking to now they have a better grasp of what they're doing virtually. And so now they want to execute so things are starting to pick up a little bit more but that first month was like whoa, like it was silent. I had to struggle myself to sort of figure out like, how do I shift to support people in a life that that this ideal for us virtually for it to be a graphic and web designer. This is ideal. But how do I shift my model and Mark it to my existing clients and helps them in a virtual world. So I have a shift a little bit as well as a little scary at first, but it's starting to balance out and feel a little bit more like normal. Nice. What are your work dog? Kind of looking like right now just in general. So I try to balance things out between the graphic and apparel side because I do in-house printing for that piece. So I have sort of like a split day where maybe like the first four to five hours. I'm at this desk designing probably the last and then I do like some mean time in between and then late in the evenings. I'm printing for about another 3 to 4 hours. Wow, and you're doing the the printing in-house. Yes, I would say about 93.3% I know that's a weird number, but about 93% of the printing is done in-house. I used to use an online resource, but now just to kind of keep quality and that's basically to keep quality in shape. I was like, you know, what is an investment, but I need to bring this in house to make sure that I'm giving the customer what they expect. Wow. So you must have a dog I mean, well, I don't know tell me like what does that space look like it is so I'm home base. I am fingers crossed looking to move into the studio space of bigger workspace wage, but it's literally basement Workshop setup. I have a printer that he presses everything all the equipment that I need to treat the garments. I have any other like vinyl cutting different things that I do depending on a designs. It has been self-taught to for certain extent. I was not familiar with any of this at first I had other people that I would work with so long. It's yeah, it's it's not a massive work space but it gets the job done. You know, it's enough to kind of get the job done. I utilize about a fourth of the basement. Okay, I'm curious about that because you mentioned you know that you were doing it online and I know that there's a lot of these sort of print to order type of places where you can just like upload like an EPS birth. Something upload the design and then they'll do the printing but I feel you on the quality. We try to do merge at revision path. Oh God, like two years ago. Yeah and the quad he was definitely very sketchy. Like some people would get the shirts and the image is all glitchy and stretched out and I'm like, oh I didn't expect wage is definitely a trial-and-error with different printers. Yeah, because yet you could have a good run with one printer and then all of a sudden you'll get an image a t-shirt back in your life. This is not how we should look so it is it was so hit or miss and what I didn't like was I would have customers or people it was it luckily. It was people that knew me and so they were reach out and say hey just FYI. This is how a shirt look in case other people call and say something and so that's how I would know because lung Three people who were supporting me in the beginning were friends and colleagues. So they would reach out and say hey this is what I receive. And so then it was like, okay. I have to think about other option and I did do some local printers here in Chicago for a bit, but I still needed to they all had different print processes. So one person might get one shirt printed with screen print and then one person may get a vinyl shirt. And so it was so all over the place that I was like you need to streamline this because at this point it's starting to look more like a hobby business. And so I had to make the investment my family was super supportive everyone around me, you know were super supportive and helping me get support page that Financial place because I was literally diving into something that was way out of my budget, but, you know, we managed to, you know, they were able to support and manage the page. Get everything in place. But yes, it is very sketchy with online printing. Yeah, and I mean and that's a big step to to purchase the equipment and decide to do it yourself even after going with local printers. So that's I mean, I would say that's a testament to the fact that it's something that you're very serious about and that your customers are important to know that you are kind of doing this by hand. That's really good. Yes, and I thought this was not my plan. So I have literally been following God's path on this because I had no desires at that particular point to be in the apparel industry so long it was like, you know, what if this is something you're going to take seriously and if this is what God has put on my plate then I need to treat it as something that I'm passionate about and so my goal is always presenting producing a product of service whatever to my customer that I would be proud to say or pay for myself. And so yeah, I have to make the decision to bring it in-house wage. So how did the the idea for the apparel line come about so I I like to joke that I fell into it literally so about two years ago. There was a day off the premier for Black Panther and I think it was like February ish and so in Chicago this day it was warm typically around February it snowed, I see but this day it was beautiful outside. So I put on every little I have my outfit ready to go because I was going straight to the theater after work and home I felt amazing, but I have boots on that probably should not have been born in February, but it looked as if there was no ice outside and I was walking to the train headed to work and she caught one patch of ice a black ice and I slipped and failed and resulted in me breaking my leg and my ankle in three places. And so yeah, and that was a really wage. Recovery, I was unable to walk for about four months. I was in like really intense therapy for about another three to four months and I was dealing with depression. And so one of them go to when I'm sort of down is designing like I I truly enjoy designing and so I couldn't figure out what to do with these x-rays that made me so angry so I decided I you know what, let's switch the narrative and so I took the x-rays from when they were my leg was broken in the x-rays post-surgery and created this really funky graphic and I had the Mantra on there of broken heel stronger better because I wanted to get to strike I was at I was at the Hill Park physically, but I wanted to get mentally and emotionally at a stronger and better level. So I would where to put it on a tank. I went to my online printers and had them placed on tank tops and t-shirts and I'll warrant a physical therapy and then I would post it on Facebook when I would, you know, make em Need a milestone and people kept saying like hey, that's a cool. Graphic. That's a nice shirt. I need that and I was like, well, I'm kind of lonely making them for me and they were like well, but I need it and so it's sort of just happened home where I was sharing my story and posting with the graphic and the t-shirt on that people got interested and then they were like, so what else do you have? Like what other designs do you have? Do you have a store and it was horrible but as a web designer, I only had an Etsy set up cuz I didn't I wasn't taking it seriously. I was like, you know what I'll put a Nancy up and that that way I don't have to commit off all the way and then it just started to grow by and then ideas started to come about and I was like, well, maybe I should give a name to this thing that I'm doing and then maybe I should actually create a site and take this seriously because people are actually interested in the story and what I'm doing and so yeah, so a probably about a year later earlier out last year June know about May of em. 19 is where I officially launched merged by be Davis Designs as an apparel brand so that with more of a focus of what we were doing. So he designed off apparel and accessories in a way that Embraces healing confidence and culture and that sort of my mindset of how I'm designing when things come about so yeah that's dead merch in a in a quick little bubble and it looks like prior to the pandemic you were even starting to kind of expand this merch concept out into doing events, right? Yes. That's all from this recovery phase. I always said I wanted to do art therapy. It has always been something that's been an interest of mine. And so that's when I started to use graphic design to heal from my depression. It started to kick in more and so I was like, how can I do this? I'm not in life. Therapist of course, so I'm like, how can I do this in a way that provides a nice fun social environment but also some healing aspects to it. And so I started doing a merchant ships which are similar to like your paint and sips but we use t-shirts or cigar boxes that are as the canvas for painting and typically we start with a mantra of some sort that gives them like an outline of how they can start with the designs and then partnered with me. I have a Reiki master in the sessions. And so she provides, you know about 20-minute sessions here and there and it was very interesting. I was a little concerned because a lot of people sometimes are not as open and she was very well received and a lot of people didn't even realize like they were painting and feeling good, but then they go over to her and they have a conversation and you see tears and they're like, oh my God. Finally released this and I'm like and they were like, I didn't even know I needed to be here Brandy but I am having so much fun. And I managed to release something that was bothering me from this era thought it was just really good to hear that. We were at least on the right path. We have some tweaking to do and some different things but it was Merchants if it's my way of sort of months starting the art therapy. Peace, but in a social environment, wow, I saw the video that you had on on YouTube that sort of showed the event and it looked like it was a lot of fun. Like they were really enjoying themselves. Yeah. It was really cool. And what I like is that the last event I was able like more guys showed up typically the paint and sips a lot of people assume it's like girl nights and things like that, but it was really nice to see guys show up and it was a good variety of Ages like we had some that were in their twenties. We had people there that were seven dead. And it was everyone just sort of had a good time and we played music from every different era and everyone had like a really great time. So yeah, it's been fun to do those jobs will be glad when pandemic is out of the way so we can get back to some of those events. But yeah, it's been pretty cool to kind of see those takes shape. Yeah, Amen to that. I I was watching it. I was getting I mean, I've never been to that type of event but it's like because we've been in this, you know pandemic for so long and I mean, some people have been getting together and still having parties up and I have it but just watch it. I'm like, oh I missed that I missed that kind of like Fellowship, you know, I do I am with you like I have been to a couple things but I am very standoffish. I am sort of like wage give me space. You know, I haven't been to an actual Event Event. I've done like dinner here and there like maybe twice but it's been very hard like a lot of events have started to kick back. And in terms of like bending and stuff that I used to do with the merch line, but I am not comfortable right now stepping into that space just yet. So yeah, I looked at the life. I've got the time hops because they actually the first one was this week last year. It was on the 14th. And so the memory came back up and I was like, oh I really miss being able to do this. And so I'm with you like and it's like oh, yeah. Now while you've had your own business, you've also worked at a few countries to such as digital Bridge Solutions. You worked at Careerbuilder for a while. What did you learn from those experiences, you know, each job came with its own less than a digital Bridge taught me like a different skill like they were very good at helping you sort of like learn skills because they were a small boutique company. Yep. You wore a lot of hats. So I was able to be project manager. I was able to do QA testing which I turned out. I really love and so it was really cool there to be a need to learn different skills, but add Career Builder. I feel like they taught me how to have a perfect work-life balance and it was interesting that it came from managers, but they were very good at like hey shut down, you know, like we understand the commitment shut down. This is your time work will start tomorrow and that was a very interesting and I really loved how I was able to sort of like grow into my own. They're without apologizing, you know, they're like, hey if things are happening may happen, let us know what you need from us and do what you need to do. And that was really good. It was it was good to have like different jobs where you're able to experience certain things because you don't know. What's the right choice. It for you until you've seen all of these different places. I worked at some places where here at one place in particular mostly to name, but it was so strict. It was very corporate office. Yeah, I could almost say I hated it. It was not the right work balance for me as a creative you like to have some level of creativity some level of expression and freedom and different things. This was not that job. It was not the job at all. So it was very hard to design in a very rigid environment. Let's switch gears here a little bit. Where did you grow up where you originally from Chicago? I am originally from Chicago South Side if that has anything to anyone but yet were you kind of exposed a lot to Art and Design grew up in Chicago? I would say in general. Yes, Chicago is a very artistic creative City. I would say probably from as early as preschool. I was introduced to it, you know, I would draw and do different things. I would go to plays and and different workshops. They were bringing to the schools like back then art programs in schools were like amazing. And so you had exposure to all types of things. Like I was able to do any level any entity of art I was able to experience it within our Chicago public school system was down music dance sewing drawing painting literally. I have been able to participate in all of that within our school program, but then we would do these field trips and not we would go to the Opera and you get I could care less about I like I was unconcerned about the actual performances. I appreciated them, but I got like wrapped into off. Like the details of the colors that they use in the backgrounds the costumes that they use and I was like focused on the details of like the structure of things and the ceilings the paintings that they had in the ceiling but I would get lost in the environment and completely missed the entire performance. So yeah, I would say like any given moment you could drive down you could drive down Stony Island in Chicago, especially around 79th Street where you have the theaters you have everything that are right. There is a Regal theater was on 79th and Stony Island and it was like literally a massive mural and so everyone just loves to be on Stony cuz at any point you see like murals and art all over so yeah, I'd say Chicago is very good at exposing a youth to Art now was your family kind of supportive of you getting into the Arts. Yeah, maybe know so they are really split so long You know, I would draw all day long all day long. So it wasn't a surprise for them that I loved art in high school. We came time to pick and colleges and I really was not excited about this nursing program that I was registered in but my dad was not for me being a starving artist. He had no desires for me to go to art school because what I couldn't do was struggle and fight and he is you know, he's been working since he was fourteen him and my mom, you know, they've worked all of these different nine-to-five jobs. And so for him and artist was someone who just painted in there off and didn't have a job and didn't get paid for it which you know, that's probably his upbringing and he had those misconceptions but he was so against it and so I had to sneak off to an art school interview. I did tell my mom cuz I needed someone to pay these fees, but I've missed some of my mom like look don't tell Dad but we have an interview Thursday. It's cool to see about the program and at the time I was going for a three D animation and my mom went with me and she was supportive and she was like Hey, if you want to go, we'll make it happen and thought there was so irritated but at that point he couldn't say no. He appreciated the fact that I actually went took the steps needed to research and find somewhere that I was off a little but he was so irritated and then when I graduated and started working and my first job that wiped out any doubts that I am in art, he was like, okay cool. So what are you doing next? You know, like he was on board and ever since then he's been super supportive. But that was the one time that he really pushed back in question. If I was making the right decision now before we jump into that that first job out of undergrad you started out at the art institute's in Chicago, is that right? Yes. What was your time like this song? Feel like they really kind of help prepare you as a working designer. Yes, and no, I feel like I had really great instructors who took time beyond what their curriculum was designed to prepare me. I feel like the the curriculum itself. It's you know, it went over and helped with the basics and it gave you some repetitive things that you would get used to in a work environment, but I wish it came with some post-graduate support or some in school trainings in terms of like an intern or something like that where you were able to sort of even if it was just working within their graphic department or their web department and sort of getting that experience because I feel like we sort of it felt very like a boutique type school like we touch everything on a high level and then we if you had an instructor that was very passionate about it off. Then they took that time so kind of plant seeds in you to kind of get you prepared and and give you some expectations of what to expect when you enter the real world. And then they all kind of kept in touch with me after school. And at least for about that first year or sold first year or two out of graduate out of school days. They kept in touch and kind of like helped me navigate the space. And so that was Health. Yeah, like I don't regret going to the school, but I do feel like to a certain extent within our curriculum programs. We should give the same thing same type of approach that we do to anyone in business school or Finance or somewhere that they are now plugged into an internship as part of the curriculum. So yeah, I feel like that piece was missing and just to kind of like put this in a a chronological context. This is around like The early 2000s. Is that right? Yeah. So this is like at a time when the internet and the web are really starting to become a thing, you know web design is now starting to become like an actual possible career profession, right? So I think a lot of those schools at that time and I'm thinking of this mainly because I was in college at that same time at a liberal arts school and I really wanted to go to an art institute's because I had been doing web design sort of as a hobby and wanted to learn more and I figured oh I should go to like the Art Institute that was down here in Atlanta. Like I want to go to the artist to the VIN lands because they would know they would have that information. So it's it's interesting to kind of, you know, put it in that context to see that this is at a time when we didn't have all of these types of boot camp bouncing online courses and things that people have now where they can really be like not necessarily so well self-taught. Yes, but also like it's built on the backbone of really kind of the early birth. Days of design when that information wasn't available. Yeah, and and that's why I don't regret going there because like to your point, they likely didn't even know how to enter into or out how to get us involved in this area. That was so very new. So I feel like they did the best that they could in terms of it being something that was a very new program. If I'm not mistaken. It was the first year when I entered it was the first class that they were ever like sort of experiencing and you know working with so yeah, it it they did the best that they could you know, I think things have shifted a little bit. I don't even know actually if that that department is even still available within that within a school system, but they did the best that they could what we had like you said starting out right? I mean it's it's kind of hard to to underestimate just how much things were changing during that time. I mean if we're talking really mm. Web layouts were still being done with tables. I mean, I remember vividly the switch and a lot of people's anger and having a convert table designs to CSS like using CSS for layout. I remember that time so vividly and how many people fought that yes. That was that was a doozy of a time over. Yes. Yeah now right out of undergrad you got an internship at at the one and only George Johnson publishing company which for those in our audience who might not know they were the Publishers of Ebony and Jet Magazine among many other Publications that they had. Where were you when you first heard the news that you were going to work there. You know, what the good thing. I was saying that one thing about the art institute's is that they put me on this path of getting to Johnson, Georgia. Because all of these groups that they aren't programmed not our programs but art groups that they promoted one of the group's I joined was one that they were promoting off and it happens to be black designers and it was based on the south side and it was so cool to see people who looked like me doing the same thing because that was not represented in my classes month. And so I joined this and one of the ladies in that group worked at Johnson and she had posted in the board the job and originally I thought it was graphic. So I sent it to a friend and she sent it back on like no was for a web. This is for you apply. And so I interviewed and then I can't think of her last name. But ladoris was her first name was over HR and I love her dearly and she was like the sweetest but the most Stern person in life, but she called to let me know and I feel like I may have been home because birth. Cell phones were not that tough in mm right free. So I likely was at home when I found out the one thing that I don't remember about this experience is where I was in the month that I got the call everything else. I remembered in detail, but I would assume that I was likely at home and probably kept it to myself for about a day or two because I was so overwhelmed with the idea of working there and my family and friends were so excited and it was so much pressure. And so I kept a lot of things when I first started there to myself because it was just so much so I likely got the call from the doors Foster. That was her last night. The door is Foster, and she she did she let me off I was like, hey, you know, they want you to call me in on this day. And if I'm not mistaken, I think it was like August 8th. Oh, wow. You remember to the day? Remember? I'm telling you. I remember so many details except for Thursday. But it was August 8th of 2003. Then I was start and I remember because I remember saying eight is a number of new beginnings. And so I kept going through those Biblical numbers of things say, yes. That's the the moment when I found out no, I'm curious, you know being from Chicago how much I guess how much of a reputation did the company have like as you were growing up cuz you mentioned your friends and family being, you know, super excited about it. And of course folks knew about Johnson Publishing Company because of the magazines, but like I don't know if if people can really sort of get a grasp of how much of an influence that company was during that time. Yeah, like there was so many story. Like when I started working there, I have family members Mississippi call and give me stories about how Mister Johnson helped them when they were in school and or paying for this or it was very strange to see wage. That all of these experiences people were having that they had never shared until they knew someone who worked there and soul in Chicago. He was like they were like the first family of Chicago regardless of who was the mayor and all of that. They were the they were the black royalty of the city and everyone got excited riding down Michigan Avenue and you see the building and you gave me like, oh I can see the ebony and Jet signs and things like that, but they they he has such a huge impact on all of the South Side the black communities that he was like literally like Keen to everyone, you know, like everyone got excited they respected him because he was a straight shooter and so it was it was cool to work somewhere. That is silly you say the name and at that point you could have been anyone in any position and the respect instantly shot through the roof because Thursday Of who he was and who the company was to everyone during that time? Cuz I remember like my grandmother having the magazines, you know all out on the table and not subscriptions comedy and and oddly enough. My sister picked my first name by reading an Ebony magazine, like my mom was pregnant with me and she's like I was reading an Ebony magazine and I saw an actress from a soap opera name Brandy. Wow, my mom, you know, cuz originally I was going to be named Camille. And so she was like, no you should be I think she should be Randy and then it was so when I started working and she was like wow, like that's literally you're working at the place where I literally read the magazine to get your first name, So it was really cool to kind of like see it kind of take shape. Yeah. I don't know if the current generation of black designers now know just how much of an influence wage Johnson publishing company has had in the black community. I mean they were around they started in nineteen forty-five. They've been there through pretty much every major political civil social movements from then to now documenting it with articles and pictures and everything and also Johnson publishing company owned a Cosmetics company called back. It was Supreme beauty company. So it mentally run into fashion fair Cosmetics. Yeah Fashion Fair cosmetics, and I actually have a story about that. So John Johnson's wife Eunice is from my home town. She's from Selma, Alabama. Her father is a doctor where father was a doctor they all passed on but her father was a doctor her father used to be my grandmother's doctor off. So so we do we knew the Walkers and every year when ebony would do the Fashion Fair like Fashion Tour, right? They would always have a stop in Selma. No, it wasn't necessarily like printed on the schedule. They would always stop and Selma so we could like see the fashion and the makeup and everything like that. So yeah, yeah, well was like I said if it was not on the schedule and if someone made the mistake and did not put it on the schedule, it was a huge issue because she the children made sure that they always hit them home spot States and they always make sure that they did some type of event where they were fundraising or volunteering or donating something always made sure that when they got to their home City that they did extra it was always, you know, like led me let's do this. Let's have this bring this person out is donate this and so that I loved about them cuz as long as they have been in Chicago and everything that they had been doing they never lost sight of who they were and birth They came from and yes, Selma was if it was not on the schedule you'd have to answer as to why did you assume that? She would not want to go to her home City say you were there for I mean nearly nine years working your way up from being an intern to being like the senior designer slash producer there. Do you have any any stories from the wage? I'm like, what? Are you remember the most about working there? So I like to tell people that working there was like going to your family reunions with your your favorite cousins every day. So it was like literally everyday you and your favorite cousins are hanging out. So it was like ten floors and so each department and pretty much had a floor but like everyone went from Florida floor because you have to interact in some sense of the for the most part A lot of people have come to the floor I was on which is graphic and with so I got to interact with a lot of different jobs. Events, but it was so much fun. And I would I would like soak it up like all the history like I stayed in the library. Like if I was on lunch break, I was in the library getting like dates information about stuff that happened in the seventies or reading books that you know, they would be reckoned. They were recommend kind of give you the history. And so it was it was from just a daily interaction. It was amazing. It was like fun, but then there was celebrities and it was almost require that we had to interact with the celebrities and I was like, okay so to stop work and entertain like and so literally you see your like home they say, oh Halle Berry is here or no. It was Toni Braxton. Toni. Braxton is here and at that time like Tony was like the person you wanted to be like an Choi. So I was like, yes cool. They like we need people you gotta come up to take pictures go out, you know, like every time a celebrity came it was like we have lunch come downstairs introduce yourselves like to know what you do take some photos things like that. It was great, you know, sometimes they would do concerts and we would just sit there for two or three hours just like talking about things they would get information. They needed for the story. Just kind of get them, you know feeling good about what was the setup of the story and and what direction was going in so that's pretty cool. Like those were the really good memories of like just having a celebrity sort of just pop in and they're like hey, how you doing? And you don't elevated like, oh, okay. I just came from lunch Bhai. Sorry about anyone, you know, it was rappers. It was R&B singers. It was blue singers gospel like at any point. It could be a 22 year old rapper or off. 70 year old gospel singer and you knew them because they were Staples in the black community and it was just so cool to kind of see but I would say probably like for me one of the wage best experiences was like when I got there mister Johnson was still alive and he was but he was sort of he you could tell that he was getting starting to get sick, but I was excited because at least got to spend some of those years that I was there where he was still in his prime and walking around and doing things and I got off take a a got on the elevator and and Mister Johnson and Eunice got on the elevator with me and he knew who I was which is is a huge thing because I never had to meet him when I interview and so it was so shocking to me that of all these people who worked here. He knew who I was and he spoke highly home. This person told me about you. I know exactly who you are and that like the kid who is like coming in as the internet and to know that someone has both highly involved with me to the owner and for him to remember me. It was like the best feeling ever and then to see him and his wife interact as if I wasn't in the room or the elevator. It's so hilarious and they realized so funny and laid-back and I'm just sitting back here like I'm watching a movie but this was like my life. And so those were the the memories that I I hold the most the celebrities were cool, but it was like experiencing all of the different people who had key roles in the history of the magazine seeing them in their prime or at some part of their Prime was like amazing know speaking of like the history of the magazine you were working there making sure that you were getting Ebony's web presence up and this was during a time when dead And then you can kind of you know fill me in on this but like I feel like this is during a time when magazine publishing was starting to decline and print and starting to go more online. Do you recall kind of that shift was like for you as you were working there. So when I started they had already shifted to putting some presents on the site, but as it began to wage increase, I would say probably about a year or two into being there. It was definitely a ramp-up of we need more traffic you had started to get more advertising online instead of the magazine. And so it was a it was a huge adjustment and it was met with some pushback because Rightfully, so no one wants one entity to take away from another and so when you're used to the magazine publication what you don't want to see is the web now become the dominant theme when you are used to this physical magazine and so it was a lot of pushback and a lot of growing pains of getting them on board that one supports the other it doesn't replace it. And so we have to wage go through that process of just showing them how we could use the to to complement one another and not replace the printed version because at the time there was a high level of subscribers that of course worst that were an older demographic and they don't understand they didn't understand let's go off. Line to look up the latest article. They wanted a magazine. So it was it was difficult to kind of get those conversations started and and come out with the result that we needed that we felt was needed for the company to grow in the right direction eventually things started to get a little bit easier as they saw ways that okay, we can there were certain things that they couldn't print in the magazine because of space and and whatnot. So we couldn't do extended versions of the interview on the website. And so it was things like that that helped them get them on board with everything but it was some difficult conversations of getting a lot more content on the website. Yeah. What do you think about sort of where I bought a black Publications are now cuz I think I was funny. I was talking to my mom about this the other day cuz I was I called her up and was asking her like what was the importance of Ebony and Jet like when you were growing up? Up as a child like she was born in the early fifties, you know grew up during the Civil Rights Movement et cetera, and I'm asking her just like what did it mean to her? And now I think what one of the only place its magazines were all to the only print magazines for black folks are Essence and black Enterprise and they both have web presences, of course, but like with you having worked in publishing on the web in that sort of way, how do you feel about sort of the current landscape of what like black media is doing from a personal standpoint? It pains me deeply to not see everything in jet on the newsstands off. I understand that thing shift, but it pains me deeply to not see your physical publication. I wish the current generation understood the importance of that history and how it needed to be cultivated and and kept around but things shift and I appreciate the presence that black media has online dead. But I do wish that we would have been able to adjust and keep some of that history because when life and all of these other Publications when they are no longer in print they are remembered and they will continue to be remembered by by many. I feel that black Publications. Can I just get lost on our current generation because there's no importance behind that history of it. And so it's great to see people moving to a online media, but at the same time it feels like we're losing a piece of history and black Publications that we won't be able to get back. Yeah, like I appreciate everything that they're doing in an additional sense. It just pains to not see more Publications printed. Yeah and to that point of you know, now they're being a lot of these black media Publications and such online wage. As you sort of mentioned in terms of like archiving and preservation, like where do the digital copies of these things go because you know, most of the stuff that we do on the web is is largely a federal law gets overwritten. There's new versions things been saved over at cetera. Like, how are the older versions of these things being preserved like I wrote for this website back in like 2005/2006 called black Web 2.0 and it was you know, it was a Blog essentially but it was talking about like what black people were doing in technology and startups and things like that. They you can find vestiges of that online in the internet archive, but everything is not going to be saved in the internet archive. I think first of all, but then secondly, you know who or what organization or entity will be responsible for preserving what black people are doing online in this digital age, you know, I mean, yeah, we can go and find the old versions of Ebony and wage. On Google, you know, it's not the full archives, but it's part of it. But like where are you going to find stuff from? Let's say I don't know Urban online or Africana Com or black voices, like all that stuff has been erased and it's gone to like the annals of time. You may be able to find pieces of it here and there but like not in any sort of capacity where you should really go back and see like what was going on during the time what were people talking about like, you know, it came to me when I was thinking of how Netflix is bringing back. These old T shows now like Moesha and Worcester sister and stuff like that and I was like man that's like you p.m. Monday night and I was I was telling that to someone and they were like, what's your pee in what I would have been that long ago, but like the fact that the history is not even preserved in a way where you could find easily as ridiculous. Yeah. That's the part. That sucks. I always say that the internet off. And web design and all of that is a blessing and a curse. It's awesome for advancement and being Innovative and progressing in terms of Technology. But to your point on a lot of things that we were able to preserve and keep an archive and you know, those history those articles and magazines and different things that are important to our culture that we are unable to do. So in this environment and so it's a blessing in the sense that we are advancing and we're getting more involved and and things are like literally stuff that I probably would have never imagined as a kid how the things that I looked up to and admired as a kid are now being sort of lost and there's no way like you said to sort of wage pull that up you could pull up ebony but if the site is gone if whatever reason that site is off gone, then what is left, you know what their besides ebony. Medical ebony articles and that only going to be there for so long as people are sharing them. But at what point does it just sort of remove itself from our memory and history? Yeah, because I think what will end up happening is that as it's being removed and people don't remember it then other people step in to try to tell that story and they may not be doing it from the best, you know intentions. Yes, they may be honestly lying, you know, like so to have that in our own words and that way I think is that's definitely very very important part. One thing that I saw as I was watching. I saw these videos about your merch line, you know, it's gotta bring it back to that. It reminded me how a lot of designers. I know now have some sort of a hobby or off or side business or side project or something where they're making something physical and I think it's you know to the point you're saying a lot of the work that we do is kind of saved over and forgotten or our dog. Or not even our time but just written over in some way. So they're doing something physical like how you're doing merch other people do other physical tangible kinds of things and I don't know if that's the main purpose of it, but it made sure that you have some kind of physical relic of the work that you've done. Yes, that is definitely like one of the things that is important of being able to just have being something physical which is technically like March in terms of like Chicago slank is like just that something that you can design and put something on physical like a practical item that you can put a design too. You know, like that's how we associate merch of it. And so it was like, yeah, it gives you a way to sort of carve your own little piece in history in this moment to have that physical thing because we know we design things for clients if it's not for huge projects or four things that are going in in Avengers. For our workshops are different places where that history is maintained. It's thrown away, you know, like once you do it it's done it's gone and I have a lot of designs that I'm like, oh, I really I love that design but there's no way to use that again. It's done, you know, and so this is a way to sort of have that passion project where you can design from a true passionate creative not attached to a client with no inhibitions like you could just do whatever you want and then off because of that physical item you are now able to keep that into some sort of a history whether that'd be me archiving it myself or someone who has purchased and keeping in a holding on to it. My mom who has kept everything Lord bless her heart in her wallet if she like has had every first business card I've ever made in her wallet. So just having those physical job And it does bring back, you know, the ability of being able to kind of have a piece of history of piece of look this is what I used to do, you know to be able to show that yeah, absolutely. So as I was, you know doing my research for this interview and I was watching videos about you there was a line that you said in an interview. I think it was on the Chicago like daytime talk show or something. Yeah. You said that design is constant in my healing. Can you talk more about that? Yes, so Typically when I designed for myself and sometimes for others, it comes from a place some form of I designed for in that moment of how I am feeling. And so if I am not in the best of mood then I start designing because I need to shift because as I said, I truly enjoy like designing is my happy spot. I truly enjoy designing and so if at any point my mood has shifted off or I am dealing with any trauma or anything that is happening in my life that has interfered my peace. I start designing because that is the one place that I know I can get lost in it and not be worried about the moment. I can get lost in whatever world I enter in for that design and off. Almost an instant feel-good peel because once I keep designing until I get to a point that whatever I needed nurturing inside of me have been satisfied month. And so it clicks in the moment when I get to a certain point in the design that I'm like I'm done like this feels good. And it's it's one of those things of like I like to see them when I'm talking to my clients. I like to say hey if I can connect with you spiritually we're going to have some really dope designs because that means I'm able to tap into what you need from a different level than the statistical area. And so for me designing the spiritual it feels good. And so anytime that I'm designing it is definitely a healing process for me. So it is always the two go together hand-in-hand always Chicago inspire you said I was like my mini New York. Like I really love New York because of New York because of the artists artistic presence that it has and I feel like Chicago is on that same level like I love the culture. I love our little language inside the city instead of whether your side or South side. We all have our own little slangs that we use. I love having that influence that is around and so Chicago is like Saddam was home. Like I feel good when I when I talked about it, like I love the food. I love everything about it. So I get inspiration everywhere in the city and Thursday. We're not necessarily like in your face about a lot of things from the artistic world, but every time that you are around or in different birth, Is that a city? You can tell by just how like the graffiti ships or different murals start to change and different building structures? It's just Beauty all around. I don't think we get enough credit for the beauty in the artistic world that we have and the influences that we have but we are some really talented people. We just you know who are not necessarily given the platform or on the platform that a lot of these other cities are but I get inspiration in Chicago Daily like there's a conversation that will spark an idea because someone will say some slain from back in the nineties and it's like wait a minute I can turn this into something so it's always something that is happening that from a cultural standpoint. I just love about Chicago question that I'm asking every guess pretty much this year is how you're using your skills and design to have kind of job. Build a more Equitable future. So as you got to look back at your career and what you've you know been able to accomplish. How are you using your skills to do that? I would say from a design standpoint. I am likely shifting into a different industry but keeping graphic as my own Foundation graphic design as my Foundation. I feel that my passion and long-term and Longevity is in marrying graphic design and mental health. And so that is where I am working toward. I don't know if that means I'm back in school and I become an art therapist. I don't know but I am open to that idea because I love the sound of that but I want to use graphic design as a way to impact the mental health industry environment where we are helping the youth in the city. He'll just as I say designing is always part of my healing process. I want to use that same passion and skills and take Weeks to help others do the same thing because we have so many of our youth walking around in depression and anxiety and they're dealing with trauma daily. Like at this point we have become desensitized to it. But there is trauma daily in our city and we're not allowing them to have a creative Outlet of how to express that and so I thought I would like for me in terms of long-term goals of using my skill as a graphic artist to impact the mental health industry for the Youth of Chicago. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? What kind of work would you like to be doing? Hopefully after this pandemic has gone off. Yes after the pandemic so it would be awesome if there was a B Davis designed I call it an art Hub, but I would love song. Have an art hook that that allows anyone to come in and experience as graphic web apparel art therapy Merchants tips where we are having events with our healing people. We are having workshops. We are designing like in my head. I wish you could see inside my head memories in my head is the most colorful Palm Springs it has, you know, the history of graphic design and text and fonts and different things being represented on the walls as murals coming together as an art piece in itself, It is teenagers over here, you know designing graphics for apparel for you know, different things like it is me in my life. I happy space creating a a fun and safe space for my community to experience art and to create wage What I hope would be a future career for them because a lot of us we get in the industry. We may be self-taught and different things but my goal is to teach them not just the graphic the creative side, but the business side of it so that they are able to navigate. So in five years, I don't know what you call me in five years, but I have a creative Hub that is allowing the community of the south side of Chicago to thrive do graphic design. Wow. Well Brandy just you know wrap things up here where can our audience find out more about you and about your work and everything online. Yes. So my website for my graphic and a pair off is I do graphic and web design and then for the merch Peas where it has the art therapy and Merchant ships that is a merch by Bee Gees. Designs.com and then I am on Facebook and Instagram the most so those RV Davis Designs LLC and merch by be Davis Designs both for Facebook and Instagram. All right, sounds good. Well Brandy Davis, I want to thank you so much for coming on the show. I mean, like I mentioned, you know kind of during the interview as I was talking about how I discovered you I found out about you. I think really from hearing you talk about your work and from the passion that you have from it is very clear that like wage as a woman of faith that that's something that really inspires your work. Like I feel like you have this divine inspiration that pushes you to succeed and to create and to really even turn off, you know bad experiences. Like you said breaking your leg taking that and turn it in into a virtual like that's that's inspired. So, I mean, thank you just for the work that you've done for the work that you are continuing to do and I'm really excited. See what you do in the future. So thank you for coming on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me. This has been awesome. I am truly blessed to be in a space that is allowing me to share my thoughts in any capacity. So I thank you for allowing me to do so today. And yes, I am definitely a woman of faith and my passion for design goals will be on anything that I could ever imagine if there's anything that I could have been doing outside of design. I don't think I would want it. So I thank you for allowing me to share that show me big big thanks to Brandy Davis and of course thanks to you for listening. You can find out more about branding at her work through the links in the show notes after office hours. Com. Revision path is brought to you by lunch a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, Georgia. Are you looking for some creative Consulting for your next project? Then? Let's do lunch service visit us at. Yep. It's lunch., I'll put a link in the show notes. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me Maurice Cherry with engineering and editing by RJ basilio. Our intro voice-over is by musicman Dre with intro and outro music by yellow speaker. So, what did you think of this episode hit us up on Twitter or Instagram or even better by leaving us a rating and review on Apple podcasts. I'll even read your review right here on the show off as always. Thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time.

Chicago Brandy Davis Mister Johnson web designer New York City black Publications Boston art institute USA Publishers of Ebony and Jet Ma Salt Lake City Maurice cherry Art and Design intern Johnson publishing company design director Stony Island Michigan Illinois
Sheryl Underwood 05/28/20

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

08:02 min | 9 months ago

Sheryl Underwood 05/28/20

"Steve Come on. Introduce our girl, please. She is here from the Talk News, gentlemen, while I, do stop all his mission round Surely, underwood. The woody. Thanks I'm always happy to be part of Steve. Harvey Morning Show is because you know we real over here. You know what I'm saying so. Hurt and frustrated and still get a laugh, but we not don't let the devil beat us down. You know the black man bird-watching first of all. This Negro is Watson in Central Park, only one. I know okay okay I know black people dead bird. This heart never known Wenham Watch. Hot. Bird, watching Bravo in the off. White Lady feels like she fit for a life. You. Don't the only you fail for the dog you choking with lease. He told was he did. He wasn't even on a lease. Because he took off the neck with the column. Yes and see to me. Listen. It's a list them. What is the parking? Lot Pet barbecue better? What the what the since you're right? Yeah, IT'S A. Zone. I don't talk. I Need White folks I think John and have a meeting. I need to get your wife. Oh can check. Because this is this. Don't make no damn sense, and then the province say you know I just want people to recognize racism I. Don't want to get death threats you know, but you could have died. Okay, surly, scrawled, capable real ale, Shabazz beliefs. I'll go let it. At CBS. Right. To me. What surely Sade shows the Compassionate Black people have because black people knows what it feels like to be Sold the. canceled. Yes everything done to you for the simplest of things? Yes, I got some fighting. Over it ain't over everybody that look tiger king need to apologize the Michael Vick right now. Who See okay? y'All didn't WANNA go to. Without All been done to the animals from the I don king, but you want to get him out of jail. Ain't nobody apologize to Michael See this is the problem we have to come back. Do I cannot go. Because! They're more of the things we. We talk about being black in America racism. This enfranchisement treated differently than other people, but need everybody that's watching time, king and movies being made pilot. Michael Vick right now. What somebody goes break I'll come back. I'm Cheryl hanging on. To break. We'll have more with Cheryl coming up right after this you're listening to. Morning Show. All right you hear a voice in the background. This is Cheryl Underwood. Over. Over because she had a lot to say this morning, go ahead, girl! I have more things on my mind. Now listen. We got an election that we got to win my rice the hobby we got. That's exactly right. Okay, then and there's a reason why I'm. GonNa get to the tragedy. That's really bothering us right now, but we got elected. We need to win I me people to stop doing the drive bys on radio shows. Get face crack. Now Hillary Clinton got on radio show is she got high southcenter purse? Lose Elections Stupid Lisboa on talk about Indian in her family. When all black people know, we got into family because my hair's wavy natural wave newborn. Okay, now you got Joe Biden time out of you. Don't know the difference between me and Donald Trump. You Ain't black. Just was also I think what are you talking to? John Arrive with, Biden? You know that's the cat assess. We hear words like that. That make you go. What you know? What my problem with this you got suckered into it. Don't get so relaxed with us that you trying to be him. Be What we want to elect. Am I right brothers you. Don't try to be something. We don't WanNa hit it. Don't try to talk in colloquialism. Don't try to relate to us is something that sounds unnatural when you try to sound young hip. Older stupid now. What this election! We need to win am I am I right, brothers, a man right we got we got the. Nod Gang. This is not a gay, you know. Why because now bring a home fight you. A black man was martyred. Hate crime may end the neck. Not Some anybody should be doing, and nobody wants to talk about white supremacy and law enforcement where we're no longer protecting and serving, but anybody you deal with a color is the enemy to be Keel. Am I right brothers and sisters Amen. And that is why we've got to win this election I don't care how many times people say. The FBI Going Investigation Department of Justice, going to best gay. That's the start that ain't the end, and if we don't have it at the top seed, a president is. Feeding into that rhetoric. That's why these people feel that they can do what they do. They get away with it, and this is why the election is important. You can't just registered to vote. You gotTA. Vote up and down ballot. You got sat out to the mayor. The whiteboard as he right. That's right, but it goes beyond that is to Congress is to Senate. District Attorney's. It goes beyond that. Why because we want justice? Not Jess for a FIDORA and we want justice for Briana. We will justice for Ahmad. We will just for people. We don't even know anything about. We want them to stop fabricated reports. They said the boy his in drugs and doing the pass and thirty money. What that what do that have to do with the fact that somebody put me on his brother neck for at least nine minutes, and here's a man caller for his. Mama God Russell so mother been day for two years, but that's when this boy knew his life was over. We not standing for this one. We won't justice. We the wanted in the courts. Are we going to take to the street? Now I'm not telling nobody be violent. What I'm saying is this is not a game so autumn little jokes stopping. Don't come on black radio trying to get to know us. Come on black radio and tell us. What are you going to do to lead this nation because it should not be a death sentence to be black in America that I I may. You brought it home and brought it home. That's that's. Why want you know you got to remember? Why immaterial pitcher of the open casket was in jet magazine because his mother wanted the world to see what they have done to hustle on. That's right. Thank you Cheryl likely. Hours, surely thirteen X. We're appreciate you always girl. Get Out of here. Coming up more music, more trending topics and some headlines at twenty minutes after the hour right after this you're listening to. Morning Show.

Cheryl Underwood Michael Vick Steve Come America John Central Park Wenham Watch Joe Biden Harvey Bravo jet magazine Hillary Clinton Donald Trump don king Shabazz Ahmad CBS colloquialism president FBI
The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

The Nod

16:31 min | 5 months ago

The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

"Hey, y'all it's Britney and we are back again with a very special episode of our show the not with Britney Eric Today's episode is the first part of an earth shattering to part good for the blacks were we explored the pros and cons of one of the most controversial divisive yet addictive instagram accounts out there the shape. That's right. We're hashing it out with journalist and author George Johnson to find out if the shave room is good or bad for the blacks. We all know the shade room is where you go for top tier celebrity mess you being there lurking look I have learned from time to time but I think we can all agree that not all mess is goodness and the room plays great area a little too willingly at times trust me you're not the only one who feels that way and that's why today we're bringing the shade roll into the light is the shade room good for the Blacks GonNa find out this is the not. In a world filled with Daesh ously bountiful boss of headlines and videos that screen world saw the shave room has taken instagram by storm in two thousand fourteen Joachim. Wanda start at the shade room after realizing she can use her love for celebrity gossip to practice her writing. But after hating ten thousand followers you want to realize she was on something. Today, the Shade Room has over twenty million followers on instagram and features regular commentary from celebrities like the descent Nicki. menaj and Ti that last part is what makes the Shade Room truly unique outside of twitter it's pretty rare for celebrities and everyday people to have so many interactions with those blurred lines are also what makes the Shade Room? So controversial whether it's making Ziya, Wade owner of harmful comments or the legal back and forth with Cardi B. When it comes to boundaries, things can get ugly. So today we brought on journalist and author George. M Johnson to help us figure out if the Shane Room is good or bad for the culture. Thank you me. I'm excited. You know the showroom has built an empire. Moving celebrity gossip here's what's your take on the importance of celebrity gossip. Gossip. It kind of is what keeps your career going on social media wise. As media has shifted from red carpets to kind of step of house, you can kind of create your own `Paparazzi. Kylie Jenner. Day. The. Whole Light Brown skinned girl only. Even though it was big, it kept her name out there viability for twenty hours on. Sale somewhere absolutely down, I think that celebrity gossip in general is fun I. Think it just gives me something to think about. Everyday life especially, these days I'm like recently has gotten dark I will say. The thing that? Has To be say. For the most part, it can be fun. I think that there is a difference between having good fun and that exposing like the more vulnerable aspects of somebody's life four laps, all that being said, what's actually start our. Conversation today with the pros. So you our guest you welcome to start off with the pros at Oh i. Froze are that the platform very very large and When they are used for good, can generate a lot of money especially to light nonprofit organizations are community based organizations and especially small businesses. I think a lot times sites will amplify. Small black businesses or business owners were creating things and it literally opens you up to people to support your products i. think in ways when you utilize your platform to uplift. And encourage and support resources in things that are out there for black folks I think that's something that more of. These types of sites can start to do. Now that's the point I do wonder what percentage like if you actually did, what percentage of share on posts are act I kind of lean towards the lifted Maybe one out of every fifteen. Twenty. That's something I. Think if I'm considering what my pro is I think the showroom actually does what I consider a pretty exceptional jobs documenting how black people use the Internet, black folks have. In DEX on social media, you know we are on twitter. So much is referred to as black twitter. This thing that all kind of white corporate executives are trying to figure out and the share room kind of will break down those pieces before black people like I think about the the not obeying video that came out recently. Day aware she. Fucking Bang. Not A. wakeup talking about not obeying and I'm like what is going on and I knew that I can go to the shave room and it will break down who made it why popular all the means they had developed all around it and I think that actually can be a big service like I don't know of too many other places that are talking about. The way. Black people use the Internet and social media like the share room us. Come along with a whole lot of other stuff. Absolute. Auto. I think that this shade room is a reliable platform for black celebrity. A celebrity period is is celebrity gossip every single celebrity whether they want to admit it or not they benefit from the celebrity height machine and that gossip like gossip mechanism the shade room does is provide back black celebrities who are frequently shut out of your us. Weekly's people magazine's it's a place. Where you know a black celebrity knows that somebody is GonNa care who they are what they're doing whether they are selling Tommy T or in the case of the simone dry like usually I like to keep some of the scams but I can be some old was I can go on the find out but also Michelle Obama gives a speech at the Democratic National Convention. Even if I missed it. Yeah NPR. Have NBC. SHAVER. Remarks on that to the thirty years from now we look back. The Oscars, the grammys, the emmys, the institutions that don't frequently reward black talent. We might look back did not see an accurate reflection of what was happening in the culture, our culture at the time American culture at the time. But this Shade Room Shave is GonNa Habit accurate count black people the culture and shaver actually documents a wide variety of black people and I think that's a good thing. Archive of like everything going on black. That's a good point. It's an interesting slice. All right child that is off for the pros and for what it's worth I think we made some compelling points in the next episode clubs come off. It's wind twitter fingers burnt a trigger finger. Run the house like a tomb raider. Okay. Maybe not but tune into part time for our final verdict is the shade Rupe good or bad were the blacks. Yesterday we discussed the instagram paint you hate to love the shape author George M Johnson joined us to discuss all the pros and the platform like now it's time for the cons and our final verdict is the shabery good for the blacks Georgia's back again to help us decide skin real up here this. Is. I know Jim has been print for a long time but like I'm wondering I'm like. Is there some sort of weird cross section between like jet magazine disappearing from like the digital space and the rise of the shave group I don't know. Jet Magazine ran so the. Koran black ultra into the ground basis. On how? To that point obviously, yes we had discussed brose and I think this. Is Looking really good right now but there are a lot of aspects of the Shade Room Platform. There are frankly upsetting me and my homegirl, and we're GONNA get into that with the cops. I'll go first. Okay. So my cons with the shade is that they don't understand the boundaries of good DASA coverage. The point of celebrity gossip is that supposed to be fun you supposed to know who the he'll is who fool is the person who you're like supposed to be punching up making good gossip editorializing. We'll make who that person is abundantly clear the SHAVER. Over and over again is you know make really kind of like I think offensive armful post about celebrities children. Whether that be just about their looks or you know showcasing without comment the the treatment that the parent gives them like in the case of Ti. Busey. They also will go for the jugular as far as talking about. The gender identity or sexual or the assume sexual orientation celebrities child. As we've seen the case Ziya weight and it's just not okay. So. Is The transgender child of Dwayne, Wade and Gabrielle Union and believe it was last year as I. decided to you she pronouns as well as the names I await. We just trying to figure out as much information. We can to make sure that we give about child the best opportunity to be her best self leitch, of course, made headlines that something I've written about. Multiple, times. But Win of course, the Shave reported on it it. Did Not. Go over clearly wasn't gonNA go over because they know who their audience is and so it realistically just put a lot of arm in the eyesight of of Zionism who already struggling with community and. Things like that, and it's like not only you have. They have a bunch of adults discussing kids business, but additionally, they had offshoot. Called this shade room teens where they're taking all of the unhealthy parts about share platform and repackaging it for people who are in. Middle and high school, and when they go for the jugular disrespect that kind of like boundary. With celebrity children and also by providing content for. Really, young audiences that can be really potentially harmful. Are George. I think it really isn't breeding ground for all of the `ISMs. Phobias. There's literally nobody to check anyone win. It's happening and they leave very heavy in. Misogyny and. In a way that they don't do when. I guess they're speaking of light and they all raptors who were doing. But then when they team do travel I pull something about. Anyone who's a male on new platform they're like a bunch of who comes defense and so it kind of just becomes like this breeding ground is hateful breeding place and I think Cardi B. has also is almost like a personal titian. My fans have semi videos. Of the shave. Room. The. Leading positive comments of me. So I got to argue with them and I told them don't fuck you post me ever again. Don't post I. Don't watch posted. This cycle of work and as someone who's a writer and journalist like you have to do it from the place that doesn't say in in some bias of the people that you're reporting and I think that we forget that celebrities are human. They go through the same things that many of us go through and so when you're watching people like summer walker breakdown and you know you're watching people like offering lennox than like people who are struggling with their first time success and then they go to a site like that literally is exacerbating whatever their struggle is I think it becomes more harmful than good because there's no one to balance out the Hey Hewlett a moment for me because I am followed the room like four years at this point. Cringe I have not quite hit the follow button, but but it's true like there are like the shade room. You know there are parts of it that are really really toxic and I think dangerous too because I think there are I, think the shade room now has actually start to get involved in the mess directly in this way that does not feel okay. bringing you mentioned like kind of. Editorial standards, and it's clear that there are none because I think about Masika and Alexis Skye and kind of their massive battle I mean to be honest. He could probably replace Masika with a few folks because the less guy has consistently. They'll post about the fight. But in the comments, you will see the celebrities actually threatening each other saying. Well. You WanNa say this will pull up and it's like at nap point I'm wondering about what the people run. The Shea Room are thinking because they are they are they worried that some actual harm might come from the work that they're doing. I want to see the room comment on love a hip hop storylines. Cheryl. Actually be part of love and hip hop storylines like that is. Taking it a bit too far. So now it's time for our vote are ready and just to be clear we are not voting on whether or not. We like Angelic Blonde do war her writers we are voting on whether or not the platform the shape is good or bad for the. I've asked the both of you to head to your fridge and pick up two very important items a jar of Mayo. And a bottle of hot sauce. With. Hot Sauce you know sauce almost universally revered by black people. We love a little flavor. We level spice just very important. We're talking about the the shade room. So if you think the share room is good for the blacks, you're going to hold up your bottle. Haass. Do It with your Chess Mayo I usually like a little bit of Mayo on a sandwich or two but I think we all can agree that Mayo is typically not where it's at on the condiments scale. So if you think that the shade room is bad for the blacks, you are going to hold up your mail confidently do it with some power do with all the flavor. At the Mayo Lax. Okay. So we're going to do this on the count of three I want. Two. Three. Shockingly unanimous and this hurts me is hurts me a little bit but. Shane Room is bad for the blacks. First of all George, you understand this the first unanimous bad for the that we have ever had. Three years. Okay. I. Think as the room is right now it is not healthy for us. We just all ourselves much better especially during these times where some reforms. Space Shea Room. defunding, abolish the belief willing to inform. Will, join our say thank you so much for participating in our. The DOTS. mean. Thanks. Thank you so much. This is so much fun. Thank you. Well. That is all we have for today's show, but we have to know, are you a loyal roommate? Are you thinking about breaking the lease tweet us your thoughts at the Nacho using the Hashtag good for the blacks. Thank you so much for watching today we will see next time for a brand new episode.

Shade Room George M Johnson Shane Room instagram twitter Shea Room SHAVER people magazine Britney Eric Today Joachim Kylie Jenner jet magazine Oscars NBC Wanda Ziya Wade NPR
Naomi Campbell & Cuba Gooding Jr  - 09/26/18

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

26:29 min | 2 years ago

Naomi Campbell & Cuba Gooding Jr - 09/26/18

"Welcome to the Bravo clubhouse for the podcast division of watch what happens. Live with me. Andy Cohen dresser you're watching what might be the final home game for the cardinals of the season. I'm praying. It's not, but it's not looking good right now, but you know what? You never give up hope with the cardinals. She just never do they. They have this way of pulling it out anyway. I don't want to jinx it and you don't want to hear me talk about this. You're here to hear me preview. Tonight's episode of watch what happens. Live with Andy Cohen. I'm Andy Cohen tonight. We have Cuba Gooding, junior and Naomi Campbell. How's that Naomi's inner dressing rooms. She's like walking around looking for me. She has a present for me which I'm very excited about and. You know, that's what's happening. I mean, I really have just glued you in on everything that's happening back here. I'll see in the clubhouse. He was in Jerry Maguire and if you're not attracted to her, well, you're just Aligarh. It's Evans live with Naomi Campbell and Cuba. Gooding junior or now. Andy Cohen live in the clubhouse and a Wednesday night with a woman whose beauty is profuse another David swimmer kept calling Jews. You've seen my first guest son, countless Haggas you've seen struck down many runways and you wanna see her in person. You should start on down to central park. This Saturday. She's co hosting and producing the global citizen festival, say low to the always stunning always smells great, always wonderful. My friend. Jason crime story was so mazing should've been a frequent crime. Now he's making his direct horrible debut in by Uqaab VR a film. He also co wrote and stars in no biggie, welcome back. You, but Gooding junior. And behind the bar, use the star of the new NBC medical drama, new Amsterdam, so I might need them to revive me, followed you. Thank you. Thank you. Yeah. As of last night we officially are the biggest hit on TV. Plot. Becomes through. Let's get started Cuba. You just mentioned to me right before the show started that you walk Naomi down the carpet at the canned film festival in two thousand and four. We've found the photo. Wow, that's great. Yeah. Remember how it happened because you at the last minute called said, you can walk me down the covered I go, I don't have. You're like, fine. One. Regarding real hot size of Dallas which was on tonight last year, Cameron showed off her Birkin bag. Raincoat Naomi. Have you ever seen one of these raincoat for your Birkin. The trend is spreading because carry us one two at I just this goes to our first poll question raincoats for your bag hot or not go to WWAFL dot TV right now Keller. Have you seen these? I have seen them. And are they? I mean, it's a thing if the thing I thought Asia, you did you have a raincoat for your person, right? You don't, but I have a rank cut for my case for. Okay, bye will then that's kind of you guys aren't into it. All right. That's cool. A next week, realize Dallas Deandra confronts Lianne about rich, but it's leeann d, Andras relationship that seems to be on the rocks. Take a look here. Or spine, do you feel like he's not going to stay married to you? Think you'll stay faithful? Come on as many nights I'm out at home. I think you're something you're not telling me. Because there's. Nothing's happening. There's been a lot of rumors about no his relationships with other women, and he bent was somebody's long as she's been with him. Me. Throne. Wow. N- your questions and. Coming in. But before we get to those, here's what three things I am obsessed with tonight. I, even though now only Campbell is a world famous supermodel. One of her favourite poses is actually just the seated position in front of her TV while the house Atlanta is on dining with the land ladies. Look, she thinks peachy with gone with the wind fabulous or do less. Okay. Take a look, and I just want you to go through this. What do you think of these patterned? Maxi dress and pink, scarred. What about horses metallic dress with shoulder pads? You can deal with that. Okay. What About Eve us graphic jacket with? Dramatics leave? No. Okay, sure. As prison photo, shoot on Sombo. Together for. Yeah. Marlins playful, lace bunny ears. A good day. Okay. On cynthia's low-cut, maroon dress and. Yeah. With hi flip. Like that. Not not crazy. Okay. What do you much. Too much at the split in the top and about. Okay. What to raise long platinum, blond wig and pale pink separates. Where's he just looks like the meeting. Really. Before the titan which is. Okay. These black dress with elaborate. Crystal design nice became. All right. Thank you very much. ULA Gooding junior may of once taken his pants off on this very show. But when it comes to some of the other wild things, he's done Willie be equally as revealing. Here's what we're gonna find out with Gooding or goodness. No, I'm going to go through some scenarios in which you might have found yourself. You just tell me if you've done that thing or not. Okay. Have you ever accepted a movie role? So Lee because you wanted to date your co star now. Okay. Have you said where you eat and. Yes, that is true about walking. I understand. Have you ever said no. When fans said to you, are you Cuba. Gooding. Junior, no. No. Okay. Said, when someone asked me if I was tearing tat. You. They were so insistent about it anyway. Ever had an afternoon delight in your trailer. Have you ever slid into another celebrities DM's on Instagram? What does that mean. I guess you haven't have you ever dmt another direct, Matt. Oh, I didn't know at that. Now, have you ever been attracted to a cartoon character Cuba. Gooding JR in. Yes, yes. Have you ever Jessica rabbit. Have you ever tried while watching a kids movie. From the fifteenth time, maybe have you ever fallen asleep during a table read or rehearsal? No. Now thank you very much. Only grazed over five hundred numbers old. Is it? Oh. Graced over one thousand magazine covers. Like a thousand anyway. You know what? It's money when I read that I was thinking, nineteen Ninety-four number. Forget it. I did my book. Yes. Okay. But I can't. Does only know how much magazine costs. Here's what we're about to find out. You'll me I'm going to ask you a few questions that people who aren't fashion icons might know the answers to your regular person hat and give it a go, okay, Naomi. What is the cost of one New York City? Subway. Right. To seventy five. Not that came close without going over, look at the monitor behind you and tell me what this is. Thing you put in the dryer. They'll be careful what when does the shopping extravaganza called black Friday occur in the US after thanksgiving. Naomi, what is the average price for drugstore lipstick in the United States. It's six fifty nine. Not bad. Okay, very. Eric average cost for a one way ticket in coats from LAX JFK. Four hundred dollars. It's three forty, six. Got to get her assistance there. Now you only j.j workday wants to know what did you think about Nikki and Cardi's altercation fashion week where you were at that party? Right? I compared it, but when I comes down. I love. Towed it to carrying Rockville to her face anything. But I went home on the couch watching TV. What do you and Kate we're home watching? Yes. But. I was disappointed. I don't wanna see. Women have kind of fide women fight period, so not not that you know, it's all music. It's, you know, there's no division of music music for everybody. There's no discrimination. So I felt right is pointed. Cuba. Favorite memory of working with Burt Reynolds on endgame. Brenda h, you know, every day he was there. He only came. We shot that show for about seven weeks in they had him for four days a while the every every day he came on the set, and I've had the opportunity to work with these icon ick actors before, and they they always tell pass stories of working with other big often. Probably one of his stories he was just great. Yeah, Christina. Martin wants to know Cuba how often in day to day life do are asked to use the phrase, show me the money. Everybody people coming up to you and said, doesn't ring a bell down. They only Peter, the mom Peter, the media wants to know your views on KENDALL Jenner being the highest paid model. While saying she cherry picks jobs and could never do thirty shows in a season crashed. I'm really excited about the global citizen festival. Where in this. On the weekend able super cool and to get an it's, is it. All day long believe so hosting in New York and co host an producing. That's. Simply for New York, eight seventy. What your question. Hi, Andy, I Cuba you're hiding. Hello of you. Thank you. I just had to let you know since I was five the door ju I saw you on the cover of a jet magazine. It's been on ever since. Thank you so much. Okay, so this girl has a question for you. I need your top three dating tips. Top-three dating tips. Oh me. Oh, I don't know if I'm the right person to earth. Thing. Pick up now. Pick up the phone? Oh, my God. I'm so I don't really note. It's like today because I've never been a dating person. I've always been someone that's been in relationships. Okay. So what do you do? You go for pizza that one of them. Broken. Pizza a few days ago. Is that true? Yeah. Grocery shopping. Today's go when cook yesterday. Brianna for Nebraska. Hey, brianna. What your question for Cuba. Gooding. Junior. She left. Okay. Thanks for calling. Bre, hey, what's your question? My question is for tuba. Best coast sort and the worst co star that he's worked with all who's the best. Oh, the best. Who's your favorite? Maybe Jack. Nicholson? Because he while Jack Jack? Yeah. You know, I maybe I whispered to them. It's just say, because he used the controversy. Like that. Could you say that worse? Yes, you know, what was it worst actor. Who was not Benita town. You doing it or not. She just said, I was gonna say, I mean. Doc one grip on what you did. He was just a little cranky shot in Bucharest. Wow, I do a dorm, but he was miserable. It's game time. Everybody. Enough to curl your hair. So I, I hope Cuba's been paying attention because if not, I may lose some of my here with better pluck. Next time, Cuban gonna ask you some Naomi Campbell, trivia for every wrong answer Naomi's going to take these tweezers and pluck out one of my eyebrow hairs. Okay. Cuba there are two. What named for Naomi in Holland roses or windmills. Roses, you're correct. In what city was Naomi born London or Birmingham. Yes. They only appeared in which Marley music video, this love or no woman. No cry. No woman, no cry. Is this love. Okay, which which real housewife made a cameo on Naomi show star knee leaks, Porsche Williams. Meaning. Nineteen eighty eight. Naomi became the first black woman ever to appear on the cover of which magazine British vogue or French Moke. British French vote. True. Naomi sang backup vocals on vanilla ISIS song. Cool. As is. Trick. Question. How was it directing yourself? Did you enjoy that? I did. I did. I, I'd I'd rather directed act now the first day filming though I I was in with a young actress like her first major role, and I was so nervous for her that was finished longer cut. We gotta go again, I wasn't in character. I was in that was more concerned, watching performance in Houston character. You'll help them more so than I Nord it. And then when I said cut, I watch playback. So it took me a minute. It's Tober fifth right price over. Have you spoken to OJ Simpson since he got out? No, no, no, no. The only thing I heard was he he gave an interview. He was in jail and said, cubes hit a big enough to play me. We got a question. VR walkabout on Naomi. What do you think of Michael Kors buying for Sachi. It's great for business. It's good for the industry. And yeah, I'm into it. Did you see the virtues story of, did you have? To be honest, I couldn't. I couldn't watch as I've made a plan. I was never been painful, of course. Yeah. What's happening would you David? Blaine? Naomi. David. Blaine has been my friend or like a brother to me for like twenty four, five years. So we're on the same boat. So there you go. All right. It's time for my boss goes to President Trump who had a glass half full moment during today's press conference. When he did neither leaders and diplomats laughed at him. Yesterday's address to the US. Say that they were instead laughing with him and that they were just having fun. Because you know those diplomats are just famous for their infrastructures sense of humor too much fun. You crazy kids. Shackled goes to come out. She okay. This is kind of great. She's slid into Connie west Instagram comments and told him to do the gray sweatpants challenge for those who don't remember, this is the viral 2016 hashtag that highlighted men going commando underneath their athletes. Okay. Look, I love a visible male outline as much as anybody, but do we think this exact moment is the time to encourage guys to expose themselves like maybe that shouldn't happen this year anyway, I wanna. I want to. Producer Colo's citizens. Twenty nine and in South Africa on December second wear and seven back job erg and Cuba. Gooding junior's movie. Direct to'real debut. He also stars in the film and co wrote the script. It's out Tober. Fifth, you can see him in Chicago reprising his role as Billy Flynn on Broadway October's. The beans show is new Amsterdam, Tuesdays. He's not a doctor, but he plays one on TV. Also could play of art center because he's agreed. He looked. Right. No, this guy Cuba, Frank. She wants to know what exactly went down that Golden Globe party. That ended with a KFC chicken bucket on your head. Morlin damn wins. Went down. We were, you know, it was funny thing is, is wasn't real chicken in those buckets. It was sponsored by Campsie that was break dancing and I, I jumped up and through the bucket overhead and hit oppose. He took a picture and he tweeted today. Somebody hit a post sleep. Ashley, why texted Naomi Gerber ever ask you for constructive criticism on her modeling, she calls you onto it as it. She's adorable, yeah, paddock, yeah, she's, I sat sat with her and her mother at as line. My late peppers who was no longer here. We sat on the kitchen table and we just went through all the search should do. It shouldn't do at the moment because of the baby. She is everything. She's really very proud of her. Okay. Let's go back to the phones. Maureen from? No, it's light Lakisha from Chicago. Hey, Lakisha. What's your question. Hey, Cuba Haney me what this much very discussion is for your name. Only rented vice who she gets to someone who is building a personal brand so they can distinguish this from other his building a personal brand. What is the brands. Maybe a TV personality journalist. Oh, I think everything. I mean, I think it's hard in the f. is hard in that sector to define yourself. I mean, you have to be like an anti here. The question more for Andy. I mean, you have to have something that's the extra special genetic, what that gives you that edge and think you have to be very ambitious competitive. You have to have perseverance. You can't take anything seriously because you have to be sensitive and otherwise that doesn't help in any business. You just have to push hard. I mean, it's it's never easy. Nothing's easy to even my business is not easy. That's great advice. I should've asked you purport who made that dress vanden next beautiful. He came to my house to put it on me tonight in the rain. Let's go to Maureen for what oughta done the same? Yes. Maureen. Maureen, what's your question. Cuba. Gooding junior, get that nickname of the OJ show the what was the nickname, but naked. You know, I started the business. My first one was boys in the head, and I had a sex scene. Then I went on to do murderer crows in a series of other movies where I was always doing sex scenes and anybody knows who does fixing it has nothing to do with sex. And as you know, even boys in the head we had the coast or the first sex scene was just imagining where I told my father I had sex first time they got a stripper from a strip club to be the actress. And yet when it was time to film, she was like, you have to be onset is you have to be on the set as but they pay you to say about, but it's not. It's weird, it's when you're filming it's an exposing people who look board who are there to do their job on. It makes people uncomfortable worse. So I got the nickname because I come to set naked sometime. I'm like, you know, there's no laughing on the set. Let's go to Myra from Georgia. Meyrowitz your question I end e how great my question is we're Niamey. Where for lounge wear around the house on love that question too. I wear. Tank-tops could whatever I like comfy. Does you do? Yeah, I do. I don't like being constricting. Close. Get harmed, change. Anything comfortable? Okay. Let's go to one from Florida. Hey, one. What your question. Mark is where Cuba. Gooding. June. Okay. I would like to have you ever to any of his co stars? No, never. Why is that? Keep coming up. I don't know. I don't know why think. Well, one I was buried for a long time, but even as a person who can engage in something like that now I when you're acting okay, and you're in a scene, you want to find the truth to the moment. And the last thing you need is the baggage of your Bryce in a life affecting that moment. So you know. There you go. Naomi. Your, did you have formal acting training. Kind of. Yeah. Yeah, you did. Yeah. Might see to now is season Bassim you always Oeser baton. Yeah, I know Hershey's, whatever, whatever. You know, she was on one life to live did you years, but she was goes six? Yeah, run in the same scene, but yeah. You always, you always impress me every time. I see you acting in anything. I'm like, wow, I found that really hard on the pool table in my first day on. I was just at either. Happening on the pool table. Oh my God. He's coming up on like I was just like. Understand brutal and even after I two monthly, I still get shy. Go on the set and I'm not wearing very much. Right. You know, still, right. Kind of keep it only shy. I am shy. There is a shy site to us. You know that Germany? Yes, I do. I want to q. Thanks for listening to the podcast. Everybody hope you enjoyed the show. Remember new episodes. Go live Monday through Friday at four PM eastern time. Make sure you're subscribed have a great rest of your night.

Cuba Gooding JR Naomi Naomi Campbell Andy Cohen Cuba Gooding United States David cardinals Maureen Amsterdam ULA Gooding NBC Haggas Jerry Maguire jet magazine Jason Marlins Cuba Haney
Making Amends

TED Radio Hour

51:37 min | 8 months ago

Making Amends

"This. Is Ted. Radio Hour. Each week groundbreaking Ted talks are. Dream big delivered at Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas that will surprise. You just don't know what you're GonNa find challenge you acts are self like. Why's it no worthy and even change you. I literally feel like I'm indifferent I. Do you feel that way? Ideas worth spreading. From Ted, NPR! I'm maneuvers. Zimmer Odi. And a few months ago, visited Birmingham Alabama. At The nineteen sixty. Trouble at Birmingham Alabama in the heart of downtown spread over just a few small blocks is the civil rights historic district. There's Kelly Ingram, Park. High pressure water. Is the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Thirteen, nine, thousand, nine, hundred sixty three bundles of dynamite set by Ku. Klux klansmen ripped through the side of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church killing four little girls. One block away from that is the AG Gaston Motel the first black owned motel in Alabama. Most individuals could pass a building like this and have no idea. The history that is embodied in these walls in this brick and this would. And they look at a vacant motel. It's a condition like this and and. and. Couldn't imagine. That That Jim Crow. Ended because of the sacrifice and the community, organizing and Birmingham. This is Brent legs. He heads the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the national. Trust for historic preservation, and my work is to elevate the significance of African American history and American history, and he does that by preserving historic places and buildings like the A G Gaston right now. The Motel was boarded up and run down, but it wasn't always that way. It really looks like. Like your quintessential stereotypical American motel like Howard Johnson's that split level, motel, and people I can imagine in the fifties and sixties hanging out on their balcony, maybe having a smoke, but was it like a fancy move like motel is a drive-in. Was it nice to know it was so? Jet Magazine said that it was one of the most luxurious black motels in all of America. It was also where Martin Luther King Junior stayed when he was in Birmingham and from his motel room he helped organize, sit ins, boycotts and marches that led to the civil, rights act of nineteen sixty four right here was room thirty. Right there in the corner on the second floor is where all. Dr King that was his room. It was the largest room in. The Motel and flair. And I can't explain it, but there are shivers like I just got goosebumps like there's something really. There's something really weird about thinking like Oh right here where my feet or walking Dr King was walking up these stairs to the second level on the coroner where his room was, and he made a plan to change the to change America like. The mom the king. It happened right there. Thank you, kindly, my give friends and some of the protest marches literally started from right here coming out of the coming out of the motel. Long as we keep moving like we're moving. The Power Structure Birmingham. What have to give in? Right here on the side of the building near King's room. is where. A bomb exploded how? Was detonated at the Black AG guest in mold. I wasn't assassination. Attempt on King's life, my Lord. That bombing was one of over forty bombings, targeting the black community in Birmingham. From the late nineteen forty s to the mid nineteen sixties, they were scare tactics to keep black people from organizing or moving into white neighborhoods. So, what did they do? How did they even function? There's bombs going off around here like how did they keep the school? Tell in business. I know it's hard to imagine living and a community where bombs were going off. At nighttime in daytime that you had no idea whether or not you would. Be Able to go back home to your family. because. You were involved in activities that. That in in. Your opinion was helping to make society better resilience of this neighborhood. Walk around your so called. The. The madness that was happening on a daily basis in terms of people, being arrested and bombs going off and. Hostile interactions with police like. There must have been such a steeliness. To. And, they're they're meaning in motels were. The who knows what could happen. They could be assassinated at any moment. That's what. I think is. Beautiful about this story is the fearlessness. Of the activists here. In spite of the difficulties and we're going to have a few more difficulties. Keep coming. Through violence and fear. The black community had a resolve, and they moved through that fear to shape the consciousness of our nation. Keep moving if you can't fly wrong if you're one walk if you can't walk. But by means, keep moving. Over the past several weeks. I've been thinking a lot about my trip to Birmingham the Gadsden Motala. My conversations with brand am I just keep thinking. History is repeating itself. I think some of the cultural conflicts that we say that's rooted in racing. That's rooted in a legacy of slavery has yet to be fully acknowledged so when we preserve A. Like the H. E. Gaston, Motel. That tells US civil rights story. We are reminded. That we still have a long way to go to be inclusive as a country into respect, all of our citizens in their contribution. Never in the history of this nation. Have so many people been arrested. Father Cau- freedom and human dignity. You're tired of being second-class. The Birmingham campaign. The march from Selma, the Montgomery bus boycott, the same issues that brought people into the streets then are bringing people into the streets now it's because this country has not feast. It's passed. As long as you stay second-class citizens. You will never get the thing that you should have A. Thing that we are challenged to do is to keep this movement moving. That is power. In unity and as power in numbers. Today on the show. What does it mean to make amends? As a country. How do we begin to make amends for past atrocities as a society? How can we learn to forgive in our schools, our libraries and prisons and in our own lives. How do we take responsibility and apologize to the people we have wronged. Or repair the damage done to us. Protesters are already removing confederate statues, calling to abolish police and demanding reparations, but for Brent legs, a good first step in making amends as a nation is to recognize and preserve black historical sites. Making a men's. Means that. Black Americans are appreciated. that. Our community is recognized. For four hundred plus year contribution. That our history. And the physical places where that history is his held. Are Preserved. Making amends means that our nation is making new investments to address years of disinvestment and an equity. I believe that making a men's is to understand that the black experience is an American experience. The is a statistic that I read that really I found kind of shocking that there are nearly a hundred thousand entries in the National Register of historic places, but only two percent of those focus on African American history, he need just help us understand how that possibly came to be I think in many ways that are national register of historic places, which is the nation's inventory of historic sites that tell an American story. It really is a a mirror mirrors social issues. The National Park, service the National Trust for historic preservation and a Ho. Coalition of kits are working to rectify this inequity. and to list more diverse historic places and our national inventory. So, The big vision of the Action Fund is to reconstruct our national identity and our tagline is till the full history. And we do that by preserving sites of enslavement, but with a deeper focus on helping to preserve sites of activism, achievement and community. I mean that's a humongous goal reconstructing our national identity. Do you feel like most Americans. Are Basing what they think it means to be American on an incomplete story. Like what are they missing? That's exactly A. When I travel around the country, and I meet with citizens or organizations, and and I bring up individuals like Madame Cj Walker. America's first self made female millionaire. And one thousand, nine, hundred eighteen, she constructed. An elegant historic residents. That stands Irvington New, York as a symbol of American on Moore And many Americans have no idea that a black woman was the first self made. Millionaire. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, so it's important that Americans know this history. Because all Americans should be able to see themselves and their history, and their potential and the African American historic places that surround them. And so, where do you stand in terms of removing confederate memorials? Do you think that's a way of making amends? Our position is that. We should not a race our history at the same time. We don't have to revere it. When we come back, we'll hear more from Brent legs on. Tearing down confederate monuments. Or keeping them. I'm anew. Roti and you're listening to Ted Radio. Hour from NPR stay with us. Everyone just a quick. Thanks to our sponsors. Who helped make this podcast possible. I to E. Trade trading isn't for everyone, but trade is whether it's saving for a rainy day or for your retirement e-trade. Has You covered? They can help you. Check financial goals off your list, and with a team of professionals. Giving you support when you need it, you can be confident that your money is working hard for you. Get more than strating with e-trade to get started visit e-trade dot com slash podcast for more information, e-trade securities LLC member. Member Finra SIPC. Thanks also to bright sellers, the personalized wine subscription company that matches you wines based on your tastes. You take a thirty second quiz and their algorithm matches you to wines. You'll like bright colors is passionate about educating people on wine, which is why every package comes with wine education cards that tell you more about the winds in your box, the flavor profile what to pair it with, and where it's from visit, bright sellers dot com slash Ted. Radio and you'll receive fifty percent off your first six bottle box. Whenever you face. A choice did helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer School will start off course economics within workout your brain how to decide what something food costs? Money from NPR. It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm newsom Odi on the show today making amends, and we were just talking to preservationists, Brent legs about whether removing confederate statues can indeed rectify our past. Our position is that? We should not a race our history at the same time. We don't have to revere it. And I think what's exciting is many communities are bringing together. Their citizens to say. How can we tell a fuller story? About, our city, and about citizens that have contributed so much to it and almost I'm starting to picture it in my mind, as almost like a manuscript being edited, and like some of the people are going in and crossing things out and removing entire passages, and then other than other people are going insane like actually we should keep that sentence, maybe massage that one and that we're in this sort of iterative process, a creative process of recognizing the way that we have told the story of our nation in addition to this new recognition that we have to find a new way to explain how we've gotten to this moment where we racism still is alive and well in this country. That is so true. And there is, there is power in truth. And even for the confederate memorials that stand. If. We are brave enough to tell the truth for why they exist. That is empowering to communities and it begins to help to. Reconcile are racist past. And I think in many ways it begins to help. Diverse citizens relate to one another better. If you do preserve and maintain all of these sites. How far does that actually go in terms of healing this country? I think it goes a long way I think it's an opportunity for all Americans to. Be Educated. To reflect? On their understanding of history. On the injustices faced by black people in our country. And most importantly. Honor all of the contributions that African Americans have made. To this amazing democracy that we call America. We are talking about moments. Where Americans will. When they're walking down the street and they see a historic marker. Or they take a moment to walk inside a historic space. And Learn and interact with at history we can create millions of. Cultural moments for Americans to. Learn something new about our own history. and to walk away more empowered than. They were before they were connected with that history. What do you think all those millions of moments can add up to be? Yeah. Say All these moments add up to. Healing. At a man's. Education. Respect. Acknowledgment. And I. Think all of those words equal reconciliation. Rent legs is the executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action. Fund he has helped raise over twenty three million dollars to put towards preservation of places important to African American history. On the show today, making amends for past wrongs, we've been looking at US history. But how do we think about our present? Should we reconsider justice in this country and how we ask individuals to make amends? If they've committed a crime, go I'm so glad you put it that way. I've been thinking a lot of this is Martha Minot and I teach at Harvard law school where I have been since nineteen eighty-one, she studies the US criminal justice, system and international law. I've been so compelled by the story of people who has young age have been either forced into the role of being a child soldier drawn into. And how international law treats such individuals. It's a precedent. Your, Very first case was against Hamas Lubango Lubunga dealer for drying. Minors children. Juveniles into armed conflicts I'm. Serious crimes for the international community. This is a recording of Lubango trial before the International Criminal Court Lubunga, systematically recruited children under the age of steam, and he was convicted of that activity as a violation of crimes humanity. Has proved that Mr Thomas Do Bangor. Diallo is guilty of the crimes. The question that then emerges reminders themselves. Because many of them do commit horrible crimes, they they. They rape they conscripted other minors. CanNot. Forget what they suffer. Would they saw? What they did. And in international law the pro. Is Very much to say well. They deserve another chance. They are not the ones most responsible. The people most responsible are the adults who created the conflicts, and and and drew were forced the miners into it. I mean that's pretty remarkable. That international law sees child soldiers as victims, and and give them another chance. You're right, and how different that is from the way we talk about to vinyl justice in this country. Where very similar elements are present. young people are drawn into conflicts drug, dealing for example that not up their creation. People who haven't yet had a chance to have a childhood to develop a sense of right and wrong. What a different approach it is! As many countries have developed for child soldiers to to say okay. We know you have that challenge and we're going to help you and you're going to learn some skills as well as have some therapeutic opportunities as opposed to what we do with juvenile offenders in the United States. The rhetoric of innocence is resonant when we talk about child soldiers, but not when we talk about teen gang members in the United States. Martha Minot picks up this idea on the Ted. Stage Youth are caught in worlds that are made by adults and forgiveness can offer both accountability and fresh starts. What if instead. Young people caught in criminal activity and violence could have chances to accept responsibility while learning and rebuilding their lives and their own communities. Legal frameworks inviting us to describe their conduct could also involve community members to hear and forgive. Called, restorative justice such efforts emphasize accountablity and service rather than punishment. So this is really about finding away for them to move forward. It is a focus on the future rather than the past, so often are legal system our criminal process, even school discipline processes focused entirely on what happened at the past. It's retrospective. Restorative Justice has a few that actually the community. The people who are involved are going to have some kind of a future. Restorative justice alternatives involve offenders and victims in communicating in ways that an adversarial and defensive process does not allow, and it's become the go-to method in places like the District of Columbia Juvenile. Justice system and innovations like Los Angeles's teen court. Many schools in the United States have turned to use restorative justice methods to resolve conflicts and to prevent them. And disrupt the school to prison pipeline. Some American high schools have replaced automatic suspensions with opportunities for victims to narrate their experiences and for offenders to take responsibility for their actions. So, what does restorative justice look like in schools, can you? Can you give us an example? I'd be glad to. It's an example and it's a true story about how restorative justice processes can work and this involved. A young woman named ladies who attended a public high school in California. And there were two other students who called her names, and they were almost getting into a fight, and a counselor took her aside and earned enough trust so that she admitted that she had stolen shoes from one of the other students and the three of them agreed to. A conference, a restorative justice style conference, which means that they each had a chance to describe their version of what happened turns out. They had known each other for a long time in childhood and ahead never found a way to talk without coming to blows. But, suddenly Mercedes apologized and she said that indeed she had stolen these shoes, but she did so. She said because her mother needed money, and she wanted to sell the shoes in order to get enough money, so her mother could get a drug test, and hopefully show the state that she was clean, and then regained custody of two other children, the other girls. Were moved and they did not exactly forgive Mercedes, but they said they didn't expect her to pay the money back and they wanted to go forward, and they just wanted assurances that they could trust her going forward and later on. CDs said that if this process had not taken place, she was sure she would have been on the road to suspension and maybe expulsion, and maybe out on the street. But the school might also referred the matter to the criminal justice system, especially if there were blows landed, and that could lead to charges hearing even two penalties as severe as incarceration. not to sound naive, but it's it seems unbelievable that if Mercedes school didn't have this program that pair of shoes could have landed her in prison. Sadly there are more kids in the criminal justice system now particularly girls. There's been a real increase in the numbers of girls who are involved in criminal justice. We are the most incarcerating country in the history of human beings and I think that this is a wakeup call for people across the political spectrum that something's not working in our criminal justice system and the institutions that feed into it which includes schools. That's why we call it. The school to prison pipeline unfortunately particularly for people of Color. You mentioned these restorative justice experiments happening in La in DC, but this isn't really about one school here or a couple of juvenile courts. I mean it sounds like you're really advocating for a broader mindset. Shift across the entire criminal justice system and society that that we need to rethink what constitutes a crime and why someone might commit it in the first place. I think we need a reset in this country, and yes, it is a mindset shift, so for example the contrast between bankruptcy and criminal laws so striking because you know with bankruptcy, we say yes. You have a chance for a second right second chance. You can have a clean slate. You can start over. We don't do that when it comes to crime, you know even people who've serve their entire sentence. You know people lose the right to vote. In many states, they lose the ability to get credit to get jobs to actually start a new life, and we need a mindset change. We absolutely need a mindset change. Yeah and I would mean that. All of us would actually need to put greater value in the act of someone taking responsibility for their actions. I think the word responsibility in English is such an interesting word because it one handed certainly implies you know blame or guilt, or who caused something, but I think it also carries with it, the idea of ability to respond, and sometimes getting hung up on who caused what can get in the way of you know people assisting the turn from the past to the future causes of why does a conflict occur? If that example of Mercedes is one that we can point to you know. Why did her? Mother not have the ability to. To get money for a drug test. Why did this young girl that she had to steal in order to help her mother right and we can we address that, and so if you really take restorative justice seriously, and and making men seriously, it includes not just in this particular situation what we do, but how do we understand what leads to these conflicts and making a a ground for building a different kind of society? That's Martha Minot. She's a law professor at Harvard University, and you can see her whole talk at Ted Dot Com. On the show today making amends how forgiveness can help US carve a new path toward addressing inequality. Even when it comes to something that seems small. Like library fines. I don't think they work. This is Don Waas ick supposed to be a deterrent. People are supposedly you know they'll know ahead of time that they would be fine. If they relate and then they won't be late. And it took until really recently for us to think about. Is it working? Does it make a difference in how people behave. Don is a librarian in Wisconsin at the Lacrosse Public Library. And she says what was meant as a simple deterrent can have pretty big consequences, so I'll use my own library as an example because it's fairly typical. In the past, we would charge ten cents a day. which sounds reasonable unless you have twenty picture books checked out and. Their late by a week or two weeks. What would happen as at the point where a patron owed ten dollars or more, they no longer have access to materials in the library. They're just blocked. And, so what we saw happening was people who had disposable income would come in, and they would pay their ten dollars, twenty dollars, fifty dollars, or whatever it might be, and they would go on with their lives. And those who don't have that money available to them would not come back. That's where you see it. Really add up and really impact people's lives, and especially the people we want to serve most. Here's more from Don Wasiyu. From the Ted Stage. In libraries across the country that charged fines, the poorest neighborhoods have the most number of people blocked from us. In fact, the Colorado State Library was so worried about this. They've published a white paper and they stated unequivocally that it's the fear of fines. Keeps poor families out of libraries. Books level the Plainfield by exposing children of every socio economic background two words. At the library we offer programs for adults on computer, classes and job skills training. Business start-ups? We do all of this great work for our community members, and at the same time we counteract it by charging fines and fees of our patrons. Now, why would we continue to operate under model that hurts? Our most vulnerable patrons the most. So, what would you prefer to see? I would prefer to see late fees go away entirely altogether altogether everywhere, just no more. What we've done here in Lacrosse and what a lot of these libraries that are eliminating finds now are doing is said. To charge any late fines. If you bring the items back. You're forgiven and you can check out as much as you want again. And that seems to be really the only incentive. People need to get their things back because they want access to everything. We have to offer them. You don't think the people would just. Take books out and not be fearful of forgetting to return them that they just hold onto them and I mean if there's no repercussions. What's the difference? Yeah so what we are seeing is that people are still bringing them back. they still want to check more things out, and so they come back, but they. They aren't as fearful about fines. Oh! They still could lose an item and have to pay for it somehow, but we just try to make. People feel as comfortable as possible when that situation comes up. When we come back, we'll hear more from Don wasiyu about eliminating library fines on the show today, making amends I'm Newsom Roti, and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. Support for this podcast and the following message come from the American. Jewish world, service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. These days Chelsea. Handler tries to keep her and her friends white privilege in check. She starts like really getting weepy house what? You just said you wreck white for Jillian you cannot talk. Comedian Chelsea handler on white privilege and a new book listen to. It's been a minute from NPR. The Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a Newsom Roti and today on the show, making amends ideas on how we can be more forgiving in our prisons, our schools and our libraries. We were just hearing from Librarian Don. On why she thinks we should eliminate overdue book fines here. She is again from the Ted Stage. When other libraries have experimented with eliminating fines like one in San Rafael? took away children's fines. They had one hundred and twenty six percent increase in child card applications within the first few months. When. People aren't afraid of the fines they might accrue. They line up to access what we have to offer. Now, you might think I forgot money piece where we need to finance libraries, right? But finds have never been a stable source of revenue. They've always fluctuated and in fact, they've continued to go down. Over the last few decades. You might be surprised to know finds on average nationally one and a half percent of libraries operating budget. Now that can still be a lot of money. If you're looking at a large library or large library system, the dollar amount can be high, but it's an achievable cut for most libraries to absorb. And finally and maybe most importantly. Finds Cost US money to collect. What we found is we were spending so much money to collect fines spending all his staff time. We were spending money on mailers. We were spending money on a collection agency. And we eliminated all of that, some of that kind of balanced out, and then what we did is we said okay. These staff members now have time for other kinds of things, maybe more mission centric work that they can do. So you, you're saying that. When the punitive model was diminished, the amount of time spent enforcing, it was also diminished, and that freed the librarians up to do things that actually increased the outreach to get more people to come to the library, yes. The debate about whether we should fine how much we should find. It isn't new. We've been talking about it for almost one hundred years. Study after study has shown that the reason libraries fine because of strongly held beliefs about the effectiveness of getting materials back on time backed by no evidence. Basically we find because we've always find. Seems like a pretty good argument. How people responded to your sort of mission to get rid of fines. There's always people who feel like. No people have to be punished because they've messed up right. This is the rule. If you can't follow the rule, you have to be punished. Money is the way we punish people. but lots of people are really excited by this idea. You know this can work. It's working all over the country little by little. Do you think that there is sort of more broadly a bigger conversation about rethinking this punitive model and thinking more restorative -ly simply, because not only is it good in this instance for the people who want to take out the books? But as you explained, it actually can work better for the librarians and their staff as well. Yeah, I feel like it's. Connected to this idea of libraries being for everybody, more and more libraries are trying to make sure that their staff reflects their community in all kinds of ways, and there's a broader conversation about how we make sure that stay relevant. And not just relevant to me class warfare, Americans but to everybody that we serve, and so when we talk about that. Those punitive models really throw up such a barrier for people. Our purpose is to get information. Of every kind out into our community and make sure that they have access to that, and so if that's our purpose than creating these fines as a deterrent. Just really goes against everything we stand for. That's dawn Wasiyu. She's the youth services manager of the Lacrosse Public Library in Wisconsin. Even see her full talk at Ted Dot Com. And by the way, if you checked out library items before the pandemic, it chances. Are you're overdue? Fines have been waived. On the show today, ideas about what it truly means to make amends. And just a warning. There are stories in this next interview about sexual assault and violence. That may be hard to hear. If you're listening with kids, you might want to turn down the volume this one so back in two thousand seventeen during the me too movement. It seemed like a lot of people accused of assault or harassment responded by saying things like I'm sorry if you interpreted my actions this way or I. Remember the incident differently. It often felt like the accused. Most of the men didn't give real apologies. been no apologies, the really happen. No apologies and I think this non apology must be pretty fundamental column of what's holding, patriarchy up and keeping this kind of toxic masculinity in its place. This is playwright. Eve ensler you might know her play. The Vagina monologues and she recently wrote a book called the apology I. Think an apology is an equaliser. It removes hierarchy. It makes you humble. It makes you vulnerable. It makes you human you know and I think. There are many reasons why men don't apologize I, mean one is I think from a very young age. Men are taught the sign of weakness. It's signed vulnerability, but I also think that to apologize requires. Awareness and it requires knowledge acquired wisdom, and it would mean that men knew how to go through a process of self interrogation where they would have to look at their behavior and investigate who they are. How they became the person they became how they became the kind of man they began. That is capable of raping somebody or abusing someone harassing someone or violating someone. And I. Think all that requires a mindset that doesn't really exist within the Korean culture of Patriarchy. Eve's perspective comes from her own experience with sexual violence, which began when she was just a child. She told her story on the Ted Stage. My father began to sexually abuse me when I was five years old. He would come into my room in the middle of the night. He appeared to be in a trance. The abuse continued until I was ten. When I tried to resist them when I was finally able to say no. He began to beat me. He called me stupid. He said I was a liar. The sexual abuse ended when I was ten, but actually. It never ended. It changed too I was. I was filled with anxiety and guilt and shame all the time and I didn't know why. I hated my body I hated myself. I got sick a lot. I couldn't think I couldn't remember things. I was drawn to dangerous men and women who I allowed actually I invited to treat me badly. Because that is what my father taught me love was. I waited my whole life for my father to apologize to me. He didn't. He wouldn't. and. Then with the recent scandals of famous men as one after another was exposed. I realized something. I have never heard a man who has committed rape or physical violence ever publicly apologize to his victim. I began to wonder. What would an authentic deep apology be like? A. So. Something strange began to happen. I began to write. My father's voice began to come through me. He began to tell me what he had done and why? He began to apologize. My father is dead, almost thirty one years, and yet in this apology. The one I had to write for him. I discovered the power of an apology. And how it actually might be the way to move forward in the crisis, we now face with men and all they abuse. So that apology that you're describing turned into your book. How did you come up with this idea to write a book from Your Father's perspective to make an apology on his behalf well as survivor of enormous, sexual and Physical Abuse even though he was dead, was still this part of me that yearn for an apology I started thinking well. Maybe I should write the letter I want to hear. Maybe I should write the words and say the words that that would free me, and possibly this could be a blueprint for men who might be wanting to write such an apology so I, wrote my father's apology letter to. To me and I want to make a big distinction here. There's a huge difference between explanation and justification. There's never any justification for sexual physical abuse ever, but I think I wanted to try to understand why my father did it because there's something about getting to the core of the why that has aspects of liberation to it. When you just begin to see, Oh, here's the culture. My father was born in two years. The family he was born into. Here's the story. He was born in to hear that. Here are the things that affected him, and and changed him and made them into this kind of man and. I think I think the book. Really was my attempt to create an apology process, and that's what the apology is. Apology is a sacred commitment. It requires complete honesty. It demands deep self, interrogation and time it cannot be rushed. I discovered. An apology has four steps. And if you would, I'd like to take you through them. The first is you have to say what in detail you did? Your accounting cannot be vague. I'm sorry if I hurt. You or I'm sorry if I sexually abused, you doesn't cut it. You have to say what actually happened. I came into the room in the middle of the night and I pulled your underpants down. I belittled you because I was jealous of you and I wanted you to feel less. The liberation is in the details. An apology is a re membrane. It connects the past with the present. It says that what occurred actually did occur. The second step. Is You have to ask yourself why. Survivors are haunted by the. Why why? Why would my father want to sexually abuse his eldest daughter? Why would he take my head and smash against a wall? In my father's case. was never allowed to express tenderness or vulnerability curiosity doubt. He was never allowed to cry. And, so we was forced to push all those feelings underground, and they eventually metastasized. Suppressed feelings later became shadow man, and he was out of control, and he eventually unleashed his torrent on me. The third step. Is, you have to open your heart and feel what your victim felt. You have to let your heart break. You have to feel the horror and betrayal, and the long term impacts of your abuse on your victim. You have to sit with the suffering you have cost. And of course, the four step is taking responsibility for what you have done and making amends. Can you talk me through a little bit? How you came up with the four steps to a real apology? Like? How did you break it down so that it could be an apology? They counted. I think I just went on the basis of what I needed, right? I think often particularly with sexual abuse. We talk about it like it's this broad thing like gender, violence or sexual harassment, but we don't really talk about what it does to people all the ways that affects our health and our psychology, and our ability to function ability to show up in the world, our relationship to intimacy and sex. We don't talk about all that and so getting a perpetrator to really have to. To look at what his actions did to sit with the suffering he's caused is really a huge piece of it and I think that's what I needed from my father I needed for him to sit with that suffering to feel my suffering to feel bad about how bad I felt that if he didn't you. Did you wrote it for him? Well, the imagination is a powerful thing, right? I think sometimes the imagination is more accurate and more persuasive than anything we can do you know? The most liberating thing I've ever done and when the book was over, my father says at the end old man be gone. He's gone and he hasn't come back. And that story is over, and I'm no longer living in his paradigm. His narrative I'm living. My story is not a reactive narrative. I'm not living out of rage. I'm not trying to prove that he was wrong. I'm not it's over. It's done. And it's been so moving. People are writing me to say that they're actually doing this. They're writing to themselves from their perpetrator and are having a really amazing impact I wouldn't do it alone I would do with counselor. Or clergy or friends somebody to support you. I'm also getting letters from men who want to undergo an apology process, which has been very moving. That's what we want. We don't want men to be destroyed. We don't want them to only be punished. We want them to see us the victims that they have harmed and we want them to repent and change. And I actually believe this is possible. I. Really believe it's our way forward. But we need men to join us. We mean men now to be brave and be part of this transformation. I have spent most of my life calling men out. And I am here now. To call you in? Even, it sounds like despite everything you've been through and everything you've seen. You are hopeful that this conversation. This straightforward half to making amends can start to really change things. Look! I have to believe that I've been fighting to violence against women and girls for much much of my life. I have tried every angle every approach. I can go down the list of the thirty million approaches. This is my newest approach, right? I feel like you just keep coming at it from this side and keep coming out from that side, and I have to believe that at a certain point, something is going to catalyze men to join us in this struggle I dream that there will come a day where we just can't believe that any man with ever lived a fifth to a woman than any men with Retina woman at her job. By making physical overture hers to her that she couldn't resist without risk of losing her livelihood and if I didn't believe that. I'd be very very depressed. I think I'm one of those people you know. I can't go on. I will go on I must go on going to keep going until someone tells me differently, but this would be a very very good moment for men to come forward. We're ready. Eve's book is called the apology. By the way since we recorded this interview Eve has decided to change her name to the letter V. She writes that although she holds no anger towards her father, she no longer wants to live with his name or the name he gave her. You can see the full talk at Ted Dot Com. Thank you so much for listening to our show this week? About making amends to learn more about the people who were on it go to Ted dot NPR dot org, and to see hundreds more ted talks checkout Ted Dot, com where the Ted, APP. Our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Synopsis Shkin Poor Rachel Faulkner. Diba Mohtashami James Del. JC Howard Katie Monty Leon Maria. Paz Gutierrez Christina. Kala and Matthew Clue Ta with help from Daniel Shchukin our theme music was written by Rahm Teen Arab Louis Our partners at Ted are Chris Anderson Colin Helms. Anna Phelan and Michelle quint I'm newsome are Odi and you've been listening to Ted Radio Hour from NPR.

US NPR Birmingham America Brent NPR Ted Martha Minot Dr King Ted Stage Sixteenth Street Baptist Churc Eve Alabama Ted Conferences Jet Magazine Don Wasiyu Kelly Ingram Wisconsin rape
Melba Moore

Questlove Supreme

1:24:16 hr | 3 weeks ago

Melba Moore

"At carmax we're pretty flexible with how you can buy a car if you'd rather scroll through fifty thousand cars instead of walking the lot go for if you want to see how a car smells on the lot before you buy it by all means. Hey we all have our things want the whole thing to come to you without ever leaving home by online. Compare how the speaker sound when playing your favourite mixed visit our lot if you wanna browse a little on the lot and in select markets never delivered at home. We're certainly not stopping. You carmax the way. It should be ever buy something and immigrant like pants. They fit great at the store. But after awhile you avoid sitting in them they're itchy and the windshield wipers are hard to find. Okay we're talking about cars here. That's why car is introducing the love. Your car guarantee with twenty four hour test drives in a thirty day. Money back guarantee so you can take a car home and get comfy with it because sometimes you just don't know it fits until you fall asleep on your couch. Sorry talking about pants again. Carmax which should be fifteen hundred mile limits carmax dot com for details of course love. Supreme is a production of iheart radio. Boy your the prison person get her name right and lies been everything. Lysol everything every princess leia. What's going on a good to have you here. Great to have to ladies and gentlemen This is quest love hosted screen. What can i say well. First of all teams supreme solo. And steve tikolo pay bill somewhere paying his bills. I gotta say that this interview is a long time coming Once again always say that we're honored to be in the presence of world t but this is definitely the case for that episode for this episode. melba moore. You know What can i say broadway actress. She was in the original hair hair. The original here with ronnie the so many questions She's a tony award winner for pearly. I even saw her in the. Y'all might not remember this but seventy eight timbuktu was a big deal as attempt to her in earth a kit i think the first week he came out my mom took me to see timbuktu not to mention her music career. Scientists neil bogart's legendary buddha records in the early seventies soon to epic records and then of course in the eighties or legendary run on capitol records Having discovered in been involved in so many greats including one of our favorites. Freddie jackson managing his career Not to mention movies everything so legendary about this guest. Please welcome to our show. Finally queen melba moore thank you. That's yes i'm so excited to be here with you all well how you remember all that. Jesus that's what i heard still. My platform is nothing. But just the having the best seat in the house and interview people that excite me. I'm you know i didn't. I guess i became friends with you because you would always come to. You know are always on our gigs. Denies nice's Dj gigs mind as well and got to know you. I'm still do one actually wait. I just did your dad. I forgot to tell you. I finally did yesterday jess together and a finally finally got together last week when we sat this way later but yes i finally got one. Toge- how are you were you. Are you still a new yorker. Like what part of the. Yes new jersey. Okay that part of new york. Yes the jersey part. Yes i feel like everyone yeah. True true new yorkers live in jersey. I listen i new jersey to So where were you. Were you always in new yorker. Where were you born. I was brought in new york. Yes hospital okay. You're harlem night. No i lived on one hundred street. So it's not too locks below harlem debiting okay almost there but not quite there. See that i guess in your while in your beginning. What was your your your childhood into at least musically. Did you grow up in a musical family where you know that your parents were also like singers as well. Like what was your childhood like. I haven't jeans. You might know who teddy hill is. Do you know the name. I don't need your study. You walking encyclopedia you. I know the name teddy hill but not all of your father correct. It was very famous leader. Physical gusty and those folks played in his begging. That's my natural father but he didn't have any my mother. Some mother was a professional singer. Okay k. so on i started out with music and my blood but you know estranged family. My grandmother had stroke so she didn't speak so i don't know my family history. My mother's from on pipe shop alabama. Nobody ever hear that. Right about birmingham girono by pipes up. Okay really. don't wanna go from there right. They don't stay. They don't stay. So as i saw my life really with a disjointed broken like many african american people did the my mother my stepfather who was a piano player and they worked together so when i moved to new york. Because he's he wants from newer. I didn't have a step sister stepbrother. Later on tour in half blood. Brothers and eddie made us all take piano lessons. So that's when i found out i could sing about while i was only ten years old and new the estimate in voronezh. Would you expect like you can start singing about four years old because the instruments already there. So we'll start at lake as my point isn't so for us. Starting at that age was late to you and your in your mind like well. Usually when people have a voice all the time to be four years old. It can say okay. Is that what happened with your mom. 'cause y'all have similar voices in web. Listen i guess you say quest. You wanna know what you want to know. What is your question. I don't know. Well i really wanna know i know that also in newark Especially in that time period the legacy that newark had as far as singers are concerned. I knew that says houston was around there and at the time the work sisters and whatnot like as far as the musical written richness of of newark. What was the environment like back then. do a lot still bars clubs with with a band. In macondo. they run. The were still continue to be an people like road scott in great orchids when these clubs all the time of course we also had concerts and It was just very very rich. Mean to the point to where By the time it was time for you to go to high school. I already decided. I don't know if i can have any the tower but i wanted to be logged in music i want to i would high school. Was it okay so there. There was like a performing arts schools. Okay i see a famous one right. It's not famous like the one in new york. But i can take people there while. Yeah i was gonna say who else went there. That was a of newt old winter one of the anyone else. I can't remember long now but tons and tons and tons of ridiculous talented people. Okay bike who your idols. During that time period where like at least what was the. Who's the person that you looked up to. The most people have bobby tended to horace silver. I thought i was gonna be. Oh okay okay. That was miserable. Yeah well because my stepfather was there and he played really really well and he love ano- and he made everybody around fall in love with a look so then what was your first moment as in an entry into your professional leagues. That moment where you knew that you were going to make this your life calling well after i spent about three years of teaching Music in schools are nor home. My father i said this is your dream really well i don't really look duties introduced me to some your viewer. If he can me into the industry as performance it doesn't work out comeback in school so make a loss or a little bit shorter one for its people announced valerie. Simpson some music offered by the songs already the beginning highlife career. 'cause this was like a late sixties and we changed number since she got me involved with studio accounting work and singing. Jingles ruined into the industry will started off valerie. simpson is. She's at the top of i change. He started out at the top because he's genius town. Yes so then would. Would you say that acting like did that. Come into play before you became a singer like was acting. Your first four is as far as like doing plays or whatnot i just. I didn't have a clue that that would be my future. But one of the recording sessions was being performed by gauntlet dermott. Who wrote the music and they still casting for a cultist one any of us they had really basically been auditioning us without us knowing it. And if we wanted to They would find a par for all of us in the show if we sing from the director and producer. I was the only one on the date at a into theater. So i got into my first of all. We show that way so okay for our listeners. that don't know Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah i was gonna say well. Not only that i knew that Hair was jess something out. You know out of nowhere. Well you know people think of here at least everyone that i know that it's all that saw it in real time told me that basically. That was the first time that you know open front. Nudity was such a thing on broadway. Like how controversy was then to get involved. How did they talk guys into it. We were at previews and arnold someone from the action came up with the idea and told us all we had to do. And everybody threatened quiet because we didn't have that in mind and was shocking to us. And then when i made it kind of role she want you can you. Don't you don't have to. I was curious. So i did it every every night aren't remember if i did it every night. Brush if you want have to you take us through the hayride. Because i read right that you also replaced diane. Keaton was like the first time in a black woman had ever done that in via too. But what was the. What was your your actual cross here. Okay what happened was had been shot for about a year and he had a lot of people to to do the lead role of schilling and they weren't happy with giving and so one of the girls the black girls. I'm your awful. I would be great bill. But what's he. This anchors was very loud now. Big mouse young. They'd that affect one of the parodies that she plays. She played abraham lincoln online the gettysburg address but like enwrap ask you a rebate posting to you. It was a monday. Wow yeah we did. We did it for production of hair. When i was in high school. I played hood so out but you know it was a very toned down version. But you know we did it so she puts you in front of the bus. And then i'd like to addition for so rehearsed me in in the role a couple of different of saturday at nays. Let me get up and try outs. That's how i got to roll. Was that your first play or yeah. Okay background really. Wow you know people musical i mean. Yeah but i'm talking about back in the day. We were allowed to do anything now. Yes well so. Many legends came from that production What was it like well. Because i you know you know. For a lot of favorites. That grew up listening to when i was a kid in the seventies. You couldn't find out much about them. I mean i've always heard about ronnie dyson an incredible. He was as a singer. But you know he really didn't get that much press now. It was fresh for black people town except jet magazine. Oh yeah Besides ronnie dyson was there. Anyone else notable that was in there was so Trying to think Denver rating women. Donna summer wow i forgot. That was okay was how long was it until was pearly was immediately after or immediately immediately about black girl. Aca say her name is avis. always remember mary. You display a long time. You start up a say you know how audition disip alert off. Don't even know how she told me about dishes for early. And she told her. I had a call asking will marry. Isn't william learn. Something about the character is look at the character and of course was back woods illiterate made but that's what that's what was raised by because we had we call the governess or any because my mother was a single parent. She's gone and she was. She was a backwoods chopard. So like most americans we have two countries that we identify has in so comfortable's mind face off about the those early days. I'm sorry Talk to my dad who comes from new york around that time you still party with. John don't know him that's fine. But he was saying that the parties around hurley in one of the lead dancers who had two homes one for the artists at the weapon himself was like just like you've never seen before early hurley. The cavs whatnot in the they. They will great everything as they could say more. But perhaps i shouldn't oh lady tell us would never not history as well. I'll tell you Who isn't the chorus He shelby like what. The tony. Awards out told me that i had Form down which george phase on all your say your love him yes the choreographer of the whiz everybody and sherman hemsley old He had to say already heard about sermons because he thought he was calling. You thought he was. It was. Oh god i love it. I love it. They seem sometimes. You just seem so much more freidan sometimes in here. It is a little bit more uptight when i was doing. Our street stays state as it. Auditions your first audition. That's i a second to how. How shocked were you to get a tony for pearly. I seen it on tape. But i don't remember half of Too shocking to shock. Let me see what you war. 'cause i know it was fierce costing because we performed on s right. I remember the lights on because you know television. So i could see pearl bailey and harrison in these people. The what i did. I didn't know we are supposed to be. What the categories were so heroic. Call my category and there was a gentleman. His name ackerman jones. He was doing a lot of the announcing the same category. I would confuse people's all drunk. Thought he got it wrong. You thought he was drunk. And wow because he said somebody else's i name and my last name or you start no more no more going on. You know it was shocking to. Are your parents still with us at this point when you re tony. Yes what did they. I mean with think well. My dad was glad that he didn't insist that i teaching school. That wasn't too happy about the new scene. Air for your parents. Were more like fall back on something. Mets yes secure. Not get to this point. Do you lease have like a manager. Are you like okay. I'm going to go full throttle. And yeah so you just like i got lucky. I got one play him in. Oh god gotten another plane. I wonder tony so after that. I got an agent after that okay. Actually television show came along. I was working all the supper clubs at the palmer house chicago. Waldorf astoria in new york and all these so negotiated. So i got an agent so so it's like exactly when you say a supper club. What was that type of entertainment. Venue like uniform fancy. Let me see the city wineries. Oh okay a city water. Yeah we in iran for something like that very very and you have dinner. You have supper judge. Gotcha yeah and you could have a big orchestra or small ensemble but the top entertainment. Okay god damn after close if you love his business he loves you back. Yeah so you're recording career. I know that You got signed. And i think in an seventies but I made a mistake neil Buddha wasn't your first label right. You don't actually less 'cause i got that on. I guess early early seventies. While i was still in purley. I've look what you're doing to the man. I think that was was seventy one seventy. Yeah because i got that as a result of early recording offer lead singer so even then it's not like by the time you get a record deal surely by this point you're fully operational business. I should hope so. Well not if you don't know the business wait. How can one navigate without of well. You know at least in today's terms it's like everything has to be in place like your manager. Your tour managers your social media manager your business manage that but back then it. Just none of that ever occurred more structured than than it is. Now you've got the almost a one man band allen you know to your own media because a lot of things that you can kind of outsource quality. There was very kind of systematic and especially a black woman. Somebody had had to go before you negotiate these things. I mean the only reason. I was even talked about the being allowed into these Venues because it became a game feeder which essentially was white not essentially was white. I mean i remember seeing a little ellen tonight shell l. but the people would let him go. You know systemic racism. So you've got to have some kind of management team to to carry out us office. Can't you had somebody does. It wasn't a still funny. Because i was sitting here thinking like but you came from a family fully musicians but yet and still. They're black musicians so business never right so it's not like you could look to them and be like well. What should i do when the level of information pill from us right and you're still is your evolving. 'cause you're gonna place they've never gone so is like besides sally right as ill. The one the one album in your your arsenal. That i'm fond of is a peach melba which came out and seventy five first of all before i ask you anything I gotta know during the height of lean on me itis and not deal with as lean on me album. moore's If if you were if you were alive and aware at the time when the song was at its height in the seventy s most people know that you hold a note for lisa. Good thirty seconds. I'll say longer than longer than bill withers singing day on lovely day idea and i used to. I used to actually try to. You would do this often. I've seen you on the tonight show of senior even when you did it when you did it live longer and i just never knew a person that can hold one note for like almost fifty seconds did you. Did you regret having do that. Every time i almost felt like it was it was his own olympic comp like competition like the duration of holding that newt. Right it was fun for me was an athletic activity in the something got was wasn't always there everything that i'm able to do. It seems like i had twenty five times harder than other seen is go jump rope swim. Dog you know. Doing vocally seeks study And scream and yell and everything and then after a while the the stamina to the point where one day. I was saying some on mountain some little group in a nursing home somewhere. Mer big big president in a laid out any kind of went across the woman through travel strong enough so that i was standing holding so conscious that i was doing it us. One that's eight. Kept holding it. If i could always do that when i started to do it. And it's just become something that i'm so grateful for happy without and now i understand that guac eat everything do this. That's why i call at a letter activity now. Why can't handle jack daniels. I have fried chicken ever buy something in integrated pants. They fit great at the store that after a while you avoid sitting them they're itchy and the windshield wipers are hard to find okay. We're talking about cars here. That's why carmax is introducing the love your car guaranteed with twenty four hour test drives and a thirty day money back guarantee so you can take a car home and get comfy with it because sometimes you just don't know fits until you fall asleep on your couch. Sorry talking about pants again. Carfax which should be fifteen hundred mile limits carmax dot com for details at carmax. We're pretty flexible with how you can buy a car. If you'd rather scroll through fifty thousand cars instead of walking the lot. Go forward if you wanna see how a car smells on the law before you buy it by all means. Hey we all have our things want the whole thing to come to you without ever leaving home by online. Compare how the speaker sound. Were playing your favourite mixed. Yes visit our lot and if you wanna browse a little on the lot and in select markets. Have it delivered home. We're certainly not stopping. You carmax the way it should be. So what is what is what is your regiment as far as keeping your your your your muscle intact because again to hold it for that strong and that much for bronco over forty seconds is not normal thought. Kenny cheating method where you see your circular reading as or circular breathing. They go at the end of the own house. Top of are you talking. Tiger woods of course had never knew that the the whole topic forget what we were doing but some we talked about that. So yeah i remember. The last time. That i've been doing it is it is involved in to make it so when you're a five year old. Listen to that. I thought you were doing. So taekwondo i never heard of before. I do wanna hit the answer to that question. No wish. What is your when it comes to your voice. A lot of baked chicken or lean protein. I know you think chicken is a gospel bird but it is what 'cause i thought you say darier okay. Well no dairy year okay. Yeah i know. Fried foods no oil. No not a lot of jewish vegetables but then i gotta work out. I think swimming help. I love swimming. Scorpio water science is now since they walk in on the on the desert so they will be walking to aerobic exercises sink but making harden the lung capacity. I was curious to know the producer for peach. Melba was Eugene mcdaniels and to hip hop to my generation he means something totally different but What was it like working with him. I i've never really heard stories of you. Know what he was like in the and his creative process what was what was that like. I might say with him and his wife and his own come to california hills is so i'm very. What do you call it affected by environment. And he he looked way of. It was probably soon so i was. I sound to me on that pitch. Melvin album a sound different or like another zalm Jimmy jiang's me like were you were you aware of this kind of his. At least at the time and seventy five is is controversial political zeros yeah like stance with the government. I know that the story was that when his second came out headless heroes of the pacalypse Spiro agnew kind of placed a call to ahmet ertegun and kind of had hadn't blackballed you know. Had his musicians union card revoked won't so he was kinda left to make a living as a singer songwriter. So this he worked on your record. Roberta flex blue lights in the basement. Like oh that's of what he on. His island was the big cedar. Not even that. I think just i think it was rare for an artist to just you know the way that we call out the government now in in that instagram bank route. His albums were twitter. You just didn't hear of black people like just blatantly. Call the government's liars the that stuff and he had it in for nixon. To the point that you know The nixon administration just did all. They could to silence him. He couldn't he lost his record. Deal so you know him not eating right. That's the time i make love to use them. That would have been. That would have been hurting for him. But he produced People in the in the meantime they couldn't stop him from producing other people. So i just wanted to know like just as a as a human being like was he kind of bitter what the government was doing to him or he just hurting speaking about his politics. Wanna go kind. Kinda is sweet and gentle. Okay though but he was not anything about is actually horrid. Okay so were you aware that at the time when you made the record Did you meet the kids. That did sunshine superman with you know. I'm sure that people have reminded you that. A wendy melvoin of a wendy and lisa princeton the revolution and her twin sister susannah where the background singers on Sunshine superman so probably knew at that time and time okay. I see you also released two albums. Later you worked with mccoy. He produced the it record. What was what was that. Like in putting in disco. I was gonna say. How can you describe what it's like to. Every every artist. I see that was recording in the seventies disco was more like a kind of that film and louise Mountain jumped like. Can we make it to the other side or are we going to fall underground. Like were your thoughts on on conquering that and new book. Art was your was your president at the time. Like what was he. Like as a not not much said about newborn guards time at at buddha in casablanca. I know that a lot of his artists were like colorful and he really. I guess you could say he was like the original ditty almost to the point where he was just as famous as his artists were him. I know he was and he was very very famous. But i really didn't have an awful lot to because by the time i had good management though they were the ones that actually went out and got vent and the god van mccoy for me and Put us together than he. I worked on what we're gonna do. In china establishing the as according artists and help develop a style an identity. I didn't have had in what. I was interested in bamako. Vancouver for he. He gave me this zip. Which put me into the disco or the dance dance jonah. I knew he had lean on and soon he wrote me here. That's a weird. I can't imagine van mccoy writing. Need non uptempo lots of balance very prolific songwriter. So that's how it reached you. Well no no. We'll tell me. Yes but no. I had heard my favorite artist disabuse the franklin singing and i know i couldn't in her lyrics and everything just movie. Some much started singing it. So i developed my own little arrangement of it with the with the long and big long just exciting trying so hard to express something and wanted had presented itself and i came in contact in touch with him. Do my rage on he coca You also worked with mcfadden whitehead I'm a philadelphian. So like any of those guys that are in the arsenal of under the umbrella of gamble and huff in next ones l. And you know. Tom moulton like all those guys under the affiliate umbrella. What was it. What was it like working with mcfadden. Whitehead let me say well produced the portrait of melba. Yeah i told you what it was working with german henze right. Yes yes good. Fines were crazy adversely. John whitehead really mile philly. Didn't i mean if he walked down the street. Strange things happened. How strange did you record. Philadelphia was it recorded in new york. New york okay. What kind of old than some affiliation we will managing my our company imagine gene and john and so we were the ones that Or manage them to stop this now. It wasn't really an international. You'd better tell that story. Oh wait a minute you. You can't just casually like bene- tell it is more gotta borrow jan. Hus production started in nineteen. Seventy six years have been. I only only knew of only started hearing of the term hush productions closer t like your capital work. But i'd never knew when it when it started. So you got you and your husband got into management. Because i didn't have a manage at a certain point. I had asian but that time i had already lost my career for the first time by this Yeah yeah that's that's unusual for an artist to start a manager. At least you don't hear of that. In the seventies it was like a separation of church and state artists artists in seals were ceo. So would that was. That was the case with me but london husband is a gift. It was a gifted business person and when we met we started. We tried to find a manager for me. But everybody tony was she's broadway. She can't do this. you can't do that. Started a new record in. She has coaching. But my point is that everything that they said. I could do had already done so. Instead of having a stable of artists we'd started a stable of managers. Brilliant okay so unless we got me started. We got freddie kashif. A bunch of wonder what your roster looked like can you. Braxton more with was on the rest of the sheep see Let me some more again. All the capital. Bo was beau higgins or consolo huggins huggins remember orpheus was up was that u. s. yet leila thomas paul paul paul george. Md's orson dis empower lawrence. Too album came together music of then. What was what was kashif. Like he was always one of those guys that i just really. You know admired and You know we had a music class in college. And they made us read his book. You know everything you know about What was what was what was he is as he became Well is daughter and his wife and good friends because we put a recording studio and building at two thirty one west a street when kashif would come. He would record a stuck in our studio. Well you it was like well. It was like a vocal coach. And the way he stacked background voices Almost like you take individual. Sounds an singers. And you put them in different places not like a background. But he's structured everything you need. he was a perfectionist One phrase all day to your god. I so good. I'll get this. I'm gonna learn how to sing. It was fine with me. You know i'm not gonna have patients with like it one of those singers. That has like okay three takes in. I feel like it's enough so let's move on the bering it. Okay let's see Under that under that production unit So you guys managed conceived you guys also manage like a or no there is There is ronnie harris as well. Lash ronnie irani harris like the bunch of like tristate. Guys that i know that were kind of under the were they under like kashif tutelage because he had a very was his own entity airily another. Okay now the could she. I see Yeah like for me. The the the but see somewhere the other side of the rainbow album. It's probably a year one of my favorite records. That was one of my aunt. Used to play that record all the time. I was like three when that came the project. Jim art is a giving melba. Did you also claims are. Did you specifically work with had one question about a seventy eight record. Because i did a cover. You stepped into my life. Did the beam civically right that for you or instead the bg's at four you know that was. We'll all asong saturday saturday. She might von element might have done it. Someone else did it but i. I didn't know who did it. I i okay. Let's see anything everytime deny slaves that record because he plays that record. And i hear it in my dreams like a new record. I limit denies only days. You make us railroad relevant rich. Good as hoping that you is okay. Good so it doesn't ask. It does matter Slowly because you know. God keeps. But i don't get to religious keeps doing new things at least every decade or so and he changes it. And so you've gotta change context. You had to change the neighborhood. I can't do that. I'm not even songwriter. Dj's first of all you're used to just spin records. Now that's grown into your are a songwriters producers you promote showed you created adana so you have some autonomy. Have some authority any you. You have created a community days And i'm not saying his all black but is so we have some place. Be your early days especially since a somebody like me opportunities anc through theater so racist but what they try to get here to do and you want to do was a crossover but if you do that your community they try to convince you don't belong here you don't belong out. It was too late. Thank god for that convinced of that. So then we try to get a manager and we couldn't do it then. We sat oklahoma. Why we tried as you're done theory on tv done this. Got somebody from each of those areas and set out a what kind of music. We're going to do so like i said My then husband is gifted a business. Nobody taught him business. You learned it just like many of us offensive people get a chance to go get it get taught it then you learn some kind of way learning. You have to learn how things go created a space for yourself and call it in between the baron on the foundation of american music. You doesn't hold a right now. Don't be humble about his true. There's one question. I missed before we skip to kashif. I always wanted to know this so you worked with another legendary producer. Peter people belotti. Yeah i guess. Well i'd i'd like to know at least was the decision in getting him. P people out did a lot of music between him and giorgio moroder like those guys were like talion electric. Has i mean what we what we now know is like electronic music. Those guys were pushkin german producers. So sort in line of what crap work was doing all that stuff. What was it like working with him. That was the decision to sort of. Go into sort of like a futuristic dance mode or like what was it like working with him yes because we were trying to say aren't and a again opposite. My husband went out and found the song writers and producers who were relevant for the time and seeing red things were going and could we fit into it on decided they would work with inside code. The songs that we by then house me told me. I should learn how to write. Yeah you get your money off the internet year. So did you. I felt like you made the transition to the eighties. It was for a lot of artists. It was hard transitioning to the eighties but Of course with you know. Would you work with with paul lawrenson kashif and and all those cats those new york cats or jersey. New york jets Just what was the. What was the environment like time because also like You know there's there's allow alive there's like so many so many of these greats that are in the what was at the time. I what i what i is with with. At least the style of kashif was Him being kind of Instrumental in the sound of a bogey. Which is you know post disco kinda the sound that Leeann silvers in like that. Boogie sound could you explain what the environment and the early eighties was. Like in new york as far as like that whole cruise concern freddie jackson. Lala like all those people. Of course i may be you know a ticket in actually describing with so much fun some musical exploring a place where everything function and work out because we were in charge and you could go state was taken onto the husband did. It was good at it. So we were touring moore on bending up and coming artists. Some always Thousand musician so i mean that was like being in heaven. We have phone liked each other. You know we're not. No problem was great. And then you know we was. No lack of of money or a work was fun was happy that my baby was obviously knew. Mother i is your is your husband. He's still alive him and his brothers still alive okay. Are y'all on good terms. Or how's it that they should yoga. We're family hatred. Get religious with god creates suck up to the boss and our daughters happy and you know coming into her own so eighties baby. It sounds like okay. What was the story in developing Freddie jackson like i feel like of of your state he was definitely your your breakout artists. Like how did you discover. I'll tell you by show. I thought he was serving to cook as a party. Every wow that's how it was one time we were in the studio and he was gonna come to my house. No for breaks just a little bit. So i got dressed up. I forgot what i had on for the had to get in china So so. I open door. It was so he. He was so shocked. If fell down on the hallway floor laughing. Now remember is what freddie jackson from autograph love. That's too much. Okay all right. But but he likes to. Of kitson is his darker. It could probably do standup one or two is real personality those laughing and of course you know he could anything you can hear the question the day these babies might wanna know. I'm sorry know. This is touchy. But he and luther. I knew this question because we we grew up thinking it was. I was gonna say like in my mind. I felt like there's impact biggie going on was going to be the king of the hill of i. I don't think they were friends for. I think it was just like a lively friendly competition especially on fridays part. Because luther was the man who is the money beat me on spot there true that everybody would want to aspire to that agus. That's just my humble opinion. Because i don't really know what was the relationship like with With you it. Like hush in capital i remember. I was watching Years back. I think i was watching. Freddie's unsung and he was talking about how his records were like going crazy. And the people capital didn't they had no idea like they didn't even they will just so of what was going on a black music at that time that went his record kind of took off it. They weren't prepared for they prepare. It wasn't only what was going on in black music. Our company became really a junk to direct company. We were the ones that started street. Promotions with the posters gutter. And actually working in your in your own areas in harm your own much people. Your own salespeople got. Your street team won't be going to say where we give you a hit. You find that. It's harder harder to be both artists and artists manager. Yes i knew a lot of babysitting and jedi mind tricks in a match report so i manage a skill that i didn't really have and i don't think i have a real great interest in it but always interested in Showing you an opening the way life for since week the freddie on the road with lean he was my opening act. Let him open from. Put him in the middle of my shot into those people him as soon as he starts setting yoga screaming. So i'm gonna tell you who it is now famous. Put him in the middle of my show instead. Find making all let fresher new. I get out there so national anti manager nine that is a dividend the distinction the an honest. Then is that what you mean that makes us have a lot of other things been coming to you for like mentor shifts throughout the years. I was curious about that especially with all the voice stuff. I think they've come to me. Because i have a team of a bill everything. So don't come to me but we have an opportunity. They've got interested on interviews people on. Well how do you do this in. How what would you tell somebody else. And so in that. That way i can. I can offer information suggestions. 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Morgan was also part of that stable. Correct yeah i again this these are. I'm just asking because again like there's this a period between eighty to ninety two of a bunch of artists that you know there wasn't social media outback. Then there wasn't anything unless they were in jet soul train or ride on magazine. You really didn't know or ebony. You really didn't know about them. What was melissa like in working. How did she become part of the the stable once again. Hush signed her as an artist. It so their relationship with her was with her but melissa become friends while what she likes me so i mean we had difficult time. She's denise help you you know. Are you going to find out. See how i am. Whatever just just been friends and with some shows together now that i have and You know we could do ourselves and we want to be with. We often work together. Moving in you know what when the when the when the iron is hot period in the eighties. Did you think about making a return to your other to the other. Arenas that you were in as far as like you're acting and plays and whatnot. Well yes i. I may my then husband foot partly on videotape. Well only thing. I've seen on video game. Should others templeton tim santan because it's still not a common thing to do. Okay to those unusual beckmann weight would you involve with the. What was your involvement in our. This is deep one early. Would death by contagion. Yes how yes this. All over you. Jackson l. joint but it was the joint with a hartson and bill and james bond. The third ain't well he created by detention. Because that i was saying where you the producer of the film as well or yes okay. What was that like step into film and like producing your own family. Yes a lot. We will learn how to try to promote it and it in theaters. And so i started to get into that. A relationship with my husband and hush pedestrian broke down shortly after that song. Oh man with what led to the breakdown. In your opinion. I will think i should say now with not with the daughter sitting there she like mama are not not. I love you after feel. Let me ask we in the nineties now but but let that you know trying to be a mend. Our ways be better in. He'll give is such a different place now and i think because of covid Around the world stopping we do have a chance to start over in. Maybe the play will never be even but we've all grown so much. We have asked trying to start over so trying to do that. But that period is when you credit like things went bad then. 'cause i think you said something early on where you will like my career Fell down or something like that and then you you said that was the first time so you can bring. That was before this time we now okay avenue visit say okay. Well getting very good at falling and getting back. That's it is it is going to be. You look amazing. Like you've really busy. But i was about to ask about your moisturizer was because you know i was like that. Not the fried foods if i didn't eat fried foods. Is that what. I will end up looking ahead because answer that daughter just as you can wake up your hate own nice cream stop. You know masks. An exercise face end exercise. You know like exorcism wasn't good. My mother always you posted the e. r. o. And all of exercising that. Okay so now. That's true yeah. Yeah like a man you got to. You know. black don't crack but it's can rust. You know what i'm saying. You got to take brusson but can we. Can we talk about nine hundred. Eighty seven that win les miz. When did they yes yes. That's no ms was thought it was later. But it laid it would because or ninety nine hundred and ninety was around that time but that's time lost my family in hush all. That really was homeless. Oh wow i heard an ankle matthews else. You wanna know educators spell. He created us vehicle. Tyler perry has taken to the city. Has the first one to tyler. Did wall is did the first okay. That's what i'm very first gospel. Okay i guess book yes. What he did was he went to. The church is around the major cities that had blocked populations and he to that. So that's that's why we have asked because from their audiences were at church in so Other time i met michael i was just about to be My daughter had run away and you know where she was because of all the trouble is going on. I found out that i was divorced and had to go all that stuff but Michael cole knee Invited me to come to st louis. I was doing one of his plays in his is huge. Like two thousand seater. Three thousand seat theater was gant able news churches so he he has marked the church's fill emma every day of the week. And so what he did then. He said his incredible actors and singers that he had put the chosen musicians as mary. Mary came from. Wow right Taking why and the one of them is married to the there from work now. warren campbell. Baby weren't him but Give you the quality of the music and but the look raw and i came out to start bringing stars into incredible companies with. They do so. Actually that's how really began to learn how to sing gospel Opera though well no. I was born to an adult learning. Why merce reversely. What was asking about les miz. But all okay. So so. I was telling you about that but then i didn't have anything so trying to write a play where i could be star so i could get up and get some work but richard j alexan- who casts they. Ms rob was in this little town called florida. He came to see my play and he didn't know i could sing classical music. Because you don't think classical imperilling the be grateful lisera. That's how i got you mentioned. You mentioned something earlier. That i wanted to ask so you. Twenty twenty a lot of people in our profession in entertainment especially in march. I'm one of them. was definitely panicking Because you know lot a lot of artists they were coming or going you know. This is how i make my living and you know that. So i personally went through about a good six to seven weeks destroyed up like panicking about to lose everything you know so d- i will say that it takes a steady mind to navigate yourself out of that situation. How were you able to the first the first time around when you were about to lose everything in sort of not knowing where your career was going to go like what. How is your mind state. And that keeping slow and steady to get to a greener pasture. If you will a safer space that you can still be an like how. How were you able to to mentally overcome bet over payment. I don't know. I don't think i would call him in subtle. I was depressed. I was impressed repressed. But i believe you overcame. 'cause you're here speaking with right now and you you know but just at the time what i was saying was that after two months of just dominated lose everything we lose everything i had to stop sit silent and and restart get like you have to just really nothing else you can do. A part of a always had helped aid even going through the grant station. Hand money. I mean i was embarrassing. Shame but people came in eight and one of the things. I guess is outstanding about going on the road with michael matthews in the gospel shows. They really weren't saved. All i would say invited me to come out on road but auburn. I remember the first rehearsal. We'll stick his last name jackson. Good morning sates pace. Everybody has gone home. Run news always cussing and you know and michael would beforehand. And sometimes i will be just so broken at empire because i was to not just sit there but somebody will come and sit. I mean maybe. Come to my room to be with me. You don't have to talk. And i was spiritually oriented. It'd be dropped into that. You kind of discover going on. And what is saving and You charlie wilson right. Listen to eat his brother. Variety wilson was on on the road. I'm we used to call electrician. He's he's hilarious butter people. This is what they do. This is all they live On a course all the shows were about family in different situations some on raw whole point was you need jesus. But that's really what are am who i am. What happens is i go back and tell you some of these incidents that never currently to do anything harmful to myself. But i was not only figure anything but someone was came as what about this. How about this will need this. You know what was going on. Which may as it turned out as i know. There's no Coincidences coincidence accidents. Put me on the road within. Just what i was gonna get in a had filed bankruptcy so i didn't even have a bank account but he eighty seven thousand dollars cash every week marley of was i was alone. Arrogant special olympic singles. Wow but that's true. You know my first time going on tour in you kind of tool you've ride along. Highway travel tour buses in the bus driver. He prays before we go. The serious about it and Just just in amazing presence. I can say the presence of god not however you can describe it or not so good describing it all in time but i know you just are in. You're not by yourself. You might think you are actually speaking of which i totally forgot to mention. We should note that you were. Part of the ensemble cast of the fighting temptations show. What was it like doing that. Production fiance in cuba gooding junior walker eugene. Oj's virginia set several all of experiences. But i wasn't going to the movies or watching movies on tv. So i didn't know that could gooding. Junior was an accurate east side. For the i wouldn't i wouldn't. Nobody knew that. No you'll get it. You going over three acro- slips he was. He was training to be in the olympics. Oh look if you if you look really date myself here lionel. Richie closed i. Don't richard closed the one thousand nine hundred eighty four olympics in los angeles and cuba gooding junior was he's alfonso ribeiro of lionel ritchie's michael jackson At the at the closing ceremonies for the like tom and break dancing. And all that stuff. I did not know we. I'm telling you we have to get cuba orange show because he's amazing. He's a crazy story of ever heard emote like he's one of the most interesting people i know is like humid to that. They were nice people out. Say about being on saying she made. Everybody look shorten ugly. What what's he gonna do over the last song of the credits coming down. She she end zone. And i are starting down the runway. You know doing us. All them academic academics if i wanted to know advocate. Ot song that ns be shirley. Caesar seeing mass the check. I sell them. Tubas liberals are so fast florida. Can i get the whole story to let freedom ring from the song to the video to can. i just can get some love. Freedom ranks story Absolute well see all k- how on sabbatical i think i've gotten sick of no is taking time off was watching tv and i saw the n. Double acp awards. And they will. Dr dorothy height my goodness who that weighty i wanna meet her so i've found out how to get in touch us culture and she said why should come out with the family reunions. We do. My dad has a picture of you and dorothy. Hi my dad's a photographer in dc. Here's a picture y'all to et that black family reunion lion right not be a tool. I'm sorry i was at the time. Oh i mean. I was like one. She is younger than me. I started to travel with a doctor high end to the the the breakfast you know we had people like maxine waters and you know alexis. Herman alexis herman why i mean. I met correct scotty. Every with the black family reunion the jackson's campaign. This is crazy. I remember yes. That's where i first met clark sisters clocks a while changing or on let freedom ring by the story on that but was performing at one of the enemy. Reunions was that that's how it was. It was so exciting. She says well did you. Think something at Meetings are some of our meetings. Why don't you sing the national anthem at it. No we had one out okay. I'm sorry clear. Moore at all i found out about it and i was with representing time so i went to a person holds with at the same time was bbc. One is that a gospel artist was a label and You went by baby. One is for me and everybody else. Agnew from dion to. I'm trying to remember to take. Say wonder wonder how you would a bobby brown bobby brown by that was yes. And he was the green era girlfriend. Era by bobby didn't make it to the day of shooting. He was one of the only ones with a green screen right. I'm guessing right. How would they do a lot of about the video bobby on the greens green. Remember six virgin got a grammy nomination for recently crying. Fairly i think so. And who was the decision. Because i know. Jasmine guy is dope in her early history. But who'd made the decision to have a to have her dancing in the video. Probably debbie allen right because she direct direct to video return on sept antique directed and I think i think w was my under study in parallel. Was one of the batches dancing. A george all right. 'cause she did the or hotel the wonderful things later. Run row her concept and Had lou gossett do the narration on the audio version. It was jesse jackson okay. We got permission from n. Double acp square to be a thing. We wanted to donate all the all the fun and easy pay and it was my idea to have all different celebrities. Because i figured if i didn't we had a negro national anthem other people will do not think it was my hit record songs. My to have an. I did a may have done that wreck. I thought he was left. Free to ring waiter right so okay. Before before i wrap i gotta do. I mean because i have a lot a lot of them. I mean i could say in or just a little bit more love covenant you put of your of your songs of your arsenal. What songs are your personal favorites. I don't have personal favorites. I have favorites. People like an it favorite seemed to be loves coming at you and lean on me even to this so when you perform that to this day. Are you still as intense when you're performing it. Yeah because maybe it's because i'm still not really trained in certain way if i really focus in. Get everything out as scare to this day yet. It never goes away. It's like i can see that means you still care as with all i think so because you start in your focus you what am i doing is not sanctuary. Beforehand is because this is not something on. That's just naturally a okay out to take care of it so make sure everything is like to give you a run for dispersing of his senior. If i did watch so i can still get a close eye way. I was going to ask like. Have you ever been in a situation where you a horse one night or unable to kind of had to slide under the under the bar. Like y'all see bobby brown. You'll see okay now with so many times. I haven't had background cigarettes to do. What makes you panic can scare so. I'd probably prepare. I assure you that her audience would just sing the the the ad libs verbatim before we go. Can i ask boss. Because it's it's funny. We were talking about covert and stuff in. I'm just curious as for fans and stuff. We see you on denies the show. We see you all around. How can people continue to support you. I see you got a little post back there that your daughter might want you to shout out but i made for folks who want support as he can't come see you. She told me where i am on. Instagram told me on this graham at number one more to the right now is noble. More calm anywhere else service. And what's your daughter's name charlie. C. h. a. r. l. Charlie charlie charlie thing shirley get. Shut up I yeah. I gotta say that this this is definitely one of the silver linings of the covid era 'cause when i saw you on on the school i was like there's no way that that's actually melbourne. More possible was the squirrel. Oh i'm sorry this. When when when i'm dj -ing and i could see who's in the room in the comments in the comments. And i'm like oh my goodness thank you. Yeah i'm just you know this is one of the the the few bright spots of twenty twenty which you know i can have a conversation in linkup with with my childhood heroes in. You're definitely a hero. I thank you for sharing your story with us on the show and everything that you've contributed. Yes i'll say you know. I've heard about you quest and i was very very much intimidated because you are a walking encyclopedia. Just fortunately decided to come to mind lane. Let me be comfortable. I really thank you for that. You could really take somewhere else of say. I seen you play to play some no no all things to you and i appreciate it Yeah this is one for the books. Leasing jomon melba moore on quest love supreme on behalf of bigalow Sugar steve and To goodbye sugar steve. Thank you i have. I have your nineteen seventy one album. God his it always counts An lee bill. The team supreme. And we'll see on this go round of course love supreme. Thank yell something. Make sure you keep up with us on instagram at cumulus and let us know what you think. Saddam don't forget to subscribe. So i guess i love. Supreme is a production of iheartradio for more podcasts. For my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years and counting and the all new two thousand and twenty one f. One fifty is completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f. One fifty ever to help make work more productive. 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ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 3

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

51:14 min | 2 years ago

ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 3

"Move. Happy election day, people hours. Right. Well, they know they they've been kind of out there. We know today's the day duck it, no duck. Oh, no. I promise you radio TV yard signs billboards. I trust. Somebody just heard me say happy election. It was like oh snap. That is today watches Paul is open. So vote often photo pose ever closed close. All right. Here's Paul's always brought to you by Buffalo Wild Wings wings. Sports. Twenty eight to fourteen last night, Monday night, football key. It's going on. It's going on with your Cowboys. What's going on with Dak going on with Jay Jason Garrett going on with Jerry nothing? Good is going on in down. Nothing's going on in Dallas. I think that when you look at starting with the offense align that's a little older banged up. Playing at the level that he played two years ago. Trump's rhetoric out fat Frederick Zeile debt Prescott. If you look at him. He's not the quarterback of two years ago. He's certainly regressed in this situation. Then they go out in a utilized Amari Cooper at the bare minimum. It seemed like to me instead of just forcing him to force. Feeding him the football. I think he could have been a difference maker there because certainly he had an opportunity when he had the opportunities. He certainly called the ball will and delivered the defense at times gave up the goods mariota. But it was also a positive sign for for Rabl in what he was doing with the Tennessee titans. The coaching staff forget all that where you apologized to America for all those great things you said about who was going to be good. They need Tamari dot com dot is a quarterback. You gotta pay him. Raj. Will you apologize? Stop trying to put words in my mouth, dude. Stop it. If you want me just to say that I thought the debt Prescott would be playing better by this time. Yes, did I think that that? I think that he would be playing much better this season. Of course, Zeki Elliott back in the line. Of course. But it hasn't happened. I'm Jay Z cost himself the opportunity to get signed again or are gonna get it any it has it in as it. They got one year. They. Continue to figure out what. Page tag, take figure out what that is later on down the line kick, the can down the road and try to do it. But I'll have one and so at the end of the day there. There's no rush to pay him it you can. Back somewhere. You could find another guy if you choose to do. So she'll be nice used round pick on what I think though is there. They've set themselves up will in terms of their offense for the future, depending on who comes in as an offense of minded coach that understands how to utilize all of those skill sets that they have you said in your talking about what they're gonna do in the future, an offense of minded coach that you've already in your mind. I think in my mind, I think Jerry Jones mind they've already moved on from Jason Garrett. Harry is we asked the question about the coaching staff last night in his response. Listen, he won't even say his name. And it's not an issue. Whether it's head coach or offense coordinator coaching issue. Here was they did a heck of a job coaching job out there giving their Tennessee there. Do they did have had a good game plan? They came in. They were able to stop. For whatever reason to keep us from put some pressure on. And couldn't get some of the throws off. Maybe we would have wanted to get off look at it. I thought they did some pretty good things and the defensive front got to. That. Impacted. Well, again out of I don't get into plays or games impacting confidence on any coach. He did for him to say, I don't get involved in any coach or player. He does he has and he will moving forward. So when he plays, but but when he refuses to address it he very clearly is displeased, they're very clearly gonna move on from him. You've been saying it that this was the latte. So one do now why not just. This is why Aikman just to quote, the great. Troy Aikman recently said in the interview with three thirteen ten the ticket, quote, go through the mist and this team over a period of time has been what has been it hasn't always matter who the head coach has been to me. If you're asking me I'd say there has to be complete overhaul of the entire organization now in quote now as far as I concern key Troy is talking about the guy who says I'm not involved with the decisions in terms of plays as well. He's also talking about the leadership of Jerry Jones because let's face it. This team hasn't really mattered in the playoffs much longer than Jason Garrett Jones has been twenty kosten. He's been the consta-. So so what would do you believe would both the you believe one at a time? Now, no step on each other. What are you? What are you Travis? How start? All right. What do you believe? Jerry Jones has an is doing wrong. I think that he first of all is way involved in something that he is not an expert in which is which is in in the idea of being involved in the draft being the general manager of the team that this. He is a businessman and in a very very good one. He's director is good at understanding how to make a buck. He's been great at squeezing every last dollar out of the Cowboys. That's a credit to him. But when it comes to constructing roster building team drafting a guy making a decision on trade for a wide receiver those decisions invariably have been somewhere between not great too awful. That's where I think he's way involved. Well, here here's what I'm gonna say. Jerry Jones is involved. He's he is the the last guy to sign off. But there's a collective group of individuals that compile the information and help make decisions on who to go out who sign all sorts of things. So it's not him solely alone. That's one of the reasons. Troy say what he said about a complete overhaul of the entire speech. Aw. Who hired all those people to help make the decisions. What do you believe in? The problem is I believe that if an organization, regardless of industry has been unsuccessful for two decades, you have to always look at what has been the consistent factor over the course of those two young. It hasn't been the players and has been the coaches has been the stadium, but it has been Jerry Jones. So whether that means Jerry needs to take a less of a role in terms of the fund decision-making terms of personnel decisions or evaluations, or it means he maintains his role, but have different advisors to help fund the information to him, but something in the decision making process needs to be drastically changed because for two decades you've had this failure. And you have to look at the consistent factors of that. Fillion right now all was appointed j just so as I start to look at the Dallas Cowboys and understand that whole. Oh processor putting the roster and a team together. I don't think there's anything wrong to a degree with the roster team. But what do you think rush? Well, I think there's a reason we have a coach for eight years at someone hand picked, and he's still there these people that you spoke of be Neath him that help valuate and come up with these decisions only one man hired him. I think he held onto people emotionally too long when he should get rid of them sooner yourself being one of them. I'm just bad like us. Yeah. Yeah. And in case, you're asking I do have a poll, by the way who gets the blame for the Cowboys woes. Is it that Prescott Jason Garrett or Jerry Jones early poll results show, sixty two percents? A Jerry Jones thirty eight say Jason Garrett. No one is blaming Dak Prescott. So here here's what I was saying about the Jerry Jones situation Jerry Jones, if you want to blame me for anything Jerry Jones has drafted will. He has picked players that have been pro bowlers. They've done a tremendous job with the talent dissemble, whether it's low price free agent guys come in and started for them. That's not the problem. The problem is the staff he hasn't had a coach that demanded anything from him coach stay there. No, I get it. That's the problem. The problem is the coaching the last guy that told Jerry Jones get away who's Bill Parcells and at that time and work. The Cowboys has started to get build it the way they needed. Two way Philip took over they went fourteen and two it then all of a sudden built that team, right? They were doing the moment thing. And then all of a sudden it went south. He got more of a guy who control that's the problem. He has to get a guy in there like a Sean Payton, that's not going to stand there and let Jerry. Dictate everything it's really hard to overcome meddlesome involved ownership in less. It's just scratching checks. That's that's what you want. And that's not exactly what the Lakers get blowed out by the raptors. But that doesn't mean that some guys aren't going out afterwards. Where next release a market has. Everybody least monitors. Today is national saxophone day. People say Nacho day. How do you? How do you sell saxophone in Spanish saxophone falls? The same the same word. Phone you need to give me. Buddies actually shut up on the children the trigger. Lettuce. That's his last name Jose let you he's a leasing. Jose sexy phone. My free. What else Caesar? Ruge? Microgram? Baby spinach. Little Chris Christine, e yeah. Christina avocado spread across. All right. So Lakers got blowed out. The raptors fell behind by was twenty seven in the first quarter set a restaurant in the process at a party and LeBron after the game, according to TMZ attended ditties. Forty ninth birthday party is in West Hollywood, he hung out with LL cool J Courtney Kardashian. Usher, Mary j bly and kid Capri. I like old party. So it sounds fun. I mean, I mean, I knew everybody. You like usher. Marriage. Jay, did he? Lebron's old or not that owed me not as a bunch of them covering up, the knees. You. Knees man, because you know, you got the fold over when you get older close pan. Hi. But everybody's complaining about not everybody. But obviously it is brought up because people are questioning whether or not LeBron should have been there because Lakers got handled by Toronto. And he decided after the game, and he was going to go. Enjoy a, you know, a moment with some old time France in people were like, oh, it should have been concentrating on watching film, basically. Well, you saying if people are upset, I don't even know that's true. I think it's what are these things that we anticipate the reaction that because LeBron is out, and we we heard from some callers earlier, you know, why is he out there should be of home getting ready for the next game. I think that is an incredibly small slice of people that are genuinely offended by LeBron James or or really any. I mean, I it depends first of all on who we're talking about. If we're talking about a guy that's constantly in trouble talking about Adam pacman Jones, then it's like, okay? This is a guy. That's always having an issue. So maybe he shouldn't. Be out at night doing these sorts of things. Maybe LeBron who's never been in trouble never been out of shape who's never been shot showing up for a game later. There's no negativity surrounding LeBron at all off the court. He wants to go party who gives a damn then go to a party. I mean, especially considering whose party it was. I mean, it's it was my party. That's good. That's fine too. What if it was like export initially? Why can't go to drugs board which numbers has been a good number thirty for your? Forty nine forty nine. It's like right before you turn fifty. Decided to go to Drake's party. So why is Drake's party different? Why LeBron does is long as he shows up ready to play the show? He always shows. I don't care about any professional athlete that Desai's at at the end of a game win lose trou- that they want to go out in enjoy themselves. Whenever that is wherever that isn't. However, it is as long as they do there's opposed to do the next night that they gotta play care less. They show up to work. I don't care. What? Right. Do we have to tell a guy who's a professional athlete? Just because I have you can't do x y and z, but a normal human being that doesn't play a sport. That's a doctor lawyer, whatever the case is he can go and go hang out, and do whatever you want to you want him to operate on. That's good. You want him to defend you in court. That's okay. But the moment that a celebrity. Style athlete Desai's and he's going to go to a party or goal on a short vacation put it take. Glibly the athletes because if an anger shows the party, no, he says, hey, why don't you read your script? Exactly ready to know the blocking of the next scene. That is true. But that's not apples to apples either. Actors and actresses singers, the aren't necessarily doing things for a team that should know once cheering for Hema. Well, he mean rhapsody, no one says no running around t shirts saying I'm team Queen. And I want this movie to do really where I went to a parade. Yeah. I know you did. But you are with the makers you are with the dodgers. And it's a combination of things. So what? The fact that you've got blowed out and the entire team tire. Is the fact that there's controversy or conversations about your slow start. And what's going with you'll slow start? If they were nine in one TMZ prior wouldn't even wouldn't even bother but recognizing that they're not nine in one that the below five hundred that he is the Brown, James. They look tied to dig it blowed out. And then immediately afterwards on the same day, you go out on a Dan what you suppose look tired. Then I understand why people, but he does say he was tired. That's people creating this narrative that he dog are som-. Tired? He didn't tell you. You don't have to tell you hit a jump shot. I saw you hit the looking at him and saying, oh, he tired that doesn't meet just because he's sweating. Well, he realized down thirty. So what's the point is he juncture, he listen, I love me. Some the Brian damn James. I've seen him play me a thousand games, maybe more. I know when he looks tired. He did not look like LeBron James. And even he said some days, you don't have it doesn't mean he doesn't mean he's time. Maybe he just doesn't have it. Maybe just doesn't fill up to running up and down the court. Doesn't mean entire time. That's just. Not to do it. Maybe maybe it was down so far. He was like, well, we're not going to get back in. Travel stop. There are some Laker fans. I trust on their Twitter handles. And because I don't watch everything you don't trust the damn fan. Well, they watch the game. And so the games have been a little concerned of the passiveness. So or some say being tire and us our Twitter Twitter people us, oh, the it's an interesting point he brings out, and I think that there's a school thought that LeBron is doing something that is not unprecedented in his career. We'll talk about it next sitting listening to some damn fan. People go vote. Open for ninety minutes. Yes. Yes. Speaking of polls. Raj are cowboy pull your cowboy poll. Well, Michael Raja's poll out Rogers cowboy pool. Oh. Raj. How's your bowl? How is it? Very strong. So far funny. Travis we have of course, the poll who gets the blame for the Cowboys failures five percent blame it on deck. Thirty two percent bring blame it on Jason Garrett. A whopping sixty three percent blame Keyshawn zone. Jerry jones. Rogers police brought to you by Buffalo Wild Wings wings. Beer sports. Yes. Extra crispy off? Let's limit pepper isn't Christmas. Right. So we. Cowboys football. No, let's talk about LeBron because we're talking about anyone out. We're talking about that he went to should've gone out. And now, he's fine. But it's interesting the bra if you look at the bronze numbers, they're entirely in line with what he's done is in tire career that he's right? And if you watch the games LeBron has moments where he looks like LeBron he's playing like LeBron. But. Have you guys seen the LeBron that we've seen when the brunt is fully invested when LeBron is fully in LeBron because the Braun that I'm seeing right now is it's a the the performances in the effort is a he's giving you exactly what you would expect to get. But it's not exactly what we expected to get in the sense that it's Fulla Braun full investment full speed ahead at all time. So maybe he's picking his spots. Maybe he's pacing himself. We've done this before. But there's also a little bit of feels like it's felted other times when he's doing what he does. But not fully engaged to the way that he has win he's competing for championships. And and the question is why I think it's just ten games in is that all it is. And it's the regular season LeBron James leading the team in minutes. But that's minutes. He's on the court that's necessarily minutes in which he's going full out. And you know, there have been a series of stories that were certainly done over the last two years that look down the bronze James's energy, exertion, and and miles or feet traveled during possessions versus others. And so even though he's leading the team in all these statistical categories he is very smart picking and choosing his moments key because is just ten games in but it's two regular season. And you don't get to be LeBron James and the finals for eight straight years by treating the regular season to go. Well, you have to treat the regular season. It is to go to a degree to get to to be able to get to the playoffs would be able to get to the finals. He I wouldn't suggest doing just enough. But he certainly the great ones turn it up in the postseason. I mean, we talk about the Kershaw. You want to call it in the postseason. You take it to the next level the regular season you doing well. But for whatever reason in the postseason of play the prime time games things that nature guys can play at the same level. But it seems like they're taking it to another level. Because it's the only game in town see only show available. So if you look if you took his ten games in this first portion of the season in you for whatever reason moved it and put it into the postseason even like damn the Bronx, killing you would honestly say that because it's the post season. But because it's the first ten games in regular season. You just sit back ego AMIS? Okay. This is this is imagine if javale McGee. Yeah. Play the same way he's been playing in the postseason. Not was sitting there going Dami might be this this this isn't a stats because like I said the numbers are almost identical to where he's been first career first career. He averages. Twenty seven point two right now, he's averaging twenty six point eight you're talking about a half a point difference. Not a difference s now he's seven point seven this season for its career seven point to a half an assist better down rebound seven point six to seven point four virtually is slowing down. So it's it, but it's an eye test thing, and it feels to me that when you watch him. He's evaluating what's going on with this team as much as we are that he's he's so talented. He's so good. And he's so smart that he can go through and play at a very high level. But it's also one of these wanna see what all you guys are about right now. I wanna see with coaching staffs about what to see what my teammates are about. I want to see what this is. And I'm not gonna give you all of it right now part of it is the regular season part of it is what you were saying you're saying key. But also just if you really watch and you've seen LeBron at his best. And what you're seeing right now, there's a difference in engagement level, it's subtle, but it's there. No, I agree with you. And you know, we talked about this before. Season started. How obviously the one year deal veterans are dishing. But also, the young guys are additioning. I I've said it countless times keep on saying the roster. They start the season with it's not going to be the one they finished with. But who just moving win is all contingent upon this addition process now, I would like to think the raise Mondo and jail McGee and land Stevenson have all earned their stripes for sure all proven that. Okay. These are great moves. Michael Beasley probably didn't work out. You know? But that's okay. It's only. But what was Michael Beazley's role supposed to really be about this come in once in a while trying to get a bucket once in a while, actually. But don't wasn't expected him to carry always carry the team because that would be crazy, but you wasn't expected for him to give you much more than what he probably is giving you. But he hasn't give you anything you want. Name to be a part of the rotation because I wasn't I was expecting what I was expecting particularly with the one year guys was for them to be auditioning as well. These are minutes that need to be used who's going to claim these minutes mass TVs and gut the minutes put a chokehold horn and said these minutes on mine, Michael Beasley, had the same Tunde. But he didn't come with the same result. That's what I meant in terms of. Then I give me anything you had a chance. Chance but took it and you didn't maybe it was never really managed to be given to him. It was more. Like, he is now just a body that fills up the twelve or so chairs there that if if Dyer knee comes you kinda use him in a certain situation a row, maybe that was a plan all alone. Even though he probably thought that he was going to be able to get minutes of buckets. That's why he's kinda signed a couple of the same type of players perhaps. But my larger point in terms of what you were saying with the point and watching to see what happens you're looking to see which pieces fix which ones. Don't. And then also which pieces that if you were to move to different piece, you can find enough duplication are in the squad. She won't lose anything. That's all proud of this evaluation process. Lebron for magic for rob the fit thing is what's interesting to me. Because if LeBron wanted to go full Braun to save Luke he could if he wanted to go out there and give us that just to just to end the story to get us to go above five hundred to go on a streak where you win four five or eight neuro or or eight of ten or whatever it is. And it just seems like he's in this evaluation mode and not just his teammates. But the coaching staff is well, just let's see exactly what this is. He did it with their expulson. He did it with David Blatt. He's done it with other guys before we comes in. It's like you could never watch game other than maybe that. Final against Dallas and say, LeBron not engaged at all. He's he's engaged. He's present. He's doing it. But it's just one of those is he all in on this right now. And I don't know if the answer is yes yet. I think he's being here. But I don't know if he's all in on this group in by the group, I'm talking about teammates and staff he's all in on his teammates for sure I can't tell you about the staff, but I've never seen the branches be a bad team or someone who doesn't support his teammates that doesn't mean that you're going to be long for this world. Yeah. It just means that as long as you are part of this world. He's got your back. I'm wondering if he's satisfied with his number two. That's the question I part of the evaluation process, and what everyone's asking who's Robin. We don't know yet. I don't I don't know if that answers actually happened yet. No. And so, you know, the evaluation process, I would think he is still trying to figure out not just you know, the entire makeup of the team. But whose number two God that you can turn to when it's really time to lock things up like a Cairo. A D. Wade break time. If you didn't like what the dodgers did during the postseason. You're not going to like. Plus, Sean McVeigh is talking about his defense. He's got some. He's got some thoughts. You'll hear him next. We can't judge things based on single moved here. And there we just have to trust overall process. And as far as that goes, we have complete confidence for the process. How much should they? Well, that's, you know, again, accepting your friends that there's blame to be given. Well, there's going to be some blame to begin when you lose the World Series two years in a row. That's dodgers. General men are hand Zaidi talking with the press. I gotta be honest. When you hear the phrase, you've got to trust the process, it makes me think of the Sixers who've accomplished nothing I know that they got some good players through the draft by trusting the process, but I don't know if that's a mantra that you try to steal from someone else when it's identified with being terrible. Well, yeah, I was trying to George at about the Philadelphia seventy Sixers for a couple of years, but you've got to trust the process it's security situation that we're in guys because why so because when one hand we have skipper we have a managerial team that has produced a tremendous amount of success in a relatively short period of time. We spent way too much time on the Cowboys and then ineptitude for the past two decades. This is what you want the Cowboys to be. Like what the dodgers have right now winning division titles in the championship round back to back years. Why aren't we satisfied weren't we happy? Why are we able to enjoy this ride that were on is it because as a fan based that our expectations are ridiculous is it because we've been thirsty for three decades. And which is so close that we can almost tasted then against yanked away by what we think are bad decisions. Or is it simply the fact that, you know, fandom stands for fanatics. And fanatics aren't logical people. It's all of it. I it's never won in you. I think yet second it's been thirty years. So that that's a big part of it. It's Kirk Gibson's home run was a long time gone. But it was in color. It was wasn't. I was in high school Travis shaneco alone time ago whenever they will him out there and he's barely walking around like Dan boy logo. Well, he's going through some stuff. I mean, we're talking Michael Jackson bad. Yeah. He. It's been a long time. The expectations are a part of it. The other part of it too is is that this is the next step in the progression of what they've gone through. They went from winning the division again bounced in the NFC s they've been going through some things that that he's been going through to the World Series to the NLC s to go into this to go into the World Series to winning the world. It's what's next on the list, and they haven't gotten there. So that it's stalled in this particular spot. I think is why people are frustrated you think we stall or do you think we've regressed I think. Stall stall go game seven with homecourt advantage. The next year. You lose game five you don't have home critically. I think you you've also played against a better ball club in Boston. I would say the u d it overall against Houston a year before when your team was slightly better that same year you played Houston than they were last this past season against Boston slightly bit. See I felt both years at AOL teams, better know, said better black. Boston was better blouse was Ben better. Boston was better. And you were not as good as you were a year ago. If that if our team from year ago who went to seven plays Boston this year, the dodgers, probably, okay. But let's say that just still foreheads line. Let's assume the premise of your point is right that the Astros were better as well. And the Red Sox were both better. The dodgers went to game seven with the Astros that chance to win the World Series. Even though it was a five game series other than game five daughters in every game. Yeah. The dodge this this was a pitch. This was an at bat. This was a decision that could sway. This wasn't a the Yankee series where the Red Sox the Red Sox just times. And it's like, okay. That's just not gonna go that way do Rosh on his, hey different this time. And so when you hear Zaidi say, hey, look, this is what we do. And here's the quote, he's saying the World Series MVP was a guy who matched up some and platoon. Um this year. And he's talking about how you know, you just the match ups and the platoon sometimes they work sometimes they don't, and if they're going to roll it again and hope that the math works because we we've discussed it. The math works over six months. The math works over one hundred sixty two games. The math works over thousands of decisions that get made over the course of a season. But to just say it works in the proof is in the put. Yeah, it does if you're taking a giant slice, but I've to make a decision Pedro bias or Alex wood in the moment. I know the math is telling me one thing. But in the moment, I need to have a manager. I need to have a front office. I need to have some players that are flexible enough to say, I know what the math says don't do this. This is what we need to do at. That guy's throwing one hundred leave him it. Yeah. You know, it's. Is hard to hard to argue against the numbers in our understand. Why people contain to lean against a numbers went on else fails because at the end of the day. The predictability of the numbers pretty sound. Otherwise wouldn't be there. So I get it left hand here right hander here this guy matches up here. But you do the math when it comes to the eyeball test. You have to be on a extremely long leash in order to get away with going away from what has been statistically proven? Because you have a feeling because that's a sensually. What you're doing is saying I know what the evidence says. But my gut says, okay. And and to be able to do that, you gotta have the ultimate trust completely agree. And you're right to just all of a sudden show up one day and say I've turned left here every day today. I'm right. I get it. I get it. But the right makes a lot more sense when you can say, look, we went left all season long. But the last four times gun left the old Alex wood left hand, turn has ended up with the ball in the seats this guy. I know it's not what I've done. But tonight, he's blowing guys away. My left has just blown the game for me every single time brought him in there. That's not an indefensible. I felt something. That's this guy's been getting lit. This guy hasn't role in with this. That's a different in the in the context of the moment. It's not totally out of the blue. No, no, I agree. But but even within that you still need a front office that supports kind of flexibility which leases to the larger question who's really managing the team. Yeah. It's a Dave. And the numbers presented front of him with the numbers being led by you know, I think crew Dave's managing the team in the sense that it's his responsibility. Sure that the twenty five guys in his clubhouse understand their roles that the twenty five guys to have relationships with them the sense that and I don't even know if it's that they like him or that they trust you. But at least that they know that he's going to shoot him straight that he's going to tell them what it is that his expectations are to make sure that everybody understands their role in the team when it comes to who pitches which inning and what the batting order is on any given night. And when we're gonna pull a guy out. I don't know how much he has to do with that is just the tip of the spirit. He does it the decision been made on a I wouldn't wanna put him in a box like that. I think he makes that decision on the line of card all little sorting. But I think there's analytics there that certainly helped him to a degree understand just like any other scouting report would be in a sport understands what he's facing what he's going up against. I don't wanna make it seem as though he's a would you call another puppet? But just. Yeah. A puppet or button push. Yeah. Whatever those. Derogatory terms like to describe the skipper. I would say that he certainly has more input than that type of guy because that was the case the dodgers can get me or you to do it. Because when his skill set is is it's not just remove Pedro buys and put an Alex would because he's a former major leaguer because he's a former major leaguer with success because he spent a lot of time in dugout clubhouse. He can relate to players in a certain way, talk to them in their language talked to them in something that they understand. It's not you. And I couldn't go in there. Obviously, I don't mean you, and I literally I'm talking about if we were baseball people think now now we're closer to the answer. I think it we're getting closer to the point where his long as a guy has you look at AJ Hinch doesn't have a ton of playing some. But getting to be getting more and more guys that are just use the example, again, the when the angels hired Brad Osman who was mediocre in Detroit. The answer was he understands the math it translate. He'll do what we tell them to do with the math. He woke me neocon, Detroit. But not as a player. No. As a manager has a manager. But we're getting close to a great player to to not. No, you don't be a guy who how to manage the situation. Need to be a guy that will take the math and use the math Mike socia- where they were for years and years they were trying to figure some because he was a guy that wouldn't use the Matt he used the gut he used instinct, and he wanted to leave him a long time ago and. Get your name is chain your fan diehard. You see it already the freeway you're going to play it. Anyway. Dodging garage where the dodgers are going to be better next year for a couple of different. No one they get their arguably their best player back. They played. They went to the World Series last year. Best player missing virtually the entire season. Justin Turner, presumably will be hurt or will be healthy for an entire season. Cory Seager coming back is Matt course, better player, Manny Machado, Charleston, all star. Maybe an MVP one day. So as core Seger. You get him back. He's a guy that probably strike out less than Machado. You get you get back. He's he stays. You've got an ace in Walker. Bueller? Who's for rookie of the year? Who's going to go do what he does. You've got reuse a free agent. You got to figure out there. You're getting we have Travis. Do we have a week? Can we question? Maybe maybe can we get trout. He's not your angel. He's not up yet. I think you go break the Bank and go get Harper or any of the that doesn't work house. He's still MVP candidate. Anyway, who might try route? Because he's the best player in the league at any another ward man when I saw his name flash cross. I was like come on you won't win. No, he won't win. Well, it depends at this. This is the oldest argument in the world. Or what are we talking about the best player or the guy who was the most valuable? I know that the MVP by definition the part, but it usually goes to the best player finished third games out of first place. Man, how you an MVP list Mitro because he's really good baseball. He's the he's the best ever in baseball there. Meanwhile, they're meanwhile, he's one zero. That's why I say you not the best. That's why I think the Mike trout argument is why the dodgers need to be cautious in pursuing somebody like Bryce Harper. I like his hair. I it's nice hair. I get I get that. But if you're going to dump thirty five million or thereabouts on one guy where we just did it for Kershaw. And it's you and I. Not a great plan. Guys. There's an important list that came out today. So you know, that gets me to thinking about hump damn last man standing tomorrow. Some of these people Cording to people. People you say some of these people will according to people magazine. Good job reading this up this episode or this. What do you call it another episode, but installment segment segment? What would you have a magazine this one? Yeah. That's the issue. Well, we have a new sexiest man alive. So I what Keyshawn nothing. I'm listening. So tell me I'm gonna give me the last tense in no particular order sexiest man alive. According to people magazine going on your first. Give me one. Matthew, mcconaughey? Come on, man. On there. Oh, I thought it was a little kid's name that was Michael Jackson. Coco. This ain't gone. Guy. All right. Matthew, mcconaughey? Hey. No, he's not on. Now. Stand quick, Johnny Depp. Johnny Depp, two thousand nine Matthew McConnell. Bradley Cooper, Bradley Cooper, two thousand you're out. You're out kesha. You don't get to play anymore. L D your turn George Clooney, George Clooney. Year. But I know he's on there. Brad, Pitt Brad Pitt. Very handsome is Brad Pitt not on here. Let's see. No. I'm sorry. Tails you win. Well, guess what this year if this year in two thousand no this year? It was aegis Elvis Driessen Elba. L every new that. Okay. Why don't you answer because we wasn't talking about previous it last ten. This is one of the last. Production meetings. You need to do. Don't rock the rock. Does that count names? Dwayne clam. It is Dwayne Dwayne Dwayne Wayne Johnson. David beckham. Chris hemsworth. Adam the von. Lavine whatever who's that Channing Tatum, rockstar, whatever who's Adam LeVine. Yeah. Ryan reynolds. Jackson who Jackson, Hugh? I don't think he got fired. Coach to Brown jacket was. He's jackson. You can't do this to be the sexiest man alive in two thousand. What station are you getting sexiest man alive? Spion traffic. Full ID in Los Angeles. John. When he was in the sexiest man alive deal. Jon Gruden have. We have a correction what Mackey McConnell who was on there to my sent not on the list. I have got to run rundown. Sexiest man alive. No since I'm like with. If it had a hill Brad, Pitt like if math econo- Hayes, not on it, not going to the white people ain't gonna go for that. Home alone. All downhill. Tinos the sexiest man. You know, how hot is goals the white people? You have a movie coming out new song or new TV show? Usually those things go hand handsome man would at our coach the Rams after Travis see that translates. I went to Jon Gruden. Walk around magazine. No, stop it. What I a lot. First of all, why was he in the magazine? He was he was I don't know if he was it was issued. It was the sexiest man or parts of sexy is man alive at a top fifty Beauce top fifty most beautiful. That's what it was was top fifty most beautiful people magazine, and he was in there. He was any walkies walk around bad spider two banana slice. Slice out the back. Z talk. Crazy, Matthew don't fit out where to finish. This was the daily top fifty jet magazine. No, I'll talk on that. Remember the little magazine. Jan is still available is really. Live saliva kicking unison them still the number one advertiser member Virginia. But. Cousin? I I knew. Sweat till you probably knew at that time frame probably knew about just about four or five of the beauty of the weeks. Just knew him because they was from LA or it was great. How would you just know because it was young model? You know? No. All the white people that are listening. What are you guys talking about? Oh. Slim's lady of the week. What does jet? Jim we have our people. Magazine jet magazine centerfold. So yes, a very small magazine. It was very thin. It was a small little deal. There was like this. Yeah. Basically it had probably forty pages. Maybe. It was about us the things that we accomplished as an African American community. Okay. Jesse Jackson was always pays to. Every now, and then they had a sports one or two pages for sport. Michael, Jordan, or a young college athlete who accomplished something graduation every. Every. Started as a joke. But did you ever go on in jet magazine? Jank. Oh, yeah. We could wait to get you back. Pitcher pitching to carry my phone is jet magazine cloth. Graduated from USC this is from this. I wanna see that. The Michael Thompson picture. Remember coming to America? Yes. The beauty contest. Would you have the sensually that was jet magazine? Okay. All right says from jet magazine. Let me think there you go. All right. Right. Jet Mandela graduate account. All right. Charles because the largest society when allow us to be celebrated as beautiful along with the rest of society. So we had to create our own Evy magazine. You heard ebony magazine. Yeah. A lot of the beauty. I knew I knew that jet magazine was a magazine for African Americans. But I for all for everybody. Insane. Centerfold featured wishes. Rhetoric. Advertisement. Guess black folk when they smoke cigarettes was Virginia slim Newport. Yeah. We do ports slam. We didn't have you know, no-ball camera. Marble and camel didn't make it in. They went interested in advertising. The Rams now I is making a beautiful black people saw McVeigh. Is that a smooth transition John Nick day was asked about Marcus Peters was asked about his defense. And he says that he's not that worried interesting that he say when you listen to his post game comments because most coaches was surely claimed that they didn't hear anything that an athlete's it because it wasn't listening or paying attention. That's various student of him to understand that it's important that he's listening to his players that was Sean McVay, tugging on the Sean McVay show Mondays at six right here on ESPN LA, but he's talking about Marcus, Peter. Specifically isn't a Marcus Peters issue as Marcus Peters. What is not working with his defense? Or is it all of it? I mean drew Brees didn't hit the deck on Sunday air got a hand on him once or twice. But there were no sacks. They got very little pressure on him. Here's what I would say. I think it's a little bit of all of DeMarco was on with us earlier. And he was saying basically, it's a bodies out there. That's that's on the field to degree it is. But it's also part of the defensive. Coordinated understand that Marcus Peters has struggled all day long with Michael Thomas nepotism, who's my nephew who lit them up. Okay. So you don't put him in a blitz zero situation with the game on the line and think that he's going to win when he had won all day long. I don't care how much confidence you have any at that moment in time. You find he's going to beat you again, you you find something else to counterbalance what Michael Thomas has been doing to you all day long. You don't leave him out there on an island in the slot with all that room and all that feel to operate on in much coach McVay said he got him on a release at once. You get him on the releases nothing he could do. Anyway, he's six foot four this. Do you ain't got you lose anyway? But how much of that though had to do with the fact that they would decided to pick their poison. In other words, they weren't very effective against the run either. So was it simple. Like, okay. Are we going to get gas? This way are gonna go get gas. Away because we hadn't been able to stop either aspect of their off. But at the same time, they didn't go seventy two run into ball. You know, are we overstating this a little bit though? Here's the thing. And look they give forty five point. So forty four point eleven eleven and forty five is forty most points of any team. They gave up in a forty five and they've eleven eleven but they plus thirty to everybody that offense was good. Yeah. That's the NFL. Now, the this isn't this the NFL. Now if you're playing a good offense, they're going to score thirty points. Just like the Rams the Rams scored thirty points every week to there a good offense. The saints are good offense. Minnesota's good offense. These are the teams that we're talking about that can score points. The Rams only gave up ten points in the second half that couple of weird things happened towards the end of that first half Jared Goff. Threw an interception on a short field. They got a quick touchdown. They gave up a couple of big place. You get some touchdowns. And I understand that all these things at up to forty five. But in the second half the saints only score ten. Yeah. What did they win by? I I hear you the key the point that they didn't get gashed all they got gashed for a half. And they gave up a big play your nephew made more better in the second. They made those adjustments in you can look at it a lot of different ways. All it took for me to do. Was have more points than you. We tied the score. They tied the score at thirty shut up. They tied the score at thirty five thirty five. It was tied. It was dead. Even was a lot. But what did they do? They got ten more than you. They went up and got ten in the second half. When you didn't get that ten to tie it back up. You didn't get that three when you decided to fake it. And oh, everybody says what I was standing right there looked like a I. It looked like a first down. What are you looking at his knee hit the ground? You're and a half for the marker. If I could see it in a refs Ghezzi, how come Sean McVay and the rest of the people couldn't see that was a mistake that was made in my opinion that was critical in the game from a coaching staff point, you take entry. I hear that three. And you probably would be in the situation. I plan the way that you play because you didn't have to force yourself at the end of the have to try to throw the football to get some points before the have it costs you the one that. I didn't love the decision to fake fake feel. Roger I didn't like it. That wasn't my point. My point was that we're talking about this defense like it's a hopeless situation. It's not it's fixed. Marcus Peters has not played well for a month or more and they've given up a lot of yards. A lot of points drew Brees walking straight out of New Orleans and straighten in the hall of fame. He gonna do a lot of people. That's actually he's going to do that to a lot of people and the Rams in the second half defensively were and I've watched all these. Games. The Rams are always better in the second half defensively than the on. The I I think that's a credit to Wade that he does make some pretty shrewd and astute adjustments. It's just that when the other guys got Michael Thomas drew Brees. They're going to get some. You're not going to pitch a shutout against those guys. They're going to get some the question is when and in a when I when I think about the things that went wrong for the Rams on Sunday. The one that keep thinking about is when the big plays happen when do they occur? And if you know that. Yeah. Marcus peters. He isn't totally the Blaine. But windy gotta have something. That's we can go that to me is the larger problem is knowing that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We're in a dogfight win a dogfight. But when it's money time, I can just pick on this guy. Right. Guy. Go get him or go. Down down. There you go. Put the red lot on. Jon Gruden is coming up with more things to try and fix the raiders. None of them are going to work. Here's what he's got going next as.

LeBron James Jerry Jones dodgers Travis shaneco Cowboys Jay Jason Garrett Rams football Troy Aikman jet magazine people magazine Lakers Prescott Jason Garrett Jones Jon Gruden Dak Prescott America Dallas Marcus Peters
Remembering Emmett Till | 7

American History Tellers

41:38 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Emmett Till | 7

"<music> imagine it's august twenty eighth nineteen sixty three and you are in the nation's capital. You are joined by two hundred fifty thousand people here on this day to be a part of history. You're used to crowd you happen to be a professional basketball player but this is something else you had no idea it would be this big of an event win on a whim you borrowed a car and drove to dc last night. When you arrive you got out and walked around picked out the perfect spot from which to view the event and organiz responded responded you sized you up and then asked if you'd volunteer to help with security the next day you said shore and he told you to return at nine a._m. And here it it is nine a._m. The next morning it's loud and hot dense crowds on every side the organizer from the night before shouts and waves you over your man here take this. This is your credential. Keep it on you at all times and put this on the event organizer hand a little white cap. We need all of our security people to where these okay this way and we need you by the podium. You joined the rest of the security team and look how upon the sea of faces that look just like yours. I surround the reflecting pool chines brilliantly in the sun. It is a site beyond anything. Your parents or grandparents could have ever imagined you have stepped into a dream you. You've stepped into history. Dr martin luther king approaches. The microphone were mere feet behind him. When he begins the speech he speaks of the path of racial justice and the fierce urgency of now suddenly in the crowd a woman shouts. Tell them about the dream. Martin king gazes forward the notes in his hand seemingly forgotten whenever he's about to say he didn't write it down now. He knows this part. He feels this part. He tells everyone all two hundred and fifty thousand of them that he has a dream. When the speech ends the response from the crowd overwhelmed wells you kings steps away from the microphone and a nearby man commends him on another great speech but something inside tells you that this is not just another great speech impulsively you walk forward. You barely even comprehend what you're doing but you know you must do it. He watches king accepts more congratulations. You see he's holding in the pages of the speeches script and his left hand the words tumble out of you dr king. Can i have that speak. King offers you a humble smile. He appears flattered that you would even ask without a word. He simply handed over three sheets of paper single space type. He's about to say something to you but in an instant and he's whisked away by another wellwisher you stare down at the speech doesn't have a title but you suspect it will soon you will hold onto these pages for the rest of your life in your heart. You know that today's words will never be forgotten that one day dr king's dream will be realized american history tellers is sponsored by chase well. The search is over. It's been a rough road. The two of you been looking for months getting a bit desperate with a baby on the way but now you found this could be your new home. Your family's new home. Your agent is lining things up on the phone with an offer you open empty cabinets and closet doors not really sure what you're looking for so much to think about inspectors paperwork title companies and a mortgage but that you have covered you've been smart art went with chase you know the last few years have been a seller's market and that it's important for buyers to be taken seriously chases. Closing guarantee is one way to stand out as a chase customer. You'll close quickly or you'll get one thousand dollars getting your first home. Even faster with chase were more a chase dot com slash tellers colors chase make more of what's yours all home. Lending products are subject to credit and property provoked rates. Program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states. Go for all amounts other restrictions and limitations apply home lending products offered by a._p. Morgan chase bank a an equal housing lender from wondering i'm lindsey graham and this is american history tellers our history your story <music> more than two hundred fifty thousand people attended the march on washington for jobs and freedom fifty six years ago today august twenty eighth nineteen sixty three. It was there that martin luther king delivered his a conic. I have a dream speech from the steps of the lincoln memorial auriol where he looked out on the crowd to proclaim the event the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. One of the attendees that day was george raveling a former basketball player who by chance ended up working security at the march raveling was just a few feet away from dr king during his speech and after it was all over king handed raveling his original typewritten pages with a smile george raveling still owns those pages and he says he has no intention of letting them go king king speech is largely considered the marquee moment of the civil rights movement and will forever be an integral part of united states history but just eight years before that on the very same day another seminal moment in the civil rights movement occurred it was the murder of emmett till till was a fourteen year old boy from chicago who was kidnapped snapped tortured and murdered by two white men on august twenty eighth nineteen fifty five while visiting family in money mississippi. His killers were never brought to justice but but his death galvanized the nascent civil rights movement. Our guest today is davis. How he's a professor of rhetorical studies at florida state university this month he launched an app app called the emmett till memory project it uses g._p._s. historical documents and photos to illustrate a significant american tragedy a tragedy that occurred on a date change the course of history not once but twice. Here's our conversation davis. How thank thank you for joining me on american history tellers. Thanks for having me today now. You were i interested in the story of emmett till when you're undergraduate and you've spent a fair portion of your career career on it. It is obviously important story in a turning point in the civil rights movement but why is it important for you. Why have you dedicated so much of your time and career to to it. When i was teaching at florida state back in two thousand three i was teaching racing rhetoric course and we reading a book called local people by john dittmer and i made the mistake in the small seminar of asking my students if i could arrange a field trip to mississippi who would be interested in going and everybody put their hands up and at that the point i was sort of committed to doing this project and i won't go into great detail but we we went tennis and one of the stops that we were able all to negotiate with the folks doing the tour was the bryant grocery and meat market which was just <hes> just a shell of a building in money mississippi but it's still there and being that close to ground zero of civil rights history was was moving all of us that was two thousand three and and that point i was i was just curious to know more <hes> i had heard the big broad contour story of emmett till but i didn't know the particulars and so seeing that store up close elicited my curiosity and <hes> that began a pretty active investigation into the case <hes> where i spent a lot of time initially lindsay was that the mississippi department of archives and history. I was very interested to see how the mississippi press the white press mississippi reacted to the kidnapping and murder and so in jackson. There's a great archived there with all the <hes> newspaper coverage and that was the the jumping off point for my first major project on the till case called <hes> <hes> emmett till and the mississippi press when you mentioned the bryant store as a kind of nexus for your interest in this episode of course i think the store run by roy bryant who with his brother in law j w milem were the instigators of this event. Can you tell a little bit about them and their trial sure <hes> yeah so roy bryant and j w milem were initially arrested. Roy bryant was arrested august twenty eighth not long after they had murdered emmett till the body had not turned up yet in j. W milem was arrested the following day august twenty ninth. They were both initially arrested on kidnapping charges because like i said the body audie had not turned up on august thirty first they find a body in the tallahassee river in it's so decomposed and hideously deformed that the only way moses right emmett till's great uncle could identify the corpse was through a ring on his finger at that point. The body was shipped back to chicago. The charges were upgraded to murder order a grand jury <hes> issued indictments for murder on september sixth. <hes> shockingly has just does not work this way now. <hes> the trial was held on september nineteenth at lasted five days and on september twenty third and just a little over an hour of deliberations rations the jury acquitted milem bryant in terms of who testified <hes> for the prosecution moses right testified again emmett's great uncle and there's an iconic picture that was kind of the picture was not supposed to be taken but one of the black photographers in the courtroom snuck a picture in its where moses writes stands up and points at j w milem on his attorney asks him you know who had who had come to the to his house on the twenty eighth to to take him out of it. There were several people who testified for the prosecution including mamie till emmett mom who was able to identify the yes. This corpse was her son. <hes> <hes> the defense put on a very very brief <hes> defense the the two men never testified of course carolyn bryant did testify but her her testimony was not allowed to be heard by the jurors but one of the key people to testify on the defenses half was the tallahassee county sheriff by the name of <hes> clarence aren't strider and strider testified under oath that the body that had come out of tallahassee river had been in that river at least two weeks maybe longer and he couldn't even intel it was so decomposed that he couldn't even tell the race of the person of course if you go back to the newspaper accounts as i did <hes> the day the body body was discovered he was there on the riverbanks he claimed at that point that the body looked like it might have been in the river two or three days and so he he had changed his testimony dramatically mattingly over the course of those two weeks and he was testifying on the defense's behalf false accounts or perhaps the heart of the story because just after that trial bryant and my own story was reported in look magazine and that's pretty much the basis of america's understanding of the event the time but what was the fact and fiction in that account well this gets to the crux of the matter because <hes> william bradford huey who's very famous journalist at the time paid milem brian a little over three thousand dollars. The the attorneys also got some money to <hes> essentially confess. What really happened in order to do this story in my colleague. Dave tell has done a marvelous job on tracking the story down through the huey papers at ohio state. University huey was made trying to make sure look magazine himself. We're not going to get sued and so they were trying to get all parties involved in this case to sign releases essentially granting him permission to tell the story and they weren't going to sue him for liable or whatever and and it turns out he was only able to get a couple of releases <hes> roy brian and j w milem most notably and so what we ended up getting <hes> huey ends up telling this fabulous tale <hes> from from primarily g._w. Mile point of view of this incredibly boastful <hes> amatil who stands up to them is unafraid of them and up till the time the jada milem supposedly shoots in on the bank of tallahassee river. You know we have a boastful. Oh emmett till bragging about being with white women and sex with white women. It's all a bunch allies and we know it's a bunch of lives now <hes> but this hit the newsstands ends on in look magazine huge circulation magazine in january nineteen fifty six and immediately is is the most story talked about for weeks <hes> <hes> in our country and a lot of people in mississippi in particular a lot of white people in mississippi in particular grew up with this version of the story the version of the story that has emmett till being for all intents and purposes a rapist and was it simply that this was a mainstream publication with a large mostly white audience that this is the story persisted rather than perhaps the the true one exactly and there was a counter story and as we know now that that story was largely true told by james hicks and other other black journalists who had investigated the case more carefully and told a vastly different story but it was a story that weight america's simply didn't hear because james hicks was writing for black publications the baltimore afro american the cleveland colin post <hes> the famous postmortem of till is shown in jet magazine and so there was a small small contingent of black press in sumner mississippi gathered there for the trial and what's so interesting is right smack in the middle of the trial the black press largely <hes> in james hicks marvelous job telling the story <hes> they in the middle of the night go find five witnesses to the actual beating of emmett till and so the white preston touch the story they didn't really tell the story the huey supposed confession and because it was marketed confession so many people took it as the truth and again it simply wasn't <hes> it was a series of lies to protect j w roy brian's friends from further prosecution but the people who really got the story almost dead on wor was the black press well. Let's take a moment then and run through a condensed condensed version of the real story. What happened <hes> on that day. August twenty eighth on august twenty eighth <hes> emmett in his cousins with backup to the the twenty seventh which was a saturday they had gone into greenwood and had a night of fun <hes> as a group of cousins on summer break with do they drive back dak late saturday night going sunday morning back to the right residents which is about <hes> twelve miles north of greenwood in money and they get back due to the right residence <hes> go to bed and moses right testify is about two or two thirty he hears two men at the door asking the boy who had done the talking down at money and at that point the two men walk into the house right did not invite them into the house they just kind of burst into the house with their they're forty five handguns and flashlights <hes> and start going from room to room and eventually they find it and they pull him out of bed and he gets dressed and <hes> as they're leaving elizabeth right moses writes wife <hes> is begging them in if money will pay you money. Please don't take him they. They know what incredible danger is at this point and <hes> as they leave the house j._d. Milem turns to moses right and says <hes> something to the effect of preacher if <hes> if you want he asked him how old he is and preacher says <hes> sixty four and he says well if you want to see if you wanna make it to sixty five. You're not gonna tell anybody about what we're doing here off. They go they get into. We're not sure if it's a car or a truck and moses right testifies at the trial later that he heard somebody say is this the boy and moses right testifies and i think these are exactly his words in voice lighter than a man's <hes>. The person person says yes that's him. Is that carolyn bryant. That's the speculation because she could i._d. The boy she could i._d. She could identify amit and off. They went back towards money with the lights off and that's the last point at which moses right saw his great nephew what's interesting to me is a historian orient the case because we really just don't know i don't know that we ever will know this was about two thirty in the morning on sunday august twenty eighth the next i witnessed that we we have seen the men and emmett till is about six or six thirty in the morning forty miles away just outside the town of drew mississippi and we know this is good testimony tony because willie reed actually testified at the trial and would testify to his dying day that he had seen until on the back of a pickup truck with with two or three black men holding him in the back of this pickup truck <hes> several whiteman driving the pickup truck including j w mile roy bryant and they were going to they stirred up on the the plantation was called a stir on plantation owned by the sturt avante family and the reason they were out there was because they had a half brother by the name of leslie milem silom who managed that plantation and so they clearly wanted to beat and torture and eventually kill emmett till away from a crowd they didn't they didn't want to draw attention attention to themselves and willie reed just happened to be walking down the street that early that sunday morning <hes> when he saw this green and white chevy pickup truck with emmett till on the back of it and later he heard the beating the beating happened in a in a small seed barn on this plantation and he told some other people about it 'cause they a several people heard this awful beating happening in the shed later he saw a pickup truck back up to the shed in probably at that point put in emmett's body over tarp and this is probably about seven o'clock so the sun is up <hes> and they got to do something with this body and so again for me as a historian. I'm interested in okay from to thirty the time they took. 'em it for money until about six or six thirty up near drew what was happening in those three or four hours what was going on and the best we can guess is is that milem and bryant were getting together their people they were going to make something of an event of this and it took a while for that to unfold <hes> <hes> pre cell phone pre anything bryant's had a phone in the store so <hes> but it's it's one of the mystery still that we just don't know and and the awful fool terror that emmett no doubt experienced in those four hours 'cause <hes> he probably knew at that point that his life was engraved dangerous american history tellers sponsored by quip summer's over the vacation's done. The kids are back in school. 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Just one charge with brush heads automatically delivered advert on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five dollars so you're never using worn out bristles and there's a quick kids version two so that the whole family can brush better together plus it just looks good sleek and modern i like it sitting on my bathroom counter and that's why i love quip and why over one million other happy healthy mouths due due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quick dot com slash tellers right now you'll get your first rico pack free with a quip electric toothbrush. That's your first refill. Pack free at get quick dot com slash tellers. That's g. e. q. u. I. p. dot com slash tellers. You mentioned that the moment till was taken by these men that that everyone knew what grave danger he was in and in fact of course the reason they knew was that the possibly violence like this was not uncommon. Many many african american men had been murdered by white supremacists before but what what about murder push civil rights leaders to act whether it was a couple of things <hes> i think one is you know him. It was a child who's fourteen <hes> perhaps more importantly he he was from chicago and his mother had friends and family who were pretty well connected with the a._c._p. In chicago and it immediately it became a story in the chicago. Defender probably the nation's largest black newspaper and so the story unlike a lot of <hes> young mississippi black men who mysteriously go missing <hes> this one didn't happen quite that way because it was not a mississippi boy he was from chicago and his mom immediately <hes> <hes> activated her network of people and people began writing about this case so it went from a and you can see it happened in the mississippi press it goes from being this very local story <hes> told him the greenwood commonwealth and other newspapers to quite literally exploding within a week after his body is discovered one of the trip wires <hes> to make the story a national one occurred on september first so literally the day after the body is discovered roy wilkins. Who's the head of the end of lacey eighteen nationally comes out and all but accuses every mississippi in a being a child killer and just very inflammatory statement and he should in hindsight he shouldn't have set and of course the the white mississippi press took wilkins's comments and ran with them and in that case you you can see a pivot almost overnight in terms of how the press treated this case especially in mississippi. It went from being a case about. Can you believe what these two white men did too much more of a national focus us and let's watch and see how northern black people are coming to attack southern white people so it becomes this big big case about about race immediately and roy wilkins really was one of the people who ignited that case so emmett till's murder was the moment when the civil rights movement became the movement. We we know it gained its momentum. Why is that so. There's a couple of explanations for listen. They're really really interesting lindsay. The first is <hes> so the keep in mind when the until cases happening in august and september in november of nineteen fifty five on december first a seamstress over in montgomery alabama refuses to give up her bus seat in we know her of course as rosa parks and rosa parks many many years later not in nineteen fifty five and not a nineteen sixty five but really end of the nineteen nineties she came out very publicly and said when i stayed seated on a montgomery bus i was thinking of emmett till and so what this did immediately really was drew a pretty direct line from emmett till's kidnap and murder and the injustice from it directly to her act of resistance and we know from her active resistance we can draw a straight line to the montgomery boycott bus boycott and a really direct line for at that point to dr martin luther king and so you see what's happening here. We're we're we're were stitching together. Civil rights history were going directly from money mississippi to montgomery and the rise of dr king and so that's a that's a very powerful <hes> and compelling case that a lot of people are making about amatil being the catalyst for the movement. I would argue. There's two other things going on here that don't get a lot of airtime needs more airtime but in one thousand nine hundred sixty in february of nineteen sixty in greensboro north carolina we know that four freshman from north carolina a and t sat in at a woolworth's counter her <hes> and were arrested and shortly thereafter this movement of eighteen and nineteen and twenty year old black college kids across the deep south it just happened and overnight it it it was <hes> it was on college campuses and communities all over the deep south of the sit in movement and what we tend to forget add about this generation of eighteen and nineteen and twenty year olds as they were there emmett's generation they were fourteen and fifteen when emmett was murdered and and their parents subscribe to jet magazine and so what came out of this movement is the student on violent coordinating committee is formed literally in april of nineteen sixty by ella baker and a lot of snow kids would later say what got me into the movement was seeing those horrific images of emmett till there's a third sense in in which emmett till i think could be argued as a catalyst for the movement and it wasn't until recently that i heard this interview but the main organizer for the student a nonviolent coordinating committee in greenwood very close to money was a fellow by the name of sam block and <hes> josephson shurmur who was an undergraduate at duke when these interviews interviews were done back in the eighties interviewed block and block. Is this fascinating interview. Where for the first time i heard that the reason he was able to organize greenwood in sixty two and sixty three is people were still mad about the till case and snick moves its headquarters greenwood in the early sixties such as the the fervor there to organize and so i think <hes> from rosa parks <hes> from the snick generation which is really the emmett till generation and locals in greenwood wanting to organize because they're still angry about the till case. I think that's how emmett till matters. In terms of catalyzing what became the movement there was another moment that proved pivotal and that was till's mother's decision to hold an open casket funeral and then the photo that was published in jet magazine. What did this her decision do well it it it immediately. Media radicalized a generation of black parents and black children as what it did because it a lot of people think oh that that photo just circulated in jet magazine zine and while jet was kind of the premier publication of black america nineteen fifty five that also ran in black newspapers around the country. My colleagues and i have have collected a lot of these papers. Just kinda see where that photograph and there's a couple of photographs. There's not just one or did those gruesome photographs run and they ran all the way from from washington d._c. All the way out west to los angeles white america did not see those photographs <hes> to this day <hes> you can find him of course online but white america did not grow up with those images amatil <hes> after they fished him out of the river and so what happened was <hes> blacks in chicago lined up to bear witness this <hes> she she not only let the black press come in and photograph the corpse but she at that point said i'm going to have an open casket funeral and we're going to have two days two full days of showing this body to whoever wants to see it in so chicago turned out for it. <hes> the estimates are upwards of fifty to one hundred thousand people which is hard had to imagine but you see my point. Black chicago turned out to look at this monstrosity that had come back from mississippi so tell me about your app one of the places you highlight. What's what's the user experience the way the app works is it's based on a map in eighteen locations and so you oh using your your smartphone are going to see these eighteen sites and you can kind of customize the experience in in terms of where you want to start so let's say you wanna start at the bryant grocery store in in money. Where can you go from there. That's nearby well. The apps going to tell you the closest says place nearby is the right house which is about three miles away and then when you're at the right house <hes> the place that's gonna show up. Next is the church which is just down the street where they were going to goes right preached but also where they were going to bury. 'em it and so what you're going to see on your phone is you're gonna see some pictures <hes> some recent pictures of the site but you're also we're going to see some pictures from nineteen fifty five and then you're also if you wanna pull it up. You're going to get kind of narrative experience of why the site is significant and what we wanted to do was so each site has about five hundred to eight hundred word essay that that kind of complicates things that gives you the basic history but but will also we also didn't want to oversimplify. We wanted to kind of let viewers have their own experience and kind of say okay so <hes> historian say. They say they say you see. We don't know exactly how this all played out but the point is here. The different versions of history <hes> that we're going to support at this particular particular site in fact here are the archival documents that florida state university has in our emmett till archive that support these different interpretations here are some photographs of people involved in the case we were. We're trying to tell a complicated story. We're not we're not trying to make this real simple so i'm interested if you've heard from any users at the app on their pilgrimage through the emmett till story one is their emotional experience for why are they drawn to this event in history yeah lindsey we we really haven't had the feedback yet because the the app just went live not too long ago literally weeks ago <hes> so we really haven't had a lot of of user experience with the app yet but <hes> but i can tell you having been at these sites countless times over the years. It's just your when especially let's start again back at the bryant store arguably lee you are at ground zero of american civil rights history in this in this nowhere place in the middle of the delta and <hes> you are literally standing on the porch were emmett stood food and whistled at carolyn bryant and then you're standing in the cemetery where emmett's body was initially buried. We can talk about that later why he was going to be buried. There wasn't so it's it's just the proximity to history <hes> as my students have experienced it through the years. I took a class <hes> there. In two thousand seventeen most recently took ah eleven and my students to the delta and <hes> it's just a different experience. It's <hes> it's not reading a book. It's <hes> it's walking emmett's footsteps. It's walking in the killer's. Footsteps stops it seeing where the killers are buried. It's walking on a local plantation. It is wandering in the cemetery. It's <hes> that proximity just changes the experience employment american history tellers is sponsored by mail chimp. So you want want to grow your business. 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Today and mail chimp will be there to help as your business grows and needs new capabilities so if you want to grow your business you're wondering now what mail chimp that's what learn more at mail chimp dot com <music> so you mentioned that emmett was intended to be buried in a cemetery there in mississippi but that it was not what's the story there. The body was so awfully decomposed posed that the family wanted to get it in the ground. Immediately and preparations were made at the east money church of god in christ east to where we're again. Moses wright was a preacher up until nineteen forty nine. There was a little cemetery there and a grave had been dug. They were going to have the service in the afternoon afternoon of the thirty first the same day as body came out of the river and somehow some way mamie till got wind of this and again the communications were really really hard because so many people in mississippi simply didn't have a phone <hes> but crosby smith who was moses writes brother-in-law in lived up in sumner about twenty twenty miles away shows up with a deputy sheriff at kind of the last hour before the body's getting ready to be buried and says this body is not being buried here in money mississippi today. It's actually going north to chicago. It's going home and so maybe till was again. You know the many many of her heroic acts. This was kind of one of the first ones which is to say no no no. I wanna see that body. The bodies coming back and soak crosby smith who for me is one of the unspoken heroes of the case for what he did for the family and in an as soon as emmett was kidnapped <hes> at two thirty in the morning <hes> the first thing moses right in elizabeth a threat did was they drove up to sumner to figure out with crosby smith. What should they do. Should they go to the police because jay w mile already threaten britain moses rights life. What should we do our you know our kids now missing and so- crosby smith <hes> with is just kind of a heroic brave figuring all of this but he shows up with a deputy sheriff and says note the body's going back to chicago and in fact if i have to take the body myself back to chicago. I'm going to do it because that's what i promised mamie till so at that point the body <hes> it. It's it's eventually embalmed and <hes> is put on a train and arrives back back <hes> in chicago on the second and of course <hes> just not to find a point on it but with without that body coming north. We probably probably don't know this story emmett. Till's death was sixty four years ago but he's obviously still a potent symbol of african american civil rights today and unfortunately just last month <hes> in the news again when three white students from the university of mississippi pose with with guns next to a bullet riddled old sign honoring till this kind of animism has happened before what is the response in the community in mississippi and across the country that this still still goes on while the response has been a lot of outrage a lot of i can't believe the still happening in two thousand and nineteen nineteen but on the ole miss campus when jerry mitchell broke that story he later interviewed some ole miss students and <hes> they didn't know who emmett till was. They didn't know why the story matter. They didn't know why those three frat brothers posing in front of a sign with guns. John's was a big issue. I think having not interviewed a bunch of white people in mississippi who are hostile to emmett till i do this that having talked to do a lot of white. Mississippians is white mississippians and black mississippians. Do not share the same history of who emmett till was and what he did and so i think a lot of white mississippians or probably they feel pretty aggrieved that this chicago boys on their landscape forever and they don't like it and they think of him as has a would be rapist of white women and again. That's the william bradford huey narrative. The narrative is still there. <hes> part of what we're trying to do with the app is to change that narrative <hes> but it's gonna take some time and we're not naive about that is that perhaps the reason for the app and your interest in this event that that this story needs to be known even though it was a critical turning point for the civil rights movement. How do we forget the story and then remember it for for nearly thirty years <hes> than aim at emmett till oh was simply it it there was no circulation of the name at all <hes> especially in popular culture in film documentary <hes> the academics weren't talking thing about him at all and so for thirty years kind of there's this void and what begins to change is the <hes> the documentary eyes on the prize <hes> directed and produced by henry hampton. <hes> changes everything. This documentary is shown for the first time on p._b._s. In nineteen eighty seven and the in the first episode called awakenings in this is red readily available online. If your listeners wanna one of you it but very early on in awakenings awakenings <hes> we have about fifteen minutes segment on the till case using lots of archival footage using lots of interviews with moses right using interviews with james hicks so telling the black presses point of view on this and it's a fascinating fifteen minutes and this is one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and so this very prominent documentary starts to breathe some life back into the case a couple years later we get our one of our first books by stephen j whitfield at brandeis recently retired called a death in the delta and this takes us into the ninety s and <hes> some filmmakers get interested in the case. One of them is <hes> good friend. Keith beauchamp and keith had promised mamie till until her dying day that he would we get justice for helmet and he does a really terrific documentary that is so good and the interviewing is so powerful that the f._b._i. Gets interested the f. b. I. <hes> reopens its case in two thousand and four and dedicates a lot of resources to trying to get justice for him until <hes> in two thousand seven. There was a grand jury that was convened. They heard the evidence that dale kellinger and the f._b._i. Had collected and they did not issue an indictment statement we know from <hes> the reporting on the case that <hes> killing her in particular had his eyes on carolyn bryant who is one of the very few survivors still alive <hes> in a black man by the name of henry loggins who may have been in the truck that night <hes> but there was no indictment in two thousand seven and so that put the case <hes> the front page news <hes> george w bush signs the emmett till unsolved civil rights bill in two thousand and eight which gives resources of the federal government to <hes> <hes> investigating unsolved civil rights murders so <hes> yeah the groundswell of emmett till interest really really picks up in the nineties and then and really <hes> move forward in the two thousands and here we are today where it seems like whenever young black boys murdered <hes> especially if there's no justice <hes> <hes> emmett till's name starts to circulate right whether it's martin lee anderson here in florida or trayvon martin or jordan davis <hes>. It seems like whenever a young black male is murdered in there's suspicion about that murder in this country the the name emmett till comes up and so we've we need an accurate history of emmett till was in the first place we were. We're getting closer to that but we're still a long way away davis. How thank you for talking to me today lindsey. I appreciate you having me. That was my conversation with florida state university professor davis how you can find wind his app the emmett till memory project on the apple app store or google play. There's also linked to the project's website in the show notes and next on american history tellers long before for the island of manhattan became the dense and bustling metropolis. We know today it was part of a dutch colony with two principals at its core tolerance and capitalism. Those principles helped shape the city of new york but how the dutch came to settle the area and see those ideas is all the result of a massive blunder in our next series on dutch manhattan in hatton. We look back at how legendary explorer henry hudson discovered manhattan and how his decisions altered the course of history and spurred the development of one of the world's greatest cities from wondering this is american history tellers help. You enjoyed this episode. If you did subscribe now on apple podcasts uncast spotify google podcast one dot com or wherever you listen to this right now if you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art of this podcast you find the episode so not including some details you may have missed you'll also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help us offer this show too for free and if you do like the show we love you to give us a five star rating and leave review. I always love to know your thoughts and reviews are the best way for others to find the show. Tell your friends and family show them how to subscribe you can also find us and me on twitter and facebook follow the show at h. tellers. I'm at lindsey graham. Thank you american history tellers. This hosted edited and produced adduced by me lindsey graham for airship. This episode was produced by lea hernandez and adriaan a cargo jenny. Lower beckmann is editor and producer. Our executive producer is marshall louis. We created by hernan lopez for wondering.

emmett mississippi moses mississippi carolyn bryant chicago murder milem bryant chicago martin luther king florida state university roy bryant Martin king mamie lindsey graham basketball greenwood W milem jet magazine
ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 4

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

22:57 min | 2 years ago

ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 4

"SC players after every game. We play. You know, wanna be raiders that's been the case my whole life. And I think the brand of the raiders is is an exciting one. And I think a lot of players no doubt do wanna play for for us in the future. And I'm not gonna speculate any further than that. I'm not gonna get into who who calls me who text me. I've made a lot of friends in this business over the years. No, I'm just trying to get people excited about the the Oakland Raiders. In my experience as a sports fan. You know, it gets people excited wins wins. That's just me. I mean, I don't know. But it seems to fans do like teams that win more than they lose. Then if you've got a good halftime act. I'll get excited about that red panda the the lady cycle when the when the hawks were awful. The Atlanta Hawks were awful. Exactly. When I was down there. And they were awful they were tout- to have Timex when you tell you what's team was gonna play. They'll just and then have time. Yeah. That everything that comes out of his mouth is just kind of silly at this point. Because it's it's either not true or it's misleading. And now the latest thing is that he's asking the rookies to step up. What a defensive players Arden key said the Gruden at a meeting with all the rookies last week. Remember they played on Thursday in the message was to increase their efforts and trust their instincts. He doesn't want us to think of ourselves as rookies, but as five-year vets I mean, really, this is what we've gotten to where you're going to pull the rookies aside individually and say that I need you guys to play better. I need you to give me more. I need you to play like vets when you've gone through and gutted this team. What s his whole deal? Anyways, always say needs more needs Moore's any more. You know, he's going to try to make seem as though he's grinding. And he's doing what he's supposed to do. But the prominent problem is he's got it to team. Like, you said when you whenever you've taken some of the guys and got rid of the guys when you necessarily didn't mean it didn't have to do it. Even though you meant to do it to save faith at the end of the day, you knew which type Ross a you were going to construct because whatever for whatever reasons in my belief. I feel like he just wants to get the credit of rebuilding the team. So he could say I built the team. This is my team accept such and such one or two players in pretty much at the end of the day. That's pretty much. It would Colton Miller got hurt the other Tate. He walked out to the side walked Xilai to the field. Oh, it's like you you care about cope Miller because you draft you drafted him. Right. You know, you drafted him. So you walking out to the middle of the field to check on not get it understand. I get it. I get it on a per se in this. But if there's a silver lining, so I'm assuming this is why we still talk about the raiders. They don't have the worst point differential that's to belong to buffalo. Buffalo scores. Six game. Buffalo messing around with a court. Nathan Peterman is a win a world who am Brandon Beane gentleman's is a really good friend of mine from our Carolina days. I don't get it Brandon. I just I I don't know how in the hell he major fifty three man. This is a guy that threw five interceptions and a half. This is a guy that when he comes in a pick every time he comes easily, and I'm not even doing this to be a bit or he's dreadful. He he he does not pass the minimum competency requirements too. It's not even close clo- doing their why how do you don't get out of the look at fifty two guys skiing and say, we're going to roll this. Why don't we went away from the raiders to the Buffalo Bills? But I swear to you try to do it. I can go right now to thirty one other teams it picked Thurs string quarterback on their practice squad quarterback. And he they'll be ten times better than you. So what are they doing? I have. No, I did only quarterback available. If only quarterback out there some way are going to do that though doing thing. I got a cell phone just like you camper Knicks done, but cabernet not gonna option to go back to the raiders for a second. These guys have to do with John gruden's asking the do or they're going to be gone to. I mean, these are. But I want to be going to say I don't care at this point one in seven. There's no hope he's an ask who are would you care at the end of the year. I want to be going anyway. Players. Don't there's only so many look liberators Fifty-three NFL jobs. Not everybody goes around. Yeah. Everybody, but I'm talking about if you player like a real player. But if he's pulling the rookie, the rookie guys in who do not have the flexibility. You gotta do you. Gotta do deals player like in a more kupuna. Play Herge is already taking place with the real players. The players are already and other places. You have it there some real players steal. They're like a Conley to corner cardis there. So there's some real players, you know, that at the end of the day. Bruce Irvin is a real player. He walked in allegedly from what I'm being told in asked to be released. He acts them to release them because he didn't want to be a part of whatever it is that they're doing you wonder if there's any regret at all in Mark Davis is such a strange guy as far as NFL. Oh, he's not terrible. We don't know a lot about them other than he's peculiar. He's got a weird haircut. Every day, and he was Al son. That's his requirements drives may haircut alone. No. Dr about Manny Machado. Davis. Who's gonna say he belonging to three stooges all he's got a gotta he-man haircut. It looks like the cartoon from the eighty s he's got a he-man haircut. And he's doing it on purpose. It's not like, you know. You know, somebody dared EMMY lost bed. He's he's worn this air cut for about a power gray stroke, the power gray skull race, go go, but I'm like, gray stroke. I think any other owner in the league. Would have had that my gosh. What have I gotten myself into moment? But no one. No, Mark Davis doesn't seem to have that gear. No other owner in the league was going to hire John grew. I mean, it was room is about the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. We're thinking about bringing him back. But I think that was more about him living in Tampa steel in his agent putting some stuff out there to try to get them to consider one of those types of situations where if it's available I take a look at it type deals, I'm not interested. But if it becomes available. It may be something that would be interested in need to talk to my wife and kids and find out. I don't know. I mean, thank goodness that the raider fans are as loyal as they are that they are that lawyer anymore. They just haven't they're not making you can't make noise vase duct together. They stuck with that team through twenty years sticking sticking with the team is different than when you had a team. That was okay to where they are now. Now the fans they're gonna stick with. Team sticking with the team is different to stick with the coach. Oh, yeah. Because it's going to always be in a role with him for a while. They're not gonna cut me after eight gain. They can't convey, but they're gonna be mad. They met the they should be mad every raider fan. And I've talked to now in the last couple of weeks. They like what's wrong with a whole lot with the coach. And no, it's an outcry about Why's he doing what he's doing. And remember this was a big play not necessarily about transforming the team in a short period of time. But about making sure there's some face some names, some cash shea you open up the new stadium in Vegas with. And I would dare say so they two years. This is a huge miscalculation from a PR perspective. What if they go because by the time you barrel into Vegas, if this thing isn't turn his his face be mud and not the attraction. But if they win six games over the next three years. Yeah. They might now. Now his face on radio still going to be there. This was a raiders will he's. Still I was at a bar. You know, doing research once again at a bar that Thursday night game hard worker ESPN credit card. No, no, I use. I drinks at this place. Not the one that had no not that one methamphetamine look at people. Anyway, we. It's a long story. But I had a good time. But anyway, so it was San Fran verse raiders two games between both men in Reiter phases. They was all in it until halftime the rate is they're they're they're loyal. They're there is about as loyal a group of NFL fans as you're gonna find. But I just I like the raiders I don't like what the coaches do. Right. But this this was not anything that anybody. That's watched football for ten years. Anybody that watched Jon Gruden at the end of the line didn't know that. This was coming. I didn't know it was coming at all. You didn't think this was coming? This is come out like I thought he'd gone in there. Oh, I did. No. I thought he'd gone in at my conversation with was at one or two pieces. Oh here here. What do you think about that? And then I was pretty much it, right? And I thought that they would lose gains because of that not tear down in lose. I thought he'd just wouldn't be able to coach them up the way that they needed to. I didn't realize he would tear the team. I thought this was a guy that had been out of the NFL for ten years and wasn't very good. The last time it was here. There was no reason for me to think that this was going to be a success. There was there is no data to say that this was going to be care about success as much as just competency. This seems like is not being run in competent fashion. Don't take casper to Utah. Just remember that don't tell Z's top ten boo is coming. Is is coming up next. It's time for L Z's top ten. I want to pause. I yeah. I'll make sure to tease gets to breathe. All right here. We go. Brazil, greece. Everywhere. Moving to country right now is bohemian rhapsody human wraps the about. Freddie. Mercury. I don't know why. He don't want, Freddie. Mercury. And Queen now I haven't had an opportunity to see the film yet. But it's also the raven. You haven't seen Raj brace raves about it? But I have seen a ton of other musical bio about the in. I think we know how it ends. It's not. Music bio, pigs that I love I didn't say they're the best the highest grossing that you angry. Yes. Tim number ten. Come on. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much Richie balance. The bubba. Yeah. Yeah. I really liked that movie. And that's because of the song. But the song definitely helped you remember number nine walked ally. Own Johnny cash, Johnny cash Obama blast. See that one. When we're not. Was pretty good. Yeah. But I just said didn't come on my TV. I wasn't. Did you have? No, no, no, no, Johnny cash was actually one us. This is kind of will. That's pretty. To hang out with those too. One of us playing bass or drums or anything. You wouldn't it down with us? You know, he was down with from afar. Number eight number eight the doors that movie was so influential me for many reasons, remember a lot of my life. Because of that movie. I was a freshman in college when it came out, and it made me so fascinated with the doors that I'd used to do them all the time with karaoke. And in fact, the place that we have in Venice whenever I walked down the street on place to Venice, then I knew in Venice it so I'm saying. Got overlooked to beach when he wants to relax doing your hands. All then stuff. A number seven straight outta Compton. Of course, I was wondering if he was going to I was wondering I literally was wondering if you would miss that. I'm not gonna miss it. It would be higher. But I really didn't. Appreciate them sanitizing certain things that we all know went down. It's good movie. It was a good movie. It wasn't good movie. But we know some other stuff that the opted not to put in there. And if you're gonna do a bio pic going to do it me some dark days dark dark day dark in more MC wrench should have been in their number six, right? Right was straight. Yeah. I learned a lot. What did you learn some of the things that went on with him? I learned like the get wet just what? Guess what I'm saying? About all that. No about Orlando. I didn't know about revenue. I didn't know anything. Yeah. The wrist wrist. Trink to try that one day. They could do what to do baby. Number five. I saw this bio pick like years and years and years ago, and it still resonates with me, and I'm surprised that has had another opportunity to do more dramatic roles. But ladies sing, the blues lily DVD, Billy. I don't know that one Billy Williams. I know who Billy is is the bio pic on Billie holiday. Seem to blues. His Billie holiday automotive. Hallmark song. Okay. I know Billie holiday's strange fruit. Let's play strange fruit for Travis a little bit later later on there. And then make you apologize later. Still didn't see it. You'll get the joke. When you hear strange for number four. What's love got to do with it? Ooh. Now, unfortunately for this failed. There are a lot of great one liners from Ike Turner. I know it's such a semi laugher that job. Good situation how to get situation. But it just what lies is the for delivery via. Thank you, even in the time. Now, obviously a little bit different. But even then it was kind of like. Like me who's funny. Right. It's a sad. Like the mama the Tina Turner's mama turn her in the kids over here. Oh, yes. Denver three number three. Now, you guys should know this one because this movie made me cry which one did before no Selena. Oh, yeah. Remember, I was slain and before and I couldn't manage it. Because it was just so so sad so young. She was young man. You don't understand? She was so young. Yeah. This do star. Like that Elsie safari Jimmy. We're talking about it on a birthday. I mean. Hit me rescue. I I was kind of one of those. No, okay. So what's going on today? Just didn't hit me. Right. Yeah. But she could have been big being. On our way was underway. That might not be any racism left us. She had been allowed to live longer. Well, that would have been nice see, we'll never now you want to cry. Now, you're making it bad go. Speaking of ban, coal miner's daughter. Now, what's this about who? I never heard and read a land. I thought it was his basic coal. My he got caught in a space play play, Loretta Lynch. She sang all the words herself. Who's Loretta Lynn? Yeah, we're not dealing with that. We're not dealing with you. Right. This is a woman married like twelve with threats. He was she left wing. Yeah. I mean every day in society, and and it was like one of those movies twenty eight grandmother man, come on, man. But I I would take you. Say it was the movie that when I saw I was like. Oh, oh, why folks like that too? I knew about offices. Is daughter. I was like on. Hey. What is this? This is it. I'm not going to be able to watch this movie, man. It's not it's not terribly uplifting. No. She says she was born a coal miner's daughter. Do you know any successful and daughters? Hit one. Live in West Virginia, Kentucky Kentucky. So no, I live in LA A. Number one, come on the kid. Who has the family who the kid? His name was the kid in the movie. I don't know. I can't keep working. Yeah. Purple ray. The acting performances Bieber. Lock to be desired disagree. No, no, no, they're bad. Terrible. Workday. Did wonderful term. Nope. Nope. There's very bad acting in it. I will go ahead and admit that. But that's okay. No, it's okay. Forty years ago. Man, this okay. What this Bill did some music bio-pics can never eight mile all the others came out to play. Away needs to fake prints percentnet tone about how to property we've music and storytelling into one company and live making her Mikko's. We're talking about traverse to this day. I still arch my back. This walking around the house where rocks in whole foods. Moran was a little money. Your whole foods is different than mine. If. That was that was one of the line today. Hey. They I turn back. Yeah. Happy I Turner yesterday. Happy birthday to Glenn fry guys just knew that. Oh, I knew this part now. Like Durant in Iran. Kiss your heart. Didn't sound like grand. Doesn't know parts of it. So. My life response. I'm gonna bounce birthday within the eagles. Well, Glenn fry you've got Don Henley on Henley. And then the third there's the third guy that did okay. On his own too. Right. What was his name? I'm blanking. Carson wentz. So there. I guess you can count the Beatles. Right. I guess. Yeah. About Wilbur Montgomery to kind of he's going to save the drop off from Paul Herold. Michael, Michael, better pool. What about the Jackson? You guys not go. Listen to my jokes. They're no, no, Michael and Jermaine happy birthday to Sally field as well. So you wish. You wish? You know, what's to those? Saudi field whenever I think about Sally field. Oh, I feel music you'd better make it quick quick story. You you know, one day. She was Tom Hanks love interest the next day. She's mother she didn't get to all of a sudden just terrible. He got some. Bit of the day of the day that bit at the day the bit of the day is driven by foreign Burg, Los Angeles, some the sunset strip. This was the tuck. Really really tough fifty on jet magazine. No, I'll talk on that. Remember, just a little magazine. Jan is still available is really word alive so alive and kicking junior slim still the number one advertiser member Hoover J C, but. Cousin? I knew I knew I swear to you. I probably knew at that timeframe probably knew about just about four or five of the beauty of the weeks. Just knew him because they was from LA. Oh, man. It was great. I loved you just knew him because it was young model. To get. All the white people that are listening. What are you guys talking about? Oh. Slim's lady of the week. What does that jet back? We have our people magazine jet magazine centerfold. So it was a very small magazine. It wasn't big enough. It was very thin. It was a small little deal. There was like the size of this. Yeah. Basically it had probably forty pages. Maybe. It was about us the things that we accomplished as an African American community. Okay. Jesse Jackson's always pays to. They had a sports in one or two pages for sport. Michael, Jordan or a young college avenue accomplish something graduation. However, go in there and started as a Joel when did you ever going in magazine? Yeah. We couldn't wait to get you back. Pitcher pitching ahead. Carry my phone is jet magazine. My graduate from USC. Now, see this is from this. I wanna see that. The Michael Thompson picture. It's remember coming to America. Yes. And so the the beauty contest. Essentially that was jet magazine. Okay. All right says from jet magazine. Let me think there you go. This is my US. Picture jets, like Nelson, Mandela graduated college. All right HR is because the largest society wouldn't allow us to be celebrating as beautiful along with the rest of society. So we had to create our own magazine, you heard of any magazine. Yeah. A lot of the butyl. I knew I knew the jet magazine was a magazine for African Americans. But I did for all for everybody. See? A centerfold featured wishes passe rhetoric. Advertisement. Guess black folk when they smoke cigarettes was Virginia slim Newport. Yeah. We do Newport's Jerusalem. We didn't have you know, no-ball caregiver. Marble and camel didn't make it in. Advertising. Ads. The Rams travel educated. Speaking of beautiful black people saw McVeigh. Is that a smooth transition? The day the bit of the sale of bitch, man. It's all good. Hornberger Los Angeles on the sunset strip brings us a bit of the day every morning to wrap up visit Hornberger loss Angeles dot com and Rover provin beyond so travels. When you go home, do you say Hon today, I learned about magazines from? I don't think I put a quite like that.

raiders jet magazine John gruden NFL Michael Thompson Mark Davis Los Angeles Oakland Raiders Tina Turner Jesse Jackson Atlanta Hawks Colton Miller Billy Williams Glenn fry Johnny cash Buffalo hawks Timex Jon Gruden
ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 2

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

37:55 min | 2 years ago

ESPNLA Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis HR 2

"This is where I would say happy birthday, hang Lee. Hang Li how my boys back. This Chris this is one of these things. I'm sure there's a connection that I'm not getting or is this just a song you like it's just a song? It's a great crisis up. This is Bill. Bilas Mayfield field. Curtis curtis. Martin no blow no curse may feel from the you know, the old movies blaxploitation. No what movies. Superfly super fly, which is relax boy tation film. Oh, he's I was saying you're you're looking at me like I'm supposed to know that. They they advertise it in jet magazine. All the time surprise you. Missed it tracks right next to Miss Virginia, slim like. Black pimp movies with big Cadillac. I know the movie I mean, I know of the movies. I just don't know the move was your favorite black exploitation films into you know, two movies. Pam Grier may but that's for some different. That's not bad. Yeah. That's something different. I like Pam grew penitentiary. No, you never saw. Did you see penitentiary? No you've never seen penitentiary. I know you have Chris. I saw two is the movie penitentiary you've never saw. No looking me because you usually got you know, some herb I'm gonna get you sucker. You gotta pull up penitentiary when you get a chance to break in that. Okay. Okay. I'm a little young teenage guy that would be. All right. So the Lakers play their eleventh game of the season key. And it's weird man that it's the eleventh game of the year. And it feels like there's a whole hell of a lot more riding on it. Then you're a team that's four and six kind of floating around five hundred that they've played well at times they haven't played well at times that the eleventh game of the air against a pretty mediocre. Minnesota team has this much riding on it where it feels like if they lose on the heels of a blow out to Toronto on the heels of magic chewing out Luke Walton that this could have implications for what's about to have next that doesn't happen this early in the season. Typically, well, it doesn't it doesn't think at the end of the day. You gotta look at the teams that they beat and look at the team that they played and look at the teams that they got blowout by without the key player on the floor, which is only one which is Toronto, you you. It all is a fallout from everything it's a fallout from the way you played on a row when you drop two in a row, it's a fallout from getting. Kicked in the back of your neck without Kawhi Leonard on the floor. It's a fallout from the defense playing poor. It's a fallout from just just everything. And then all of a sudden, the president of basketball operations general manager, whatever you wanna call magic is starting to get irritated because it automatically is going to affect his decision. Making in terms of the outside is looking at him and saying will you put this together? And y'all look in bed. We you're selling us a product that we had last year even with the best plan the world on the team. Now, you got to walk downstairs, you gotta talk. You got a summons Luke you got to close the blinds. Even though the blinds are not to the outside into the inside hallway. Overlooking the stadium and everybody hears you and see you really thin you gotta sit him down. You gotta treat him like a child to the point where he comes out of the room beat rid, and people know that something bad that went on you have to dress that issue. Then you go out there and Minnesota now you pick up Tyson Chandler, and you laying eggs tonight the net that metered at noise meter from the fan base is going to go up because you've already set the tone by simply having a conversation with them. That's that's the thing. That doesn't add up to me. What you just said that everything that you're talking about is, right? But damn I'm the they've been blown out. They played ten games. They've gotten smoked once once. Okay. So if you're getting smoked one every ten games. Well. What? If you're getting beaten badly I'll choose by words differently. If you're getting beat badly wants everything that happens that happens. You're you're giving him you're giving Luke Walton Tyson Chandler to try and fix. What's going wrong? Defensively Tyson Chandler has had a great NBA career Tyson Chandler is an old NBA player. He's not the guy that's gonna come in be the defensive player of the year the way he was previous or not not asking him to be defensive player to year. What you're asking him as get you fifteen or so many great defense at the times when you need him to especially at the end of the games when you were having leads in a fourth quarter in you or surrendering those leads in kit for some reason make stops on defense of ESPN because Vail McGee is out in our cools the five and it screws up your line. You're just seems to me that this entire process has been sped up to a point. That is unrealistic you add the best player in the world. It's gonna take time to figure out how to play with him because that's what happened in Miami. That's what happened in Cleveland. It's it was going to happen here. And only the most optimistic people thought that would happen more quickly in that. So it's happening. You have some roster pieces like Kyle Kuzma at center that just doesn't work. You're gonna have to address that they finally did it with Tyson Chandler you've had one bad game. Where you get blown out by a pretty good team. Granted they didn't have their best player. But all of these things together we've already had the coach getting chewed. We're talking about all of this stuff and ten games to your point ki. This was predetermined before the season if they decided that they didn't like Lucan that role before the season. Okay. Then this is just you got to check all the boxes before you can officially say. Okay. We've tried. You gotta go out the door. But it all of these things adding together come to a point to me, at least that it feels like they never really were giving him an opportunity to have success with this group that they set it up. So if you're having the, hey, get it, right? Ten games into the season, eight games. I guess it was before when that meeting took place and the big fix is Tyson Chandler. No, that's not big fix. What that is is a piece that was missing because you got a Wagner and v and all of these other people, that's polite, Vicks, Wagner and see. What do you want to be? I mean, you don't want to put zoo butts in there too. I mean, you got all these dudes that at the end of the bench that you can never go to toward the end of the games in the fourth quarter. Even in the middle of the game. When you need some defensive help because Vail is out of minutes are foul trouble. You don't have that. So you go and grab a guy like Tyson Chandler because for weeks now L z complain. And I don't know the Magic Johnson hurt anybody complained and he saw and he said, hey, we don't have anything in the middle. Other javale McGee we're small there was nothing else. That was out. There you kick the tires kick. The can down the road on Andrew bynum. Not a chance you kick. The can down the road on the who's the one dude joking Noah not a chance. So the only other thing that was available in became available as an option is Tyson Chandler who's who dominated them, by the way when they played them. He took care business against the Lakers. You saw it up close as the front office. And you said if he becomes available. We should grab him at two million dollars on. A cheap and they went out. And did it doesn't mean all of a sudden they're going to they're going to the NBA finals? It just means they addressed one of the issues that's going to lead them to address more issues. If this team turns it around and all of a sudden, look like real real real contender. And not a contender that we're just putting together saying this that they look like a real content and all of a sudden they go out there, and they wanna move for Dane Lillard, and they wanna move for Jimmy Butler. Why cou why or any of the big fish that are out there? I don't have a problem with them are ultimately coming new decision that Luke Walton is the right guy. That's fine. That's pro sport. That was always going to be the case. He's not as guy. But this it just seems that this is a situation that they're creating with its specifically designed to make it very difficult for him to succeed. They should've just said nothing, right. Is what you're saying say nothing to week. Not we gain twenty two. I'm okay with them saying nothing. That's fine. I'm okay with them even doing the false. We love this guy. He's our guy. He did say that he said he he said, what did he say disaster? Yeah, he's our coach for the rest of the season, unless something unexpected or extraordinary something like that. Right. Unprecedented press. One of those words. Lacks boy tation if he you in he. Uses that it calms the waters, but at the same time as a front office guy, he has to have conversations every single, I don't know football. It's every week typically football gentleman's president of TNT says out head coach on Monday. They go over whatever it is in Tuesday. And that's pretty much it. I'm sure in basketball because they play so many games back to back in one game after another and all that at some point. They're going to have meetings about what the team situation is in in that conversation in that meeting. They're going to be conversations that come up that they need to address whether they like it or not everybody knows when they're coming for you. You can feel it. It's in the building. It's what they do. They was coming for that dude immediately. As soon as the Bronx is on the dotted line. He knew that rush. What would they is it? Sometimes he's. That's right. Travis funding. You ask us today. We're celebrating hump. They win. That's where I guess we'll be giving away today. Keyshawn? The bucket. No, we're giving away grams versus theon every hour during shows that I because I forgot so we're going to we don't do this hour. That's right. Yeah. Gentlemen, too. So here's how you can win. You know, how you can win key. How easy tell me which ram player? We alluded to might be coming back soon. Eric dickerson. No, no, not him. Another network actually six do that. And just keep listening for more chances to win. We'll probably do this. I'll maybe do three in case. I forget an eight o'clock. I'll Waller's seven tell us Travis owed universe starters player. Coming back to Rams. No. Yeah. We'll tell you more. So keep listening for your chances to win people. Rams and Seahawks Sunday at the call Mark. The Rams are getting killed through the air. But could help be on the way find out next, Brooke the New York issue boy the fast study. The Rams lose for the first time in New Orleans. They get torched to the tune forty five points, Marcus Peters gives up a seventy two yard touchdown at the end of the near the end of the fourth quarter by some guy gets us every two yard touchdown. Some can't get him on my show. They're getting a key to lead back. It broke the game open and the guy that the got it on was Marcus Peters. They've been picking on him for weeks. He has not made a big play seemingly in weeks. He's been given up touchdowns and have been going out and game after game after game. A keep to leave says he's going to be back sooner than later here. He is talking on the NFL network. Had a great great visit with the doctor today. Is looking like after thanksgiving. I should be ready to go thanksgiving. Okay. Mark that on my calendar Manzi taking steps or we running or are we doing running I'm running. I'm I'm bound in them jumping lifting. So you gotta get in get in one hundred percent healthy dying to get back out on the field dying get back out there. This is hard to watch it almost not even like going to the game watching it from the sideline. It's just it's just here. Tainting the watch it like that. So. It's an a get back. I'll be backed up. He'll be back against the lions in we thirteen. That's after the the ram. No, come back. But yeah, I don't know. Just see look you want him back. Obviously that goes without saying, I don't know that it's this panic. What are we going to do with Marcus Peters? How are we going to fix the defense? How they're eight and one they lost to the saints. Who are really good? They lost the saints in New Orleans. Michael Thomas, who's one of the best wide receivers and football. Yeah. Let him up lit them up it. He's going to do that two guys. Everyone's in this isn't the end of the world top guys tend to. Do certain things of the top guys at times in much like you said Marcus Peters to me has been banged up a little bit. But getting to lead back is going to be a huge help for them because they face Seattle. Seattle is not this passing juggernaut type team that just close the ball all over the lot. That's not who they are. But they can hit plays at times they get the reading chase after that. But then they get the Kansas City Chiefs, and Patrick Mahomes, and we know what that could potentially be. Then at that point. They get a by. Then they get Detroit who met the staffers thrown for like four thousand dollars every year, and he's been in the NFL. So you're not gonna throw the football there. So you you you still have some concerns on the back end of the secondary. They given a big chunks of yards at times and games where it's cost them. So you want to address that so get into leave back. It's a big will be a big plus for. Yeah. No, it it's a huge. Plus, but it just seems to be. It's again, I guess it's what sports fans do. But this is a team that was in the top of every ranking there the last team to lose a game there the last team to have this moment where okay. Well, what's wrong with them? Well, they got a few things wrong like every team does. But there isn't a glaring weakness on this team. They got torched by good team once on the road. It look if they turn Russell Wilson torture them if Patrick Mahomes torches them, then all of a sudden, you have real problems that you have to. I don't know if it's schematics to know if it's you can do anything, personnel wise at that point. But I'm not I'm not worried about where they are at all if they win. Who cares? It's when you lose. That's it's going to affect you. Because you have the Carolina Panthers sitting right there, basically in the two spot. Okay. You have the New Orleans Saints who has who have the Carolina Panthers twice along with the Pittsburgh Steelers. So you stealing as the scheduling goals, you're still in great position and get a home field advantage throughout the playoff as long as you. Hold your end of the bargain, and you don't drop more than another game to one of these teams. I think if you if you come out of this thing thirteen to three at the end of the day, the number one seed, you could potentially be a number one see meaning you could be the one or two two and a half home field advantage would buy potentially. If you go beyond that, then you're in trouble. It's far as I go. But but here's the thing assume that New Orleans and Carolina split each win one. Yeah. Okay. So that's a third loss for Carolina. It's a second loss for New Orleans Orland. Here's here's what New Orleans has left. Coming up. Cincinnati. Not a bad team. All in Cincinnati AJ. Bring in Cincinnati, though, AJ. Okay. You got the eagles. You got the falcons you got the Cowboys, and the bucks those are two ones that they probably get. But then like we talked about Panthers twice and the Pittsburgh Steelers. They're gonna lose a third game in a Panthers will be in the hunt for the division steel. So they'll be bring New Orleans will lose two more games. So they're going to have three losses. If the Rams get through at four. Eighteen in two thirteen and three. They've got a good chance to three it'll be a problem because the same tiebreaker, right? You need them to get their fourth loss. But there's not more union. Travis you've got too many teams or going to be three loss. Four loss teams. If there are two or three I think that they get in if they three in the saints at three, obviously, they don't because everything's beat them. But they still get potentially a first round bye because Carolina with pull it in a second in rear, and they wouldn't be able because they didn't win. But on where they pull them. What do you don't don't don't even start? They would be second. Do you think that the proverbial good loss? Just say, hey, look, we can we can teach off the loss. You get everybody refocused. Get everybody back because I never got the sense that the Rams were unfocused wanna say I never got since they were. Feeling their focus focuses unfocused is somewhat undisciplined, and we become undisciplined you become unfocused, which means fifteen yard game punching to face another fifteen blocked field goal or or block puck because the guy missed his man. Coach goes off gets a fifteen yard penalty. Multiple infractions on the net. That's undisciplined and not focus because now you onto something else. That's not the Rams. No. I don't think that this would arrange these guys that were starting to feel. Hey, you know, we're the only undefeated team were the team that can't make a mistake. They're so well coached they are disciplined. They typically don't take bad been the one guy that's kind of in schematically a little off is Peter's he gets caught Pekan a whole bunch. Maybe it's physical maybe some other things. But I you know, what I'm all about where they all know what I'm scared. I'm scared to shop. Say I'm just about. What what's scary about it? I just I have nightmares about the fake field goal. I just do. It's cute to go. It's cute to me. I don't like cute. You know, who I am? If you've been around me, I don't like getting cute. A don't like you trying to in a way that I see if I was on the team, and I saw it. I'd sit there and go. Well, it's not that would being aggressive because we've always been aggressive going forward in that situation is not aggressive to me going for it. And that situation is trying to be cute. Here's his explanation for why he went for it. Oh, we came in. We, you know, we always talk about it. We're we're an aggressive attacking type team. And and if we feel like some of these looks present themselves to try to do that we have confidence in our players. Unfortunately, it didn't work out in that situation. But we came into this game feeling like we needed to be aggressive. We wanted to be aggressive that kind of embodies the identity that we do have. And you know, it didn't work out today. But that's not gonna stop us from continuing to fight and make sure that we're making aggressive decisions that are also smart, and based on the look we have a lot of confidence in Johnny Hecker. And we feel like more time. He's gonna make that place. That was aggressive when it was not smart. Okay. They you know, the difference. I do I do. But I don't agree. I understand the difference between the two things because to Miki cute is when you do something out of character. When you watch somebody gets you because you this isn't what I usually do. I'm going to usually kick your gonna I'm gonna go for them and catch left. Sean McVeigh runs a bunch of trick plays. Sean McVeigh constantly is aggressive. He's always pushing. He's always trying to get more. This was not something that was even the least bit out of character. This is what he does that's cute because you have the free three to not just gave. I it's like playing one of those damn games on CBS early in the morning, and you know, hey door number one number two. I gave you a pass. Here. You got you could take a hundred thousand dollars and you could play for Dr number one. And then all of a sudden, you go Monty hall gonna take door number one rock. Like when you got a party here. You got a girl keys q. Do you ever do that? You'd be like a partisan where you go. You know, if the guarantee, but she's a solid seven and a half. But then you see this eight and a half. And I was like, ooh, let me put the seven and a half away and try and go for eight and a half within eight and a half shooter wants to the deal tonight. Dan, I gotta go back to the seventy seven to seven and a half to move on somewhere else. Because you sit in there chasing. You know, what I mean you before and then at checkout pick you out. What? Tonto breakdown. But that's happened. You you you you. Yes, that's happened. Before who all of a sudden, you gotta right on the ropes, right? You'll greedy Fitbit. It walked by you, go hold on one second go to restaurant you come back and what she got Ricketts crickets. All right. We just mentioned the Rams took their first loss. How far does that drop them in keys week ten power rankings find out next? Hey, young fella. How're you doing? Just going back to the party again. Now, this is more like a dork. Gloom steakhouse bluesy, you know, it's like you walk into steakhouse to see me playing piano with a big sifter, right? There was some money and look up a Bill a couple bills. Tuxedo on undone at the Colin Dunn at the college. You play their travel. Nice to see you in this week us. That's like your third time, usual, usual. Monti's into valley. Would you like your usual? That's how you got your in a place too, much usual third time third time in three days. Table. You got your usual mix cited to find out how this. This power raking comes together. It's going to come together. Pretty good week ten coming up. We've got the top power rankings number ten. It was the Packers last week. They got beat by the pats. Are you sticking my line show because you didn't say anything? You're busy of looking up. Something. I see. Well, considering it the the Packers were number tandem. I'm having a tough situation some allege you guys chime in and help me out with number ten because I'm looking at the Washington Redskins which lost Packers which lost Tennessee, which wants internet. He was five five and three and they're sitting at number two. And he's still got the dolphins sitting there. I don't know. Which one of these teams could be number ten I'll tell you which one it ain't I think the the Redskins lost three starters on offense for the season on Sunday two of them on the offense of line. You saw them struggle against the falcon. So I'm gonna say going forward, and you always say you'd like to use going forward as a way you judge these. So I'm going to take them out of it. What do you say the best team that you just of all the teams that you just mentioned the team that I think is the best of that group. Cincinnati there. Cincinnati beat almost anybody in the league, it wouldn't blow. Now, they could lose anybody Cincinnati could lose to the raiders. But if you told me tomorrow that the Bengals beat the Steelers or or the saints or any of these teams, I buy it. They have some injury. Do that's whether tenth and not four. So you would take them at number ten. I would over the dolphins. Dolphins don't seem room. No. Going to cross wiler. I'm not gonna take them at number ten because I think they're slightly better. It's going to it's going to be crazy. But I'm gonna leave Green Bay at number ten, and the reason is is because that man Aaron Rodgers at some point that division is going to come back to them. I don't necessarily think is gonna come right away. But I believe it will come back to them at some point. So I'm gonna put them at number ten. All right, fair enough number nine last week. You had you had the Texans who are on a hot streak. So I know they're moving the Texas is certainly moving up at the number nine spot. Again, another Tuffy these same teams that you guys Mitch. And now, I know you said, hey, Cincinnati should be at number ten I think Cincinnati is slightly above ten. I'm gonna put them at the number nine spot because they are sitting right there with with the Pittsburgh Steelers. I didn't want to be a mat ten put them at nine five and three I think they have an opportunity to get eight. If they get in win they get AJ greenback. Healthy I think they can still continue to kind of push Pittsburgh. The division could find themselves out of the top ten altogether. They got New Orleans this weekend. Get it in Cincinnati. But they lose that game badly. They're probably out of the top ten altogether. Stay probably could potentially be their only five and a half point underdogs. So the as expects them to keep it somewhat close last week. You had these Steelers who I looked up stay under last like sixteen seventeen games or so once on the road Rams, the tunnel has them as road warriors or Steelers linen Connor have them Grohl in right now. But they move out of the the number eight spot. Put the Texans from nine to eight because they are pretty hot Shinawatra's playing. You know, good foot encouraging good football at the quarterback spot Bill. Brian is finally to me learn how to get a quarterback other than Tom Brady to play. He's finally gotten me to believe that he may be a good quarterback coach he just had bad quarterbacks in the past. Right. You mentioned it about Miami a minute ago, how it felt like Miami doesn't feel real you just didn't feels similar to me in the sense that this was a team that looked dreadful early in the season that division is dreadful. The AFC south has four teams that are somewhere between terrible in mediocre. I don't know how real these six game. But guess what though Travis they're not playing the AFC teams that that they're in their division. They're playing teams that are audited division and beaten them. They're beaten up on the Denver Broncos in Denver doesn't mean a whole lot by Google. But you still doesn't matter doesn't matter. You could say the same thing for the Rams they kneel down. At that. They got the extra inch that they needed afford now and against the bad Seattle team. You can't you can't look at it from how they won the game. The fact that a matter is on a winning streak in two hundred division games, and they beat they've beaten Indian that run. It'd be in Jacksonville. Now, run the other two wins against the Cowboys in the bills. These are bad teams. Yeah. But they still win. Right. So I mean, we we say it all the time. It's who you put in front of you record is who you are. All right number seven last week. You had the team from Washington who just recently lost. I thought they were going to win that game with that Lanta coming in their own natural turf. That was a disappointment loss of bunch of starter. So I'm sure they're out of the top ten who got just completely gone. I have the Pittsburg. No, wait with number seven. Yeah. I have the Pittsburg Steelers sitting at seven only move up one. They only move at once lot. Pittsburgh moves once not but they did move. That's that's the great thing that move it move. They did not stay up. They had a buy if they had a bye have gone. Somebody if they had a bye week. They would have moved up to it was directed at the person as always complaining. It was back to that. Mike Tomlin has them playing at a certain level of certain way, Connor all USA fries. There there are where they are. Which is where they always are which is the top of their division in November. But there without Levy on Bill. I am not surprised because if you give a guy an opportunity who was a productive player in college football. He probably can be productive in the NFL. If you give him the same opportunity. It's all about the opportunities in certainly they're giving him opportunity. If you look at the numbers same numbers. Now what what's happening next? What happens to Bill? What happens next, man? All I could do. I was reading a story yesterday about how that fourteen million dollars. You can kiss that goodbye, man. I fire my agent so fast that bad advice. It wouldn't even be funny. Tagamo over Travis up step number six. We have. Imagine what it's like to have somebody constantly talking while you're trying to talk. What is that show shots fired? Number six last week or the Vikings. Keep the Vikings run people eaters someone to keep them right at six I think that they deserve to be in a six because the teams that are in front of him or better the teams at a behind him or not as good. So I think the sitting at the six baht is where they need to be right now. Kirk cousins is playing better. The defense is starting to play better. I think ZIM is getting things way. He look back. You see him? He had a seventy yard run last week. It all of those things. Demi feel like the last because to me I thought the Vikings. We're going to be right there with the Rams and the saints in the in the eagles too at the top of the NFC, and they haven't been they've been something less than that. Because they started off slow when they start off slow with a rash of injuries. They lose a rookie, and my cues they lose cook. For a minute. The quarterback is getting adjusted to everybody ever had inconsistent. I mean, all of those sort of had to go to the doctor wings is going and getting in the right direction and trying to understand they lost one of the defensive player for a couple of weeks. 'cause he had to go get some medical medical help. So when you when you look at it there right where they're supposed to be at this time in the season. Chicago's in the division. Green beans into division. Detroit is completely gone. There. The division is probably gonna come back to Green Bay in today because I'm not a big cogs bear believer. All right. Now, we've got an issue here last week. We had a tie. We had the Panthers and chargers at number five some sums has to change where we doing. Yeah. You had to charges in the Panthers at number five. Yes. Charges in the Panthers. We swap and we're gonna Panthers and charges at number on. Yes. That is exactly what we're going to do. Because there's no again, there's no room for these teams to move up or move back. I can't move them up or back because you know, charter both vet their vote better didn't Steelers I think they both are better than the steam tomorrow night. Steelers in caravan. There's a point when you look at it Chicago, Chicago, San Diego went to Seattle took care. I know I said San Diego went to Seattle took care business when you know, you look at that thing, and I took about Seattle weekly power weekly. Whatever peeling it peeling back whatever I thought that they would struggle in Seattle. But that wasn't the case took care of business. And that would be the or saw can I make a case for why the chargers are better than Carolina. Make a case because the two losses at the chargers have or to the Rams into the chiefs in the two losses that Carolina has to the Redskins and the falcon. Okay. You're talking about a division a division team. That knows him it within the division. Same thing. Always they always can't split in. You know, whatever with the other team. I think I care what you're in Madame ear. I think Carolina with the quarterback north Turner. And the way he's playing calling up the plays offense coordinator that Carolina's a much better team than the church number three number four number four is gonna stink. Well last week. It was the patriots. How we're doing? Where you're going to tell me this team fixed their secondary. If figures out what's going on back in the Rams are going to come in at number four, wait a minute. They were one all year low. Yeah, they were. But now they're number four in. That's part of my power ranking the secondary loss for one loss to number three number three of the Kansas City Chiefs Kansas City, obviously a fixed there they've been number three. They continue to keep rolling putting up a lot of points. The defense hasn't cost them any games. This yet they got the Rams in two weeks from now that will settle a lot of stuff on who the better teams of the two are. All right. The number two who do we have at number two number two or the team out of the northeast? The Tommy Brady New England Patriots. All right number to know their record looks a certain way. But man, he's awfully good. He's all flee. Good nephew. You could do with him. He's forty one and still playing like that. It's remarkable. Yeah. Forty one is still point like that. I mean, there's a lot of ways you could be forty one and eat avocado ice cream is still played. It doesn't stop. All. Right. That means we have a new number one key who can it be done. Never that is fine. Nepotism, nepotism. Nepotism, New Orleans Saints. Pulling in one is a upset the Los Angeles Rams last Sunday ten point blowout to the Los Angeles. Rams two hundred eleven yards twelve catches surrender to nepotism at his finest. So the New Orleans Saints are at number one the pets to Kansas City three the Rams for still at us that on one of your show gaming Rams, a raw deal dropping them three the dodgers. They lost a key member of their organization. Somebody is going across the street. We'll tell you who it is next. I'm trying to plan something for us to go. Grab a bite to eat next week in the end. Yeah. Yeah. These idiots. He's trying to get that all night again on like a Tuesday night, get them. No keyshawn. I'm like, let's go grab a bite to eat, blah, blah, blah. Yeah. Tease idiots. He Chris Cody could just get a room all hang out room with now notice he didn't say again, there's no quarrel. There's no plural there. Travis a room. Save money. Well, we're all friends and just hang out. And I'll go home I'll go to lunch, but I'll go home at the end of the night. No. It's not launch. He wants to Jenner this wicked go, we here's what we'll do. We'll go you Tuesday. Let's go to let's go to the air on Tuesday. Yes. Still by where we're going to be. Yeah. Wind up tweeden any damn with. So what difference does it make where the Javier's down in new fall is one of your because I want to Newport, it's up a little bit. But. Get arrested outnumber outnumbered. Travis push. You have to explain your friends while you're hanging out with us. We'll talk about that. I'm taking a knee. I'm on both my knees. And as don't care about my house, we can go there. Run Cheeto long China for tacos. Oh, see the truck. And you said all right. So the dodgers lost one of their front office members. Yesterday, forehand Zaidi who has been working under inter Friedman for the last four years he is going to go become the new head writer giants. He's going to be there president of baseball operations. And it's not nothing. I mean, it's not like losing player. Exactly. It's not like all of a sudden, Manny Machado is going to go somewhere else in which he might do which will be different. But when you lose a guy that's is involved with what the dodgers do from the analytics in from the personnel side losing a guy like that is significant you're gonna miss him. Yeah. You you are because he was part of what they've done here over the last four to five years in terms constructed neurosurgeon terms of the analytic just in terms of running the organization has a whole overall. But what is what is that? They come San Francisco made a decision that they're gonna come and poach one of our better. Guys on in front office. So they've taken something from us to add to them to make them that don't stronger. So it becomes a hit to us as a double. Just like you see where you know, if they go out and get somebody else. He's still here with us. We're still rolling now. No p people out there to say we still have Freeman in place. Yeah. But you lost one of his top lieutenants. Yes in it. That's the case. He now has to find somebody that can make up the difference in do some of the same things that far high was able to do the lieutenants are not insignificant. They're very important to what it is. They do. But he's not the general. The general is Andrew Freedman. He's going to be able to find guys that fill that role. Now. Maybe you don't find another forehand. But I mean, the dodgers have kind of cornered the market on GM's from other places. They have a bunch of guys that have worked in as the guy in other front offices. And he's been able to do it. I I don't think this isn't for this isn't where when a Fred Claire leaves or all of a sudden if if Andrew Freedman decided to go somewhere. Else that you have to make a decision on do continue to do the same thing philosophically, and do you promote one of his lieutenants where you don't know if he's had that front office experience the head guy? This is one of the lieutenants is going everything else continues to be the same the philosophies the same. The approach is the same the top of the management chain is the same the manager on the field, we presume is going to be the same in most of the roster is going to be the same. What if what if what if all of a sudden, we get in the next March, April, whatever in may, and June, and we're seeing more triple drills, more bunting, more stolen bases. More opposite feel hits. Yeah. Then is that because four Hans gone, no because they change the philosophy there. They didn't if the dodgers wanted to do it. You're describing more triple drill. More more hit run more steals all that stuff. It would have happened already. Because the guy at the top is the one that's making that decision. One of his lieutenants is not dictating up and saying we should do it like. This. It's his decision at the talent, you know, Lieutenant sometimes can sway. Sure. Upper management to do it the way visually the way that they think because that's why they're being put in that position of help is to be able to delegate certain things and certain guys and get the feedback. So that they don't have to do everything. Yeah. But this is if you're not going to based on I'm saying all this based on what they lost. I hear you. But you're not going to go one hundred eighty degrees in the opposite direction. You're not you're not one thing. And then all of a sudden the opposite because one of your lieutenants, what could happen is if the opposite had happened key. If let's say inter Friedman decide to go somewhere else and the dodgers promoted for hand, he might have thought. Okay. Look, this is something that I was kind of into. But I think this is a better way. Then you flip it not if the top guys still there, they're still going to be matchup guys. They're still going to be platoon is they're going to be bullpen guys. They're not going to change their philosophy significantly. Maybe a small tweaker there. I think. More than anything. Maybe the players that you acquire might be a little different because they're they're gonna have more influence. I think in that regard. I like this guy I've seen this guy here the numbers on this guy. Let's go get him as opposed to any global changing in philosophy. What why just was just looking at and watching and just done. I'm. I'm a big brand zino. Garages done which means we could talk about the Lakers and having a must win game and game eleven. Yup. It's coming up next.

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Lovecraft Country | Episode 8: Jig-a-Bobo

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1:25:06 hr | 5 months ago

Lovecraft Country | Episode 8: Jig-a-Bobo

"Support. For this podcast comes from Goldman Sachs companies in the top core tile for ethnic diversity or thirty three percent more likely to have industry leading profitability and those in the top tail for gender diversity or twenty one percent more likely to outperform this data was the catalyst behind launch with G.. S. A five hundred million dollar investment strategy that continues to focus on increasing access to capital for women, black, Latino and other diverse entrepreneurs learn more at gs dot com slash launch with G. S.. lovecraft country season one episode eight is over, but we are just getting started here on Poe show recap. So everybody Mike Bloom here taking the skin of Josh Regular Nah literally he's often another dimension this week but I am here filling in to talk about Jig Bobo, the eighth ante penultimate episode of lovecraft country. But of course, I'm not alone I'm joined by two people who are definitively more welcome company than the two characters were introduced to in this episode though I don't know if they're dancing skills matchup personally of course, we've got a welcome in the guy who has been here week in and week out on lovecraft country, Kevin Mateo Kevin, how's it going? Hello by dancing skills are decent. This is the second time we're having dance conversation on this podcast. hippolyte is probably a little sad that she missed out on the dancing with a variety of reasons, and so happy to have a another third head on the panel here who is very familiar to those who listened last week. I mean RJ push has proper has literally become Chapelle show because this man has been a lightning it up here Mike, a sluggish agathe. Gunning a bunch of COPs chapelle. Him. Back. Hi I'm back. Yes. I'm here to dance with you guys again for this episode and no, I probably can't dance like topsy and Bob see but I do a little something. So I'm just happy to be in the room. Thank you for inviting me. So. Here we are third to last episode of lovecraft country and I think you all echoed on the podcast last week after that sublime yet x fact driven episode and I am where do we go from here? Now we see at least we were going in the short term. There's a lot to talk about there is a lot of heaviness. There are some surprising comedy they are really I think I mean not just moving the chains. They are just throwing the chains down the field at this point in an effort to. Really, bring all these characters together for the Final Act Kevin. What did you think about this third to last episode especially as a follow up to you know how far we went into the Uncanny Valley with I am yeah it's so weird because like this episode to me, it's like after three episodes of pure excellence, it's circling back around and in a way remind me a lot of episode four where there was a lot of really good stuff in episode for there is a lot of stuff that was also kind of like. A lot of this backstory stuff that at the time I was like really. Interested in and now like the Tikkun Levy stuff has lowered in my opinion of caring about in any way shape or form but. And then an ending part like. And things segment. That's just like what the actual. Fuck is that like? I have so many questions in about that moment. So it's a really weirdly disjointed episode, but they had some fantastic stuff stuff that I think went to central to. The goodness that we saw in the last couple episodes definitely pulling from Jordan peels own history here of. Of Horror by doing a thing that really felt like out of us. But He had the other parts of it. I just I don't know man it's so weird. To come back to like we were complaining as like men now, a lot of letting a certain point we're like, well, actually you know we don't really care about that story line much anymore, and now that it's back I'm just like Oh. Yeah. I. Really don't care. Much anymore. Chapelle. Let me throw something out here and let me know if you agree or disagree I think with the exception of episode six. The even numbered episodes of lovecraft countries are a definitive step below the odd number episodes. It's like the reverse of Star Trek movies. I've never seen star Trek. So there you go but I can speak going these episodes and yeah I mean EPA one was kind of shadow cannon. It was one of those things I. would did I just watch but you were so excited to watch episode and he was like Oh this. And he watch episode three like Oh we're back in the he was like. What's going on here? So yeah. Yeah episode six got really liked that but those things but this episode itself Yeah. I I a lot of emotions in this episode but a lot of them were. The storytelling or anything like that. It was just like kind of looking at our own world right now and kind of the things that are going on with police brutality and stuff like that and having to see you know imbeciles funeral and I on that last time I was on the show. But I I did be going using immaterial as plot as A. Plot device in not really being a fan of that unless they were going to tie his story up into something more meaningful and I'm not quite sure that they honestly, it made me feel indeed. But could you have done that without using this historical figure who is a person probably, and so I'm I'm not upset you know upset at it but it wasn't. It wasn't what I would have liked. I would I could ask for more probably. Let's talk about that because I think that's obviously that was something that you all speculated about last episode about this how are we going to see Bobo who is Bobo and the show really reaches into its historical candidate obviously seen resents last episode characters like Josephine Baker up in the show and even Jackie. Robinson Make Cameo on the first episode but I do agree that this felt distinctly different. I know I'm personally I'm still trying to like chiu-wan exactly. If I felt it was an. Effective use or not to bring in such a I don't WanNA use name because she apply you made a beautiful point about how and unfortunately this was seem very recently with Brianna. Taylor and the the judgment or lack thereof that was carried out on her killers but this idea of almost me modifying a name or using it for for reasons that transcend to the person was almost removes meaning from it Kevin What. What did you think about the use of Emmett till here in this episode? I mean it's When it started off it was weird to have. This real historical figure be used in a way to like sort of tell part of these story and I could understand that aspect of it to an extent but it's it is. Was it necessary to use a naturalist figure? I don't. Historical figure an actual real person that it had a complete and other tragedy happened to. No I don't think it was like I feel like you could have done it without. Using that I appreciate it to an extent when it started and then see what happened because that was something that I, we discussed last week that I really didn't want. So I appreciated that you didn't see what happened and so I was glad about that when it started. And then you get through specific see near the end and you're just like, oh, come on like and that really bothered me. which will get to eventually but. The usage here it does fuel weird right? It does feel weird thinking about the context that that we're in now and I don't. I don't know how to explain this fully because. The part even that got to me that even more so that made me get. Like hit me in a in a weirdly emotional way was actually when de was confronted by the two officers in the alley. That part. Really. I. Don't say riled me up but it God my heart like really. Pounding. But not in the right way to say it, and this is nothing to the show. But what it is like you know when it happened and they're attacking her and of course, she's saying I can't breathe. Normally I have these moments and I feel like this. Sadness about everything and it is like this tragedy of real life. But. Maybe it's just because of everything happening right now specifically, maybe because the last two weeks, the only thing I felt was just pure exhaustion like seeing that happen in watching hearing those words I just felt so so exhausted and tired and just. Man It was really rough in that moment for me. Of just. Honestly feeling. Hopeless but I definitely felt a sense of hopelessness like that. We're seeing this happened and I know how important and how relevant it is today and it just made me feel like this is just it. There's no kidding better from where we are anymore and it was such a weird thing that that was the moment I felt that but. For me the usage of all that stuff I could tell when they were making this. Important, it is still important and there was power behind what they're doing but the see the spiral we've been on and to see the how far everything has sunk everywhere I. It didn't have that effect that I almost wanted to have it almost was. Extremely depressing. Chapelle what did you make of I guess even following up from. Emma tells, of course, memorable and. Shattering Open casket funeral, which don't know I will Yada Yada give the cliffs outs In a manner of speaking what happened to him until this episode, his mother chose to hold open casket funeral to essentially show the world. What's white violence looks like and it made the cover of jet magazine and that really was I wouldn't say one of the inciting incident. I definitely got the ball rolling when it came to this idea of the civil rights movement and at least. From an outsider's perspective looking in as to what that worlds can be. Outside of that, what was your reaction? When you see this episode I would say it's all about de but as Kevin talked about, there was a lot of sharing the load in this manner but I can imagine that that seeing d get. Now run into the hands of these cops we have seen antagonize a number of our character so far it's not a good feeling. No I want to be clear. I don't hold it against the show for using Emmett till. In this way like I say I don't hate it is just not my favorite thing But what bothers me I guess is that I mean horror movies is supposed to make us feel uncomfortable right? We're supposed to be afraid but like Kevin was saying, it's a different kind of uncomfortable. It's almost like a trauma porn or something you know like something like. In the black community, I know a lot of times. We'll say we're tired of seeing a slave movies right? We're just tired of seeing oppressed and the president. President President Oppress. Every time we Oscar is because somebody played a slice you know or you know like some somebody's Bedouin sure something you know and here we are in it feels like trauma porn all over again like turn on the news and recently Jonathan Pryce was murdered by the police say a gas station in Texas I'm in Texas. So it kind of feels home and boom same day. This episode comes on I. Don't like it's like I can't turn off the TV without know the same kind of trauma you know reappearing so. That being said you know seeing? Struggle with that and go to a funeral this opencast, it's euro of Montrose pointed out the it's a right of passage at that time it. It definitely was you know like Montrose had gone to his life seeing his best friend Taken from him and the Tulsa riots in in a bunch of other things and you know this was almost commonplace for black people back then, and so it felt like a right of passage for him to say, okay she needs to be here but it's starting to feel like that now. I need to I, need to go and read up I want everybody who's been murdered by the police are racially profiled or whatever it's just so I can you know feel like I've? Done, you know necessary respect to them. You know and known what they've gone through and kind of educate myself on. So to see D. go from that to bump into the cops I was like Oh my God my heart hurts because. There's been plenty of scary moments on lovecraft not not a lot of scary moments but a few and most of them for me come from the cops and so when like corner by the comes in this dark corner I don't know what's about to happen Luckily, it was just a curse. because. I thought it was going to be so much whereas I was praying for that little girl. Now it was a lot. It was a lot to go from a cruel summer at a funeral to this back alley confrontation with the source of risk cups. So you know it was odd we'll interesting because I, think that that scene really is a microcosm of. The Lens that we're seeing d through in this particular episode when he asked, do you know anything about magic? She's like Google like and fantasy books and it's very clear and that's represented. The fact that the story line is so separate from the other adult characters that this is a character and maybe this is a bit from ETA perspective who has been a bit ignored who has been pushed to the corner while the adults handle the big problems because she is so young and from that perspective I, do feel like maybe the Emmett till comparison maybe holds a bit more weight too. Because this is someone who was killed. At the age of fourteen you know they have. I mean this show just kills it on the videos but you know when she is taken on those two girls at the police station she there's a voiceover from Naomi Wad ler speech from the march of our live for our lives rally, which was done for in the wake of all these high school shootings in two thousand eighteen. This idea we're not just going to be statistic the young are going to rise up a young or not just GONNA be a number we're going to move on and do things. So I really appreciate them taking on this theme. But Kevin I wanted to be the entire episode. Maybe I'm gluttonous or maybe I'm just. Not. To want to turn away some of the other stuff that was happening. But like men if they had gone with this whole, US candyman Freddy Krueger Concept for the entire episode I felt like they could fire on all cylinders. So yeah to me that's. The. That's seen side of the confrontation. I think that from after that moment, the stuff that happens to be in this is. Holy Like. That's quintessential hardcore horror that I'm just like this. This is great like the I'd you know moving in the criminal wheat poster the changing of the cover I almost wish there was one more beat of like a thing. So stocking and I feel like would've gone it. If it wasn't sadly split episode if we did just have a focus on d., we would have got one more beat of like something being off before the girl showed up on the platform. But when they show up on the subway platform I, mean you know in terms of what is a horror movie element I think those girls and? Top seen biopsy and like how they moved into the music. All of it is probably in my opinion, the number one scariest thing they've done on the shell creepy unsettling it's so shot so well in the evening and there was even jump scare the got thrown in there with the car. Yeah there's the it was really really well, actually I absolutely wish to step was Just all of those do characters because they were so fascinating and creepy and built I think a horror icon that to me. Could you know you do stuff with this? It stands to the type of creep packer you get from your Freddie's and your Jason's you know or your candy man's to actually more scary before Jason Jason is always you know pointless but. Not Pointless. Silence. But he has a comedy element into movies overall in the Freddie of wisecracker right you get a candyman there's actually just a horror element and I feel like you get that with these two characters. So those parts I, I, yeah, I wish the episode was all that because then when the episode of gets interrupts with the other stuff, which again when you have such good things happening and you a part like legit, where did I write this down? and. This is a D. related, but a GI shows up. And she's there. And I'm just like, oh my gosh, and then they cut to a tick and I'm just like I. Don't care why do you? Like about and that happened so many times they would cut the like a different character and I'm like specifically, they men they really I don't know what they're doing with. This would take a character maybe they're making him a villain. I think we hypothesized that possibility but like. Just, I cannot care less anymore I. Guess. It's interesting. Point I. Mean Chapelle is this character assassination and. What's what's tick tick now has monsters you can control in like how to train your dragon way, but it seems like his motives are simultaneously more clear and less clear than they've ever been. Yeah, he's. He's gotten to the point where he's like I'm doing this to protect my family because shocker letty is pregnant right? Like that's the big deal and we kind of hypothesize about that. On the podcast before and kind of dreaded it. I let out grown when she said it when he said it but he knows this right he's going into the future. Due to that machine, and now he's seen. I'm GonNa have kids soon and let his pregnant and I have to now protect my family and so now he's kind of putting you know the whole team on his back and his mind right so he's got things to do and they don't have anything to do with. They don't have anything to do do Ruby and those people just have more interested storylines right now. So while tickets are here fighting, you know the size of Adam we don't really care. We're more concerned with what's happened with these getting chased by monsters or you know what's happened to ruby she's in bed with Christine right white again and so. As opposed to like not not to say that tick is not a compelling character, but there's better stuff going on right now and take in his own. So I could see why we're losing interest in them because I definitely am. And you also have this this this thing with the character and self like you're losing interest, and then you have that moment to where he shows up and he so means Jiahd. Hers. You're just like Oh screw you man like you just you're you're mad at him for being means to her for pretty much no reason, and then of course, you have this weird blow up between him and let me which I was just like this just feels like drama for drama sake that they're trying to instill like, yes, you should be man but the level of a lot of it just felt like overblown just to create the drama for these characters. So try and make us a little more invested. It didn't work. Yeah I, and also if you're just gonNA bring back Jamie. Chung and just have earned that once that that's all we. I wish you did not bring her back. You did not have to bring her back I do I do think that I think that which is gonNa take a page out of watchmen and it's very clear. They're bringing together all the disparate plot threads into one central location in Chicago. So I would not be surprised if GI plays a large role especially because now that they know about her power, which was a nice little clunky offscreen piece of exposition, right? Like Hey let's. Let's relitigate what happened in episode six but know you bring up a point about we find out a bit more about ticks trip through the portal. Unfortunately, we are told instead of shown up, but it does seem at least he went to the future for what seemed like nanoseconds was given the book by a woman in a Hoodie and basically push back through. Or wasn't not the future because I mean Kevin you went wild about the multi-diverse last week. Could this be the future or is he misinterpreting this and this is just an alternate world where maybe he had a son called George Freeman who wrote this book and his entire guiding light for this entire mission might be off. Well it's it's interesting because I haven't read the book yet, but the actual of craft country book apparently, all the things he said is pretty much accurate into how the book is now. So he could like it's an alternate version of our own reality, which is quite possible. And that's the thing right though like what you just said you. We we are. We are told not shown which feels like maybe I'm crazy but there's a rule in storytelling about that You, you hear he just also showed up, got a book and then was pushed back through the portal. So he had zero adventure I just how do you have the main character of your series? Just have no barely any agency he just gets pushed around from place to place and things happened to him and like have no real adventure that you as a you're being connected and drawn to like there's so many things happening around him that are like. Point out so much cooler so much more dynamic characters because we are given nothing that is happening to ticket away that field dynamic feels like there's a driving force feel like there's something deep and powerful and weird and Kooky happening to him. The most interesting thing he's done so far is have a dream at the beginning of the series, which is insanity for your main character ragging pretty hard on the show. About this. But like come on, he's our focal point like you gotta do better with that especially again, whereas we're watching this DA's being stalked by two creepy girls long nails addresses moving very weirdly to the beat of music in a very again, Essien way that's so interesting and had me at the edge of my seat. The entire time that the comparison is crazy like it's so disjointed when you're jumping between those things. And I think we'll. Sorry Mike. I think that you know we were saying earlier that. You know that. Monologue was about you know how the I don't don't ignore the kids in all this right and the show is showing all these adults ignoring the right. She's going to them with this problem getting stalked by these monster. You know these does. Crazy people she doesn't know who they are. She's running as you run it nobody sees this as she can't speak to him like every time she gets ready to talk our voice like she. She can't use it but people are just ignoring her in general and it's from a from a medical standpoint. We're not. We are completely invested in his moment nobody else's but the watching we're watching this show like. We'll take whatever happened to you in part of that's fine. We didn't see it, but we see D- right now. Kevin Points Yeah. When all this happened to your main character offscreen, you find a new main character and while she was being ignored it by all the adults in her life, we definitely not ignore her and I was getting very annoyed at the fact that no, one would see her also we kept cutting away from her. Because she had the most compelling storyline for this episode for me at least no i. i WanNa get back because that is the good. The main pillar of good in this episode because I don't know the more I think about it the more like obsessed with the care that's put into it, and specifically as you mentioned Kevin I, think the aesthetic choices I'm intrigued see what you guys think about there being two instead of one but the the idea of taking on my serve rate on it was that. This was sort of invisible spirit until it saw the book uncle Tom's cabin, and then took on the visage of this cover character, which is the name top topsy, and it becomes topsy and boxy who also give huge to Bianca Brian and Caitlin Harris who played top Zimbabwe 'cause they scare the Bejesus out of all of us a misdemeanor everyone that's listening as. Well. But the use of topsy and also the song that played almost like their theme stop that knocking which I believe is actually go from a minstrel show. It's such an interesting representation of DIS fear of anti blackness in a manner of speaking like because topsy for those of you that haven't read Uncle Tom's cabinet is essentially this. It's his character that I. Think was initially created by Harriet Beecher Stowe as sort of like a representation of a how like you know she despite her upbringing as the children of slave like she has an innate intelligence to her she's almost delight in that regard. But of course, took white people decided to take that and completely bastardize it and turn it into a comedic caricature of black. People I can imagine you know in in the world where her best friend who happens to be Emmett till just got killed where anti-black this is really at the forefront of her mind if there is something to manifest itself in front of her, I could imagine Chapelle. That is going to sort of be this mascot of how white people toy with and looked. Upon people of color and how that literally chases her no matter where she goes. Yeah. So in Uncle Tom's cabin. Topsy is in a situation where she's being degraded so much to where she doesn't even realize she has parents anymore. And so she's getting turned into what you what you saw D running from. Or let's kind of like a caricature of what we saw the running for him. He's like the personification of just like taking. A small black girls humanity away from her, and that's what D- was looking at and that's kind of what was going through how racism was just transformed her and says such an angry you know like emotional person and she went from d like this week kid who we hadn't seen anything like this before and she goes throwing rocks at little girls on the street because they're experience happiness that she can't feel you know and she's and she's smiling after she does it and she's almost laughing to to not cry. And so de goes through all of that wit topsy. The of physical image of that as well following her, and so I think that's a great point. Yeah shout. Kaelin and Brianna I think I believe one of them was in Cardi B. Video recently. So shout out to her for sure in the video. So look it up if you have really. going. To lovecraft country at demonic topsy in. Listen when I have to make a glowing endorsement, I can't I can't pass up. So. Shut up to them because they were really frightening but that's what that's what topsy was. That's what she became in Tom's cabin just from you know as a product racism. So we saw the battling with that the route, the episode. Yeah. Kevin there was one moment that really struck me in terms of the symbolic nature of it was when d. ends the break into the police station and before that, you know fantastic line of Bits F. off pigs. She tells them white friendly like what happens when it catches me and I do feel like from a certain perspective like not to breach too much into our discussion of horror films like it's almost it follows in a way of like representation of what happens when something point quote caches you much like it caught her friends before and it will catch her friends again again, Tissue Pell's point about Montross is statements beforehand it was a moment where I think it became like very solidified for me at least and made it even stronger storytelling from there. I mean there is there is that metaphorical aspect to it right? I mean like when you look at these horror movies too when you think about like just as as we call it stalking horror or Slow stocking I think chapelle coach. Slow Ocean. You have this this element to of it. We're what know what happens when it catches you as well as death a lot of the time. Right and now you have a character who is a black character who in these horror movies this this is what happens to them when they are caught often. So it it is interesting that element happening. In. This story with this confrontation and the idea of what happens when a catches me. Now, what we are seeing by the end is that we don't fully know there's some sort of. Suffering that might happen so I mean there's a lot there too like unpack especially in terms of like what happens when it catches you when when you are black character, your personal color in this situation isn't just ethic could be something far worse than long extending. So there's a lot there that I think works really well on of course again. Yeah. Having L. Moment to of just evolved pigs is fantastic. The thing that we're all feeling thinking and wanted to say on a regular basis. was a really great moments kind of get that to throw out there. Yeah let's talk about that. Speculate on the ending a little bit because it does seem not to go into the previous for next week but it does appear that the scratch at least one that was left on her arm from topsy and Bob is going to afflict turn next week. She's like in a pseudo coma it seems Chapelle do you have any speculation because we do see these things don't turn out to be in her head as maybe might be experiencing the entire time. She does get physically injured by them. When Montross ends up holding her down after she goes just like speaking of Jackie Robinson just absolutely keeps wailing on one of them that pipe. In Montrose. Credit was one of the few people who actually paid a little attention to the he was trying and his own way to kind of. Talk to her about. About. The things that were happening with immaterial and racism and the extreme prejudices of that time and. There's merit in this time, but he was basically trying to tell her like if if if this is coming for you, right if racism and hatred is coming for, you don't make it easy on him and so by the time we get to. The last scene of d versus topsy and Bob she's got the pipe and sees swinging. She's she's destroying them I. Mean I mean she's handling business it seems like right? Before they come in, she'd start to draw them. So she draws with. Jazz down on the paper, her images of these these things that are attacking her. So what's Montrose comes in and attack scratched by them of course, Montrose Kate see what's attacking her. But now that those images are on the floor, I wonder if they're going to be at a put together, those images have something to do with those scars on her on her arm us in a coma that it looks like she's going to be, and so I don't know what is going to happen as far as with her her physical state after this episode but I do know that there are pieces laying around. That could help them. figure out what was going on. I don't know how descriptive they are but if you can look at the maybe uncle Tom's cabin and finds something in there I, don't know it might be a brick crummer something they can lead to. Where we can use to to heal the moment. I've also say on sort of playing outside of the the decide things for a second I. Think this is one of Montross as best episodes I do think that was another strong point is I think Michael K Williams. Had put in some really really great work I. Think we've seen a couple of unsavory looks in the CA- at the character in the past couple of episodes so much so that the other characters Sammy specifically have underlined. He's been but I feel like his you know his seen as. Early with tick and his decision to do this incantation, and essentially like put his own life online we talked about ticks sacrificial status. Now, we see where it gets us from aware you know mantras to saying like, okay. If there's a chance I'm going to have a bloodline from now on I need to make sure that despite maybe my misgivings in the past and the present I need to work to the future given any thoughts about mantras this episode? Yeah I mean we kind of talked about this. I kind of mentioned it like a while back where it was the episode. Ruby centric episode writing about being comfortable in your own skin. I felt like there was a turning point mantras as a person there were we saw him make that turns be comfortable with who he is and I wanted a reflection there to show him become better as a person. Once you realize that you can be who you are. That's the self-healing thing and we have seen that I think I think Montross is yes he had. He had a confrontation with Sammy he had an argument there and there are some elements within does not be fully healed. But I do like that as a character he is sort of. Changing and trying to be better, and we definitely see that here we see also you know. Situation with the is it is an adult who has lived a life. In this world. You know a black man who has lived this life in this world. Witnessing what he thinks is A. You know a black child experiencing the beginning of what life is going to be, and so I understand him rushing to comfort her not really you know understand that she's being chased does feel like it could just be an emotional thing that that that you're dealing with. So I, kind of get at the end, right like we his intentions are great but unfortunately the consequences. Are Evident wouldn't also also crazy I do hope like as these stories converge everyone is just Kinda, like okay cool. Like that's what's going on because so many times you have situations where someone in a very obviously supernatural situation who has witnessed certain things. We'll deny other things to just be like what like alternate realities? That's crazy. There's just like dude, you just fought ghosts. Like some hoping that once everyone starts revealing their stuff everyone will be like Oh. Yeah. Okay. That's wild. But yes, I believe that like you know rather than have to episode everyone thinking the other person's crazy So hopefully, yes, there will be clues that they will find through that drawing, but like be able to hopefully piece something together to to make it work. It might be like you know that's where Christina might have to come in. You know clearly she know spells better than anyone else there. So maybe she might reveal information about what's happening but. Yet it's mean like we I think those are the best parts of this episode is is the mantra stuff which connects to the have a bit of an overlap with tick. Yeah that that's that's stuff I really like and it just felt so I don't know. Jordan Peele. Did it felt like get out. It felt like us. It felt like the things that that made those movies. So amazing to me and my kind of. Changed me in terms of like looking at storytelling on was the ability to take these ideas of horror tropes before and and really paint this new context especially through a racial context on it and in accomplishes. So well, here it is one of the things where I saw I'm just like Oh i WanNa hold episode I want to hold movie like young go for it like dude do something with this and maybe we will maybe it's like a bit of the candyman because he's executive producing that you know. Like. I said it's a bit of touch of us. So yeah, like this is the good stuff compared to the side. Yeah I mean Chapelle. We essentially got mantras coming out to his son here after it was discovered last episode and it. Really took me a little while to realize that but I thought it was done in such an interesting way where if you talk about. Institutions you know institutional blank is whether it be racism sexism homophobia. What have you that's essentially how montrose paints is coming out to tick is well the reason why I had to be for lack of Bertram in the closet about this is because I literally every person I know in my life who is not is dead or lobotomize or worse, and so I I do think you guys talked about this last week with ticks reaction I think it's always good sort of hearken back to how not everyone was. At the time to everything this idea that you know that at least in this moment tick could see his father for the logic that he took in the way that he lives his life and I don't know did you have any thoughts about mantras particularly in those scenes with tech this episode? Oh Yeah. So we can all agree that Montross is getting the winner edit right? Like this is the Montrose. Art Right because he was the first the first episode and a half, he wasn't even there. Exactly but I mean who has shown more growth. In humanity as Marcos. Montrose but I guess if he started off his such a low point, right we knew him as abusive father and and so he had nowhere else to go up honestly and so now we look at him talking to taken having these very human moment of some saying like I had urges but there was no way I was going to act on those because I didn't want to die right I don't want to die or be put in the same asylum or be you know just be murder A victim of a hate crime which. He could've still been a victim of a hate crime or in an asylum experiments on as a black man. So it was like he was avoiding one in one aspect of his life because he had to face it all over the place. And it humanize him a lot. Honestly. The last couple of have been doing a really good job of humanizing Montrose in a way the he is one of the most compelling characters and he was the one who was there for D. so I'm happy to see his his art but I. Kinda sad that it sounds like it's going to end and sacrifice. He's made the point that you know he in his mind. He was always going to die at the hands of racism anyway or you know. Homophobia I'd probably a in his mind. He was already going to go like that. So he he feels like. Using the spell and being the sacrificial lamb for that. WOULD BE More feeling in. A compelling thing to do for his family as opposed to dine how he feels like he's GonNa die which is at the hands of the white man. So I guess when you're stuck between a rock and a harp like that, you really don't have anything else to do pick pick pick aside. Right but it's an easy. It's easy decision to make like you don't want to die a martyr, but you also feel like you need to pay it forward for the next person and dying at the hands of racism is not going to do that you end up a martyr. Yes but you won't be able to to make any strikes anybody else I'd much rather you be here to fight the fight. For it looks like he's found, he's found the end of his road and was it four days from now the autumnal equinoxes is come in and so he's you know take you have a kid coming. I'm good taking this L. for you. So it looks like how Macho story is GonNA end or at least that's how it seems right and let's let's talk about that equinoxes because, yeah, we get a little bit. You know thrown to us a little chumming the waters when it comes to the Mr Madam, which I will agree I think is the weakest part of the show in general for me which is the sad thing. To. Line to keep sort of relying on, don't position it as a mystery box. My feelings about misery box shows are clear. Well, we've got to investigate one corner of the mystery box I. Suppose Let's Talk Christina here because. Say That I, say that on one hand in that she is clearly she outright said her I want staying in this episode right of what she wants to do on the other hand I think we're still trying to figure out what her motivations are. She does. Apparently, help put that spell on her. She seems to be working with Ruby in some capacity to the point where Ruby thinks, she can trust her Kevin. Have you gauged any different opinion about Christina in this episode that she became more of a main fixture of everything going on I mean. Christina has always been. You know rather compelling me to an extent and I'm curious about her motives and she's to me she's a good antagonised. Up until. The ending of this episode, I would say I you know I it's terrible. But like if you're creating a villain, you're creating antagonise that least me in that moment of confrontation where Ruby is just like. Care feel anything and she's just like, no, I'm like well at least you fucking honest. Of it where I'm just like the least appreciate like a person who's truthful about that situation. It's so wild. It's funny because I just finished my angel rewatch and there's a hilarious line in it. That kind of relates to this where angels fighting one of the main bag is at the end and angels like. People like you don't care about anything we'll never understand people people who care about who who care about everything and the bad guy punches and just like, yeah, but we won't care. Rate. Retort House. Very, Christina like in that moment and like I appreciated that makes makes for a villain who you're just like, wow. Yeah. They they know who they are and they are fine with it. But then you get her ending moment that. My first question of course why? Why does she do it? Why did you do it? Like what did you notice that? Like they're just so much there in that moment where she I guess hires two guys to reenact the death of Emmett till to her and it becomes like did you do it? So you could feel what it was like and it is this weird thing where like I can sort of get the idea though. That certain white people can only truly understand if they actually have it happened to them. If they actually suffer the consequences, then they will actually feel something. It's certainly not something that relates to groups of them today. No, not at all. But That's my only like maybe indication and like it is like, of course, a privilege, right? It is the privilege that you could not only suffer the the same. Thing but come out unscathed right I. think there's something there. That was very like they were trying to do with that about this idea of like being a white woman and having that privilege as Ann Arbor to protect you at the end of the day. But it was sort of lost in the like. But why are we doing this? Why are we showing this brutality like? Is it too like I said, they didn't show it earlier in the episode I'm like, I'm glad. I, you know I. I'm glad they didn't show that and was it like, oh, it's different though because we're showing it happened in this context like year also still having a habit to a woman does so like let's not forget that part, but there's there's also There yeah. Similar thought at the time of like, okay. Like is this sort of telling more of a wholesale audience like now you sort of get a better feeling. You Know Ruby has this conversation about empathy with her essentially, and this scene is essentially a sociopath Brian to learn empathy and ultimately failing that she breaks hysterical after after she gets nearly drowned there so you could say. Like, Oh, you know when it happens to 'cause there's a whole example well, as well as you know, if this happened to a white woman, would you react the same way as if it happened to a black woman, but the issue to me but that contract is like this is not just any white woman. This is someone who to your point Kevin has been built up as like the. UNCARING, antagonised, and so it's not necessarily like a that we sympathise about. We just saw that happen successfully in this episode with D.. Who is this like young precocious innocent girl who is just like being horrifically followed and I had much more emotional investment in than than than the two minutes of Christina getting her ass kick. So I mean, if that was their mission I feel like Chapelle maybe it was a bit misguided in that in that way of speaking. I WANNA I want to preface this with I hate Christina and everything that she isn't everything she will be in the show so if she turns out to be an ally at the still hate her I wanna just play my plan that right now before I start what I'm about to say. I think she's the worst type of person I think that that moment. Was Not like I WANNA know how it feels moment. I think that was I heard the most gruesome thing. I've ever heard in my life done to someone and I want to see if I can survive my new powers because I have the privilege of doing that and when she got out of the water she was like look at me I'm shining in new and she was happy and she laughed I hate everything about this woman Irene everything. And it and it just happened today. I was thinking back on the episode and when I watched it I was upset and I couldn't tell why and I think it's because like she's kind of putting herself in an ally position and she doesn't mean anything that she's saying right she's using these people as pawns for. She finally said the words I wanna be immortal, and so everything that she does is an attempt to get closer to immortality from my eyes. So I could probably write a book on all the things that Christina did this episode that annoyed me but I mean even when she was in the episode I'm the in the body of a is it William her alter ego she shows up rubies getting like confronted at the mansion. At right after Emmett Funeral, she shows up to the mansion with our key and gets confronted by a neighbor and William shows up and tells the neighboring diagnose. She's good and then walked into the house. No William is opposed to end this moment say, Hey, screw you guys don't talk to my guest like this. She lives here she has a key you suck. Stand up her her instead he's just like, oh no, it's fine and Kinda just liked he. She. Christina William Day took. This moment to. Pacify the situation when they could say. Alliance? No that doesn't fly here. I have. I'm I have magic magic you if you don't. Leave her alone in that moment you could. You could fight for this person and I continued to see that throughout the episode instead of fighting for these people, she was just using them as pieces to get closer to term immortality even to the point where. I think is offering her you know for for ticks immunity or you know. The potion or whatever the spill to work on TC she's going to give her the the. The pictures of the book, the Book of names or whatever and. Christina instead of doing that, she says, no, I'll give it to you instead why? Because I need to be able to die so I could sacrifice some soccer be immune. Like I really everything about her made me. Upset. We even the fact that she was putting herself in a situation where she paid to white men took to attack her. If you WANNA be afraid pay some black men to attack you after you have to imitate like murdered did they will put some fearing you not these like paid people that you know that you may at the grocery store you know like that's not GonNa scare you also it's really hard to be afraid when you know your immune like you say, Mike. I was more afraid for the entire episode but mostly when the cops confronted her she was, you know she was in mortal danger this woman I watched her basically get lynched and I was not afraid for her at all. Why? Because she was not afraid for herself I hey Christina. The End. That is love and I. Give my son to travel through a portal to sacrifice himself to. She's the worst I'm sorry. She's she's disgust me. I love that. That's that's like a I love ranting like that. That's that's like my Jim. Hearts Chapelle. Speaking my language yeah. So much. and. I think you know that's hopefully purposeful. I don't think they're gonNA make an ally at the end I think she's you know position to be. Antagonists and There's a line I remember I think one episode to where she has this thing where she says to take on every white person is out to get you and I'm like Yes yes, you are. Person Wants. Out To us you and she's It's The other thing too. I. Will Say like moving away from Christina a little bit towards what we were saying. About. The spells, right like you have here where me goes to get this spell. So she now she has invulnerability it sounds like and at the same time tickets doing his own spell of protection for himself and it's just like if people would just talk to each other for. Seconds like that's my other thing. This is a pet peeve is super duper pet peeve but it happened so much TV shows and movies where it's just like you have a bunch of characters and they're all doing their own thing and all it would take is literally for anyone to talk to each other and like you saw a lot of problems but you but you don't and it's just I don't know it's the type of writing that always bugs me and and and like shows do constantly and. The excuse of just like. Well, it creates drama just like there's a billion ways to create drama. You don't happen to use this tired nonsensical way of doing it. So like now, you end up in a situation where and it's it's fine. It'll it'll it'll. It'll play in where you have led who hasn't vulnerability and tick now, summon show got demons to do his bidding. which was wild at the same point. As I have said, a number of times that scene at the end you know the show guy comes up and just rips apart those officers and my reaction has always when terrible racism TV dies Ono they. And there's A. Very much laugh album moment in the episode where they had it was like a pseudo tracking shot as they sort of follow them around and you had this fantastic panning of the one cop just flying through the air. Peter Pan on his way into his coffee and that was a pretty, damn fun way out be a very as you said, Kevin W. F. seeing that ends with this discovery of. Okay. So I guess. So, 'cause we didn't. We knew that letty wanted to protect bill. I was trying to remember what if tickets specified what the spell was an if he got the intended effect in now being able to essentially have his own little pet immortal style instead of big bulldog, it's now a big dog with multiple is to be able to do his bidding, but it seems like that's going to be the big game changer for the last two episodes here. Yes certainly, and I mean, you know I do like the twist of it like. You you this spell of protection of some sort and when you work with dark magics I, guess you end up. You don't end up with what you're always gonNA. Think you're going to get. So technically, yes, he has protection just not what he was assuming letty sort of got the like presumably invulnerability aspect of it all whereas he has demon monster that he can. Actually, who ends up with a better deal of that because like yes, I would love to tell the weight you rather I mean listen Kevin you Mr Immortality as we heard last week. So like you would rather take lettuce deal, you take that mark of Cain any day of the week over just being able to command a big floppy tongue multi beast. Well, it depends right like like has led he doesn't have immortality. She hasn't vulnerability, which is also really really good and I'm all about. But. Just Hey, on monster demon pretty good partly trick to pull out at a at a show. So both pretty good it's hard to say like for me it would be like whatever Christina's working for give me that one mortality I would love it. I wouldn't do it the way she does it but like I. Would take him mortality. Yes. That's my deal. A constant argument I have in my household to about me wanted to take. A pass it onto the people I love I would do so they apparently wouldn't take. Without that's their prerogative I it. Anyway. Exactly, you extended the offer you extended the olive. Their fault but they burn, it should do you have any thoughts about just the complete Wackadoo final scene here with these shoot out at the Boardinghouse I'm assuming is pretty r.i.p at this point. Yeah I. Guess. So police shootings at at at. The home of the black people was not out of out of the out of the conversation back. Then it was very, it was very prominent and civil rights movement and stuff like that. So you're already in that place where you're seeing this happen and then the magic starts right like well, I imagine started when the police officers couldn't get inside because of the protection spill but it seems like when we were getting revealed everybody's power, right? So we know that tick Kan.. You know some in this. This disgusting beasts there can just wipe through all of these racist cops and then you have letty who is now a invulnerable and bullets bouncing off of her and then. Is here now I was wondering what she's when she showed up in the in the in the dining room for the confrontation Hawaii's you here. But now I know that she's here because she too has a power she is Fox and so it sounds like we're assembling of injuries almost for the final battle. equinoxes like I think Kevin earlier, you all these people in the room. Right for the knows you might you want all these people in a room at the last episode when you have to have the fight, you have all the players there and so you have taken his monster and letting her invulnerability, Bill Vulnerability and and her foxy and Ruby trying to white lady so everybody's power also liked it aqua man of the power set. Turned into a White Lady for about twenty minutes. Yeah for sure you've got the Batman power like the white privilege and the money and so so but I would all our powers combined. Now we can fight the fire and Save D., and so I think that's kind of what they were doing a little bit. So it was very interesting to see that. That's how. A protection spell mantas because I wouldn't have thought. That was what was going to happen. Now I WANNA know if he can just wheeled this you know at the drop of a hat is he did like oh there's a cop. The attack dog or if it's just like you have to do the spell again or it has to be personal conditions or life has to be in danger I mean that bullet was flying right at him. So maybe that's why kicked in. Because he would have dispatched this a little bit earlier when the bullets I started flying but I guess he did not know. Our. You Kevin is someone entrenched in Superhero terminology I do feel like those powers always exposed like throughout the peak adrenaline moment right when their life is most endanger. Yeah I mean like it depends on. The story and who but yeah, a lot of times. That's the kicker. Right when your life is in danger your power end up manifesting I mean if you're a highlander. Mortality at you have to suffer a brutal death before you are borne essentially again in immortal. X. Men go through puberty but a lot of him yeah. You have to suffer some sort of fear tragedy and. Kick Start Your powers. So it's not totally unheard. Of course, this is different because it's magic but. Yet. It's interesting. I mean it makes sense. He didn't know how his powers we're going to be worked and I it could just not even have been that. In danger and kicked it, it could be his subconscious. Did it at that point because he was endangered but now that he knows he could just summon a Shogun he needs to specifically only at night I guess because they are not supposed to be around her today. So yeah it's GonNa be it's but at the same time like. Because now, you would like talking about this where you got a WHO's who's coming in as like you know the communal Fox and you got. Him On his show our you got. He would possible invulnerability. You Have Ruby who could shape shift I. Guess You have all these characters and part of me is also just like, okay, are we the X. Men now? X. Men showed up in the. Kevin, they're going to turn that house in two. Zero screaming. For the. A lot is coming back to. You I was missing. The. Like she could be able to see all possible worlds and be able to connect with everybody. Not. As. Much as we're talking about this though, right like that sounds crazy but the senate and at the same time. For the show and just like not really not. What is that? What I want? Do I want a show with a minority characters that have superpowers? Yes. Would love that maybe one day we might have forget it but I don't want it for this particular show. That's the weird part I. It's. It's so odd that the about what's happening I GAZ And we'll see how plays out I suppose there's two episodes to go, but it does set up some really interesting stuff that again I the pacing of it all I wish I would have it would have been better because I could have been way more invested. For this ending out where it's all headed But yeah, it's. Just like okay I guess that's happening. You know and I think one of the main issues with the show is that they have ten pounds of storylines and a half pound bag each and every episode and I think two choices that they make like you know it's tough to be like dedicate episode seven to hippolyte of dedicate episodes eight to d they can't be like. Well, we can't do that because look at episode six. That was entirely flashback that was entirely like you clearly have the ability to do so and so I don't know of Season Two's in the cards I do agree that I think pacing instructor are probably the two biggest issues of this show. There's a lot of great stuff in there and I want to touch on a couple of other things before we start moving into some more miscellaneous stuff. Christina, and letty scene for a second and maybe not just because of like the the tit for tat deal that she was talking about but more. So the the literal religious invocation because I feel like it's been, it really hasn't been touched upon this season this idea of like you know religious faith versus faith in the occult in Magic and I do find it interesting that you know in her time of need. Goes to the church she praised God she essentially compares Magic to the Devil at that point saying this is an evil force that it's working against you and essentially the moment that Christina makes is essentially like a very religious argument is well of basically saying people want to be God or people want to meet God and avoid going to hell but people don't realize got is heaven and hell and it's sort of this idea at least minds reputation was sort of. like a veteran, like there are two sides to the force that there can beat the same type of spirit energy. But depending on how you use it, it could have different moral affiliations and so it's almost tough to say this is good and this is evil because at the end of the day, it's still the same makeup. She did you have any notes about this? This sort of like I mean I don't know I didn't think we'd ever see a scene of love country take place in a church with all the magic going on here we are. And I hate Christina so I think a lot of attention to this part of the episode as well because Christina's interaction with both and Ruby, was. Again I just hate her so much and so when she was talking to ruby earlier, she kinda spun rubies argument the same way she spun ladies rights a Ruby was saying I, wanted to be a white woman so that I didn't have to be a black woman having sex with a white man. And this in a moment where she felt like extreme fear, right she just been seeing the face of this kid who had been mutilated she has been. attacked. Confronted by the guy from across the street because you're a black woman walking into this neighborhood to come, and now she has to be a black woman laying with the white man. She's like I don't want to do that. So she goes and become a white woman. She does it she does the things that need to be done and it afterwards. Christina's like, yeah you might say that you wanted you wanted to say for you. You did this you didn't. So you didn't have to be black woman today because it was really hard data to be black but what you really want if power and I think they're the middle ground in there somewhere. That's probably it's probably a mixture of both but Christina Leans into that and a Lotta Times in the black community we'll talk about people who who are like almost enchanted by the idea of being like Proximity to whiteness like if it's closer to white than is right. and. So that kind of is Ruby. Moving tour Christina. Let who's doing the same thing? You know she turning to church because that's what she knows. She is not a person of faith, but she is now died and come back to life and she listen somebody's in charge of this and I need to talk to them about it. She goes she's talking to Church and here comes Christina evil ask Christina walks in as she start spitting black magic and the Church House I was disgusted. I understand her point but again, she's just saying anything she can do like say to get these people to do what she wants. This is right after she says, oh no, I'm not going to give tick immunity which would have been so easy, but she has to kill him. So she gives it to lady I. Don't for Niagara Zena saying that i. hear her I see her but I see her and let. Her and Ruby. Don't see her because they're going through a lot right now all this trauma and stuff like that with the racism is happening at the same exact time as does magic stuff and life goes on this guy got Lynch and life is going on and they don't have time to focus on West right in front of them because they're trying to save themselves from one thing and I think that's why everybody's ignoring. That that monologue pointed out earlier by Naomi, it was about like kids being ignored specifically black girls not having a voice in how the crowds of a black girl is not going to hurt the same as a crowd of a white girl and that's what we're seeing. How all of this trauma is is boiling over at one time and these people cannot focus on what's directly in front of them, and that's Christina is evil. The the and. Kevin I WANNA I wanNA talk about the Ruby and Christina stuff as well. Even though Chapelle blood has practically build over. But. What is your interpretation of why the what the Ruby side of things is? Why does she ultimately decide to sleep with quote? Unquote William having known exactly the context to two and Nice stirring rendition of I put a spell on you nonetheless. Yeah I mean. It's tough right because she she does it. Not as herself but but as as a white woman and. There's just this weird things that I feel like there's so many levels to it. It's hard to even delve into something. For sure right because you have this incident here where you have the consequences of being black in this world, you have a black women were the white man would also suffer consequences because that should not be happening in that time period. So you know the idea like escaping from that about being white. So you don't feel or have to worry about consequence in a moment could be. Could be something that's played with their. I mean, absolutely I think which Appel hit on about the seductive power witenesses one, hundred percent accurate. I mean there is also the other part of like Ruby doesn't want power and you know what? Though I don't blame her I get that I d I understand the like anger and desire for power she must feel, I, absolutely can relate to that. So. I. Get those parts of it and. But at the same time, like you know, she has one hundred percent accurate like. Like. Helium Christina doesn't matter what faces being warned once their own particular goal and they're willing to manipulate anyone to get it. You know her her whole thing about the about heaven and Hell and God, and whatever. That's. That's a whole other thing that I don't want to get into about my own particular views of Heaven Hell Religion and all that other stuff 'cause that's that's a different podcast. So that part of it I think it is just her though like saying what she needs to say to get what they want Funny. Enough. It reminds me of. The vow, which is something that we're also watching also on. Hbo Max. The vow of course is about the call nexium which. The. Actually was actually named ESPN. But. The Celtics the that was around like all colts you know. Seduce. And it is that looking at this, you see some of the interviews that are happening here something is they're saying and it is all about like almost like saying nothing but just making sure that you're saying what the person needs to hear. But even though what you're saying means literally nothing you're just saying words at this point but you have people in trauma and you have that's how these calls work. Right? You take people who are who are suffering in some way who? the personal trauma in some way or know. E once they're in there, you're depriving them of sleep. You're depriving them of eating properly people are going to be so much more susceptible when they're in trauma when they're in these bad circumstances. So you can just spout this stuff to them and. Get them to believe you listen to you so much quicker and I feel like again Christine as part of a cult. Anything implying. Implicating. Applying words. Her history that she knows of what works and what can work to manipulate people. It's getting what she needs in. Have them working with her when it's against best interests I mean, I'm going to put out a bold prediction here. Maybe amount of my own maybe I'm not. I think that Ruby is definitely going to betray the quote unquote. Good guys at least once I don't know if she's going to stay there or if she's going to come back. To the end, but I feel like the sweet seductive of Christina Slash William in whatever genitalia they claim to have that moment is just too alluring for her. She tells Lettie at the end. You know I don't want to be white I'm just sick forgiving every space I enter I, WANNA. Make my own space and you look back as to like why ended up consorting with William why she drank that potion episode five and we saw her try to. Make it as a musician and really just like really hard and granted. That was like a pretty crummy gig to have. But I think it's it's a microcosm of how she feels her position in the world is almost a different take on hippolyte as whole shrinking metaphor that she talked about with parallel universe George last episode whereas while Hippolyte I think takes a more positive approach to it of like let me use these other opportunities and outlets to show. Who has who I am I think Ruby is more. So looking at like will let me be the one to take up space instead of seating space to others. Let me take power and I do feel like at least an episode benign of Don episode ten I personally could see her you know siding with Christina especially if Christina has enough of an offer to her to make her maybe cloud her judgment as to what exactly might be going on. In God knows what Christina actually did to to letty as well. Right. So we know that magic has come with a price pretty much every show that ever has any magic. We'll tell you something like that, and so she goes and puts this mark of Cain on letty and letty could potentially have some side effects. They would lead her to switch to the other side. We don't know we don't know what's going to happen to Ruby and letty from using this magic. That's. The Christina is basically just enticing the whip. So any, what's it? All these people are using Christina spills. She's the worst and so I can see ruby like going over to that side just based off the side effects of the potion. The allure of power for sure. But even we don't know Christina to not be an evil person. She is evil. She is the devil and so I'm trying to I'm trying to figure out like. The worst is the worst ending with rubies betrayal right is that going to lead to cause our strike deal right the ruby trail because our power everybody else is starting to animals and dodging bullets and she's turning into White Lady, which is fine. Forever one. Right and I can go work at the department store and be a manager with no experience, but ultimately help us in the fight. So I can see her you know switching sides and being a casualty of this war. Know, there's A. The Ruby. Question reminds me a lot of a of a book short story that was actually. It's called the ball, the ballot of black Tom in by Victor Lavalle, who's a phenomenal writer, but it is also a re. A reclaiming of lovecraft. Horror. You know from the Black Perspective Victor Lavelle is is a is a black writer. And it's really it's an incredibly done story that plays with stuff you're talking about, I don't want to delve deeply into it because I think anyone listening. Hi Recommendation Borrow the book. It's a short story. It will not take you long to read or listen to the audio. Think the audio is only three hours on take a listen to it. It's really really well done and plays with these notions you're talking about in a way that I would be really interested to see if ruby quote unquote betrays them how it's done because I'm curious I. I would be curious about that direction because there is a way to handle it really well. And I'm curious to see what they do with it. Will speaking of horror let's turn to our horror segment of the week as it's become. Let let's talk as we talked about before slow motion stocking films. I mean Kevin you brought up last week at least the preview was invoked gang. Freddy Krueger. Shades. To you did that whole through. Oh absolutely I mean their shots in there that are very much Freddie like the reaching of the of the nails is very much clause the shot where it's like low on the ground and she's biking that's very much ready and the most iconic shot is the girls jumping rope senior song about them. That is, of course, right out of nightmare on ELM street, the one two Freddy's coming view. That is that is like I comic on. So very much. It traveled through there and it's not even to me like all slow moving. It's more like the the type of. Playing with your food stocking and I do think ready falls into that for sure and so I do think like if you're looking for the movies that fought says category I mean nightmare on Elm street quintessential or for this joined ups I roll actually which was really funny. Yeah Yeah. The whole he gets sucked into bed and what like like I would even say like a Mount Saint Helen's amount of blighted just like gushes and hits the ceiling, right? Yeah legendary iconic amazing that scene for him in in that movie But like all I love I like this is we're we're hitting my this is my thing like I got into horror because of. Nightmare like that. That was like the first movie I saw when I was like four. I believe what I saw was the fifth one possibly maybe three but way too young obviously. But. Like all nightmare movies I love it they get really can't be but I'm super into that but you got you got Freddie you got. Nine fried their teeth for Jason. You've got the Halloween series for Michael which I actually really love the new Halloween that they did. This past year? Yeah. Like I thought it was brilliant but that's again that's different podcast. Candyman, of course, I'm really excited about the new version of Canyon they're going to be doing with the legendary Tony Todd as the apprehension candyman. jeepers creepers is a more recent one but that one has problems because director. There's there's so many other things like the bye-bye man which was not very good but out there. Yes. Written by survivor alum Jonathan Penner. He he wrote it and his wife Stacy title before she unfortunately got afflicted with a ls she directed it. Now. That opening of that movie. Though is fantastic. It ends in a way that I was kind of like there's lot of questions about how the world works but the opening students. I remember being like Oh, this is intense. Men. Yeah beyond beyond those I'm trying to think of the other ones that come to mind. Yeah. So I'll I'll throw it because I think that there are some that like you know definitely fallen that slasher category but I think specifically what top Zimbabwe were invoking we're sort of peaking on this this part of horror. That's like not exactly slasher like man with a knife coming after you but it's still Is this idea of like a spirit pursuing person? So obviously, the ring is the first one that comes to mind and I do think that you know the ring or ring. Goo Or whichever one you watch I think it's still as was was pretty genuinely interesting and scary. Probably the one that I like most actually out of that group is the Bob Luke, long or he became a gay icon Bob. Scaring up these this poor Australian mother and her child and you spoke last week about how hippolyte his journey was released sort of like a meditation on grief and looking at that horror movie through that Lens in particular. It's just like so incredibly terrifying and skin crawling and aggravating yet fascinating at the same time. So well done. I love that movie. It's so incredible. It's funny because I wouldn't have necessarily categorize it like that but you are right. It doesn't vocal lot of it But that movie is like what I what I was talking about whereas talking about get out and US obviously falls in category a little bit But this is like like Bob Duke is like that because it takes the trappings of horror and takes for element but speaks to something real and that movie to me is very much about depression. is about suffering intense depression and how you deal with it and I think it's so cleverly done with how they do that in that film with that with that that horror. Character like it's so good and like his designs amazing like highly yes. Agree on that one also reminds me of it follows, which is nothing referenced earlier definitely falls into this category of like that stocking horror quite literally slow moving stocking horror. Yeah. So a lot lot of recommendations you could check also the garage is also the first thing that I thought and when I saw top same biopsy of just like creepy girl following you. All Time. So there's a lot of great. I mean, even if you just boil it down to the Halloween, Freddy and Jason of it, all you have at least two dozen movies to check out some good. Some very good. Some not so good. You really can't go wrong with the handful of them off the top of my head there are. Seven. Nightmare movies and then Freddy and Jason. There are twelve fried thirteenth movies and there are. Ten Halloween's. Okay so That's about two dozen. Yeah. I. Think. There's so many times I just ran through every single one of them. We do for a Friday the thirteenth man because you're twelve. Thirteen is the lucky number for that one. You just head something very personal to me. That makes me very. Was Up. Here's my rant very quickly. We are due for the thirteenth installment of right their teeth and we were going to get the thirtieth and saw no not specifically I believe. Was it this year? It might be let me get take a look here or no it was last year I think it was because there was actually going to be a Friday the thirteenth in. October. So we were GonNa get the thirteenth Friday thirteenth on Friday thirteenth in October and then has they were going they were like sequels and reboots aren't making money at the time decided to Kissel. It guess it was very wrong about. Yes we missed the possibility of having the. Thirteenth offering thirteen. Over it makes me so upset because the decision where I'm just like, why did you make that call that whatever but yes I, totally get very heated about that. See I i. wonder if they could. You know had that idea about sequels not working before the seventeenth fast and furious movie. Walk. But also even even look at Halloween who announced two more films. One coming next one guy in two, thousand and hundred two. So it's working for some maybe not for others according to these executive. Maybe if you just put the effort into your movies, they would be successful and maybe it's not the French is. Your efforts, how dare you Evan that is blasphemous blackness talk, but we are going to be moving into not number thirteen but the ninth installment of lovecraft country next week Josh Latonya should be back but this was a good time you know with the good and the bad I can't think of a better group of people to talk about the horror filled plight of a young girl three grown men. Here to talk get through. Kevin, how can people find you on social media and what you have going on post show recaps coming this week. Sure Yeah. You can find me at Kev Mahato of. Deo. Say what's happening. I'm. So. Tired. Parallel, universe sell. Yeah. Kevin. On twitter's. Could also check out my website that Moghadam in dot com. Push recaps, of course. We have everything is super. This is the week where endgame in the end, game now. We have done it. So Josh and I have been recapping every movie in the MC, you leading up to, of course, the big finale is coming M game. He endgame here and then far from home. There's still time to southern your score. Well, actually, it wouldn't system out there should still be time. Does that instance scores? Says it's going to be just to be tight but I think they can make it. Yeah. So get that overshadows if you can. Beyond that there's a few other things I'm guessing on for our Patriot only subscribers which Paul recaps now has a patron. Mike you have a whole spiel you're gonna go over so I will leave you to do. Yes. So as Ken mentioned, Poe Show recaps has launched a Patriot a big three hour. Jurassic Park filled extravaganza held by Josh wake learn no one thought they can make a trickier sequel to ghosts. Zero Josh said, hold my amber and let me do this crazy Jurassic Park Right I. was on it Kevin and Latonya were also on and it was a great introduction to recaps having a patriotic. To Paul recaps slash patriots on Poacher recaps, dot com slash patron, patriot, dot, com slash co show recaps any of those. We'll take you to that one location where you can give as little as five bucks a month up to fifteen bucks a month to support all of us make sure that the lights are on because we know that spooky scary things come out in the dark. One of the things that I've been really enjoying is in addition to some of these Patriot podcasts that Kevin talked about including walking with wig ler, which is a monologue series where Josh essentially just talked about what he's watching that a week. It's a very like mellow type of thing which I know mellow and Joshua, there might not go together but. They surprisingly do. So if that's not incentive enough I know that we're actually only a few goal people away from our stretch goal our first one, which is origin story I believe the name of the podcast edge, which is Josh is going to get together with someone from the chickpea community talk about their origin story within pop culture that type of. Stuff available to patrons only nothing you don't WanNa. Miss out on is we have a discord server going on for post show recaps only and it's been less than a week but it's already been popping. In fact, I have been talking with people about lovecraft country right before we came on here it's been a fantastic place to talk about the shows that. We cover in addition to a lot of stuff going on there in pop culture and the world. So any little bit you can ship in really really helps US plus the chip in the more that means that Josh might have the podcast about community, which is another series that's going on right now as just sterling tries to convince Josh, to watch community. Him Watch selected episodes of community. It sounds as weird as it is So be sure to check that out as well. Again, poacher recaps dot com slash patron. OR PATRIOT DOT com slash post show recaps Chapelle what's going on with you. Will. Again, very happy to been able to come on here Kevin on show, but of course, with you Mike and step in for. Josh Latonya I'll be happy to have them back. Next week's can hear their perspective but. You know. I've been everywhere lately. I'm sure people are getting tired of me if you. please. Tell me because it's GonNa hurt my feelings but. I. Have. Oh my gosh I have more sequels in Friday, the thirteenth. And the land before time combined I think. I'm involved in that Joshua Glazer Community rewatch somehow, I. Think I'm slated for an episode or two coming up in the near future next week I. Think we're talking about the walking dead on postal recaps. Oh. Gosh. What else is there there's a bunch of stuff. Even, our from yet some big brother last time the Human Morris I know you were also on AMC in there are Avatar the last air bender rewatch with Zach. Jacob. Yes. I've done big brother and an Avatar all in the same week and I think I've got a couple of big brother gigs coming up and. I'll be hanging out with the weird sisters to talk about Harry Potter. Y- on on Tuesday of or no took on Thursday of this week. So I got a lot going on, but you can follow me in my shenanigans on twitter at Chapelle. Show HP. s underscore show. I'm probably just tweeting people talked to people like I know y'all. So if you follow me, you're probably get a conversation out of me for sure. But that's about it. So say, Hi and don't be mean. And I would also say you know I'm so proud of Chapelle for getting to the point where he can now said his calendar by podcast like that is level of attention for me. You truly have a Senate to a new level. So I'm happy to be joining you on that level. You have killing it the past couple of weeks. I'm so excited to see you do more. You can, of course, follow me at a Mike Bloom type over here on Kosher recaps I'm of course doing down the hatch with Josh we're getting into a real fun episode this we TRICIA. Tanaka is dead regarded at the time as one of the more inconsequential episodes of lost has earned a lot of favor in a real watches. One of the most fun episodes of law. So I am very grateful that Josh especially following stranger in a strange land also this week and Jessica Lisa and I are going to get together and we are going to recap of be ten episode series of Star Trek Lower Deck's and preview star Trek discovery season three, which is coming back next week along with our weekly coverage. Kevin. Have you checked out star trek lower deck's at all. I. Have. I really enjoyed the episode's ought to catch up I've seen three say so far which is it's been really enjoyable I. Like Star Trek a lot. So it it's fun watching the animated comedic version of it all which features a survivor alum on the writing staff. Yes David right and John Cochran as well. So it's IT'S A. Survivor. Riders are getting it whether it be horror or space comedies Sibusiso to check that out as that starts back up we mentioned the walking dead before speaking of getting things started Josh, and Jessica just ended up there started as a weird word. They finished the walking dead season ten coverage, and now world moved into coverage of world beyond and fear of the walking dead. We also have the aforementioned in their Avatar re-watch and pen fifteen more stuff. To come I'm sure it is all happening on social recapping. We are so happy to be here for the ride and I'm also covering unreality perspective Amazing Race Big Brother Adam, Mike Bloom type I, put all the stuff out there. So be sure to check that out and I want to thank you all for listening to give one last thing you know this episode did focus on Emmett till and his legacy, and there is an amateur legacy foundation. That actually does a lot of great work. It doesn't number of programs including training seminars for teenagers and young people of Color. There's you know this this idea the never again movement and pledged to essentially fight systemic racism. There's a others a basically a number of speakers initiatives as well to essentially preserve and perpetuate the legacy of Emmett till and his murder. So if you were inspired if you learned a lot about what happened him either for the show or through the podcast and you want to sort of put your funds to donate to the cause, I would highly encourage people to go to Emmett till, which is a two M's three till oils. Legacy Foundation Dot Com there's a donate now you can find out more information also put it in the show notes as well but considering obviously the pressure nist of these issues as the actual historical link I thought it was a good time to bring it up. Thank you all so much for listening Kevin is going to be back next week with Josh tie-in to break down the penultimate episode of lovecraft country season one maybe ever who's to say but we've got magic to do just for you. Thank you all so much for listening. Take Care bye-bye.

chapelle Kevin Mateo Kevin Christina William Day Emmett Mike Bloom Montrose Kevin I Uncle Tom Bob Montrose Montross letty Goldman Sachs Jackie Robinson EPA Brianna jet magazine Sammy G. S.. Gunning
Cinderella

Pop Culture Happy Hour

17:44 min | 2 d ago

Cinderella

"A lot of versions of cinderella animated live action contemporary at period. But you are as beloved. As disney's production of rodgers and hammerstein's cinderella musical which first aired on television in nineteen ninety seven starring brandy and whitney houston s cinderella and her fairy godmother it reimagined the fairy tale and the people in it and became beloved by an audience that couldn't easily find it streaming and now it's finally arrived on disney plus aisha harris and i'm linda holmes and today we're talking about cinderella on pop culture happy hour from npr of. Don't go this message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one. Welcome to banking reimagined capital. One checking and savings accounts have no fees or minimums and top rated banking app. That lets you manage your money anytime anywhere. Check on the account. Balance deposit checks pay bills and transfer money on the go. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet capital one. Na member fdic welcome back also with us from his home. Studio is npr. Music's stephen thompson. Hi stephen lowlander and also here is britney. Loose who most recently hosted the nod with brittany and eric on qube. hey brittany. Hey we are always so happy to have you with us especially to talk about something. As fine as cinderella cinderella is loosely related to folklore that goes back centuries in many countries and cultures. But as you probably know there's this girl and there's this prince and this shoe and here as we mentioned. Cinderella is played by the singer and actress brandy and her fairy godmother by whitney houston. The prince is played by paolo montalban and his parents. By victor garber and whoopi goldberg. Who turned out to be rather a match made in heaven and of course the wicked stepmother who is very wicked indeed is played by the great bernadette. Peters if you're not familiar with the musical rogers and hammerstein who also wrote the sound of music and oklahoma and a lot of other stuff this as a television original at first aired in nineteen fifty seven and julie andrews who was only twenty. One at the time wouldn't play. Mary poppins for another seven years since then. It has been remade. It did eventually make it to the stage but it is a television original and this is probably the version that has the biggest cultural footprint in contemporary times. I should tell me about your feelings about cinderella. I actually was familiar with the lesley. Ann warren version. I it was one that my mother watch when she was a child. And i remember that our local library had it on vhs and so we would rent it all the time. So i was already a fan by the time. The nineteen ninety-seven version came along. And that one is from the mid nineteen sixties lesbian warren stuart damon. Who by the way alan quartermaine on general hospital and also ginger rogers playing the queen. So when this came along. I remember it being just a deal. Because it's whitney it's brandy. They're black what. And so. I loved it i i remember. We bought it on vhs. I remember watching with my mom and my sister. And it's just one of those delightful relics of a different era. Because you can see how much money they put into this production. It is like a giant broadway musical onscreen. This doesn't look like a place so much as it looks like you know a movie cinema experience and so seeing the giant choreography. The camera swirls the beautiful costumes. I just love first of all how much they spent on this film because it really says to me that they were invested in this property. That was going to be headlined by two black women. Whitney houston also was an executive producer. And i just think it works in many different ways. I will say. I'm probably going to get some hate mail so i'm going to preface this now but i don't think brandies vocals are doing the most here. I think the help they kind of tried to make it a little bit more contemporary and so they have these backbeat that. I don't think really work when when you have like. Sometimes a waltz or those types of things brandy did an interview recently with vulture where she talked about how she's used to doing vocal runs and that sort of thing and she was consciously pulling back and you can kind of hear it and i don't think it really works. This is her singing in my own little corner. Which is one of the classic songs from cinderella hunch masan and it's dangerous tight. It's kim so. I just wish that she had given it a bit more because whitney is wholly doing that. And and whitney's having so much fun. And i think that's one of the joys of this for me is seeing. How much fun whitney has. We talk about her all the time instead of this tragic sense but she clearly seemed to be enjoying herself off badly bottle all the wishes in the of puppy. Twaddell who you. i'm very godmother. Honey you got a problem with that in overall. It's just a fun production. Yeah i know what you're saying about the orchestrations there's a little bit of a like going halfway contemporary. But it's still an old song. And i think you sort of have to either commit or don't do it and it's interesting because when i was watching it again. I was realizing that some of the songs they did that and some of them. They really left alone. So it's interesting to hear that. Britney where are you on this movie. I absolutely love this movie. It came out right before my tenth birthday. Sorry i like taped it off of tv and then watched it rather screen. Didn't at my slumber party for ten year old birthday perfect for that. It was literally perfect for that. And i remember all the build up for it like the jet magazine. Had come out the monday before. With brandy and whitney cover and it completely obviously lived up to my expectations then and i will say that we watching it as an adult equality of it is the thing that actually makes it have the longevity i think that a tad and also to just the cast the cast is on real like i mean you have when houston brandy bernadette peters like in hindsight now that i'm older i'm like you had bird up heaters and whitney and victor garber like this is like it was just so good but like great character van cox and natalie to sal rest in peace. I kind of agree about the vocals. But i think because the part of cinderella is a classic like musical theater mezzo soprano and. I think that brady has an incredible voice with incredible range. But i think that like the type of voice that she has is More airy and light and doesn't quite match up with like the half of what part requires that said. I absolutely loved her in this role and like to me. Like i knew that houston was really invested in that she was originally supposed to play cinderella But then the project got shelved for so long that she eventually was like all not. I'm a mom. Nothing's believing that she thought it'd be too much of a stretch for her to play that role so brandy being her industry goddaughter. It made a lot of sense But i would say that like the just the literal freshness of her in that role and the chemistry that she in paolo montalban had really like sold the whole like fairy tale. Love story thing for me in a way that i obviously bought into as a trial but re watching it again. I was like oh. This is actually really sweet but also i think what made that whole thing really special was seeing whitney and brandy together. Yeah just because their relationship was so storied. It really feels like a gift to all of us. That that's been preserved on film. Stephen what did you think. I have a pretty fraught relationship with. Cinderella like the character and kind of the overall story of cinderella going back to the nineteen fifty disney movie to me. It is anti step mom. Propaganda built around ludicrous assumptions about facial recognition. Mother i sites and footwear so times get really frustrated watching cinderella because of the actual story itself like cracking his knuckles. Like all right. I gotta go in on the reality of cinderella. Wears a glass shoe people. Think when you're sitting there watching production of cinderella and you're like the fake but this is such a charming time capsule and i'm so glad that it's available for streaming in the world for the first time in so long why was this not on streaming until twenty twenty one. I do not understand. i mean it is. It feels very nineties to me. I agree that. I had some issues with some of some of the vocals. There's actually a really interesting oral history of of this movie on shonda land from two thousand seventeen on the occasion of this movie's twentieth anniversary. And they kind of talk about some of the techniques that went into it work the way brandy approached it where she was kind of trying to sing opera and then the way that paolo montalban was singing he was trying to kind of de stage. A fi voice because his background was as a stage actor and to me that kind of made their chemistry feel a little bit more stilted Because they're kind of on different planes vocally but i'm enormously pleased that this exists in the world. I'm really hopeful that the kind of success of this release on streaming and kind of the buzz around it is going to increase the likelihood that will finally get a sound like an official soundtrack to this thing. They've never released a soundtrack to this enormously blockbuster successful tv movie that sold a ton of copies in home video because of like weird label battles one point from that oral history that i did not want to go through this conversation. Without having there was an executive who didn't want brandy to play cinderella. He wanted jewel. I'm sorry i love jewel. Yeah and this is not hating jewel at all. But i just want you all any fans of this movie. I want you to just imagine in your mind. Take the ethereal presence of brandy of this movie and it in jewel and enjoy boy. Oh boy oh boy. That would have been quite different yet. I think it's such an interesting thing about the songs. Because i do think ultimately you gotta remember these are written by some of the most storied songwriters and of american musical theater and there is a good reason for that. There are some very pretty songs because it originated on television. And because it didn't sort of you know didn't get widely done as a stage musical as much as you know the sound of music in oklahoma and all that stuff. I think the songs are not as well known. But i'm not sure that they are not just as good as a a lot of the other stuff that they wrote for broadway and four other musical pieces. What i really liked about this watching it again is the way that brandy and paolo montalban really just go ahead and play it very straight as a fairy tale in terms of their these lines like when they first meet so michelle. What would a man have to find himself in your wrists. Who wants to know. Just save attorney. Stranger this charming strangest. Seems pretty sure of himself. But he'd have to get to know me a lot better than some growing to spend on the street. Oh but he'd like to very much. You have to really commit to make those kinds of scenes work. As much as they sort of play with the orchestra to make it feel more contemporary. They don't try to transform it into a naturalistic concept dialogue. Because you couldn't it wouldn't work. It stays in this kind of dreamlike place. And i appreciated that a lot. I will say. I also just love the fact that on the occasion of the league james cinderella from a few years ago i wrote a very very long piece for npr where i looked at a gazillion different versions of cinderella. And what i took away from that was that it is a story that has been in in many different cultures and over several many centuries you know twists and shapes two different kind of realities and and the world that it's in and the different approaches to it and so i love the fact. It's a very natural thing for there to be this version. That is very beloved. Partly because as i said. It's whitney and brandy they're black. It's got you know whoopi goldberg. And victor garber and paolo montalban as the royal family. It's a it makes sense that there would be a version of cinderella that represented kind of what that moment in musicals was this was part of a series of these that they did on wonderful world of disney. They did the music man. And anne. And i wish they'd kind of kept doing them. Because i do really like these. And i agree with stephen that at the time capsule i agree that it feels really of its moment already thinking i mean it's it's also just fascinating to me. There's one article that came up from new. It was in newsweek weirdly. There is no byline on. Maybe because of the archives or whatever but it was a big reported piece where you start off saying it's great to see a black woman cinderella and then it goes into this question of like well. The prince is not black. So what does this me was. So there's interviews. I think at one point bill hook shows up within this this. He's and it really speaks to how at this moment. In the mid ninety s there is this kind of question about like our black women desirable like black men are marrying war outside of their race than black women. But then what does it mean that. There is a non white prints year. And it's a kind of echoes a similar asian. That would happen like a little more than a decade later. The princess and the frog and man did think about what a cultural signifier this was. And what a cultural moment this was and how it meant so much and how the conversations haven't really changed all that much over the last twenty plus years. It was just really interesting to see that. This was a huge deal. You it's easy to forget that but it was a huge deal. And i'm just glad it exists. I'm glad we can rewatch it and now a new generation can see it and again brandon. Whitney yes oh. And also whoopi goldberg. Yeah she is doing such great good. A little squeaks are so funny. She's he's very very funny. I also from a cultural preservation standpoint. I do wanna give a quick shout out to the fact that this is airing on disney. Plus it was originally shot for television which means it. It exists in a very square frame and disney plus has gotten roasted justifiably so for the way they have presented the simpsons by like weirdly kind of blowing up the screen. And then cropping out. Lots of visual gags this. You're getting basically kind of sideways letterbox. Where you have black bars on on the sides. So you're getting the proper aspect ratio and i will say i appreciated that enormously and i think this movie would have really suffered without it. One hundred percent agree. I agree appreciate the aspect ratio. All right well we wanna know what you think. And what your memories are of the wonderful cinderella with brandy and whitney find us at facebook dot com slash p. c. h. h or tweet us at p. c. h. That brings us to the end of our show. Thank you so much for being here all of you. thank you. Thank you and one last thing before we go we are going to be talking about the show king of the hill and we want your questions can send a voice memo with your question to p. c. h. h npr dot. Org again. send a voice memo with your question to pc h h at npr dot. Org we will see you tomorrow when we will be talking about the new film minority. It's a good one here at planet money industries we've manufactured t shirts. We bought oil. We've even gone to space. But our next planet money series. Well let's just say a superhero. He's born coming to podcast. Feed near you from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor capital one welcome to banking reimagined capital. One checking and savings accounts have no fees or minimum and top-rated banking app. That lets you manage your money anytime. Anywhere capital one. Na member fdic.

paolo montalban brandy whitney whitney houston victor garber hammerstein disney aisha harris linda holmes stephen thompson stephen lowlander warren stuart damon alan quartermaine whoopi goldberg Twaddell jet magazine brandy bernadette peters van cox Ann warren npr
Kevin Bethune

Revision Path

1:11:56 hr | Last month

Kevin Bethune

"You're listening to the revision. Pat podcast a weekly showcase of the world's blatant graphic designers web designers and web developer through in-depth interviews. You'll learn about their work. Their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host maurice cherry. Hello everybody welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in this week on your host mariz cherry ever. This week's interview. I'm talking with but soon founder and chief creative officer of dreams design and life. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do. I so my name is kevin bethune of the founder and chief creative officer of dreams design in life and our mission is to to derive and really address holistic experience opportunities to figure out ways that we can unlock human potential and really create holistic. Empathic experiences that truly unlock human potential increasing. The connection and just make our experiences more human in general. How are you feeling so far about this new year. Happy new year by the way. Thank you you as. Well thank you for the honor of being on revision. Bath for for i guess as we close out twenty twenty and head into twenty twenty. One i am i guess. I have feelings of gratitude notions that a lot of us have been through a lot. I mean there's been loss of life loss of jobs. Economic volatility concerns over health and wellness to come out the other side of it. We we have to sort of just pause. Express gratitude for that and for anyone that's coping with loss through this year. I definitely my heart goes out to each and everyone sort of coping in facing any sense of loss. So i guess it's just a feeling of gratitude for that and for knowing that my walking through this year whole and entering the new year with a sense of hope. That's where my head is right now just focusing on the important things now. I don't wanna dwell too much on the pandemic because we're still in it and everything. But i'm glad that you mentioned gratitude because you know like you said the conversation we had before there's just been so much that's happened and you know we as designers as creatives you know even you and i and probably others listening as black people like there's been so much that we've at process on so many different planes as we go through this year it's not just economic. It's not just jobs. It's you know our rights in in many cases you know so the fact that we've been we've managed to come out on the other end of it. Relatively unscathed hopefully is a blessing. So i totally empathize with that absolutely. Let's talk about the work that you're doing now your business dreams design and life. What inspired you to kind of. Create your own studio it's funny. My career has been largely multidisciplinary and primarily through large organizations and it was really the last chapter where we a small team of us. Got to create a multidisciplinary runway of sorts. We created very much what we would call looking back. Incubator that was tasked with helping large organizations create startup opportunities that wouldn't necessarily distract those large companies from their core. Focus their core business but would allow us to ring-fence multidisciplinary teams to run as fast as possible against opportunities that we uncovered in the marketplace and and sort of adopted a lean startup approach to to building businesses and spitting them out and some businesses with sink or swim but that was just sort of par for the course and we ended up that team. We ended up getting acquired by the boston consulting group in and we were sort of nurtured as a wholly owned subsidiary called vcd digital ventures and that runway. Just helped me find my footing as a as a creative leader in that fault to figure out how to serve those multidisciplinary teams the lead the design function within those teams. And while that was all fine and good in very grateful to be cg for investing in us as just a creative person. There were certain topics that i found myself leaning in on moore and also outside of the day job i had startup friends up and down the west coast. That would actually reach out personally. Say hey i have this this industrial design of this or have the strategic design question on that. Can you actually help me out. It's aiming at this sweet spot of of human centered opportunity and can you help me unpack it. Can you help work on this with me. And and sure enough. Those ads started increasing in frequency and instead of being all things to all industries on the bbc g platform. I saw that there was enough interest to entertain a few topical areas that that matched my unique individual set of experiences and my interest in things that i pr perhaps cared more about until i said with enough evidence of those sort of side investigations. I think there's enough here to plant my own flag and stand on my own. Two feet has business sort of changed since you started your studio over. Of course the way the just this year has went. Have you found. There's been a shift in some sort of way. Yes weirdly enough appreciate you asking what when i stepped away from bc. Gee i was on my own. No one heard of the name drinks designed in life. It was everything was new so empty. Inbox a new phone. Number phone's ringing. Just the deafening quiet. Starting anything new and surely enough friends of friends would introduce me to start startups that had needs into that was sort of the first source of of work but as we enter the pandemic year. It sure enough. You know the network keeps talking about perhaps the value that your your business or you as an individual or creating and the referral starts seeding themselves across the network and sure enough. What was surprising that larger organization started reaching out old friends that i used to work with ten fifteen years prior would say. Hey you know. I noticed you've been doing this in creating value for the startups. Can you help perhaps. Can you help my innovation department in their part of big multinational corporation or it. Can you help my brand department or can you help me design department with this or that question and then with the volatility of the pandemic and and the especially with the light of of george floyd naturally i think a lot of us started engaging in conversation and ultimately very public conversation around. Somebody's important talking points in because unfortunately too jarring acts of brutality to make everyone sort of question and sort of achieve a heightened sense of awareness around where to some of these issues occur in perhaps in a more covert nature especially in places where we spend a lot of time. Which is you know institutions and enterprise so a lot of big questions starting to percolate and you know being a part of those more public conversations regarding those topics all of a sudden. The large company start coming in with more and more interest around sort of the interconnections between diversity equity and inclusion as well as how that manifests to direct implications to any design or innovation opportunities that these organizations are thinking about. It's really interesting how. I don't even know if interesting is the right way. That's that's a placeholder word for something that for a word that i can't grasp at the moment but the way that companies glommed onto sort of the immediacy of this very sort of presence social justice civil rights sort of moment is to me really gross. The reason i say that is because at the time that this was happening with these with the protests and companies like. Yeah we're now going to celebrate juneteenth and that's a paid holiday. Well who is that really benefiting but as this sort of thing going on and companies are like oh well we need to reach out to black voices and we need to uplift people and things like that. It's like where have you been this whole time that this has been going on. I mean i guess in a way we should be some. What's grateful that because the pandemic had called so many people to be locked down that they were forced to see these things happen and not have the luxury to be distracted by travel or entertainment or sports or things like that. As this was sort of happening. I know it was like around you know like may june etc. I was also looking at a lot of old issues of ebony magazine and jet magazine honestly. Because i saw some me on twitter about like post the cover from your like month of birth or whatever and i was like oh play along. Why not But as i started actually going through the archives which are largely on google books like looking at past issues and things like that it got me to thinking. Well what about other big social issues that have happened in this country and like what is the conversation around that and how have companies and businesses and brands sort of responded to that and mainly i look that when dr king was assassinated and it was astonishing. How some of the very same types of empty tokens in terms of like black squares over ads or things like that were happening in the sixties. And they're still going on now and the mp to me. The gesture is just as empty. Like okay it's a black square. What does that mean you know. I think now certainly companies are starting to put some companies. I should say they're putting money behind it actually like this up thing and not just a banner that they put on the top of their website for two weeks and then take off you know but it it to me it just feels gross how they sort of glommed onto this and i got asked by so many people like is this shift. Is this a change. And what does this mean now for for black creatives and i'm like time will tell you know we'll see if y'all are still beating the drum in the fall and in the winter because right now it's just too early to tell but i also to that end on the flip side. I know a lot of people that you know sort of really came up off of this moment. Black people black creatives because they're now being seen and sought out in a way that maybe they had been overlooked before. This has actually been a really good time for them. So it's it's a bittersweet kind of moment. i think. I'm with you definitely a lot of mixed feelings especially the summer months looking at a lotta enterprise response and and it's funny. I think i love the exercise that you took to look back at the old media to see you know what were some of those trends and and to see. The similarities is quite a powerful connection. Point but i think as we find ourselves in the present and the level of how much computation has connected us all together in such a hyper connected way. Not just across the nation across the world that i think in some respects These brands can't hide anymore again. Having personal experience navigating some of these large multinationals. You can post a black square. But if i go on twitter and within a few minutes i can get a pulse of how your employees feel about your culture about your inner workings and myself even in particular even myself in particular. I remember not being listened to not being appreciated. Feeling winds of exclusion. The microaggressions just advocating corporate america and then seeing the same. You know type of enterprises espouse these platitudes. It makes you feel ill remembering the reality versus the message. And but in a good way i think brands can't hide. I think it's easy for us to understand what's happening. Inside these cultures the walls are digital or more transparent. We will find out like how your culture is how people perceive it buick experience. It and i think we're dealing with a much more. I guess savvier consumer consumer especially the younger generations that are looking behind the brand message to say. Are you for real. What receipts are your employees holding up. Are your practices sustainable. Are you do you actually care. About the demographic underserved demographics that are rising up influence and and and purchasing power. Are you respectful. All those things are being brought to the light. And also i mean you know. Aside from the sort of savvy consumer people are talking so like employees of other companies. We're talking to people across their. You know sort of respected industry about how this happens but there's also that comparison that's going on well if that's what's happening here then what's happening over there. You know like more people and this is interesting especially because so many people have been out of work in they're going you know to work for these companies. That also have to adjust. Not just to this new hyper aware social climate but also now remote work people that are applying for jobs now are coming with. I don't know a lot more things that they need. Besides just a paycheck like am. I gonna feel safe here as a person of color or as a marginalized person you know and also what's that remote work situation going to look like because i just know from job. Search the summer a lot of companies are like. Oh well we're going to be back in the office in three months. We'll be back in twenty twenty one so any sort of remote kind of setup they had they kind of just put a time limit on it so I've had friends who just accepted new positions. Where some some companies basically yeah. We're going to open in twenty twenty two so you should move now in loves. Yeah i was getting that a lot to where they. They're doing remote work but only if the office only if you live in the same city as the office. So they're like oh well. Do you plan on moving here like no. It's it's remote. I'm gonna stay. Where i'm at and you're going to stay where you're at and we're gonna work together. I think i'm still trying to sort of figure. All that out which god bless him on that your focus is largely on strategic design but also industrial design. And as you put it on the dreams design in life. Website new ecology. When you're like starting out with a new project tell me like what does that process look like. It's funny the the assumptions. That i had of how that process would start when i started. The company are largely different than with actually happening. So when i first started. I was so overly fixated on making sure my my sales deck in all the all the things in place to deliver the articulation of like what the what the think tank represents but honestly what what played out as the network again with gratitude the network do the referrals. I was thankful to have been invited into rooms with whether it be startup founders or the heads of departments of particular functions in large corporates. And i find myself time and time again just being in pre pandemic speak but being put in the room with them with the fresh slate whiteboard and the typical process is just listening and synthesizing of what the going through with. What are they most proud of. What keeps them up at night. What feelings do they have about their audiences and other audiences that they have they been hoping to reach but haven't yet achieved any residents and we have conversations around like just the current state of things but then quickly what i try to get them to do is think about their future. The future trajectory. Through what i call a a slightly wider or more open aperture and i really in the process of just having a dialogue with them. I'm sort of educating them around the creative process and try to get them to imagine looking at their their future Literally looking glass staring at the future time horizon and getting the appreciate the value criteria of their audiences. The serving are hoping to serve. And getting those see that. It's more than just like the typical dialogue that they have around their marketing funnel. Because normal human beings don't operate in market funnels like we live our lives we have on-ramps in offer inflection points the normal daylight we can live year life life in the life type of experience. And there's all types of creative ways that we can bring the true realities to life and really dig in what's missing in terms of gaps. So usually the gaps of understanding nine point. Nine times out of ten. Is that deeper. Latent stuff the the deeper substance that makes us human that people probably would have a hard time articulating if you were to ask them a direct question in a focus group and usually it's we have to figure out a an investigation approach that gives us more time in bandwidth with their audience. Get on the ground with them. Co create with them get in the weeds with them and see what unmet aspirations contradictions. What layton unmet needs that we can really crystallize and help those insights of percolate and reveal opportunities that the business can actually decide to act on or not and and those kinds of things are just super helpful to to give us some initial convictions to rally around so audiences one thing as we look through the looking glass another vantage point is just the paradigm of their industry and not just taking the present consensus of how their industries supposed to function behave as the status quo. Like taking that as a given like. Why can't we actually set. How like businesses done at the elementary level at the foundational assumption level in really breakdown. This first principles and question like can we actually rearrange this or can we take out the middleman here. Can we ensure that we're getting any friction out of that sort of set of handoffs the way that we can provide value to the people that need it faster and more efficiently more with more resonance. And that's not enough like when we opened the aperture trying to get them to really look at the holistic plethora of of trends. Inspirations that we could bring into the conversation that maybe you know within their industry the reality but also things that are running adjacent perhaps a bit outside of their office walls and bring in fresh. Inspirations and exemplars into that conversation so it gives us enough basically Fodder to have a creativity conversation to imagine new ideas new solutions new new paths forward desert of the strategic design peterson and getting them to sort of look a bit more holistically around things rather than just thinking thinking business i how do i fit this insight into my present business mechanics because typically in a new opportunity might have a a greater chance of dying if we sort of think because this i rather than future i yeah isn't hard to convince businesses of that so i'm thinking back when i had my design studio. It seemed like that was always the first corner that the client wanted to cut. It was like any sort of dissection further sort of glimpse into how they do business. They're like no no no no. I just need you to do this. That definitely reared its head a few times in the young business owner. I can't lie and say i wasn't tempted by this. Could actually you know media. Engagement can keep the lights on for the next few months. I mean we all have those temptations. But i think my career experience prior has shown me it's best to sort of interview them as much as interviewing me in my company for the mutual synergies and fit and there have been times where i've had to walk away because it just didn't feel right and the initial collaboration to your point like they wanted an execution partner only like they're thought of the need and the opportunity they just. They want someone to hold accountable to get whatever sprint. They pre hypothesized to get that done. And they're not really interested in partnership whereas i gravitate to those early conversations where there's a clear avenue a wide open highway for collaborating on the important issues to have the latitude to question the paradigm that are play and then we will get to definitely pathways of execution whether industrial design or deeper investigation. Or whatever it might be but we feel good around like shared collaborative partnership toward the things that matter the most and then let's go deep on those things that that feels good and i learned a certain smell where where that's happening verses. Not if it's not happening. If i'm not feeling it than i am happy to walk away because it's the opportunity cost of spending time on something that's transactional is going to kill the opportunities that i really need to be focused on. Yeah i mean. I think you know whenever you're working with a new client. It's sort of like there's a series of of video games called dungeon crawlers and they're like dungeons and dragons type or i'm trying to think of other games that are like this etc but there are these sorts of games where you're basically plopped into this scenario and the only way that you really get through is that you make the map as your life traversing through the terrain. And so it's different from a game like say the legend of zelda or something where you find the map in the whole dungeons already mapped out for you. So you know where to go to this chest or where the boss is or anything like that. You don't know what the pitfalls are these other types of games because you have to make it while you're going through it and so if something happens at least you come back to the map that you had to say all right. Don't go here go here. You know and i feel like that's very much. What's the strategic process. It's sort of like you're walking with the client because you're trying to uncover colleges strategies you're trying to uncover that with them and that can only be done together like you can't really go in solo and just try to one shot at you have to walk with the client. They have to sort of work with you in order to make the map together to that end are you do you find that. There's like certain types of businesses or or even like business certain sectors that are maybe more conducive to this type of work than others. I think startups have to think with multiple hats. You know you're dealing with the small funding team. Everyone's wearing ten to twenty hats in the first place. So i think there's a greater flexibility in appetite to want to sit around the table together solve things cross functionally. That's always traps an easier. Sell if you will to that momentum going but within larger enterprises like i felt blessed of you know the transactional requests in. I didn't feel like perhaps it's going to lead to anything substantial. But i do especially this year. There is a growing concern. That any notion of like true multidisciplinary collaboration focused on innovation. Companies are realizing more and more that they actually have to treat that as a new normal not. Just treat it. As the exception to the rule everyone talks about. Oh yeah multidisciplinary this That but the larger the organization. Is i find when you get into under the hood. The amount of time that people actually spend collaborating cross functionally is very few and far between and i think people are realizing enterprise leaders are realizing that they actually do need to commit more bandwidth and concerted focus around like the opportunities that are coming in their future over the horizon. And not. Just fix it. All the calories on the short term and the core business itself because the landscape the market out from under their feet in a matter of months in this year is shown us that no industry companies immune from disruption. Even though i think that's an overused word but people on their value criteria their audience value criteria is shifting all the time and be flexible and fluid into know that. Whatever you're working on your core business whatever products you're selling will have to mature. They will have to be replaced with new products new services and ideally with more respectful performance. Around those new things that you're in. You know injecting into the business hopefully more profitable more sustainable responsible more a better all around for all stakeholders like those new things do have to come in and order to realize those new things that need to replace existing. You gotta dedicate more time for this type of work. I think that's why. Specific design was an incredibly powerful differentiated that we cultivated inside the bc g. environment and seeing its impact on a lot of larger organizations in that in that experience and then to continue to be powerful even as a small unknown entity as dreams design. Life is in its early early trajectory but the the the impact that organizations feel when they get to experience it with s continues to just blown away how powerful the potential is and and lawrence or leaning on the muscle misquote satisfying. I predict that. We're gonna see more company. Start to really look at strategic design especially now that twenty twenty is really sort of fundamentally changed the way really a lot of industries. Now have to business because of not being able to really do things in person you know. It's amazing how technology has really stepped in like who'd a thought zoom would have been the apple two thousand twenty. You know. I mean and that it ruled the roost over so many other competitors i guess you could say in their space like really this could have been scrapes whole year and they just. I don't know but like other things like webex or blue jeans. Our goto meeting or whatever. But you start to see a lot of events that have moved into these virtual spaces and things like that. And i think companies now are starting to. They're gonna start looking at strategic design more to see how they can really innovate within this. Totally new space. You know like the whole game has changed and a lot of ways absolutely and i honestly think it takes more than just saying that you know you believe in the zeitgeist of design thinking and you call yourself. Human centered as an organization. Yeah emoji buzzwords. Yay i totally agree with the mindset of like okay human. I shiver but the way that it's being applied. I think it's still nebulous across most enterprises especially ones that i encounter and i think strategic design. Or whether you wanna call strategic innovation it takes actual real roles real designers real engineers real business people and digital technology strategists working together to actually unlock these opportunities in a they need. I would argue a more tactical set of approaches to put muscle bandwidth time resources and focused in the areas to actually reveal these opportunities. Because it's not just gonna come from soundbites. Yeah let's switch gears here a little bit. I know we've talked a lot about your work and what you're doing through your studio but i kinda wanna go back to the beginning. I wanna know kind of the kevin bethune origin story. Tell me about where you grew up. So i was born in upstate. New york a little town called newburgh. But i spent the majority of my childhood. In downriver detroit metropolitan area little town called riverview and essentially that was in the hard of the automotive industry. Most of the neighbors were engineers. Are business people working for the big car companies. But i was. I would say curiously creative. I drew for hobby in the environment. But when it when it came time for thinking about where to go to college and what. The study notions of like art and design were sort of in the abstract coming from a middle class upbringing parents sacrificing so much for their kids if we got the shot to go to college and that was money mental in itself it definitely did dictate choices that you make as a young person like you know for the level of sacrifice. There have been a a good job on the other side of that. This isn't go to college and the majors that you picked and for me right round there. A different design and art were just a bit too much in the abstract for me to make that choice. And so looking at all the neighbors and the community that that i was surrounded by and because my my interest in drying also intersect with math and science engineering made more pragmatic sense so so that was the initial choice to study mechanical engineering. Because it ended all those elements and ended up going to notre dame completed my degree and as companies were coming to campus to recruit. many of. The the industry's had a similar. Pitch around well. You know you'll come in you understand our business. Maybe we'll put you on a factory floor for five ten years and you really understand our business and then we'll let you do some of the hardcore engineering work on new product. And i thought it was a little bit of a cognitive disconnect because i loved learning about all the cool like simulations and laboratory testing procedures and the analysis the classical hand calculations. I loved all of that as part of the curriculum but the thought of like waiting that long to be able to do those things on new product. It was a little bit of a disappointing message but one industry in particular had a different pitch and that was the nuclear power industry. They were facing would call a knowledge crisis of sorts in that they hadn't hired young people for the ten to fifteen years prior to be coming out of school and all of a sudden company westinghouse nuclear out of pittsburgh pennsylvania united emailed us and invited us to pittsburgh to their headquarters and they were basically saying. Hey we really aggressively wanting to to hire young talent. Show you the ropes. Because we have a generation of folks that designed a third of the world's nuclear operating fleet in the first place on the verge of retirement and were were concerned about this huge brain. That's ahead of us. We need to step in get mentors by these amazing engineers and help shore up our future and so that was a wonderful wide open door as a young engineer to come into that environment an alert a time around product in and working with high performing teams in such mission critical spaces that were nuclear power plants. Interesting nuclear I'm guessing this is like right around like probably like century right like ninety nine two thousand something like that. So yes started in ninety eight. And i was with them for five years but it honestly felt like ten because of the incredible projects that we're a part of those five years of experience. What are you remember the most about work in there when you step into a nuclear facility. You may have driven pass them on a certain highway drives. You'll see this gigantic concrete structure like a big concrete dome or maybe there's a couple of these domes on campus. But when you go inside the first thing that you do is look up just by the sheer magnitude of like these machines. That are several stories high and destroy like beyond comprehension. How all the inner workings sort of piece together and somehow we're able to produce energy from these gigantic things when the plants actually opened for feeling you see the actual fuel assemblies being moved about underneath the water. You need the water for a shielding from the harmful radiation but you see this globe murkiness from the fuel underneath the water and just up the shear power of you're dealing with something that's just beyond to worldly. I'm glad that you said that. Because i kind of want to have you demystify a little bit sort of i. Guess the concept of nuclear power and ask you to give a treatise on it or anything like i grew up in the south and the only nuclear power plants. I've seen have been on the simpsons. And when i heard about nuclear you know it's always been in a almost in a a wartime sort of aspect like we have nuclear warheads or i would play video games. One of this like i play sim city. One of the scenarios is a nuclear meltdown. Or something like that so granted. I've heard about it and he's very disparate kind of ways but it sounds like what you're doing western house like nuclear power is kind of more common than we think it is. Yeah depending on any part of the planet that you go anywhere from ten to twenty five percent of the energy supply would come from nuclear power plants. And you know there's there's a lot of them hundreds of them operating across and there's new ones being built a lot of people don't know there's actually do par. Plants adding built heavily across asia. But even in the us been new plant. Construction back underway. And it's a technology that is just enormously powerful for its future energy producing potential. Of course there's grave concerns around. You know safety and safeguards and and what do you do with you know spent radioactive fuel. But i think the more. The industry works in leans forward into those opportunities. They will figure out safer better. Cheaper faster you know more easily deployable and safely deployable technologies that. Ideally are melt proof in their safe for the public. That's my hope for the industry. Having worked in it that they continue to make it all those things and now while you were at westinghouse you attended carnegie mellon to get your mba. I'm curious because earlier. You said you know working at westinghouse for those five years it kind of felt like ten was pursuing your mba. A byproduct of that. I don't know that sort of phase of time that you felt like you needed to level up or was this sort of always kind of in your plans to do. No definitely wasn't on the initial plan but i think through those five years. I felt like i just lacked business. Acumen to be apart of more strategic conversations as technology professional sometimes engineering content a plateau. Like if you're a great around a particular engineering competency typically companies want to keep doing that over and over again and even when it comes to pay like there's a plateauing of your sort of future potential if you stick to that core subject matter expertise so i felt like in dealing with the marketing department and wondering why the company was engaging a certain projects and not others and certain utilities not others that curiosity for wanting to know the business acumen around some of those strategic choices that an and feeling like i lacked those things into your point leveling up like if i gain that acumen a top of my tech background i thought the more doorways could open for my career and so i thought about time going part time but it was one programmed my my girlfriend at the time now wife she found. She was a grad student at carnegie mellon. Before i started she on this program called the consortium for graduate study in management and it was an initiative around increasing the numbers of underrepresented folks in business executive circles as i ended up. Applying to the consortium To a number of top ranked business school programs. Through the consortium at the decide who gets into the schools and then there's a second conversation around who gets awarded a fellowship to actually go study for two years and thankfully carnegie mellon was my top choice because they were friendly to engineers looking to abbott business layer. They accepted me. And then the consortium decided to give me a fellowship to go study so the consortium made it very very much an easy decision to go. Get that business acumen the fellowship opportunity. So you're we're at westinghouse for a good while almost six years after that you ended up working for nike doing process management. Mostly from what i can tell from looking at your lincoln. Talk to be about that. Was that a big change. Kind of such a popular. Consumer end from westinghouse was so. I started nike business planner typical post nba job. So what was great about that. I grew all. I got to release solidify that classroom a business knowledge in the real high pressure dynamics of public of a publicly traded company like a nike. And how you needed to navigate earnings releases calls these kind of things and helping senior executives understand a clear story around the objective financial and operational performance of the business. So that solidified that classroom knowledge in a real meaningful way but through that experience though i was a product guy at heart and nike being the collegial network and culture that it is it was nothing to have coffee with someone. Have the more people that you might be curious about. Meeting and so coffee chats led the more coffee chats. So i started meeting more and more product Hoax that worked in innovation departments across campus and those copies has turned into actual invitation sexually help. Those organizations serve as a side. Hustle is free stretch assignment to just show those product organizations. I was. I was really passionate about what they were doing. But i also had some skill sets that could be useful to them. And let's see if there's a relationship to be had so that was sort of. Did the opportunity end following through on those conversations and actually volunteering help. Some some of those product organizations. It made it easier to interview for jobs internally Eventually after eighteen months i moved over to the product injin. I worked in a process. Management sort of an ops job. Looking at how we can help. The product creation teams figure out better ways to perfect their craft as they created footwear in apparel and whatnot. And that brought me in front of real professional creatives for the first time in my career and my creative curiosity was lit ablaze. Seeing how you nike in the best product teams perfected their craft and and watching just shoes to benefit our way through the credit creation process was quite powerful to see and the networking continued. I was much closer to that engine and my new creative friends saw some of the work. I was doing for hobby. The drawings and whatnot in a few generous souls gave me some runway actually flex my teeth on real nike product under their mentorship. So the jordan brand is one category that gave me a couple of shots designed shoes for them. Under the under the mentorship of dwayne edwards. Who's now the founder of a pencil. Yeah but at the time. He was designed director jordan brand and he had like over a billion and footwear sales to his design credits so his his pen was mighty haven't learn under wayne so i would. I would meet duane in the early mornings would commiserate on the briefs that he didn't have enough designers for and then we go to our day jobs. Now work on wayne's assignment at night and we work that way for the better part of a year in march two shoes in that door led committee other open doors during my time at nike nice. That's nice you. Got the design with the dwayne edwards. Wow he's he's a friend for lay still call mentor to this day. He's amazing. tell him. I want him to come. Revision path. oh absolutely. I've wanted to talk to him for so long to have on the show i had actually so he did a reality show on youtube. A couple of years ago called lace-up ultimate sneaker challenge. And i had one of the contestants from the show on revision path and i don't think she does shoe design anymore but she was doing at the time and i got to have her on the show so i will of them on the show but no. That's i've heard so many good things though about black designers at nike and the jordan. I don't know if that was like intentional. Under like dwayne leadership or anything like that. But i've heard a lot about just a lot of great design talent that has come out that managed to sort of touch. That brand particularly within nike jordan. Brand is that it was a business that wasn't supposed to work. I mean michael. Jordan was supposed to retire and they were supposed to sunset other opportunities but the staying power that michael implanted in the scene of athletics. Just not even just basketball but beyond basketball just the the energy the ideal the aspiration that represented michael i think the early authors of jordan brand. I think emulated that similar. Dna of leadership that made that that team just lean and mean and i watched that team during my time at nike do enormous amount of business with very few people and unlimited resources in the same small team achieve a billion dollars of business with again limited resources in just being a scrappy category and probably a category. That was more willing to give me a shot. Perhaps than some of the established ones. There's a dna there that works and it's a dna that recognizes the power of of black creativity in culture. Nice so you worked for these pretty big names in the consumer space. You work for nike. You work for westinghouse and you gotta mba and like you said at first. Starting out at nike was sort of this typical nba job. That sort of evolved into something else. There you ended up working for several like consulting firms. You've worked for exxon you worked for booz digital you mentioned be cg earlier. Was that a big shift kind of going from such a big consumer industry. That's something that was. Just more like consulting backtrack a little bit. I think it's a great question but something weird is happening with my path inside of nike but then also in the broader marketplace at large thanks to the power of computation so while i was super grateful for the nike environment for forty meters opportunities life changing opportunities but i was approaching a fork in the road. Decision point where the shoe projects that was getting. We're giving me a little bit of evidence to see the potential that creativity could have in mind formal career path but it didn't answer it fully a full humility like it. Just because i did a few sneakers. It didn't say Kevin's ready to be a fully-fledged footwear designer now. I could chose to continue to stay in the nike environment. It might have taken another ten to fifteen years before i would have gotten seasoned by their definition of what it takes or you know i could say while the world is changing at the same time look outside of not seeing the advent of the ipod and the i tunes system was just coming into view at that time. We're hearing previews about an iphone. That was coming. Like that was sort of like i was also seeing like business magazine celebrating designers on their covers for the first time and the other path to take would be to actually go back to school in mind you. I thought i was done school okay. Mba a grad school done. But i started looking back into grad school again and actually made the difficult decision to leave my job. And i went back to school for another two years so i decided to move down los angeles and flush out my credit foundation through an additional master's experience at our college of design and my wife was at nike as well so she she basically relocated down to we. Relocated down to pasadena. California to continue to work for nike for another year remotely. While i was embarking another two year journey to get my masters of science in industrial design. So it was a very risky career gamble in my my wife and my son who wasn't even one. We couldn't nike jobs. They're the true heroes because they were very supportive of of that that bold move but it was a move based on like where i saw the future unfolding like that. The future was multidisciplinary. The future was involving greater commitments toward innovation and looking at designing innovation more holistically beyond just the another app or another widget and so that was sort of a calculated move in the design schools. Were changing around that time to really embrace that that notion of interdisciplinary collaboration on top of the design craft as leaving our center. Finishing up the the program. Of course i'm consciously beginning. How do i get back into the workforce as fast as possible. This is a a huge two year sacrifice but what was funny as most of the regulations. I talked to. They couldn't fit my hybrid persona into a singular job profile so that was a difficult messages navigating that but one of every ten of those conversations did get it. They did want it. They did see that same future. And i met a small group of founding partner serendipitous late in the los angeles area that had lived long. Tenures at places like mckinsey. They also were in executive hot seat for large departments of large global multinational corporations and they knew all too well the perils at large recognization face they pursue new growth opportunities is typically a waterfall process where a strategy firm would work with them for a while then they would handed over to a design firm ideo or frog for a while and then it would that ideal get handed off to a couple technological implementation firms and so it might be two years before a prototype that you could actually tested market whereas when i met them serendipitous. -ly thesis was well. Why don't we just all work to get around the table from day one get to an integrated vision fast with said and then just go build the business with them in for them as fast as possible and we just started doing that for a couple of businesses dusted the exxon referendum. In it snowballed into who's in company taking the first chance on us. So that was our first global platform as we ran under their their house as boost digital for about eleven months but they got acquired by pricewaterhouse coopers and that wasn't necessarily the right fit for our our little multidisciplinary incubator that we're creating literally putting the wheels on the car. Has its flying down the freeway and then bbc g was like come on board. We we really like what you're doing and we became bbc g digital ventures inside their full and they'd really invested in us. We were working of the inverse of what you think of of a typical business consultant always on airplanes troubling to client sites. We actually asked you know. Hey you got to invest in innovation studios for us and what we want to have you do is send your clients to live in residence with our designers with our technologist with our digital strategists. Will ring fence. Multidisciplinary teams will give him like their own war space their own through villages for head down work and will let them run in create new businesses. Until that's what bbc's you did. They ended up. I think now they're up to like eleven studios globally. Were they literally house. These these businesses that are being created in residents and then it will ultimately will spin out as either new businesses that plug into as new business units that plug into the great client mothership or they'll become standalone benchers where all the equity holders are sharing it in a joint venture sort of trajectory moving forward. Do you think that your career would have sort of taken this path. Had you not made that leap of faith from nike. Chilly wouldn't have convinced. It probably would have had an enjoyable trajectory but it would not have looked like this. That's for sure. And now of course you're doing you know this sort of work now through your own imprint. S- their dreams is on in life. So that's a good thing and you haven't stopped there like you're still working on other innovations even within your own studio. I mean i know we spoke a little bit before we recorded about kibo. Can you talk about that absolutely so Kibo was one of the first projects when i stepped away from bc g some startup friends in the bay area. Basically said hey we want to look at the emerging space around these weird little crypto hardware wallets in basically familiar with blockchain distributed. Ledger technologies anytime we. You're i decided to invest in something like bitcoin or some of the other coins that are popular if we engage in a online or are mobile first marketplace to buy and trade those cryptocurrencies. We're sort of we're giving or handing over our identity and our keys to be able to make those transactions to that marketplace and what's been happening in this nation space of crypto currency trading is that it's vulnerable to hacks or if someone mashes a large amount of of coin and the price of bitcoin lately decade amount to a very enormous amount of wealth that either gets hacked or if someone passes away unfortunately their loved ones can't access those funds because they might not have the password. I mean it could be that insane. You know that the conveniences that we know from typical savings and investment accounts those same consumer-friendly afford ince's aren't available to folks in the cryptocurrency space. So there's been a few physical hardware while it set allow you to basically record your transactions but then unplug your device which has a record of the ledger on it and your own identity and keys on it so soon you plug from your computer. You basically have a physical record and as soon as you plug back in you can transact you plug your sort of protected. There's like a wall of air gapped security from you in the marketplace from being prone to those hacks in those problems but the problem is physical hardware laws that are on the market now. There's a ton of manual gymnastic. You have to go through to protect yourself so we basically said let's design a better mouse trap a better device and also surround that device that we created with additional services to feel like me. You maintaining a six safe deposit box at your at your local bank. It can be that easy and also. Let's get rid of the manual exercises that you need to do to even transact so we're we're taking a lot of those things away by creating a better device. That embodies more biometrics more layers of security. That what you had before other choices and so my contribution to that team was to basically derived industrial design of the form factor of the device itself and i continue to serve as a co founder and investor business. I know that there's been a lot of talk recently around. You know bitcoin and blockchain. I feel like that's been a conversation actually for a few years now and i don't know if if it's still something that the general lay person can kind of wrap their head around but i think seeing something physical like this you know like kibo is a start absolutely. It can very easily get lost. In the abstraction the whole environment is so much feature potential beyond even just the trading cryptocurrencies. I'm i'm personally excited about the applications that you could build on distributed. Ledger technologies whether they're being being able to maintain a medical records. And not losing your son's immunization records between moves in these kind of things or not being able to reveal your identity if you wanna get into a a particular space the blockchain would know. It's you without you having to articulate to someone at the desk that it's you like these. These things are part of the future. That is coming that get me excited but yeah we do need some sort of like real anchors for people to better understand these use cases and hopefully kiva can be an exemplar for people as we move forward because currency for a long time. Still been something that has i think been associated with a physical object of some sort a wallet. A coin a bill that kind of thing. Those phrases are still used within bitcoin and everything because it's currency but when you start adding i think the blockchain on top of that or as part of the conversation that sort of where people are like okay. I don't. I don't think i completely understand. I remember the last time. I was in austin which was twenty fifteen for southbound. I went to a restaurant there and they had a bitcoin. Atm and i was like how i use this like. Do i put my debit card here. It's still was a little kind of confused is this. I mean there's there's ways to go but it's good that you know you're working with a company that has thinking about ways to kind of make this happen so so that's a good thing and on top of all this you're also writing a book. Yes sir it's been a blesk cathartic and magical journey with the book project. Thankfully the mit press bid on the proposal that i had flooding around and based on some nudges from some helpful mentors. The proposal in the contract became real at the start of the pandemic. So i think through the quietness of some of those pandemic weeks. I was able to you know furiously right and a lot of the thoughts that have been percolating through. All these different multidisciplinary experiences. It was a cathartic process to get some of that out on paper for the first time and structure perspective that i could call you know a product of the lived experience that i've been blessed and grateful to have enjoyed and if my experiences can help someone else think about their career already been their place within a future enterprise especially the enterprise. That has to think more multidisciplinary in the future. I wanna be a help to that and you finished writing the but now. I think that's what you told me. Earlier right correct. I just sending the final manuscript. Mit press has rigorous peer review process so many stripper sent out in the fall months and got some pointed constructive feedback from objective reviewers and so. I had had a rewrite aggressive rewrite as during the early weeks december so just handed it off and it will take. Mit press another twelve months ago to their process of of taking it from a package tool launchable product. Oh wow this is pretty thorough. So yeah we've got another twelve months here to wait but it'll be worth it when it comes out. Yeah what drives you to do all of this. I think curiosity if i look back at all. These different chapters curiosity has been the defining thread through all of it and honestly there were times where. I didn't act on my curiosity as aggressively as i should have guessed. Things happened sooner for me. By if i took those chances but i think thanks to the definitely a product of my my community right Mentors pioneers doing similar. Things ahead of me looking up to them with any adversity that i might have cowardice especially as a black man navigating stem in the early career and then leading into high circles. Business influence your there was tons of resistance and pushback of course but still proud out of every nine to ten people. That really didn't see me playing in there world when unattended. They would open the door for me and curiosity bulleting convictions. Wanna light extra experiment on those curiosities extreme it might be a side hustle or an investigation or a phone call or coffee chat like that leads to something and at least creating more evidence that gushing hold up not only for others to see but for yourself you can actually step forward with competence and credibility so curiosity is still what gives me energy like there's tons of things that i still chasing. Learn and figure out how to do and have a master. So i think that's going to keep my hopefully my runaway as long as possible and i've seen you've even given a ted talk a legit talk at the ted conference around design so i mean clearly. This is something that drives you. You're very passionate about it. So when you look at kind of where you're at right now like right now. We're recording this for people that are listening. We're recording this actually. On new year's eve what is the most dominant emotion in your life right now. I think its gratitude but i think with that there is a comes with an imperative or a responsibility so as we've talked about before the the path has been very unique. I never would have predicted things playing out the way that they did. But with that. I feel deep sense of responsibility. That comes with a gratitude to move the needle for organizations. I want them to see things through again. A wider aperture more open aperture but also dick debt as ideal with more and more enterprise leaders startups that we can no longer think about business designing attacking 'isolation. That's not enough anymore. Link of course the features multidisciplinary but we can no longer think of that as enough. We have to think about every decision that we make in a business. Context has deeper ramifications. We see that now. Like twenty twenty-eight show there's a lot of that you know impact on employees ethics especially data ethics of privacy you d impact on the growing and ongoing pandemic of climate change and with a heightened awareness around societal balance like all these things are hyper connected. We need canal appreciate how deep. How far back does threads of systemic imbalance go in all of that informs every institution every enterprise that we navigate and if as future business leaders leaders of institutions governments enterprises. We have to think about these things in their holistic way in a no that the forces converged paradigm that we need to treat that in isolation but but together and if i can be a voice to get people to wake up and see these emerging realities like i definitely want to do all the candidates that what advice would you. Would you give to someone that is kind of listening to this. They're looking at your work. They're seeing what you do around. You know strategic design etc. What would you give for someone. That's listening to all that and they wanna basically follow in your footsteps. What would you tell them. I wouldn't recommend the big cause some of those inflection points. Who are quite painful. And i don't believe in having someone replicate the same steps when i do. Hope is that people find the path. That's right for them. But i will say a couple of things of what someone might think about. The is creativity can be for you like you don't have to the designer listening to think that you know the power of what we talked about in. This podcast is for you. Creativity is for you. Whether you're an engineer businessperson designer a student union. You could partake. You could participate in the creative process and there are things you can do to stoke your create a fire. Your than that stems from curiosity look up every now and then you gotta look up and see what's happening in the side of your video purview and find inspiration that go find out more like whatever excites you go invest in that curiosity and start making those natural creative sparks connections between things in your immediate view as well as finish that. Are you know above the horizon in ahead of you. Bring that into your everyday business. Bring into your curiosity navigating your education in a collegial environments bringing into your government work like the all. These things are hyper connected. So invest in your curiosity and know that creativity can be free you and then i think the other thing that i'll say is that what we think about the future career path i think the days of of the steppingstone progression over feeling. Like you have to go to get an mba. Because you think you need that piece of paper to get validated. No you should go pursue an mba because you think education to empower the path that you want to take based on your curiosity be the reason you go. You truly believe that investors can empower you. I do think that a lot of us because we are going to deal with more multidisciplinary diverse reality ahead of us. We have to think about our our career in terms of i believe breadth and depth. People can call t shape. People could call it a pie shape but breath deck for me i ask such breadth is sort of like knowing that you're going to be in rooms with more diverse people. Different backgrounds different experiences cower you equipped and uniquely equipped to collaborate and communicate with people. That are different from you. Because you're gonna find yourself in a situation situations more and more and so. How do you communicate how you align. How do you collaborate strategically with those people. That are different from you. And then we still need you. Whether you're designing engineer business person we still need to deliver your depth of subject matter expertise. So can you still. Can we still hang our hat on your ability to deliver ensure that your craft your competence. Your capability is excellent world class that you can actually stand on your own. Two feet in those regards. Still need that depth of expertise from people. So that's how. I think about like any time i give advice to be amenities or young people. Sleep about your career from a breadth and depth perspective. How do you want to build out like the unique avatar Define your breath adepts as you enter the next organization as you look forward to experiences as you look to ideally map yourself to a future vision that you have of yourself now you mentioned earlier your son you have a eleven year. Old son said eleven year old son. Does he see to work you do like. Does he see like what dad is doing. And and like wants to follow in that like do you see a design spark in him or anything like that. I do see you does come down to my home studio office. He does ask questions. He likes to pick up the medical things that i'm messing with. He loves computers. I know that about bottom already. He loves to draw. So i suspect either engineering or design for him for sure because he loves to build by nature things nature and he's inspired by the work of the seats from my office. Are you kind of like subtly pushing him into that. I think. I think my wife. And i are just like exposing him to as much as we can and seeing what sticks like he he loves music. He loves computers. He loves video games. Of course like most kids nowadays. And we're just trying to nudge a little bit segment. If you if you really liked that area maybe we can do a class for you. And i like that but we are trying to plant seeds that he will have to appreciate that. It's going to take hard work to master some of the skills that he's curious about and we just want to prepare him for that proper mindset to have and that's a good age to i mean that's what i think that's like around fourth fifth grade something like that. Yeah that's a good age you you kind of start really seeing what it is that you're interested in that what you know what you want to continue with and i would imagine even now especially because of the pandemic and with different school closures in stuff you probably have more of a unique opportunity to you know even guide or show in some sort of way different possibilities that maybe you know. He wouldn't have gotten in school totally. I mean when example. We talked so much about what has been taken away from us but there are things to be gained through this awkward period that we are in and one example. You could take arts classes extension classes but you had like drive away across town los angeles which is like perhaps an hour and a half two hour commute times to put him into an extension class around drawing or illustration whatever it might be but with the pandemic they made all those offerings remote so now we could easily take those classes. Yeah where do you see yourself in the next five years. It's twenty twenty six. We've got the vaccine available at starbucks. Where do you see yourself. What kind of work do you want to be doing. Extra shots and vaccine. Please 'grande the object. I appreciate you asking. I've been thinking a lot about it especially during these holiday periods that we find ourselves in our look at i i look at dreams design in life as more than agency i do want to achieve and realize different facets of the ecosystem. That is the business. I do still on of course offer services to organizations of this strategic design industrial design ilk of work but i also as you see a future where i'm getting too right. Hopefully more books speaking more on some of these hot topics that can affect people in ideally inspire them to think about their careers replace organizations differently. I do want to create products under the drinks design in life umbrella that represent the highest ideals of what i think could manifest as as design artifacts that show like what is possible right and have some products that live under the umbrella or lease license product ideas. Ny p two organizations so just having a flexible platform that that affords opportunities for more people to join but also affords the business of flexibility to entertain opportunities that convictions and be able to enjoy that license of choice not feel like always under the burden of of keeping the lights on and collecting fees purely from the services play. Yeah and honestly once you get that five year mark and business. Like i don't wanna say you're set but you certainly have like a good sort of beacon s sort of where you want the business to go and the kind of things that you want to do. So i see that happening. I definitely see that happening appreciate you. Well just to kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you about your work and everything. Where can they follow you online. Sure so they're welcome to come to our website at dreams design end life dot com or you can easily find me on twitter and instagram. By the handle at kevin but dune all one word just like it sounds kevin but then and then from there you'll find the tentacles to all the drinks designed life properties on social and all the other properties that i have as an individual but i'm i'm easy to find in welcome anyone to to reach out. Sounds good. well kevin bethune. I wanna thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you really for. I think putting words behind a lot of kind of abstract concepts around strategic design and really giving a good glimpse into the type of work you do and the process behind it you know. I know we've mentioned the pandemic a few times during this interview. Probably more than i wanted to because we get feedback from listeners. And they're like we don't always want to hear about the pandemic but we're in it and the reality is that many industries and many sorts of normal ways of life changing and still changing because of that and so it's people like you that are able to kind of forecast in some sort of way where we can go and what this new world is going to look like. Certainly i think through your studio will be able to to chart that course together so thank you so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you more is better to be on your platform. Thank you big big. Thanks to kevin zone and of course thanks to you for listening you can find out more about kevin and his work the links and the show notes at revision path dot com revision is brought to you by lunch a multidisciplinary creative studio in atlanta georgia. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me maris. Cherry with engineering and editing by rj. Basilio our intro voiceover is by music man. Dray with intro natura music by yellow speaker. What did you think of the interview. What do you think about the podcast overall. Don't be a stranger. The best way for me to find out how you feel about. The show is to let me know directly so hit me up on twitter. Instagram district for revision path. Or even better leave a rating and review five stars on apple. Podcasts let the world know about the show it really helps grow helps us reach more people around the world. I mean we've been doing this now for almost eight years. That is a lifetime in podcasting so the best way that you can show your appreciation for the show. Show your love for the show. Let us know on social media and leave us rating interview on apple podcasts. As always thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time took.

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01/21/2021 - Hour 3 - The NFL's Black and White Problem

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

41:59 min | Last month

01/21/2021 - Hour 3 - The NFL's Black and White Problem

"To show you how easy it is to file a claim with geico. We hired a soap opera star. Gracious me like or has storm damage. And i had to file a claim could possibly get worse when my claims team leave me for someone else. Someone less intense. No actually when you file a claim with geico you get your own dedicated claims team. Who promises to stay with you throughout the process. I've never known such loyalty. You can't wait for the second season. Geigo great service without all the drama. Tonight it's the biggest night of the year for podcast fan or twenty twenty one iheartradio podcast award. These are really some of the best and brightest and smartest most compelling minds in the country. Celebrate the podcasts. We've leaned on for laughs. Headlines stories to get our adrenalin pumping and voices to comfort us. Donna thank you to my listeners. Because without them this would don't miss our twenty twenty one iheartradio podcast awards watch on iheartradio youtube and facebook and listen on our iheartradio at night at nine pm. Thanks for listening to the odd couple. Podcasts be sure to catch us live every weekday from seven pm to ten pm eastern four to seven. Pm pacific or fox sports radio find your local station for the odd couple at fox sports radio dot com or stream it live every day or the iheartradio app by searching f s. You're listening to fox sports radio. It is the couple. I am chris. He is rob. We're coming to you. Live from the farmers insurance fox sports radio studios you can call one triple eight one eight eight farmers to switch and you could save on your car. Insurers what else are you gonna do with the phone for the next few minutes. You might as well call. Farmers is looking at pictures of food. That your friends eight again. Call one eight eight eight farmers four quote. We are fun at the bottom of the hour. It is the segment that is taking the nation by absolute storm type. Shirts tower of trivia is may alex. Tighter thursdays superstar is it. Is it every time we're doing it tonight. But is it every thursday. Or yes he's everywhere. Say sorry rob was robbed in what you trying to say. You didn't want to do it wrong because what is it you try out the doing it tonight because i won last week. I didn't say that you got lucky. Every once in a someone's going to win abc just last week. You always changing stuff around. So i don't know we have the same literally the same formula every show. There's an open there's called there's guest there's open and then we have like five regular features and each what is specific day. So like right don't you. How dare you call. We made this as simple as possible for you arrive at you. Bills screwed it up so messed it up speaking of switching things up. We got to clear up what we're talking about at the end of last segment. So here's the deal. So i said right. That line is from the good times themes legendary theme song hanging in a chow line. Now the reason. I said it was because i saw it on the dave chapelle show riles. Somebody hit you up and said that's not true. Well i'm we been doing some research. The i gotta give alex the credit. He was doing the research. But here's the thing i gotta say. This i janet do blah. They said is or do boys. The body is do voice. She was milona and she sang the theme song or no. she's saying the jefferson's on jefferson dry. She was even so she said it was hanging in the childline. But then Bernadette stands who was Velma right. I had a crush on her when i such so didn't but anyway used the baby all right but i wasn't old enough to smoke baby oil the to twinkies yes everybody had across odell but but then the writers of this all right. Alex helped me out. yes basically. Yeah i found out. I looked it up in. It says lyrics furnished by songwriters. Alan and marilyn bergman in this is in the twenty eight january twenty eighth jet magazine it says and i quote so forget all this hanging in the chow line. Mass jive turkeys. It's actually hang in and jiving hail josh what it says. Hey hanging in in job. that's what it says. Cook didn't make sense. That's like his warranties. How does the challenge is the product line if you think of the taco truck or any trucks out there you know where people wait. That's what i assumed that. I think of i think people waiting for free food. You know like a child. Line like reich. You know what i mean. You're down and out of need given the government's giving you free chilly like how well it did. Sound like a reach. You know it sounds like you know what we gotta find something that rhymes let's just. Oh here we go hanging in child you know but that makes more things hanging in jiving. Yeah and i mean the writer said it. So i guess that's what it is don't overlook the jive turkey. Cb yes jive turkey. That was big in the seventies jive target nearby target rob No jive in here. This is not funny in the least bit. I look i've never met you. Have you ever met him. Talked to me now like that. Nope because they're making an and i don't believe that making a movie about his career as a coach sleeping with the enemy. No what was okay to me. I was okay. I can't believe craig melvin. Didn't like added everything but but rob the picture that these rumors are painting of him. And i don't think they're the writers that are repeating this stuff that they've been told off the record and you know anonymously not i don't think they mean it this way. I don't think they're trying to do. It is making you if you don't know him and again i don't believe this is the case but it would make you think this do must just be like a bumbler. You oughta mean when they say the interviews. Don't go well and you like what a resume is is great the resume. I mean who wouldn't be going after this guy and they say the interviews don't go in and you say well it must be something is he. Just you know not a people person or you know and so. It's unfortunate that they're putting that out there because look tony. Dungy came on our show and it was report into that. Pat mahomes told this shawn watson b. in a is great. He is helped me so much. Andy reid said the same thing now. Notice his guy but he doesn't have to give being credit go overboard. We're giving him credit for mahomes. The the other thing too is and i remember when tony was trying to get his head. Coaching job chris. I've been covering the league since and eighty seven. And i remember that and it was about tony. Tony getting turned down and it was about you. Know tony's a soft spoken guy. He's not a jump on always jim tomato whole right. Jim call will yeah. Yeah you know what we're personnel. They're just as different kind of person. But that doesn't mean you can't lead people right because you're not a raw raw everybody's not that guy. Everybody is why it's not cooked law. There's no doubt no doubt so. Literally i mike d'antoni not that these even tony dungy's class. Don't you won the super bowl but antonis a. He's a soft smoke in like quiet. I mean he's he's guy he's not ride and all excitable and all that stuff but nobody ever hold that against him. No no you're right. This is this is interesting just that it's not the norm chryst won. A team has had as much success as kansas city has had you pick the coaches from teams that win that. That's always been the case in the nfl brag and this is not like okay. This is the first year people are looking at the enemy thinking. He's a coach. He went on interviews last year. Rob how many did last year. But he did a number of us last year. So you know it didn't happen last year. People go okay no big deal get one next year right like it wasn't like a big chunk but now we're getting here and once they feel this texas job and not him then maybe we'll have to call it sleeping on the enemy because they will have passed on them two years in a row. Thank you at least got that you force that one. 'cause you complain so much about the last you'll take i'll take it. It was a because it was a good show. It did deserve craig. Melvin or did so alex he he owed you thank you. I appreciate it whatever. Know what what do you think the ramifications will be. I'm just saying in this in this country where we're living now. What was has gone on. You know what i mean with black lives matter all the stuff that's happened that the nfl comes off the heel of that in the nfl. I mean the national anthem at the first game and black lives matter stuff all over. You know what. I mean. The nfl was was in on this. And it didn't change the mind of the mostly white ownership that all the people who make the hires ultimately you know data. Yeah yeah you're right and what we're talking. Because i don't know if i even introduced the topic but eric being to me is the poster child for this but they're six coach head coach op openings. Five of them have been feel and no african americans and so now right. Now you have two of the thirty. One head coaches in the national football league african-americans. That's four percent or four two out of thirty two four percent in the league this seventy percent african american. Nobody's saying it should be seventy percent coaches but the population of the country. It's thirteen percent. Black white man between eighteen and seventy we can find a happy medium. But but yeah so. I agree with you rob in that. I'm not surprised. I'm not gonna say i i expect. I thought the owners were better than this. And you know what i mean. That woke and all that stuff. I am surprised though because like you said there was so much put into you. Know black lives matter. The players had the great video. And you know like you said the black national anthem. I would never have predicted. And look maybe houston will have her back coach black coach but i would never have predicted after coming off all of that players. Neil and all that stuff that would be shut out. Yeah that you would not hire one black coach out of six as a what can be done. Look you don't and you notice well rob. You don't want it to be a situation. Where team hires a black coach jeff. Because he's black right we all know now first of all. He doesn't deserve to be treated like that. he's done a great job. He's qualify chris that to be a token higher zang abby of the hiring. And so you don't want that you'd want it to be organic and people would just hire the best person for the job and look at qualifications. But i think robin. I don't think this should be on. The plate. should have be their responsibility. But i really feel like the only way it it may significantly change is if the players were to really stand up and just be like this is ridiculous. You know what it is where said before you don't go play for organizations that don't give teams mistletoe. You've not playing for any team right right. You know what i mean they have to. They would have to do it. Rob as a collective and basically say we're not playing. I mean you can't do it before next season. 'cause you're not gonna stop play because you only got one more higher but they can do they gotta figure out something. I think that might be now. Some people are saying court legal. But again you don't want it to you don't want it to be a quota system you by hope. Not but you have to look at it and say something is awry here. I mean there's no other way to look at it and not think that something just doesn't add up and they like i mean the guys they're higher and who's the guy they hired in philadelphia. Do you know him. Knicks serianni. I'm you know hurt his name here and there is an assistant coach right you know. But but he came out and that brandon alii. I bet you can't come up with a with a one story about that guy and from you know how hard and philly who came out of nowhere and they hired him no and they said you know. The only way to rooney rule was put in place. Was you know the law legally right and so you know some people are saying. It's going to take that. But i you know i think it would have to be the players in the off season. You know doing something but these hires are made. You're not gonna is. It's tough man. I. it's a tough position. I you hate that the players will have to be in that position. But you always say it. They gonna wanna opportunity at a career when they're done playing and remember chris. Most coach most players to average careers. Four years there's a whole life and if you wanna get into coaching and have giants. I know what i mean. Everybody's not the most of the coaches that played in the nfl weren't that good. No get into it right. Yeah like because the superstars see hall of famers. How many hall of famers go back and coach you know especially nowadays when they make all that money if they're that good so yeah it's you know and i don't know what to say this i was asking. I think he interview for three jobs last year. Be enemy yeah. Yeah all right all right well. Eight seven seven ninety nine on fox. Eight seven seven nine nine six sixty three sixty nine. It's your turn away in. What would it say about the nfl folks. If eric being me get shut out of the head. Coaching hiring cycle once again. We will continue the conversation with you next. Where really intrigued to see what you're going to say about. This is the cup of fox. Sports radio keep it locked. Be sure to catch. Live additions of the odd couple with chris broussard. Then rob parker weekdays at seven pm eastern four. Pm pacific on fox sports radio and the iheartradio app good afternoon. Would you like to try a free sample of our double fudge brownie. Sure that's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and geico saving folks lunch money on their car insurance macadamia nut. I taste take one more sir. I thought so fifteen minutes could save you fifteen or more whether you're a resolution person or not it doesn't matter miller lite with great taste and just ninety six calories will be there to help you enjoy some much-needed miller time whether you're meeting new goals are just making it to the weekend. Twenty twenty didn't set the bar too high for what counts is improvement. But that doesn't mean we all can't strive to get better in two thousand twenty one whether it's exercising more eating right or finishing that project around the house that you've been putting off twenty twenty one is your year for improvement miller. Lite great taste less filling. No matter how you feel about the start of twenty twenty one you can get miller lite delivered to your door by going to miller lite dot com forward slash odd couple to find the delivery options near you celebrate responsibly. Brewing company milwaukee wisconsin per twelve ounces ninety six calories three point two grams of carbs less than one gram of protein. Call one eight eight eight farmers and you could save on your auto insurance. It's better than using your phone to see if your post got any likes again. Call one eight eight eight farmers to get a quote. We underwritten by former took insurance. Exchanges are affiliate approximate available and stay. I'm guessing you're fan at his show. Rob hanging with mr cooper rob's eating his bologna and no i am mayonnaise. You big fan of this show this hanging mistake. No i'm is hanging with mr ku hanging with mr guber. There was all right. I wasn't like year. It wasn't it wasn't all that that's the point. I thought it was going to be better added to because he was yeah. I saw him stand up. Stand up one time at one time. He wasn't he. Yeah he was pretty good. Stand up. yeah. That's why. I thought the show would be better It was okay. All right we are coming to you. Live from the farmers insurance fox. Sports radio studios. You can call one eight farmers and you could save a whole lot of somethin- something money moloch cash had douche ducats cheese cheddar greenbacks. On your car insurance you can save all of them all right. Eight seven ninety nine or foxborough turned away. And what does it say about the nfl. If airbnb and black coaches in general get shut out of this hiring cycle all right. Let's kick it off with chris in washington. You're on the odd couple fox sports radio. What's up chris. God couple of what a couple of goofy boys man good evening. What's up man to me. And i didn't necessarily call. You're talking about eric enemy. The great college athletes correct colorado. Yet running back yes. Great running back. Well mediocre running back in the nfl but had great talent absolute but the man also had domestic domestic violence. Some sexual assault charges the coaching at all. He's coaching at all day. Long ago and players in the league doing dry head every no chris. No no no hold on. Hold on chris you. May you do something out there. Now we're going to discuss it right. You can't have it both ways. Okay so my point is got players have done all kinds of stuff. They're playing in the league. If eric be enemies should be disqualified from getting a head coaching job. He shouldn't be coaching in the league. So you can't use that. As a reason. He can't be elevated to another job otherwise he shouldn't be coaching at all. Here's another on that okay. So he shouldn't be code. Is that what you're saying. I don't think all the players should be playing at all the ones that have those. So people aren't that people get second chances all the time so wait a minute serve him. So so the baiters over meyer now. He didn't do it but he oversaw everywhere he's been. They've had scandal after scandal after scandal. So he not man. Be able to coach i in my opinion. No look out for them. I mean look how long it took for took for them to get joe pa. How and that guy was an idol of mine growing nobody but they had to get rid of him after that happened under his watch. But what about the patriots owner he got busted prostitution. Whatever was chris. Also i say with the colts said issues with the laws. Well why are they owners at you can't you. Can't you how to stakes. We're not justifying behavior at all but that was long ago. Some of that stuff happened in college. Who's year but but he's doing that obviously no way but right. There's no sign that's decades ago. Chris i just. I can't buy into it because other people have been given chances if it was a league and nobody. Chris got a second chance then. Okay he can't be in the league. Yup tori louisiana urine. The couple fox sports radio and chris. We appreciate you calling him. We do tori. Tori was up man. That's all good. I'm calling to state my my my opinion about the nfl and the lack of black culture being tired. I'm not. I'm not at all surprised because the template is already been set at the college level that the black players are already used to accustomed to white coaches that big programs so as you see that all the turnover that has happened at the college level and not one. Black coach has been considered at that level. So for most of these coaches aren't coming from college. But i understand that point. The coach was not coming from college. But i'm speaking of at the college level. The black players are already cuffing to why we we all used to working for white people. Let's just keep a real. That's what it is. So i'm not. I'm not at all surprised that the enemy or any other Coordinated that's a call of black. That's not getting high because the nfl fan. The same rule and the power. Five campuses are in college. Okay i hear you. I hear you and we know college. Football's a problem and i love the dion. Sanders is getting players. And he's rah doing his thing. Generous state the hp sat you right at an hp. See you or whatever but my my issue too though is i. Don't know what the numbers are exactly in college. As far as the assistant coaches and the opportunity. Chris but in but in the nfl where these guys are in these jobs that naturally ought to feed her to head coaching unacceptable. Do you see what. I'm saying like the pool of people there. If you've been picking from offensive and defensive coordinators forever and now the team would the guy on the best team. And they've lost one game in the last whatever it's been you know thirty games and he doesn't get a job. Something's wrong for their eight coordinators. Left right if the final four teams in the nfl. They're eight coordinators right. Yup four of them were black right so the humor black think about this should be. Those guys should be moving up to the next step. That's what we're talking about. We're talking about giving people jobs. Haven't worked running the work chris. These guys of putting the work. Frederick douglass said power concedes. Nothing without a demand like we've said before rob it might have to come down to the players making the demanded some. Yes because ticketless right. Because it's just not gonna happen out of the kindness that the owners hearts alright titus tower of trivia. But i talk sports. Radio has the best sports talk lineup in the nation. Catch all of our shows at fox. Sports radio dot com and within the iheartradio app search f. s. are to listen live. Geico knows there many reasons why you ride from the exciting adventure of the daily commute to the peace of mind that geico always has your back with twenty four seven access to claim service and legendary customer service but pamela had one reason in particular. My skin is extremely averse to most fabrics except for the soft buttery feeling of leather thankfully. I found my clan of leather lovers in the biking community. It's been life changing geigo motorcycle. Fifteen minutes could save you. Fifteen percent or more twenty twenty was a tough year of filing your taxes. Doesn't need to be at each nor block. Our tax proves will get you every credit and deduction you deserve every time with up front and transparent pricing. Yup that's max refund or your money back guarantee with an average of ten years of experience. No tax situation is too complex for hr blocks tax pros and the reason to fight. We have over sixty thousand tax pros and eleven thousand offices across the and in each of those offices. Safety is a big priority. We've made h r block offices safer for our associates and clients by requiring face coverings. Social distancing increased space between chairs and desk and more face to face. Just visit your thing this year. No problem you can drop off your tax documents at a local office or submit them using h. and r. block secure app. We want tax season to be easy so whether online person this year block has your back gouda each nor block dot com to learn more time for tyson star of trivia ladies and gentlemen begins and meat eaters lovers. Rubble chip lovers. It's time this is so easy for tight. Shirts tower trivia. That's right at the hot new segments sweeping the country though segment that proves you gotta like sports to work in sports media friendly. Does it every night. You know this segment works. I got seven very easy. Sports related questions. Chris and rob can give one word clues to help our resident. Dj alex t-shirt get the correct answer again. The rules are very simple. No foreign languages rob parker. You keep breaking it every week so hopefully. Hopefully we'll figure this out. I can't say blank something. No one word clue. I did the coin. Toss during the break. Chris walker carpool. Chris won the toss. You get the first question here. We go chrissakes. Fixes it already lee. Summer olympics are held once every blank number of years right alex. Let's go see three words. I would have picked up from last week and go with four on this one direct. Alex unbelievable like i have here. We go question number to get a little bit harder every time. Rob parker in the nfl. The red zone starts. How many yards away from the opposing. Endzone boy nike my. Let's go with twenty. How game where would have been personal got narrow eighteen more number questions anymore because this is getting ridiculous here we go number three thai shirts tower trivia in basketball when you get fouled in the act of shooting you get to shoot unguarded from the blank. Throw line chris liberty. Are we going with freedom free. Throw right yeah judge to review the tape. We said freedom. We'll have to review that for next week but going forward throw line so i can't talk. He knew right here. We go level number four again to get a little bit harder every time. Nba champion. ray. Allen is the star of a basketball movie alongside denzel washington. That movie was called. He got blank. Rob parker rob. I have no idea the saint like eighteen. Other like that i see. What do you got for me. I need help. Rob said please timely okay. Can you repeat the question. The name of the movie and he got blank. Okay mom rob here. We go on ready board. Okay i'm putting down with putting up. I'm gonna go. a game. has copy my strategy start smart the tone of voice in audit. That was my thing. You guys are running the table right now. Tone of voice all right here. We go president which will not get this. You know anything about high level number five hockey rinks have three wide lines on the ice one is read. The other two are this color. Cv when he got streak streak. What can i put together with that. blue streak blue down two minutes. That was good. You know what. Alex you kill me because i had a perfect i. The perfect lou clue for that. What were you gonna say. It was gonna be white fighter automobile. Have lillian on how you do. All right we'll keep it clean air. What it is now. it was going to be black. You have this. You'd be suspended at the very hot ever happen. I'm glad that that's not what rob's clue. I titus tower trivia. Chris rusada up thirty to twenty perfect game going. So far it's go. Level number six rob parker nicholas arguably the greatest golfer ever lived at a nickname after one of the most ferocious mammals in the world is already just confused right now. He was known as the golden blank. Rob parker yogi. Okay bear yogi. Bear was i can say with supreme confidence. Alex had no idea any of these last few the phenomenal so the job guys. Good stuff all right. Here we go level number seventy two levels let we have a perfect game. The first i ever get points all. Nfl teams have a logo on their helmets. But only one afc team has a logo on just one side of the helmet. That team is the blank pittsburgh. Oh my gosh steelers there. It is the pressure is on. He's gonna fold here. We go Putting his ties perfect game this is. How do i get this bet you. I can't help it that you guys were perfect game harder that they do get harder. That was easy that lasts me when a baseball player strikes out four times in a single game. It's known as a golden blank rob for the tie. Amal rob this is your forte. Come on rob channel. The mind of a young is. I don't want to give it away tomorrow at one word to those getting a paragraph together Come on rob. Okay what did you say rob. It's known as the golden blank. No i'm not passing. Ara best he can do is ties. You gotta shot here. I want a perfect game. Rod helped me here. We go again. Alex has no idea what the answer is. he's view any won't get there but alex. Yes aw come on believing you now. Gimme one word okay. Now is this one word. One were eighteen already. Professor parker right. Now wait a minute one word. I all right here. We go suspense is killing me. Rob hat that's it. Okay hold on. Let me try rob. I'm going to really try here. Hold on okay hats. Hold on dig about what you about to say. What does it go out one hatch. You're okay hold on. I might be wrong here but this just sounds good but it's it's probably not. I'm going to say golden cap alex gamay. Cb were done. Yes sorry give me give me one word to say i would think about it mexican. This is just for fun now. It's kind of racist. chris. I i feel like i'm going to answer. I was gonna say golden fiesta. But i don't think that's it now that's not it either. Go tell you the correct answer. What is it going. Glare rob sombrero. You know what i wanted saying. I want to say sunhat out. Let that slide. No no that's too and he's still got it. He's got hat though. It is better than has really. There's other ways the enthusiasm that chris mexican burrito combined in mexico only a half a day after mexican hat. So i if somebody said to me a mexican head. I'd say some borough well you know what happens now. Oh god bryce tenley between this galax gonna go shrine robbie rob. I just want you to dance group. Listen to the bongos. let's get in your soul. Go to the motherland show. We go here. We go here we go here we go here we go here we go here. We go here really here. We go couple keep it like a joe will rob ever sway to. This will never happen not today. Not tomorrow not ever. That's right joe. Be sure to catch live editions of the odd couple with chris. Broussard and rob parker weekdays at seven pm eastern four. Pm pacific on fox sports radio and the iheartradio app call one eight eight eight farmers and you could save on your auto insurance. It's better than using your phone to see if your post got any likes again. Call one eight hundred eight farmers to get a quote a farmer circuit france affiliate proxima available in every state. All right this is. I guess this is what we wrap up with. Nowadays robbins seems right. Tv things song. It seems right one down the show right right right so you know watch it made me wonder watch cheers we're hanging in jiving we've been jive rilot today show we have and we're coming to you. Live from the farmers insurance fox sports radio studios you can call farmers today for a quote. We are also brought to you by lows. Now whether you're pro or joe when you're on the job site or manage properties clean and safe issue number one priority folks lows goes beyond the basics it brings you commercial cleaning from top brands like clorox zap and rubbermaid shop. Lowes for pros dot com and choose delivery or pick up in store. Lows is the new home for pros united states. Only rob this big game. We're talking about lakers. taken it. To not quite a pitchfork to the bucks but they are putting it on them. They're up ninety eight. Eighty nine was six and a half minutes left. I'm i'm a jaanus is struggling a bit. I've seen him rob g correct me if i'm wrong. I've seen i think to airballs from him. He had one of the last possession. And i thought he said had when early i might be wrong. He's on there. I know about seventeen feet wasn't like a deep three the and he's got eight turnovers so jaanus is struggling and he's done that before. It gets lebron and the lakers. Lebron is having a tremendous game twenty nine points eight assists four rebounds level. Twenty two eight five threes rob. Ad were talking about earlier. Eighteen points eight rebounds good but lebron has been the guy tonight. Casey p two six for seven from the ark. Twenty points for him rob. I honestly think. I mean this way early but lebron is right there in the. Mvp you know he could he could maybe be vp this year. We'll see now. I don't think it's crazy. But i still think it's a long way to go way. And anthony davis play and not playing well right now great. And he'll play better. And usually even if lebron plays well like i said normally when you have two players like that it's hard to get an mvp. We'll see well so a lot of people thinking k. d. obviously he's got a three a trio and he's their their record will get better right now. It's not great was nine seven right now. Ninety seven i think embiid joel embiid is. He would be right there at this early point. 'cause they're they're the east and he's playing really well maybe the best ball of his career And i rob steph curry. He might be in the hunt this year there to see right now. I don't see that if they end up in this a long season but if they end up five or higher if the records are close you know he's going to have because he's ball and he's he's oh have much help man. That's the cert it'll be it'll be just way too early to talk again early to at at the all star break chris. Let's see where the teams are you know did the nets run off. Twenty straight wins. You know what i mean and k d's played tremendous and then they'll look at coming back from the injury to be k. D. from the nets could be going to vote for kyri especially within walking out for karadzic's he's been balling hard. Numbers are great numbers of great. But him him now going to hurt. What two or three. Triple doubles hardens average. In a triple double with the nets right now he he's at he's had two of the three games he played and i think a transferable double at least two. Yeah yeah all right. Great so we were hanging in jiving rob. We are and hanging in a child law to all right go to apple podcast soundcloud tunes and download. The podcast subscribe. Leave a nice message. Five stars would be kind of you. All right is. chris arrived. The and we'll be back tomorrow.

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How Did Emmett Till's Murder Shake the U.S.?

BrainStuff

08:04 min | 10 months ago

How Did Emmett Till's Murder Shake the U.S.?

"This episode is brought to you by IBM Today. New problems need new. Thinking retailers are turning to the cloud to restock shelves more quickly teachers are working with ai to rethink the classroom. Let's put smart to work see how IBM's helping at IBM DOT com slash Cova. Nineteen welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. Today's episode gives brief. Put graphic details about the murder of Emmett till listener discretion is advised. Emmett till was just fourteen years old in the summer of nineteen fifty five when he traveled to visit family in the small community of money in the Mississippi Delta till was born and raised in a suburb of Chicago. He had never been to the deep south. The tragic story of young till's murder at the hands of white men because he was black became too many a catalyst for the American Civil Rights Movement but historian did not end in Mississippi. It never really ended. We spoke with Florida State University. Professor Davis Hawk. Who helped create the Emmett till memory project and has been instrumental in building? Fsu'S EMMETT till Archive. He said I'd like to think that if we had the trial again that number one would have some black jurors and some women that in fact justice would be done. That's the optimist in me but I don't want to be too optimistic because we're at a time in our country right now where anything goes in terms of violence visited upon young black boys for whistling at a white woman. Yeah I think we're pretty far down the road from that but I don't want to say we've arrived at some ideal place. We haven't a murder of Emmett till could have been lost a time. Just another of thousands of lynchings were perpetuated all over the United States. After the civil war the equal justice initiative has documented more than four thousand four hundred lynchings in twenty states between eighteen. Seventy seven and nineteen fifty. Till's murder stands out separately from those though not because of its sheer violence. Lynchings were by definition brutal but because the particular inhumanity brought upon him was not automatically relegated to the inside pages of newspapers as many others had been even in Mississippi shortly after his death. News accounts almost immediately condemned the teens martyr. The governor of the state at the time Governor Hugh White even spoke out against it still it was not until till's mother Mamie till mobely then Mamie till Bradley demanded that her son be returned to Chicago for burial that the entire world took notice because she held an open casket funeral to show what had happened to him. He was beaten shot a hat a seventy five pound fan tied to his neck with barbed wire and was then tossed into the Tallahassee River where he was found several days later. Bradley told Documentarian. Keith Buchanan years. Later in retelling the story of the day she saw her son's body returned from Mississippi. Oh yes we're going to open the casket let the people see what I see. I want the world to see this more than one. Hundred thousand people attended till's funeral jet magazine published graphic photos including one depicting. Bradley standing above the coffin containing her battered son's body and the outrage grew outer when the two men accused of the murder. Roy Bryant and J W Milam were acquitted by an all white jury weeks later anyone looking. For further reason to put an end to lynching demand racial justice had a rallying point. What prompted till's kidnapping and murder is still debated and in reality is beside the point. The jurors were told by Brian's wife Caroline the 'til had whistled at her come into the Bryant. Family store grabbed her by the wrist but his hands on her waist and bragged about being with white women. But it wasn't true. She recanted that story. Years later what she told author Timothy Tyson for his twenty seventeen book the blood of Emmett till strikes at the very truth of that night. She said nothing. That boy did could ever justify what happened to him. Still the original retelling the encounter between fourteen year old till twenty one year old Carolyn. Bryant has had remarkable staying power. Despite the fact that it's been disavowed by its creator. A nineteen fifty six look magazine article. By William Bradford Huey containing a confession from the murderers that look paid them to give was purported to tell the true account of the murder. How said that so called confession continues in some to function as a history of what happened to Emmett till that night. What the article has done what I see is it divides Mississippi along black and white lines. Oh Emmett till was kind of this borderline rapist. Man Child who had coming to him. You will hear that in polite company in Mississippi to the Present Day till story had an immediate and profound effect on Americans at the time both black and white largely because of his mother's bold decision to display his body and jets decision among others including the Chicago defender to publish the pictures former politician and activist Julian bond. Who died in two thousand fifteen wrote a forward to Devry as Anderson's indispensable look at the events? Emmett till the murder that shocked the world and propelled at the civil rights movement in it. He wrote the till story was touchstone narrative of my generation among many southern horror stories. This was among the most morbid. The till death picture was proof of white southerners malevolence. Their refusal to acknowledge the killer's guilt was proof of their acceptance of evil. 'til story was recounted through the nineteen sixties. Civil Rights Act became law. It still widely cited by activists from bond to Rosa Parks and beyond and the story of what happened in. Mississippi August of nineteen fifty-five may not be finished either till's body was exumed positively identified as part of a two thousand and four department of Justice reopening of the case which resulted in no new charges a Mississippi grand jury in two thousand seven found. No evidence suggested by Documentarian. Buke camp that as many as fourteen people may have taken part in his kidnapping and murder in two thousand eighteen. The Department of Justice again opened up an investigation. It's evidently still pending. Many articles. Books documentaries have been produced on the story. There's now an Emmett till Interpretive Center in Sumner Mississippi. A few other museums are in the works. The State of Mississippi has several road signs that detail places in the Emmett till story. Though many of the signs continue to be shocked and otherwise vandalized the National Memorial for Peace and justice dedicated to block people terrorized by lynching opened in two thousand eighteen. Not far from the Legacy Museum. From sleeve length to mass incarceration both are projects of equal justice initiative and finally on February Twenty Sixth of two thousand twenty the United States House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed the Emmett till Anti Lynching. Act Four hundred ten to four to make lynching a federal hate crime. This comes after lawmakers have tried and failed more than two hundred times. The bill still needs to be passed in the US Senate and signed by the President to become law. Today's episode was written by John Donovan and produced Tyler Clang for more on this and lots of other topics visit. How stuff works. Dot Com grainstuff is production of I heart radio. More podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio. App Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows it's a basic truth. People need each other. It's why Penn Fed credit unions. I members join together for a better financial future for eighty five years. We've been there for our members and communities and we're here for you today we can help you bridge a financial gap save wisely and make confident decisions with your money. We know we are always stronger and better together. That's why we hope you'll join us. Membership is open to everyone. Apply today. Pen Dot Org insured by NCUA.

Emmett murder Mississippi Emmett till Interpretive Cente Chicago Roy Bryant Mississippi Delta IBM kidnapping department of Justice United States Vogel Bradley Florida State University Governor Hugh White NCUA Cova funeral jet magazine Fsu
ActOne Group: Janice Bryant Howroyd (2018)

How I Built This

48:14 min | 2 months ago

ActOne Group: Janice Bryant Howroyd (2018)

"This message comes from. npr sponsor. Adian the future payments platform welcome all payments beyond the cutting edge of customer experiences. And grow your business with adian. Visit a. d. y. e. n. dot com slash. Npr to learn more. Hey it's guy here over the past year a lot of the founders who come on the show have told me how hard it is to ask for money. They have to sell their product or idea is an amazing investment. Made it clear how they're going to use the money even impassioned pitch but still risk getting door after door slammed in their face and when people do give friends family angel investors. Vc's whomever our founders are overwhelmed with relief and gratitude. Well before the end of what has been pretty trying year for a lot of us. I would like to ask each of you to show your generosity in your appreciation for what we do by giving to your local. Npr station many of you. Listen to the show from your favorite podcast app. But how i built this is also a radio show that plays an npr stations around the us and those stations along with our sponsors directly support. The work we do. So if you love this show and the stories we tell giving you my best pitch so please be among the friends and family who give to our show. By giving to your local member station you can go to donate dot n. p. r. dot org slash built and give directly to a local npr station. That's donate dot n. P. r. dot org slash built. And thanks. okay so onto the show and first of all. I just want to wish everybody a happy holiday season and thank you for being such incredible supporters of the show this year. Our team is taking a much needed break. But this week we wanted to revisit the story of janice bryant howard and as you'll hear there are a lot of reasons why her story is kind of the perfect way to end the year this episode. I ran about two years ago. And i think you will love it. I'll tell you candidly. And i'm not proud of it. There were times when i would gift my intelligence to other members of my team and have them go in and make a presentation or them. Make the pitch so that the client wouldn't have to interact directly with me as an african american or as a female. Because you thought they wouldn't want to. In some instances i thought it. In other instances i knew it from npr. It's how i built this of show about. Innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built guy roz and on the show. Today how a temporary gig. As secretary inspired janice brian. How roy to build an employment agency that turned into an empire and being janice the first african american woman in history to own a billion dollar business so hiring employees is one of the hardest things about running a business. If you've listened to this show long enough. You heard founders talked about how when their company started to scale hiring enough good people consumed so much of their time because hiring requires patients and research and yes luck even the best applicants sometimes flail after they start in this was an insight that janice brian how royd came across early in her career. After working as a secretary for her brother-in-law it was the late nineteen seventies and her brother-in-law. Tom noonan needed an assistant for his growing role at billboard magazine in hollywood janice notice that lots of other executives in hollywood needed clerical help too and they needed it fast. They just didn't have time to find the right people. So with oliver money which was fifteen hundred dollars janice rented a small space in front of a rug shop in beverly hills and she started an employment agency at the time janice was a young african american woman starting out in an industry dominated by older white men now today her company act. One group doesn't estimated billion dollars a year in sales act. One handles hiring and recruiting for all kinds of industries and it also provides a lot of back end services like employee screening and payroll but when it began it was just one office one phone and janice she opened that first office in the city barely knew and she first arrived to la in her mid twenties china's had spent most of her life in a very different place from hollywood. She grew up in the nineteen fifties and sixties in the big family. In the small town of north carolina. I grew up on the other side of the tracks. And that's literally the case because we did have a train that ran through our town. We were A town that was incorporated in the seventeen hundreds so a train track in the middle of the town did indicate some level of prosperity. Now we were segregated. Make no make no mistake about that. But we have that southern etiquette that went along with it so there was a politeness that occurred amongst people but we also were very aware of the injustices. How many how many brothers and sisters did you have growing up five brothers. Five sisters all type a. So eleven kids in your house. Yeah you say that. That sounds so much to you does it. Sounds like a lot of kids. Sounds a chaotic house. Oh my no. You don't know my mom and dad if you thought there was chaos going on brian l. Sold as a matter of fact we had assistant. We are The older siblings with the younger ones. When i say take care. I mean they were responsible that we did chores appropriately. We had personal grooming taking care of. They checked as foreign helped us with and that homework was done is so sandy got me. She was first born. I was fourth born and when she went all the way off to greensboro north carolina. Which by drive time is about Four hours it felt like the end of the world at happened for me. I the everything just felt so empty to me yet. There were still twelve. People left in the house. Every day of we had no guests come over. Did your parents i mean. Was there ever a sense that you know that they were struggling or did always feel like you had everything you needed as a kid guy. I remember sitting in a class. And i had what oprah later coined aha moment and i remember sitting in class and thinking. Wow we are poor. Had no concept of poverty growing no idea none at all. We always had enough for us. And som- to sheer and that mitt clothing at mit food and that met emotional support when you were when you were little did you. Would you dream about what you would be when you grew up or did you already have big ambitions as a kid or or were they kind of like you know. I'll i'll see what happens now. See print media was really the that taught me so much and books print period. My mom bought encyclopedias and then she paid off over time she also had periodical. That came to our house. Bill was a magazine called sipa. There was ebony was popular. Jet magazine was popular back then. And so i knew a lot about the world. And i knew a lot about what black people were doing and so i had role models who Fulfilled thoughts about what i might do when i grew up But s a very young child. I remember marring my mom so much which i continue to do to this day. She even then. I could sense. Even though i couldn't put label to it was quite an efficient person and she ran our home like a business. And what did your dad do. My dad was a form and he was a form an dye factory. You know we're textile community in north carolina and dad was very integrated in our lives. He baichung were that. We had our thursday family meetings. Thursday was paid a and we all had to gather around and we discussed what we done. What we would be doing in business. We say we discussed the gaps and we brought forward the solutions in my family. Dad just the. Let's see where we are and where we're going kids. That was always his own. How mitt to us genesis when you were when you were a girl when your kid. Did you see entrepreneurs around you either in your community or or in your family retrospectively. I saw them growing up. I did not know. That's what i was looking at. I remember grandma door walking around tall bora in high heel shoes. Coming over to our house and they ran Barbecue shop and they had a beautiful dining room in it but bear. Dining room was to serve their customers. They ran it out of their home. Yet and white people would come over to eat the Which was a big deal that they were coming over to have dinner at the lunch. But i didn't look at. That is entrepreneurship back then. That's just grandma. Did you know. I also saw her run She fed people to go bags where they become invite their lunches or dinners at the back and she would charge based on who was working in. Who was out of work. And she had that sense of justice in her mind about how to run her business and I think it paid off because she didn't quite well. So such as i read that When you in high school your mom and dad decided to send you to a an all white high school. You're going to be the first african american student at that school. What do you remember about about your first day going in there. Well mom and dad didn't send me. We decided as family that that would happen. Our community wanted to have our best and brightest go to white school to lessen any fear around whether or not the school would dilapidated anyway. Bu are attending it and i was one of the first and i remember my first day going into my english class and i thought oh english is always been one of my better subjects. And i'm going to fail because i couldn't understand my english teacher. She had a twain bet sounded so different to being from my side of tara. Mind you. We're talking about a distance that i could walk to school from my home but she found it so different but communities were truly divided in that way and we had a teacher who stood up on the desk that day the first day i went into his history class and explained so eloquently. If you can even see the paradox that that how blacks were so suited to slavery remember chewing so hard saying god. Please don't let me cry if you just let me get out of here without crying. I'll never come back. That's how intimidated. How fearful in how foreign. I felt in a us history class. Did you want to stop going to that school. I mean i could imagine being sixteen year. Old fifteen sixteen year old kid and and feeling that level of hostility and then hearing a teacher say that somebody with power to just to say that. I absolutely want to stop going and i told my dad. I didn't want to go back and dad gave me three options. He said you can come back here and compete against other black kids. Who are going to need scholarships to go to school. He could go up and he could floor the teacher and Seek retaliation or. I could go back and i could understand and this is something that if you say too many black people they will finish this sentence for you is not what they call you. It's what you answer to. And that was my first big lesson from dad that i should not listen to what they called me. I could only be what i answer to in life. so you You graduated high school and then you went off to college To north carolina. A and t What do you. What do you remember about that time. I loved that campus. And that's where my older siblings at gone it. It was such a wonderful time to be at north carolina. A and t. When i graduated everybody was full of promise and ideas about what we could do. So much of my adult framing happened on that campus. And by the time. I started my own business. I was able to reach back on what i learned in my home. Which is where i gain. Most of my business education was in my home and the ability to to meet new people and not a strangers that i learned at a and t. That was so wonderful. Yeah and what did you do when he graduated i. I worked in the national academy of sciences in washington dc. I worked here for about a year. And a half. And i went home to visit mom and dad and i remember one morning my mom and dad when we were kids early morning was always there time told you. Dad left her work really early in the mornings and their daytime was early morning and they dated in the kitchen and the little window where she has tabled the to this day and i got up to walk through the hall and i saw them and hugging just just like teenagers and i thought ooh you know i'm an adult by then right. That was the last time my mom saw my dad alive And i many times since then have thought if you have to say goodbye. What a wonderful. Wait for her to know that the last time he saw her alive he held her and loved her so richly. And she him. My dad had taken two young men out on the waters north carolina. Shrimp boat fishing. They wanna shrimp boat. And a storm came up My dad was taken in the storm. And so i remember my mom took her be it for a couple of weeks and i had booked a ticket to come to california to visit my sister. Sandy and i remember I told my mom. I'll stay here with you mom and help you. Mom had been married since she was a teenager. She never had any other boyfriend. And i knew there would be some heavy adjustment for her and she said i'm no i'm gonna have to learn to live on my own. I better do it now. And then She said the last thing dad would want is for me to stop living your dream because we certainly Certainly have lived hours. Wow so you you leave north carolina. I mean what a what a what a moment in your life and your mom's life and your family's life ministers like late seventies. Yeah and so you come to l. a. to visit your sister and it was it was supposed to be just a quick visit to see her a couple of days or weeks or something like that had a couple of weeks plan. It was going to be good. Visit two weeks back then was a long time still is. Yeah and you're just a kid. I mean you were in your mid twenties right or early twenties. At that point i was hot in popping. Although let me tell you when i got to la. I didn't think so on the east coast. I thought i was all of that when i got to. La and i saw all these women who worked without pantyhose on they carry purses with somebody else's name on the tone and i was calling it louis vitton and they were all all all the black people all the black women i saw. Were like fabulous gorgeous women. And i felt like this little napa ahead girl coming out of north carolina of monks. All these fabulous didn't feel hiding popping. Then what was your first impression of at that time. And this is like late seventies. it was palm. Trees gorgeous gorgeous palm trees and you know you go up and drive all the way up and look out over the city and it was just so beautiful so beautiful. La was wide. Open it truly was a fairy tale kind of existence for me. And i wanted in on it. You wanted to stay. I didn't at first. I needed to sustain my stay financially because my sister kept saying stay. I'm the first family member. She's got out here from home. So sandy and and her husband. Tommy he worked at at at billboard magazine. Right he did. He had worked at motown for years and Helped move motown out to la. And then he went to billboard you know his career had been in the music industry remember seeing his name scroll the year he died at the grammys and tommy invented what they call the hot one hundred chart of the billboard hot one hundred yes to this day i keep meeting people who just have such great memories of him and certainly i do. He was an incredible incredible first generation irishman. So you you glad to la to see your sister and her husband. You're brother-in-law tommy. Says hey you know. I i may have some temp work for you at at at billboard and and that's what you did you cannot went to his office and were kind of worked for him. Yeah she and tommy were going to a nimick conference in italy and When he came back. I had reorganized. Things put things in a form. As i saw they should be and he thought i worked magic. I thought idea what i was supposed to do and he said you know you. Don't you really are good chanice. You should not go back without proving you can make it on your own. And he was the one who seeded the idea that i should hang my own shingle. You're looking for work. And and essentially says hey janice why don't you just open up a business and you've got your job you've got your own job. He absolutely did. It was that simple for him. He later told me. He saw so much. Enterprise entrepreneurship in me. That i wasn't seeing myself. So what was the business idea that you guys started to talk about. I actually started as a full-time agency with meaning what we were finding. I i found people full-time jobs. You will like a head hunter sort of. Yeah at the admin level so what once you decided that you were gonna start this company this agency to help place people in jobs I move i mean. Where did you get an office. How did you. How did you start it. I made a deal with the guy who owned a rug shop. And i set up office in front of the shopping very very beautiful in beverly hills in beverly hills location location location wanted a beverly hills address to say i had a friend who hooked me up with someone who had a beverly hills location. I was not looking at real estate that way. But it worked out perfectly. The stars were aligned for me. And what did you call it. Would you call the company act. One does in act one. Like when you're in a movie one you know because it's located here in los angeles Air yet many people thought that but for me it was more around the biblical sense. The book of acts the. Oh so you get get this office space and what you put in a desk in a phone and if they are didn't have to it was there and it worked out very well from me but i'll tell you something idea get my own office. I remember the first day. I got a fax machine. Do judy jetson is sure. Of course yeah. I thought i was judy. Jetson technology hit hard for me. Yes that was incredible for me and it also taught me the power of technology. And i think that's why over the years my company has evolved much around how we build human friendly technology than anything else when you started act one. Did you need a lot of a lot of start up money to get it going. I borrowed money from my mom. And i had saved nine hundred embarrassed six hundred from her. But so you had fifteen hundred dollars to start this business and that was going to get you the office at least on the office and i guess a phone. But here's a i'm trying to understand. You're so young and you just essentially just got there. So how did you even start. How did you even find people to to recruit to say. Hey i you know. You're looking for work. i can help you well. Fighting people to place was not an issue during that time Finding jobs was and the core of our business remains today as it was when i was one desk and thus undestanding the power of the interview. Underst- i mean you've talked with me for a few minutes now. You know a lot about me and you a lot of resources to go to gain more information. And that's the way the interview worked as well so the power of that interview enabled me to make sure that i understood the individual who was looking for work. I knew where they'd already work. I knew if they were all ready employees that once they left there was going to be an opening. Vr and because of the rich network. That i was able to achieve in the social side of how is lived with my brother and sister. I knew people who were looking for assistance people who were looking for people to hire and built it on that in the early days i call it the wound word of mouth. Baby i got. I got most of my liege toward opportunities to feel positions and most of the lease toward applicants by word of mouth. So your business model. was you help. Companies fill these jobs mostly clerical jobs and they would pay you a fee. And how were you able to guarantee that the person you were offering was gonna work out. Oh my goodness there were so many different guarantees that were offered in our industry back. They haven't thought about this for years. But that's the risk you take on making sure that you're making a good placement. And that's why. I say we had to focus on the applicant. Because you you offered people money back. If they didn't work out then you know you had. You had a reduction in that feed you got and you got. You had to pay that money back if they didn't last so nobody wanted to do that. Were you were you. Profitable pretty quickly or did it take some time actually thinking back on it hitting profitability year. Seems pretty good but living through it. It didn't but remember. I was in a very low overhead business. And i was in a business that cat high transaction. I was as good as my effort. Allow me to be in those early days as you as you start to grow Kings were like kind of acting in the in the midst of this. You like you've got to write like in the early eighties. Well i met my husband at an industry conference bernie. I saw this guy and he was really handsome to mean he had this presence about himself and he also spoke with this english accent but he liked me a lot more than i did him. I noticed him. I can't say. I didn't notice him but he liked me a lot more than i liked him. And he he chased me for a bit and I found out that he was the founder of apple. One and apple was a temporary employment. Agency was apple. One was apple. One was a really respected temporary employees. Full time placement agency Doing business in california. So you married essentially your competitor. How did you keep like work and personal life separate. I think it would be the same as if we had been physicians source is surely are going to share a love of the industry and talk about it and we're still competent capable people building a business and so one. Was it clear to you that this wasn't just going to become sustainable but this could actually become really big. Business was it was within a year. Was it within. Two years was after that. No no no. I would say it was about Oh i want to say six or seven years in. And i remember a lady named gwen moore when moore was an elected official congresswoman out of california here and she had been very active in championing and i believe she was one of the original authors of legislation that require public utility companies in california to have diversity spend because she say your rate payers are diverse so you should be doing business with them and she contacted me and she said i wanna come see you and she met with me and she told me that i had an obligation to get certified to do what as a minority woman owned company. And i didn't want to do that. I was doing very well. Thank you and she said no. It's not about you doing better although you will. She said it's about you creating the opportunity for others. Who won't get a shot. She said we need some strong businesses. That are run by women and run by minorities to certify and go in and do business as such to open the door for others and even when she was arguing. Appoint as eloquent as clear as she is. I wasn't getting the point because Initially i thought that certification was a strip search. I needed to open up my business to total exposure to someone to in return. Have them come back and say yes. You are a minority. Yes you are a woman and yes you are running this business. And it just did not align with how i felt that i wanted to be measured when we come back in just a moment. Why janice wound up changing your mind about that and how she turned. Act one into a billion dollar business. Stay with us. I'm guy and you're listening to how i built this from. Npr this message comes from npr sponsor. 3-m supporting communities in the fight against covid nineteen since the outbreak. Re m has responded with cash and product donations including surgical masks hand sanitizer and respirators through local and global aid partners. In addition three m is on track to produce two billion respirators by the end of twenty twenty learn. How three m is helping the world respond to covid nineteen go to three m dot com slash. Kobe three m science applied to life. Thanks also to hubs spot legacy our platforms have made you compromise for far too long with hub. Spots are platform. You don't have to choose between enterprise tools that are powerful or easy to use. It gives you both so your marketing sales and service teams can align with ease accelerate sales and anticipate every customer need finally. There's a crm platform. That helps you run better so you can grow better without complexity ever getting in the way. Learn more at hub spot dot com. Thanks also to invesco q. q. q. You don't have to be a deep learning engineer to help drive us into the future. Become an agent of innovation learn more at invesco dot com slash q. q. q. invesco distributors inc. At planet money. we are also grappling with. What's going on in the world. We just don't know and you're still going to have to decide so we call economist like emily oster. It's like we're fighting the pandemic by having a bake sale or something to respect to bake sale. Listen and subscribe to planet money from npr and just a reminder. This month is npr's annual end of your fundraising campaign. So please go to donate dot npr dot org slash built to support your local station and thanks. Hey welcome back to how. I built this from npr. So it's nineteen ninety-two and janice brian howard's la based employment agency. Act one is doing pretty well. In after some back and forth she eventually decides to get certified as a woman and minority owned enterprise. Becoming certified opened up new client opportunities for me because now companies could look at me as look at my business as an opportunity to meet numbers in quotas that they had a round inclusion diversity and inclusion and it became a choice between me and another company who was not certified. I was going to get that opportunity. I'd never known that existed before i got certified in. So that's when. I started to expand into contract business before then i was doing business on handshake or on service agreements but once i started to go after different types of business i needed to do it in contracts and had to learn a lot about the process and one of the failures i've seen occur in my own. Business s in others is that we create great relationships with people in companies and definitely. We should do that but people are moving all of the time and the agreement you have with the person if may not align with the agreement you have in that contract and when that person has gone that contract is still spending as so you've got to understand the difference between that and that was one of the biggest lessons i had to learn. Once i started to expand my business from focusing on one on one transactions into contract work. I just keep thinking i mean. It seems like you were growing pretty fast so your head must've been spinning well. Let me tell you two things about that one. The big thing for me was not so much the exponential growth as it was the adoption of doing the temp work and bringing temp into the fold. Temp work you're paying people long before the client pays you and so there's another element of risk in there. You're also the employer of that worker and so you assume the employees your risk so you've got to dynamic new and very strong differences are in place here and you're competing against larger entities who are going in and able because of their scale to offer a much better pricing and you are for for me and many companies like me woman owned you were the minority company or you were the diverse company. So you're getting one tenth of that business against one larger vendor and i still had to meet the same pricing as a larger company to do that efficiently to do that sustainably. I needed to integrate technology in a different way. And i didn't find any over the shelf technology. So that's when. I started to hire people and we built our own technology solutions. And i guess we just mentioned here janice that That some of the solutions that you came up with internally they actually became a huge part of your business. Yeah so our technology swedish call deceleration and it really was about that detailed reporting we were able to give to clients that they weren't getting anywhere else in so i had a client up north. Who had a very bad experience with a publicly held company called me on a friday morning and ask if i would come up so i actually ran over to the airport with my brother. Another employee and the three of us went up north at northern california to the client and we found out that they had an issue. This publicly held company was not negotiating with them and walked out and they had several hundred temps who had to be paid and we had to get all of that work together transition. Those people and on monday morning all of the work was done. Everyone was paid and they have reports on their desk. Wow i got a call from the lady who was head of hr and sent my goodness janice. How were you able to do this. And i explained that we used for her. What we use in our own company technologies that enable us to do that as she said we'd been working with this company for twelve years and they've never been able to give us some detail of reporting that you have here and they started to one conversations around how to buy my technology and my brother carlton said janice. Let's pause. don't sell them to technology. seldom service. Yeah i said carlton what are you. He said no. Don't sell your technology to them. Sell them the service and we went and had a different conversation with them and they became our first acceleration customer. And i guess. I should mention here. Jan that you miss your brother. Several members of your family actually work for for the company for act one. Absolutely my sister. Sandy was my first employee. And since then i went onto higher seven siblings into my business and they have just been incredible for all of those emotional and those of value support systems. That you need in place as you're growing business up. Everyone niece that. I needed that and i had that in siblings. Now one of the things that i insist it from my family members before they could come into my company is that they either had to work for three years in a larger company. Somewhere else or have three promotions before they could come to work for me. I wanted to make sure that they brought into my business. Some learning not just the ability to sustain for three years but the ability to have learned and have grown within someone else's organization and then bring that value into mind. I guess a certain point. This is like two thousand and seven two thousand eight. Your business is worth well over half a billion dollars by that point and you decide to merge with bernard's business with your husband's business tell me why. Why did that happen to. This was just the sort of the natural point to kind of bring your businesses together. When bernie ny were leaving a conference in san diego. We decided to take the scenic route back to la and we were having a discussion about our children. And i remember my brother had set to meet. Carlton had said you know janisch you and bernie have something that nobody else in this industry has and i asked him what he meant. He said well. You guys work from completely. Different sets of strengths often time. And if you were to combine that that could be dynamic in the industry and i thought that was nice and i mentioned it to bernie and bernie said that makes sense. I said but it's not enough to to to merge our companies and we talked more. And then i said you know burning. I think the thing that would make it interesting to remain. Is that our son not have to decide which one of us he wants to work for because by then our son was looking at our industry as a future for himself and he had worked in my company yet worked in his stats company as a kid. And i said bernie. I don't think he should have to make a choice. And it is a lot better secession. Planning for us to go ahead and do this now. Let's not have him have to do it later. And that was the decision that was thought around how we blend the companies je jess wandering looking back as as your company grew for for a long time. You were a minority within a minority you. You're a small company with big competitors your woman of color in an industry that was i'm assuming dominated by by white man Did you run into circumstances. A lot of circumstances where you you were judged because of who you are or or things were made much harder because of who you are very often very often I ran into that. I'll tell you candidly. And i'm not proud of it. There were times when i would gift my intelligence to other members of my team and have them go in and make a presentation or them. Make the pitch so that the client wouldn't have to in interact directly with me as an african american or as a female. But because you thought they wouldn't want to. In some instances. I thought it in other instances i knew it that if they saw an african american woman making the pitch they. They wouldn't want to work with you. I think the questioning and the scrutiny would be different. There would be more question of can we. Then how will we right. Whereas if i sent someone on my team in the questions around how are we going into. This happened a lot quicker in the conversation. And they're women who will tell you today that still the case how. How have you sort of grown as a leader. Over that time i mean were there things that you did earlier on that. Were mistakes that you learned from new thought. Well you know this is not the way to go. Certainly i've made mistakes The bigger of my mistakes were the mistakes. I made we are. I have held myself back because of things that were Late from my childhood and sometimes very active you know in businesses around the ism be racism or sexism or whatever but those have been where i think my bigger heiress have been made when you you say when you held yourself back by for example by not taking those meetings or by sending somebody else in your your place. What what other. What other ways to did you hold yourself back Holding myself back from a taking risks around expanding or investments. That weren't right in the core. Of what i'm doing but i always i always saw myself as you know driving in my lane and understanding where might lane us down. I mean i mean it sounds like even though you have incredible success by nature. Not a sort of a kamikaze risk taker. Well i'm not going to be the bull in a china shop. If that's what you're saying i'm not gonna rush through and you know break things on the way toward a higher goal Perhaps the one decision. I would change if a in my career would be that. I would forgive myself for being smart and being female a lot. Sooner everything else. I think has been integrated toward the good of a solid business. That has a strong feeling better today. Act one is either the largest or certainly one of the largest privately held women and minority owned workforce management companies in the us. Your you and your family owned this company. I believe a hundred percent outright. Say billion dollar business i mean. That's that's amazing. I mean it's just think about that for a moment. You came to la free two or three week trip and built a billion dollar business. It's a blessing. This is what we built. This is what all of the people who've really believed in me and trusted in me have built in in our company. We teach that they're five things you can't teach people can't teach people experience you can't teach people common sense. You can't teach people confidence. You cannot teach people anything if they don't wanna learn it and you can't teach him anything if they know it all and i think when i look at where you see the amazement in building a billion dollar In a price. I think is because those things that you can't teach i've learned how much of all that you've achieved. Do you think as because of the hard work you put in and your determination and your skill and how much just because of luck. I don't think luck had anything to do with it. I do believe that. I've been blessed. And i have received those blessings honoring them with hard work. All of the challenges all of the people all of the clients and applicants. My life has been colitis topic opportunity. I keep going back to to that moment. Where your mom told you to leave told you to go. She did. Your dad would want you to to pursue whatever it was that you were going to pursue and you didn't know what that was going to be right. I mean yeah. Kim magin with dad would make of this like his daughter running the largest women and minority owned business of this kind in the world. I mean what do you think he would. He would say or or or think i absolutely can imagine what dad was say or what. Dad would think my dad is the one who told us it was. Our attitude are aptitude. My dad was the one who told us. Education is freedom. My dad was the one who taught us that we wake up on purpose. You know and and and and i. I think about him so often and you can't not think about him when you're with mom. I was voted princess in high school. And i remember asking for new gown to wear on a float and dad said oh we can't afford it. We worked so hard for you guys. And i remember my mom putting her hand on my. He said no daddy called each other. Mommy and daddy. She said no. Daddy don't tell janice we work hard for our kids. We work hard because of the decisions we made. And i kept that in my mind is i built my business and i made a point never to tell my children. I don't work hard to give them what they want. I work hard because of the season. Kaik me you know and for main it's a joy it's a joy to i do. That's janice bride. How roy founder and ceo of one group and unfortunately we've got a sad update to the story earlier this year. Genesis husband bernard passed away. He'd been suffering from for several years and an interview. After his passing china's said quote i would never say bernie was the most perfect creature was the most perfect husband and he's left me well and thanks so much for listening to this show this week. You can subscribe wherever you get your podcast. You can also write to us at each abc. Npr dot org. And if you wanna follow us on twitter. We're at how. I built this or at cairo's in instagram. At guy dot ross please also remember to visit donate npr dot org slash built to give directly to a local npr member station. This episode was produced. By james dillon with music composed by teen arab. Louis thanks also to faira safari. Liz metzker darris. Tariff gaels julia carney. Jc howard neva grant and jeff rodgers guy rise. And you've been listening to how i built this. This is npr twenty twenty. Had a lot of his rethinking our lives twenty twenty one life. Kit wants to help you make those changes whether big or small all this january life kit will give you smart tips to think through your next decision. Listen now to the life kit. Podcast from npr. This message comes from. Npr sponsor the future-proof payments platform. Adian connects you with customers around the world and makes it simple to accept all kinds of payments in app online in store touch free and beyond with a single solution keep customers happy and your business growing with adnan business. Not boundaries. Visit a d. y. e. n. dot com slash. Npr to learn more.

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Pollinator Protectors

The Children's Hour

47:58 min | 1 year ago

Pollinator Protectors

"It helps us out a lot when you become a Patriot supporter. Find the children's hour podcasts. At Patriotair Dot com slash the children's hour and thank you. Why did the crab refuse to share her toys? I because she was shellfish. Children's PUP PUP PUP pup pup number worst at your best stinky mess. Oh Oh chocolate ice cream on your face blue ribbons mom or in last place. Oh you're odd ways big in small ways straight across matter what they say do for you and if you fell into a big black hole came out squeezed down in the small you know you my favorite singularity review Tom Machine who ran out of gas essential to the future and you had to the past. That would be insane. Yeah boop even that way. I'm telling you oh big and small way straight across. We read Yana Pink or matter what they say matter what you do in burn happy a free hard stone the is to see all they do is believe home. You know there's no test best you can but I don't pop up zip this say fanny pack put it in the pocket of Corduroy slacks. Whatever in matter now one thing change this fact I mean do take baths of course do that but all whatever you do them all. I'm for you bomb. Always that S- Elliot Park from a brand new CD called. Just be and I guess. We should start by saying hello to everyone in the studio. Hello everyone well. I am Katie Stone. This is the children's hour. I'M DELIGHTED TO BE WITH YOU TODAY. And right over here. Happy Day it's my high sch- Lucas. Hi It's Isaac. Hello it's Max. Hi It's Tania Hello Gabriella. Hi. It's David Hi. It's me A- highs call. Hello everyone. It's so nice to have you in our studio. We have a bunch of kids from the Albuquerque. Sign Language Academy and you can just give a shoutout woohoo the albuquerque sign-language Gabby at Albuquerque sign. You've got to be an and we also have an interpreter. Here who is doing interpretation in sign language? Hello to you interpreter. And she's saying hello. We are posting lots of stuff to our instagram and facebook. Pages at T. C. H. Radio. But I I'm kind of curious. Is there any news in the studio any news this week? Is My birthday owner you? I am officially eleven years old. Wow Eleven it's a prime number. You know the older you get the fewer prime numbers you turn so treasure this prime year. Do you have any big plans for eleven I mean I'm going have a sleepover. I guess okay all right. Well that's one way to start at eleven. Yeah I think I have a break. Dancing Season Conference later this afternoon. Seriously to mind during one of the songs demonstrating some. You're awesome break dancing for us in the studio. Maybe good luck with that. I hope it goes really well any other news in the studio no one else. Yeah Maya today. Is My friend's birthday party. Her birthday was like Thursday I think. Don't you love birth? What do you like to do birthday parties? I don't know laugh laugh. I think laughing's good well today on the show. It's an exciting show you folks from Albuquerque. Sign Language Kademi. You did some amazing stuff. The passing of a bill last year with a bunch of other kids. You're nodding your nodding or not income to the Mike. Talk to us a little bit about this. You passed a bill last year in our state government that protected pollinators. And we're GonNa talk more about you. Don't have to give too many details. But you know was a cool was a fun. Yes you made a difference in government and your kids right. How old are you? I'm twelve thirteen. I'm eleven thirteen is well. I am also thirteen. This was last year. So you're all a year younger and you actually made a big difference for protecting pollinators. And we'RE GONNA learn more about that and we're also going to learn about your school. Because can one of you come up to the Mike. And just explain your at the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy what. What does that mean really? Yeah go ahead. Language Academy is a school that helps people who have hard of hearing Family members are definitely members or those who are to help communicate with their family and it's a very diverse school and it allows access to anyone so you are not duff. You're shaking your head. No my mom. Stefo into the school so I could learn language so that I could communicate with her. I love that. We're GONNA talk more about your school and how it works. And today we're GonNa meet some unnamed see so Williams you if you've ever studied the civil rights era see so Williams is known to you because he was a civil rights icon and he took photographs. That were just amazing and his amazing photographs have they just. They helped change the whole message about the civil rights era. And we'RE GONNA learn a lot more about see so Williams and all of this is coming up on the children's hour you're listening to the children's hour which is kids public radio. This is Jim Stoltz now when I was just about all the murder and the butterflies and the Panini Louise Tuck onto the withdrawal of bugs and the bees and mom's data. What's with this kid? There's at among don't flip you just stop. He's a kid for the. Why airs grew a hit the woods because walking out them? And if you use a little good just be mean or what they'll toll-free echo bonner here and watch the deer run a cheese the rabbits chipmunks to win the habits MOMS to the data. I'm afraid year ask Demaim justice style. I like things the way. They are not inside. Cages are plastic jars to see things running three and a half the idea. They are meant to be. There's more to life than just TB either the rivers and the mountains and the clouds and me. It's just stacked kid back. Quitters grizzly bears and spotted at all desert. Hares and I can't understand the big money man. She started on the home change a land they have a. Rajon live own distinct Jimmy Gobble their extinction just my style. I'm a kid for the why places where there ain't no rules you can listen to the quickest hop and untold. It's all right there. Even in the air the wildernesses or something so precious Ray Moore wages dome scene. Let's get together really stacked decatur. Just starting from a kid got guests out. Always have this. Thurs clean water in an air. You know the earth comes first. Let's see the mountains and trees. That's keeping wild and keep it free and when your parents tell you go to bed and close the door and now the has say it just dial we got a kid? Yeah it's just that style. We got a kid. The kid both alive while Jim Stoltze. You are tuned to the children's hour right here And we are broadcasting from the sunspots solar studio and in the studio with us our kids from the wild friends of New Mexico and We we need to start at square one. Lukasz has our first question. What is wild friends? it's a program that works with schools across New Mexico to teach students about how our state government works and about New Mexico wildlife and so far it has been working in schools for almost thirty years. Wow thirty years yeah. How many schools are associated with wild friends around twelve? Wow and are they. All schools of all ages like elementary all the way through high school. Is that how it works? Yes yes okay. Yeah Yeah and and talk to us a little bit about what you did last year. Can someone describe what you did last year? What your effort was last year. We went to the roundhouse. Okay the roundhouse here in New Mexico just for those who do not live in. New Mexico is our state government Capitol building. What happened at the roundhouse last year? What were you working on? We were trying to? You're voting for license plate. Let License Plate. Did you choose to vote for so last year at legislature? We tried to pass a bill that would have license plates that would protect pollinators and the one that was voted was a student at our school. Jaslyn Smith and she I don't know the specific butterfly nor flower but it was a very beautiful picture. And that's going to be on the license plate and yeah go ahead Maya. How do these license plates protect pollinators? The funding from the license plates will go to the New Mexico Department of Transportation to plant native flowers and grasses along state roads and also create educational gardens with Signs at rest stops. Why did you choose the pollinator license plate? So last year we were told about the license plate and we could either choose a license plate or write a bill so the students chose to feed a license plate and then we submitted drawings to be on the license plate. Wow that's pretty neat and what it takes to get this license plate through the legislature. What actually did you guys have to do who we were talking to some legislators and telling them about our bill and quite issue to consider choosing the license plate. And what arguments did you make when you were talking to the representatives and the Senate senators did they understand the connection between the license plate and the pollinators. And what arguments did you make about that? one thing that we informed them about is that Paul it is important to protect the pioneers because they pollinate one third of our crops and they pollinate ninety percent of our wild plants. The license plate now exists. Is that right? Is it something that people who are driving cars and New Mexico? They can opt in to getting this license plate. How will that make difference the whole plan with the license? Plate is just to create More native plants to plant more and it will bring back more of the Sort of like the native things. I'm a car driver and if I decided I wanted this license plate and I picked this license plate. I have to pay for a license plate. Is that because some of the money from the license plate goes to these efforts on yes so as Gabriella said before the money would go to the New Mexico. Department of Transportation and it would plant educational gardens at rest stops and along highways to create More native plants and bring back more of our native species. Well let's hear it for the wild friends of New Mexico. Thank you so much for being with us today. On the children's are and congratulations on your license. Plate Heroes Amen offers one with the little sable that heroes too and you and me one to with a little you can do. That's where it grab. A sweater has some extra saw more favored Mazi ricky here. This sorry ricky. I think she meant hat. You sure now as I can crawl up here and keep you dyson cozy no she manhattan are- Planet Heroes Brave Andrew Omaha and you pandy one two. Oh you that's not bad com and mail it up and up and down off the water. Don't waste down JAE sources our waste water really ours heroes and and and you can one to who can be a planet roads to light. Children's hour is produced by the children's Hour Incorporated a New Mexico nonprofit dedicated to producing high quality kids. Public radio support is provided by listeners. Just like you find out more. At Children's our DOT ORG support provided by electric play house and all ages playhouse filled with food and Family Entertainment. Electric playhouse encourages healthy active. Play using technology to bring people together. The first play house is now open in Albuquerque New Mexico more at electric playhouse dot com. Talk Radio report into to be wild done by chickens. Right here on the children's hour where else but the children's our in our studio today we have kids from the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy and we have their interpreter here and she's interpreting for the kids so and parents and people in the room who are deaf so that they can here. And I really curious about the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy and I would love to talk with you about what it's like and I know our kids in our studio have questions for you to how many kids go to your school. Our school is very small So we have about one hundred Right now I don't know the specific number but in your school is kindergarten through twelfth grade. Yes is everyone at your school duff. No no okay. Can you talk about what made you choose a school if you're not deaf that's a Sign Language Academy I go to the school because my stirs hard of hearing does she speak sign language Yes she signs neath. Yeah and call you go to the school to Yes ma'am and You're are you deaf? I am hard of hearing design language. Help you understand. Yes how do you learn things like math with sign language? Yeah please come right here Mike. So we have different classes and it's distributed by levels and Sometimes most of the time some. Yeah so our teachers are bilingual. So they do No sign language and they do Speak and so They do seem calm. So that means that you are talking and signing at the same time so for those who are hearing or who have trouble hearing or deaf The teacher will be signing for them while they will also be communicating Verbally so that Kids who are Hard OF HEARING. Also get practice with Speech if you were to be in a room with everyone just speaking sign-language after going to the school. Do you feel like you'd understand what everybody's saying. Yes yes. That's an enthusiastic. Yes wow did any of you speak sign language before coming into the school. Yes partially part is so I didn't know how to sign but we did have home science so home. Signs are Signs that you create with your family at home so that you can understand what they're saying even if you don't know sign language itself. Oh fascinating if there is something you would say to describe your school. How would you describe your school to somebody? Different and diverse diverse in many ways Both in hearing kids and not hearing kids and kids of all different ethnicities deafness doesn't necessarily impact or are hard of hearing nece doesn't really matter what your race or anything is. It can hit anybody right and do you all have deaf people in your family. Is that right? No Okay I. I'm hard of hearing. Oh You yourself are and did your family speak sign language all the time to you from the time you were little and come right into your microphone. No they didn't. That's why I went to the school and now I'm able by sister. No sign language so I'm able to communicate with her parents learning to yes. That's pretty neat. Does the school to help teach your parents yet have clashes? Thank you so much for explaining your school to us. It's called the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy and this is a school based here in Albuquerque. New Mexico my guess is. Are there schools like the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy around the country? There's more around the country but in New Mexico we have to. Which is this one and in Santa Fe the deaf school? But I'm seeing your principle sitting here in the audience SPEC here he's shaking his head and saying no. There are not very many schools like this around the country This is the only albuquerque. Something Rich Academy ever so in Albuquerque but there are a few different schools that do provide on sign language classes but those schools are limited to only sign language. So here The Albuquerque's academy it really helps kids learn language. But also those kids who are mute or who Don't really speak they. We also have Speech like therapy within so that they can also develop speech. Well thank you all so much for being with us on the children's hour and If folks want to learn more about the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy do you know the website it's Asl Academy Dot Com Asl Academy Dot Com and maybe more schools like this will come up all over the country? Do you think that would be a good thing? Why yes because Just seeing the impact. That has here and the access to children because we don't only have children who are deaf and hard of hearing we also have kids with special need and we provide things that they need to. It's also good to have these types of school Around the world because There are some places where they are limited and I think they should have full access. Thank you so much we have from the Academy Me Call David Gabriella Latonya and Max thank you so much for being with us on the children's hour today Q. Two schools in the class. Where the little ones want. No all the dreams and their little hands cue to the Church Gym bag where they always seem WanNa know. Are we all of us a few the size along we belong to the long the heart's on and you will see? Sometimes love will see some times. Life can be so strange knows. Donald sold around fans share potatoes. This rose and share and you will see sometimes life can be so a and you will see some times alive candy. Certain the hands on the moon from the hands Understand sometimes you see that on. May I two no no one alive as meaning when everything goes wrong? You see some. This is moments of the movement civil rights and change in America. I'm Lonnie Bunch. The founding director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American history and culture the images of the civil rights movement captured by its photographers remain. Some of its most important and lasting records. Thanks to the work of the men and women on the front lines with the camera. Orangeburg South Carolina native see so Jay Williams learned of his love of taking pictures as soon as he held his first hand-me-down Kodak Baby Brownie. He set out taking pictures of the nascent. Movement in Orangeburg became a correspondent for jet magazine at the young age of fifteen and made national news after taking some key images after the nineteen sixty. Eight orangeburg massacre. I came to State College and right in front of Claflin cannot get any follow because they were police authorities blocking there so I found no way to be able to get onto the campus college on that particular evening late I would find out that my being unable to get there probably saved my life because doing the night that the students have built a bonfire. Nine highway patrolman started creeping up onto the campus of state college and they started firing their shotguns into a crowd of about two hundred and fifty students. Three students were later found to be killed. You had about twenty seven injured and you have Perhaps mini more. Some of whom have never come forward that also receive a fair amount of injuries the morning after the massacre. I got my car job to the State College campus and there was an eerie atmosphere surrounding the ear where the students were the night before. And where the killings taking place. This is about six thirty seven o'clock in the morning and I noticed that the maintenance stroke from the campus had Iraq they were picking up all of the debris to clean up the area so I looked down I saw shotgun shells and other debris spread all over the ear where the students had been killed and I started picking those shows up and putting me in my pockets oppose the pitch of a student holding the shelves and I think I had about seven or eight or nine shelves later. Ethel. My picture appears in I think time and Newsweek newspapers all the United States the federal investigation confiscated the shells from me and they later we used as a trial is developed. Try To patrolman and they lead the shells that I picked up to coming from. Nine Highway Patrolman. Who would actually fire on and kill the students as it turned out trial in Florence South Carolina. The old ninety highway patrolman found not guilty and this incident came to be known as the massacre. Because that's exactly what it was. They were defenseless. They didn't have any weapons and tool. Today it's also unfortunately and one of the stories about things happening this that many publications and people really don't know about all histories were conducted by the southern Oral History Program in the Center for the study of the American south at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on behalf of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American history and culture and the Library of Congress with support from the corporation for public broadcasting online at new visions new voices dot. Williams still lives in the town where he was born. Orangeburg South Carolina. And he's still working as a professional photographer he ran for. Us Senate in one thousand nine hundred four and again in one thousand nine hundred six but he was defeated in both elections and he freelanced for jet magazine when he was just fourteen years old he went on to have his work appear in the New York Times. The Associated Press the Pittsburgh Courier. Numerous other publications carry his work. He's produced two documentary films. Freedom and justice in Nineteen ninety-six and out of the box in Dixie and two thousand six and he has written six books he also trained as an architect in college and one of his plans for a residence appeared in the June. Nineteen seventy seven issue of Ebony. Magazine was called the space age home. His iconic photos shifted the narrative of the civil rights movement. You can learn a lot more about him by going to his website see so Williams dot com The children's hour is produced by the Children's Hour Incorporated nonprofit dedicated to producing high-quality kids public. Radio you can find out more. At CHILDREN'S OUR DOT. Org Meal Wolf is a proud supporter of the children's tower. Y'All wolf creates immersive experiences that transport audiences of all ages into kaleidoscopic realms of story and exploration meow Wolf Dot Com listening to college I'm GonNa take that right merchants town. Can you hear the sound? I'm GonNa take that anger and turn it around and into that Dow into town. Can you hear the sound? I'm going take that and turn it around. And into I'M GONNA take that ministry and righted. Can you hear the sound? I'm going to St me and turn it around into. I'm GONNA feel right March into town. Can you know God say that? Fear to neither round into into stories into turned into goes to no clue township bus goes on in the bus. There were two. Englishmen came to Englishmen. They were saying they were saying Bus goes to town ship. Bus goes to township in the past. There were two Chinese girls in the bus were to Chinese. They were saying they were saying bus goes to township US GOES TO TOWNSHIP INDEP US. There were two Spanish voice in the buzz word. Twos they were saying they were saying Schools ship US goes to town in their bus. There weren't Japanese girl in their bones. Were two Japanese. They were saying money going saying Gee wa Wa going. Oh School Stu Township Buzz goes to town to Indian voice in the bus. There were two boys they were saying there were a number that was lou. Bus spy follow a grammy nominee from twenty nineteen from a CD called. We stood up reflections on the civil rights movement. That was Rodney Wittenberg and Palatine with love and during the break was the Carolina chocolate drops with their snowden. Jig We all need more kindness in this world is so true and also that was Guy Davis and the piece on C. so Williams was produced by moments of the movement rights and change in America and way back when you heard Nina Simone. Please don't let me. Be Misunderstood quizzes. The children's our kids public radio the children's hours written and produced by Katie Stone at the sunspots solar studios in Albuquerque New Mexico podcasts. Show information and more can be found at children's our dot org here the children's hour nationwide on more than fifty stations in twenty five states. Many thanks to all of you from the Albuquerque Sign Language Academy for being with US Today on the show and also many thanks to Susan George From Wild Friends of New Mexico project of the University of New Mexico Law School. And we're going to go out with a song. Laura marling from seaney called semper. The Meena. We'll catch you next time for another edition of the Children's hour hum put my hands in me. I might be some might be some But I was wild and I can't forget it I was chasing stone. The Martha feels the guy who knows a remember that. There's something is something you explore. A explore the If you don't try sit down to explain and you're constantly skiing you and does not understand is not. The children's hour is listener supported kids public radio produced by the Children's Hour Incorporated in New Mexico nonprofit dedicated to producing high-quality kids public radio. You can find out more. At CHILDREN'S OUR DOT. Org Support is also provided by the county of Bernallio New Mexico. Burn Co Dot Gov and from the Infinite Gesture Fund at the Albuquerque Community Foundation support also provided by the living refund. You can find our podcast photos from our shows. Our social media feeds and lots more info. At Children's our dot Org are music is written by C K Barlow. We'll catch you next time. For another edition of the children's Hour Jill dougherty.

Albuquerque Sign Language Acad New Mexico Albuquerque Jay Williams Sign Language Academy United States Asl Academy Dot Com Asl Academ Katie Stone Patriotair Dot New Mexico Department of Trans Orangeburg Language Academy David Gabriella Latonya University of New Mexico Law S Senate South Carolina David Hi jet magazine