8 Burst results for "Jessica Heckman"

"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

09:03 min | 3 months ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"The animal is putting the smell on his own body in order to take it to show it to his friends so maybe with wolves. Be that a wolf goes out and finds a good kill and wants to role in it to bring it back to show the other wolves. Oh, there's something tasty here or maybe he wants to role in the P. from invading wolf that really shouldn't be his territory to bring it back and show the other wolves but we just don't know for sure we can't ask. Them and it's really hard to use studies about that I was very lucky to be at Wolf Park one week when a dog scientists who does a faction research so he studies about smell and how dogs smell and what kinds of smells they're good at smelling and he did this study where he put different smells out there on the ground for wolves to smell. Role in them, and then he would test to see if when they went back to see their other friends if there are other friends would sniff them more or less, and he just didn't find any. Chance from that study we were all really sad because we were hopeful that it would have told us something. So we don't know it's a great question by the way. Wolf Park is a place in Indiana where people can see wolves and where researchers can study them. Coming up more answers to your dog questions. This is why a For curious kids, I'm Jane Lynch home. Today we're answering your dog questions with veterinarian and Dog Scientists Jessica Heckman earlier in this episode, we heard from Alex in Virginia. He has another question about his own dog. Why does my valley came purple in The Sun? I. Think that probably sounds like it's a bad sunburn honestly if it is if your dog is lying out in the sun. And his back, and then his belly turns purple I would try to keep him out of being in that much sun. You know either way it might be worth talking to your veterinarian about it to see exactly what's going on it's not the southern is the only thing I can come up with, but but it is possible for to get sunburned Oh. Sure. Sure. Yeah there's the. Chinese crested breed is mostly hairless and they have to wear Suntan lotion just like the rest of us they just just like you don't get sunburned. Scalp where you have hair, they don't tend to get sunburned where they have for. But if you expose them a lot of sun and they don't have thorough protecting them. Yeah absolutely. They'll get sunburned. Hi My name is Oliver in six years old I'm from. New Jersey. and. My question is why do dogs don't sweat? Auden. Dogs actually do sweat they sweat in a different place than you do they sweat on the pads of their feet. So if your dog if it's a really hot day, you might notice that your dog leaves little footprints when he walks around and that would be the sweat coming off of the pads of his feet but they also unlike us blow off heat through their tongues. So when It's really hot out in your dog pants. That's sort of like sweating. He's doing the same kind of thing is sweating trying to get rid of that excess heat so and you'll see as he gets hotter that he'll hang his tongue longer and longer longer, and then as it gets really hot out, he will actually spread out the tip of his tongue into what we call a shovel shape. So if your dog starts getting what we call the long tongue than he definitely needs to take a break from any exercise that he's having needs to have some water and he needs to get either into some shade or into the a AC because he is getting too hot and you need to take care of him. We've had a lot of science questions about dogs, bodies and why their bodies do the things that they do. But my son asked this question my name is delayed I Live Mountain Mont on three years old and my question is. Why dogs not fans with cats with some dogs are rate some dogs like cats and so I used to have dogs and cats who live together. Very nicely. So there's a couple of things going on with dogs who don't like cats. One thing that cats tend to be smaller than dogs and dogs. Their ancestors are predators. So even though we feed dogs and they don't have to go hunt, they still have some of those instincts, some of the more than others to chase small things, and so they have those instincts. If this is a little thing, maybe I want to see if I want to chase it and that can obviously go wrong either if the cat runs away, then the dog learns to chase cats or if the cat turns around and defense herself than the dog might learn that cats are scary and might in the future either be afraid of them or bark at them or be aggressive towards them. But the other thing that's going on. Is that you know why do some dogs learn that cats aren't pray and that we shouldn't act like predators towards them and that generally because those dogs have met cats when they were very young. So when when animals are really little on, this is true of humans to whatever we learn that is around us. That's normal. We assume as we grew up that's normal. So if when you have a little puppy, you expose him to cats and he learns these are nice friendly things that I shouldn't chase. I should be friends with then as he's an adult, it'll be very easy for him to meet new cats and be friends with them as well, and that's not just cats right that strange people strange things people who addressed funny like the mailman funny things like bicycles and skateboards are all things that dog should meet when they're really little so that they are not surprising and scary as they grow up. So is that kind of also where the phrase dogs can't learn new tricks comes from that new Things are going to be scarier confusing to an older dog who wasn't exposed to it as a puppy. Yeah. Yeah I. Think Definitely, it's easier for really young dog to learn new things about the environment. But the of course, the dog can't learn new tricks phrasing as is a bit wrong because we'll certainly can be trained and they certainly can be trained to learn new tricks but it is a little harder them to learn that something that they've always thought his scary is actually not scary it can. Be Done it just takes a lot more work with an adult dog than with a baby dog. Jessica says we love our dogs but she has spent a lot of time thinking about how dogs behave and what might be going on inside their brains and she has one final thing she wants us to keep in mind when we're interacting with our dogs. Sometimes, we think that our dogs I mean I don't I don't want to say that we treat them quite like a stuffed animal, but I am definitely. Fall, prey to this feeling of like. Well, I want to pet my dog right now and so clearly it's time for me to pet my dog and obviously my dog will want to be petted because he's a dog and he always to be petted but it's you know they don't want to cuddle with us every moment of every day just like if you were. Out Playing and having fun with your friends and your mom said come over and sit with me right now come into my lap and let's cuddle. You'd say that's crazy. I'm doing something else. I'm not interested in cuddling right now and dogs have that same perception of the world that they have their own stuff going on and they love us and they love cuddling with. US and most of them loved being petted but not necessarily every time and so trying to think about the dogs perception can be really useful and just saying you know if I'm going to pet him and he's not really into it then maybe I'll put an hour and just thinking about him as a as a little creature with his own perception on his own. World can be really useful in his heart for all of us not just kids but adults to remember never approach a dog. You don't know and pay attention to what your dog's body language is trying to tell you as Jessica told us at the very beginning of this episode just because dog is wagging its tail doesn't mean it's feeling happy or that it wants hug. I mentioned my dog Oliver earlier and his love for rolling around in anything that smells particularly disgusting to me. I may not love that behavior but having a dog in our life has been so much fun for my family. We get out into the woods with him every day, and we get to run around and sniff things with him and try to figure out what he's pointing at sea something in the bushes and we sleep with him at night, and he's really just a big furry part of our family. Tell me about the dogs in your life or the cats remember we have a whole episode about cats that we're releasing at the very same time as this one, all about our feline friends. So make sure you listen to that one too. Now as always if you have a question about the world around you or about history or politics or friendship or well anything, send it to us have an adult record you using a smartphone, tell us your first name where you live and how old you are and what your question is. Then have your adult, send it to questions at. But why kids dot Org we will do our best to get an answer for you. But why is produced by melody, Bo debt and me Jane Lindholm Vermont Public Radio. Our theme music is by Luke Reynolds we'll be back in two weeks with an episode that takes this idea of pets and runs with. We'll talk to a guy named housekeepers who tries to figure out how animals and humans interact. So be sure to tune in for that one and.

Jessica Heckman Wolf Park Oliver Jane Lynch Indiana Jane Lindholm Vermont Public R Luke Reynolds Live Mountain Mont US Virginia New Jersey. Auden Alex
"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, , you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. . In this episode, we're , talking all about dogs. . Now, if , you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. . But in this episode, , we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. . Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. . Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. . Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. . Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. . Why did Adopt Tales <unk> That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why ? what we use it for? ? So dogs ancestors, , wolves, , ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then . and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, , right? ? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running <hes>, , but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So . that's another good reason they have tails. . They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. . So with dogs a tale, it's , really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. . Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, , we try to look at the whole dog, , not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. . Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why ? would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. . They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. . We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. . A. . Wagging. . Tail. . It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. . And sometimes, , I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. . So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and , you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, , six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. . Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for <hes> horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. . Into hooves. . So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. . Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, , and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. . So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, , they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way. .

Jessica Heckman researcher
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Vermont Margot Jane Lindholm Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, , you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. . In this episode, we're , talking all about dogs. . Now, if , you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. . But in this episode, , we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. . Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. . Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. . Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. . Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. . Why did Adopt Tales <unk> That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why ? what we use it for? ? So dogs ancestors, , wolves, , ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then . and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, , right? ? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running <hes>, , but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So . that's another good reason they have tails. . They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. . So with dogs a tale, it's , really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. . Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, , we try to look at the whole dog, , not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. . Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why ? would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. . They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. . We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. . A. . Wagging. . Tail. . It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. . And sometimes, , I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. . So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and , you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, , six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. . Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for <hes> horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. . Into hooves. . So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. . Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, , and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. . So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, , they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way. .

Jessica Heckman researcher
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 3 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Jane Lindholm Margot Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:11 min | 3 months ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"You WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not.

Jessica Heckman researcher
"jessica heckman" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"Is thinly Mecca. I'm ten nine years old. Why are the deer headed and apple attitude? I didn't know this until Finlay sent us her question. But there are two kinds of Wawa A- and Finley has one of each peanut has a round head like an apple and Maggie has sloped head like a baby deer. Vinnie told us that she's curious. About why their heads look so different. I think the answer to this question might be something about the GNA I don't really know yet. So I think I know the answer there were once two brother. chihuahuas one film of the deer and the other with an apple to get the real answer Finley's question. I called up a scientist who studies dogs and is a real dog lover herself. Fits your babies that Jessica Heckman. Our interview had three listeners. Who you might hear clicking their nails and panting her dogs Jenny meet Dash and Fitz who is just getting settled into his new life? Yesterday I adopted a third dog from a shelter and we have named him fits and he's a very good dog doc. And he's very happy to be here. So basically Jessica's a dog person and a dog scientist. It's good to both definitely. She's fascinated needed by what makes dogs look and behave the way that they do. She told me that. The answer to Finley's questions start with why we have dogs in the first place place. The story begins tens of thousands of years ago. What we currently think happened? Is that around round. Let's say twenty thousand years ago. There were some animals that were sort of like dogs and sort of like wolves and some group of them figured out that they could get food more easily by hanging out near his. That's because wherever humans were there were food scraps. Thank everybody who has a dog knows how this works throw food on the floor. Doug comes cleans it up. You don't have to clean the floor and these animals figured out of dog. Wolves figured out. Hey if I'm willing to go eat from human trash then it's much easier than going. Hunting scientists are still trying to figure out if this happened in just one place or or if it happened in many places in many times but dogs became domesticated or team enough to.

Finley Jessica Heckman apple scientist Finlay Mecca Vinnie Fitz Doug Maggie
"jessica heckman" Discussed on Outside/In

Outside/In

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"jessica heckman" Discussed on Outside/In

"This. This. Okay. So essentially there is no difference between here for it's all basically the same stuff. So this is Jessica Heckman. She's with the broad institute of Harvard MIT down. It's it's a genomics type place, but she also has her own blog called dog zombie. She's very into dog breeding and genetics. When we talk about hair versus for what we're really talking about is that some dogs have two layers. They have an undercoat and then they have guard hairs and the real. The real difference when we talk about dogs that are hairy dogs is that they don't have the undercoat and there's basically one gene like they've, they've sequenced the genome of dogs, and there's one gene that turns that on and off and that. So it's it's just a mutation that happened and it happened long before we started to breed dogs for it. And we know this because there's this thing called the village. Dog which is considered sort of like the dog. It's like the dog before we started messing with them and seeing this dog. Yeah. Well, they're, they're different ones all over the world, but okay, but but but you are right? Like they have kind of distinctive look. It's kind of just like it's like essence of dog. Yeah, and and there are village dogs in different parts of the world, and some of them have no undercoat and some of them have an undercoat so I would imagine, and I don't know this for sure, but I would guess that this lack of the undercoat would be advantageous in hotter parts of the world in that if you looked at village dogs in hotter parts of the world, that more of them would have a single coat and that if you looked at them in cooler parts of the world, that more of them would have the, I don't know that for sure. It's just a guess, but topples work fun. Fun fact hairs Carrington, right. And Carrington in different species turns into all sorts of craziness. So porcupine quills are technically hair and penguins scales than we note a pangolin is. You should Google pangolin. They're an endangered species and they get trafficked all the time. It's kind of sad because they're kind of cool. It's like a ant eater Armadillo. Yeah. And and and instead of like plates like armadillos plates, the penguin has these like scales that are sort of like leaves that's care him. It's the same style. Our DNA as creatures in the world is very good at taking the same stuff and doing lots of different things with it that we didn't call different names. And that's the difference with between hereon vertu is, you know, basically the same thing. Nature is amazing. All right. What else we got. Hi, this is MAry calling from eating Ville Washington, and I'm wondering why there are aquatic mammals in Vivian spread tiles and semi aquatic birth, but there are no terrestrial fish. Thanks, bye. What was that even look like? Yeah, isn't it true that there are terrestrial fish, isn't there like the mud skipper thing like live outside of water for a little while. And they sort of like crawl along in the mud yet question, is it moving on? But I feel like like in textbooks when you're talking about evolution, there's always that picture of a fish like walking out of the water, and that's how it have. You know what I mean? Does that an textbook or the New Yorker that might be a New Yorker graduation? Yeah, but and like in my imagination of volition, it starts with him. Fibia NHS, yeah, we were all water things. Right? And then we were thing that could be in both yet, and then we're an amphibian that lived more and more time on land like a toad yet. And then we were people pretty much that's the order. That guy in that gear Modell tour movie. What do you think he was of the shape of water. He needed water to survive terrestrial fish, terrestrial fish, I think since we call someone, yeah. I also think Google knows the answer to this question, but it will be one that's more satisfactorily answered by somebody who knows a ton about fish and can tell us lots of cool fish facts. Fish. So the premise of the question was that there are no terrestrial fish, but of course, this ignores the most famous terrestrial fish, the lung fish. Taylor. You're going to play some tape for me. Sorry. I didn't. I didn't like this is a long pause. Nothing to say. All right. Hold on. Yeah. The well, the lung fish fish has lung, so does Melanie knee. She is the curator officials at the American Museum of natural history in New York City there, three strands. We get African South American in Australian lung fish and all of them. It's an adaptation to drought like they'll live in these really like small bodies of stagnant water that dry up. The African lung fish, the water will drive completely and it'll burrow under the mud and lived there for like two years with no water.

Carrington Melanie knee Jessica Heckman Google institute of Harvard MIT NHS Ville Washington Taylor New York City American Museum of natural two years