24 Burst results for "Jessi Hempel"

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on Weekend News

Weekend News

00:31 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on Weekend News

"Maria Garcia. There are three things not 11 45 1 that scrambled to get the Copa. That scene continues in New York. And the supplies continue to dwindle at local hospitals to New York City now offering covert vaccinations for seniors 65 over at night just centers and three police across country considering domestic extremists. A significant threat as Inauguration week kicks off tomorrow. Governor Cuomo says the city deserves an apology from Mayor de Blasio and the NYPD. That is after a state attorney general Tish James, filed a lawsuit against the NYPD over its handling of civil rights protests last summer articulation with more governor Cuomo says the deadline for the city's police reform plan is only nine weeks away. Plan. He says he hasn't heard any discussion about and it's not just critical because of April 1. It's critical because the increasing crime is compounding the problems in New York City. Yes, you have co Vered. Yes, you have increasing homelessness. Yes, you have people who are concerned about the long term economic viability and you have increasing crime. You are not going to have a strong economy If you don't get the crime issue under control. Governor Cuomo's criticisms of the NYPD is handling of the summer protests didn't even include the hundreds of businesses that were vandalized and looted. Later On Friday, Mayor de Blasio announced a new discipline matrix for the NYPD. A court process doesn't help US speed reform that often in my view. Slows it down. We're gonna move forward reforms. We are announcing what I think will revolutionize the police disciplinary process that disciplinary matrix that will make clear exactly what the range of penalties are. Or any offensive when a police officer does something wrong. Christi COLLISION WCBS news radio 8 80 businesses are wrestling with the best ways to get an entire workforce vaccinated here, CBS Stu Kate. And should companies make a covert vaccine mandatory for workers. Nearly half of the people who wait in said Yes. Do make it mandatory, Jessi Hempel of linked in says in that company's survey of users on the question, 40% said no Financial incentives, like the one offered by dollar general to its employees might be an answer the balance years to provide the incentives that Aaron going to encourage them to do the right thing in the name of science for public health well, also allowing them to feel that they are making the decision. Steve Cave and CBS News It's 11 48 WCBS on it's time again for traffic.

New York City Governor Cuomo Nypd Mayor De Blasio United States Maria Garcia CBS Jessi Hempel Steve Cave Vered Tish James Stu Kate Attorney Officer Aaron
Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

01:22 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Hodges was one of the law enforcement members who was attacked that day. He says he wasn't that surprised at the events that unfolded. We've been seeing this kind of talk for years now. Thies kind of people that just believe whatever. Certain leaders tell them And so, yeah, I could believe it. It Z unfortunate that it became a reality that a new report from the Washington Post says three days before the march on Internal Capitol Police Intelligence report warned of a violent scenario in which Congress itself could be the target. And as investigation into the siege continues. Prosecutors now backing away from initial claims that there was strong evidence the writer's aim to capture and assassinate Elected officials, the head of the investigation now cautioning that there's no direct evidence. That's the case. President elect Joe Biden laid out a near $2 billion plan to deal with covert yesterday. CBS NEWS WAGES, Young reports Mr Biden has long said the Corona virus crisis is intertwined with the economic emergency. This week. He also released a $1.9 trillion relief package He's urging lawmakers to pass more than half of the fund's would provide direct relief with $1400 stimulus checks. A new increase in unemployment insurance from 300 to $400 a week and a higher child tax credit. Mr Biden is also pushing to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Fighting continues with the goal of vaccinating 100 million people in 100 days. His incoming chief of staff is in contact with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Regarding this stimulus bill, businesses are beginning to wrestle with the best way to get their workforces vaccinated. And a new survey looks into how employers are leaning. CBS is Steve case, Ethan has more Should companies make a covert vaccine mandatory for workers, nearly half of the people who waited and said yes. Do make it, man. Batory Jessi Hempel of linked in says in that company's survey of users on the question, 40% said no financial incentives like the one offered by dollar general to its employees might be an answer The balance years to provide the incentives that are incorrect going to encourage them to do the right thing in the name of science for public health well, also allowing them to feel that they are making the decision. Steve Case and CBS News Austin's federal appeals court sides with environmentalists and has put a temporary stop to construction of a massive transmission line corridor in Maine. Your stubble UBC Sherry small after protests from environmental groups of federal court puts a halt to the construction of a $1 billion transmission corridor through Maine. The 145 mile transmission line has been touted by Central Maine power and its corporate parent often grid As a boon to energy, the environment and the economy in northern New England. It is slated to bring Canadian hydropower to the New England grid. But many environmentalists rallied against the project. On Friday, the U. S Court of Appeals for the first circuit in Boston halted the first section of construction while the environmental groups appeal against the project is still pending. Sherry Small WBZ Boston's news radio. On Eastern teen is raising autism awareness and raising funds to benefit local autistic Children in the name of her sister, the believe busies Kempton, a cliff, reports 17 year old Haley cut burned, decided to focus. Her senior project at Oliver Aims High school on raising awareness about autism. That's because she has a younger sister, who was on the autism spectrum. Basically my whole life. I've seen her struggle and it comes making friendships at school. I've always wanted to do a big project to raise awareness for a lot. A year Now. As part of Hayley's project, she created a fundraiser selling T shirts and sweatshirts that include the picture of a blue puzzle piece, which represents autism. Half of the funds raised will go to purchase sensory integration toys for Children with autism in Eastern that could be his toys like the stiffest spinners, Little clicking but employs my sister like those it could be way to blanket so far she's raised over $1000 Kevin Tonic left WBZ Boston's news from Video. A new bill doesn't fix the problem, but at least now you'll know when you're swimming in raw sewage that believe easy's Karen Regal explains. Governor Baker signed the bill that will require sewage systems that discharge in the bodies of water in the Commonwealth to notify the public when that happens. This is an issue with their one senator Diana dissolve. Leo has been working on for a while, as this has been an issue along the Merrimack. The next step, she says, is to upgrade the infrastructure. Our step in. You know what I hope will be a continued effort to protect our rivers. Not just locally but statewide. Karen Regal WBZ Boston's news radio, Rhode Island residents be wary of scammers posing as utility bill collectors state a G and national grid or warning presidents that there's been an uptick and reported scam attempts targeting electric and natural gas customers by phone. In the most recent one, an automated message claiming to be from national grid tells people their power will be shut off in 30 to 40 minutes unless they make an immediate payment by Phone again. This is a scam. It's 2 51 listening to.

Boston Joe Biden Maine CBS Steve Case Karen Regal Thies Hodges Washington Post New England U. S Court Of Appeals Jessi Hempel Mitch Mcconnell Congress Sherry Small
Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:35 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Should companies make a covert vaccine mandatory for workers, nearly half of the people who waited and said yes do make it mandatory, Jessi Hempel of linked in says in that company's survey of users on the question, 40% said, no. Financial incentives, like the one offered by dollar general to its employees might be an answer the balance years to provide the incentives that Aaron Credit going to encourage them to do the right thing in the name of science for public health well, also allowing them to feel that they are making the decision. Steve CASE and CBS News Governor Baker signs a bill that will let you know when you're swimming and raw sewage. Let's find out about this. From WBC's Karen Regal with you and Senator Diane. It is all clear has been working on. It has wanted this bill to become law for a while. It requires two which facilities to notify the public when they need to discharge raw sewage into waterways, something that has been an issue along the Merrimack River. She and other lawmakers said. Family should know family trips to the beach or taking their animals down to the river. Going on in their kayaks going on in their boats, or just going for a family swim? Didn't wanna make sure that as our beach and it's all very beach from island on all along the Meramec River in the first half success of candy on you know this is something statewide as well that residents are informed that they have the tools they need to make informed decisions. The next step. Upgrading infrastructure. Karen Regal WBZ Boston's news.

Karen Regal Merrimack River Senator Diane Jessi Hempel Meramec River WBC Aaron Credit Steve Case Governor Baker CBS Family Boston
Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on Weekend News

Weekend News

01:36 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on Weekend News

"New Hyde Park, Long Island City, and here in Hudson Square, with an overcast sky, double the CBS News time 12 50. Now we know how tight security is in Washington for the inauguration, Thousands of National Guard members were sent to prevent any kind of armed protests across the country. The FBI is warning about that possibility and All 50 state capitals In the days leading up to the inauguration in New Jersey Governor Murphy is ordering all state employees to work from home Wednesday. I guess the silver lining of this big protest call on Sunday is that it's a Sunday And that's frankly a good a good thing. But with all the other tension in the country right now, we've made the call that working from home is state offices. Is the right call the FBI also tracking what it calls an extensive amount of online chatter about protests. Businesses, sir Wrestling with the best ways to get an entire workforce vaccinated here, CBS news correspondent Steve Kayson should companies make a covert vaccine mandatory for workers. Nearly half of the people who wait in said Yes. Do make it mandatory, Jessi Hempel of linked in says in that company survey of users on the question, 40% said no financial incentives like the one offered by dollar general to its employees might be an answer the balance years to provide the incentives entering going Encouraged them to do the right thing in the name of science for public health well, also allowing them to feel that they are making the decision. Steve CASE and CBS News A search is ongoing for a group of Attackers who police say beat a woman. Madison Square Park happened last Sunday, January 10th during a black lives matter and anti trump protest. Now, the woman says that she is a social media reporter and a Trump supporter who was recording segments for her social media accounts. Police say she was shoved, hit in the head with an egg and an umbrella and also sprayed with silly string and hit with a skateboard. There are pictures of the suspects on our website, double the CBS 80 dot com on arrest has been made of a Bronx man who police say attacked another man. With a hammer. This happened last Sunday on the A train platform at one 75th Street in Washington Heights. 47 year old Jose Marino of Mott Haven, is now charged with assault. No motive has been reported. The 46 year old victim was treated for head pain. At the scene. It's 12 52 this week in music Def Leppard has announced the unlocking of their death leopard vault, which will offer unseen and unheard memorabilia, music, video and much more. It's a chance where.

CBS FBI Reporter Cbs News New Hyde Park Washington Hudson Square Madison Square Park Jessi Hempel Steve Kayson Long Island City Steve Case Def Leppard National Guard New Jersey Governor Murphy Donald Trump Mott Haven Jose Marino
Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:31 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jessi hempel" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"House lawyers? That's ABC News chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl at the current rate, total US Covert 19 fatality since the beginning of the pandemic will pass 400,000 in the next few days. Let's find out more from ABC is Chuck's Iverson. Total coronavirus deaths in the U. S air now more than 391,000, says Johns Hopkins University States report to Hunt 44,000 cases 127,000 covert hospital patients and over 3600 new virus deaths Friday, according to the covert tracking project. The seven day average for tests is at a record high, encouraging news. The seven day averages four cases are declining in all four regions. Meanwhile, businesses are now wrestling with the best ways to get an entire workforce vaccinated. Should companies make a covert vaccine mandatory for workers. Nearly half of the people who weighed in said Yes do make it mandates. Great Jessi Hempel of linked in says in that company's survey of users on the question, 40% said no financial incentives like the one offered by dollar general to its employees might be an answer The balance years to provide the incentives that Aaron Credit going to encourage them to do the right thing in the name of science for public health well, also allowing them to feel that they are making the decision. Steve Case and CBS News It's 11 18. The FAA approved the application from a Massachusetts company to operate unmanned commercial drone flights. It's actually the first time the feds have allowed fully automated commercial drone flights. American Robotics of Marlboro will be allowed to fly drones below 400 ft along plan routes in rural areas. The FAA previously allowed companies to operate drones beyond the line of sight of operators but with a person required at all times to be on the ground, closely observing Boston police arrest a former Suffolk County prosecutor and defense attorney and charge him with rape. Investigators say Gary is a Rolla, once named one of People magazine's most eligible bachelors was wanted on a warrant issued out of Boston Municipal Court for rape and breaking and entering. Sirola was ordered held without bail at his arraignment yesterday. Well here we are just a few weeks into that brand New year, and many parents apparently are already banking on covert 19 free summer camps. Let's find out more from CBS as Deborah Rodriguez songs of celebrations splashing in.

FAA CBS Abc News Rape Chief White House Corresponden Jonathan Karl Johns Hopkins University ABC Jessi Hempel United States Wrestling Steve Case Deborah Rodriguez Sirola People Magazine Marlboro Boston Municipal Court Hunt Boston
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:33 min | Last month

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"The hey it's jesse here in the united states it's thanksgiving week and we're off. So we get into the archives bring you one of my favorite episodes it features two guys. He believed that design. Thinking can change. Our work lives for the better enjoy from the editorial team at lincoln. I'm jessi hempel and this is hello monday. Our show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us early in my conversation with today's guests. I asked whether they thought it was enough to be chasing. Happiness is.

jessi hempel jesse united states lincoln
"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"Like everything else..

"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

06:55 min | 6 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"Lives. And that makes them a slave to making money above all else, so one of the guys that I wrote about in that article in the Times magazine was a friend of mine who I saw at the fifteen th reunion and he's making about two million dollars a year, and he's just totally miserable like he's just like so unhappy, and like one of the things I was talking to him I was like well, you know. Maybe you should like. Get a hobby. You're like you know find. Find do volunteer work and he was like dude. If they're paying you two million dollars a year, you do not have time for a hobby ache like the fact that this job is boring and dumb does not mean it doesn't take eighteen to nineteen hours a day. Like in fact, that's what part of what makes it boring and dumb takes eighteen nineteen hours a day, and that's the only reason they give me two million dollars for. It is because I spent so much time doing that. How important is money? I mean two million dollars. Listen to that as a journalist and I think holy. What do we know? Do we know anything about once once? Your basic needs are met. How important money is yeah, so? He walked me through it. They basically live paycheck to paycheck. Wait a minute. Wait a minute now. This is a guy who who's in finance, and and he's like I could move someplace cheaper right like we could bring down a lot of those costs. Costs, but I can't really do. Finance anywhere besides New York, city and like I could send my kids to postpones at a private school, but like why am I working so much? If not to send them to private school like that's the whole point of working so much I don't poop who money because like I like having money. I like making money I mean like. And like staying up at night, and worrying about money is terrible. It's awful like I aided that feeling and now that I. Don't have to worry about it. It's fantastic, but I think to your point and I think exactly right is. Money can't be the only thing you're thinking about because it's never as big as you hope it's going to be. No matter how much you get there, someone else who basically just worked the same year you did and they got more, and you're gonNA, and if money is your only criteria, you're gonna feel poorer by comparison. Well it's an interesting moment to have this conversation, because as you go through for example that set of assumptions that keeps your buddy living in New, York City sending his kids to private school and working where he works. There are all up for negotiation right now. Would ask you to look into a crystal ball and tell me what you. Are Certain the future holds, but do you think that a lot of your? Colleagues are right now rethinking that stuff so i. do have some classmates and friends who have made big changes, but before the pandemic. And oftentimes I found that those big changes came in response to some type of adversity. There's one guy who like had this terrible accident. He was actually writing a bike and he got hit by a car, and and just months and months of recovery, and from that he basically realized like I. Don't like the work that I'm doing I want to go start my own thing. And then I have a couple of friends who got fire, and they came out of that saying like why was I working all the time like for this job? That like just cast me aside whenever I whenever it. It needed to I'M GONNA. Start building the life that I want, and so and I think that this is true in general. I think that like when when I look at people who came out of HP s and did well the ones who did best. We're the ones who had some hardship. They they oftentimes did knock at the job. They wanted out of business school. And so as a result they had to go build a career for themselves, and so I think that there that there are some people for whom this pandemic right now is creating this hardship that makes them really say like. Like what what makes this worth it? What makes life worth? What choices do I have to make in order to do the things that I WANNA do? But then there's a lot of other people for whom frankly this pandemic while a huge inconvenience. It's it won't really be a life changing hardship for them right like a lot of people who like. They were in new. York the relocating to Jackson. Hole and you know it's. Their bonus is definitely going to be smaller this year, but it's not like it really like shakes them deeply. I think that like this. You know there is a particularly in the American psyche and particularly among. Among the types of people who got Harvard Business School or other business schools. There is this romance infatuation with success. Like being successful is. Is a goal and an end in and of itself. And I think that that's a little bit of mistake because I think that if you're successful all the time. You miss out on learning a lot of things. That hardship and failure and deep disappointment sometimes seem to be the only tutors to teach us. And the truth is that when you're successful at the time, your opportunity cost for doing something crazy is just too high like we're lucky if we have failures early. Because it lowers the bar for US experimenting and Learning Things. Well so one of the most interesting things about your reflection on your peers at Harvard was when you mentioned that the people that you saw who were doing the best now. We're actually those people who didn't get that big job at McKinsey. That got looked over when I get together and I got up with like all my business school friends like at some point. The conversation always comes around to like who's doing really really well so like when we talk about who's been successful. And who we thought would be more successful. It's really really interesting because. The A plus students, the students who like really really well whoever and assumed we're going to be a success. They're all doing fine. But. They're not superstars. They're not like knocking it out of the park. It's the it's the beat a B. Plus students who are the ones who like are just killing it and the reason they're killing. It is because they took some risk early on that paid off and the plus students with some exceptions. There's a couple of people who were plus students who ended up taking risks, and they are actually frankly the ones who liked business school, the least the least value in it, but most of the students. They like went to Goldman. They went into private equity and the truth. Matter is if you're my age forty five years old, and graduated in two thousand and three from Harvard Business School and you went to Goldman or in a private equity. You're never going to become mind boggling rich.

Harvard Business School Goldman Times magazine Harvard US New York McKinsey York York City HP Jackson
"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"Monday are Shell about the changing nature of work, and how that work is changing us. My guest today is Charles Duhig Charles is a Pulitzer Prize, winning journalist and bestselling author. He also hosts asleep. podcast called how to with Charles Duke, and you should check out all of its work, but here's what you need to know for today. Charles went to Harvard Business School. That's long ago. He attended his Fifteenth Union any wrote about it for the New York Times. Each BS is supposed to be golden ticket. You get in, and you've got a straight shot to the kind of career that turns you into a happy, mocal, wealthy influential, a queen of capitalism. Charlie figured his peers would be pleased with our lives right. He found something else. Many many people had achieved kind of the. Top level goals they had wanted to achieve, but a lot of them were kind of miserable. You heard that, right? They were unhappy not because things hadn't worked out for them, but because things had worked out exactly as they had planned, and it led Charlie to wonder and me to. What leads tweet fulfilling career, and I'll just acknowledged the privilege that goes into getting have an economically lucrative job. Even if you hate it, it's a lot. But there's a lot to learn from Charlie's classmates. In many cases, they prioritized money over meaning. In fact they planned for money to provide the meaning, but it didn't work out that way. They A lot. Here's our conversation. What were you going for? When you chose to go to H., B. S. what did you go in winning to do? Yeah, that's a great. To be honest with you. I basically just didn't know what to do with my life like. I was I was either going to go. To, law school, or to to business school, and I got into Harvard Business School and I didn't get into Harvard law school so I went to business school, and frankly thank God because like I would have taken on so much debt if I'd gone to law school, but that's the thing is that I think that most people who go to business school? They don't go because they're like. Oh, there's this one thing I need to learn I think actually this is true of a lot of professional masters programs I think that's true of law school. School, is that you get a lot of people who like come out and they? They know that this credential will help them, and it's sort of like buying this insurance policy for the future right like like there's only so far I can fall having a Harvard business degree in my pocket, or there's only so far I can fall if I have a law degree, and of course, that's not true. You can like fall all the way down. I know many of people who have you think that business school is as will afford you the opportunity. Not to have to worry about job. Stability Journalism School basically is designed to you the opportunity to worry about job stability for your entire career. And, at some place I was very worried about that early on in a mentor said to me there are three types of capital. You will need to worry about in your life, and you worry about them in the wrong order. I. You have social capital. It's where you were born. It's how you know what to do. It is the guarantee that you will have a sofa asleep on at the end of the day. You need to continue to take care of that. You will think about that least. then. There's educational capital it's done. It's complete by the time you get to be an adult. You can build on it, but you know if you've got a college degree. That's your educational capital. Economic capital and if you've got the first two tied up. You. Don't really have to worry as much as you think you about the third. But you will spend your entire life worrying a lot about the third worrying about how much money are making where it's coming from what you can do with it. I think that's exactly right when people ask me like young people when they ask me like. How should I decide what to do next the first piece of advice I give them is just assume for a second. You are going to actually be as successful as you want to be, but also assume it's going to take twice as long as you want it to. And the reason why I think that's that's is because it's actually true right like. Pretty much like you put your mind something and you give it enough years. Anyone can do anything, but it's GonNa take a long time longer than you wish it would take to reach that goal, and what it does is it forces you to ask yourself the question? Will I enjoy those years between right now and reaching the goal enough to continue doing it, because the biggest issue that stands in the way of most people is not their talent. It's their their persistence like do. Do they actually like the process enough to stick with it? And that's the other thing I found with a number of my. Classmates, is that the ones who were? Unhappy tended to take jobs that they did not like thinking about outside of their hours on the job, right they they. They were doing the job for other reasons, either because it was still stay, or it was high profile, or give them a lot of money, and so when they were done at the end of the day at five, o'clock or nine o'clock, or whatever they would stop thinking about the job and that put them at a huge disadvantage to other people who. Who loved that activity so much that they just wanted to think about it all the time and those people those people tended to to succeed much faster just because they were literally working twice as hard because they go home, and they would fall asleep and they were thinking about that deal as they were falling asleep the same way that when you and I fall asleep, we're thinking about some story or how to solve some problem in a in the structure of an article. And so I think that if you just assume you're going to be successful, but assume it's GONNA. Take a long time to get. To get that success, it forces you to ask yourself questions like do I actually like doing this activity or am I doing it just because I want the end results. Do you think you need to like doing your job though I mean I? When I think about being successful in my career, I think about the end goal I went to achieve I think it might be a little much to expect that I'm going to enjoy the process. I actually do, but but I'm going to define your job in a different way so I think that there's lots of people have met who are accountants at big companies like IBM and they're not enthusiastic about technology, and they're not enthusiastic about accounting, but they they love interacting with smart people and helping them, and that is their job. Their job is to help smart people solve problems and so I. think part of it is like there's the job that's written down on a piece of paper, your job description, and then there's the job that you actually do and you have to know which part of that job you enjoy and find meaning from. If for no other reason than you just don't know what else to lean into. You know I want to go back to the this idea that you put forth to that your you're. Hbo Classmates would sometimes spend all day at a job. They really had no connection to. They'd WANNA. Leave that job and not think about it anymore and that this might have been one of the reasons. They were unhappy. I think there's gotta be another piece of it because I know I have a lot of friends who have jobs that they do and don't think about when they leave, but it's because they have enough of a life outside their work that they find purpose and meaning in other places, and their work just enables that and one of the things happens for the people who really aim to go into these high powered white collar professions, investment banking consulting is that their job is the only thing they have time for and their.

Harvard Business School Charlie Charles Duhig Charles Charles Duke Pulitzer Prize New York Times Stability Journalism School Harvard IBM H.
IBM pulling out of facial recognition market out of profiling fears

Techmeme Ride Home

03:14 min | 7 months ago

IBM pulling out of facial recognition market out of profiling fears

"IBM has sent a letter to members of Congress announcing that it is exiting the general purpose, facial recognition business, and that it opposes the use of facial recognition technology for mass surveillance, quoting axios. IBM Not offers general purpose IBM facial recognition or analysis software CEO Arvind Krishna said in the letter quote. IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any technology including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors for mass surveillance, racial profiling violations of basic human rights and freedoms or any purpose, which is not consistent with our values and principles of trust and transparency and quote. An IBM representative told that the decisions were made over a period of months at had been communicated with customers. Though this is the first public mention of the decision IBM said it will no longer market sell or update these products, but will support existing clients as needed. The letter also included Krishna's suggestions for legislation around police reform, and the responsible use of technology IBM said that Ai for example has a role to play in law enforcement, but should be thoroughly vetted to make sure it doesn't contain bias. The company is also calling for stricter federal laws on police misconduct quote Congress should bring more police misconduct cases under federal court purview, and should make modifications to the qualified immunity doctrine that prevents individuals from seeking damages when police violate their constitutional rights, Chris said Congress should also establish a federal registry of police misconduct adopt measures to encourage or compel states and localities to review and update use of force policies and quote. Now your first reaction to this headline probably mirrored my first reaction and actually. It seems like our gut. Instincts are probably right here as Chris Anderson tweeted quote. This is brilliant number one fall woefully behind in technology number to realize that you have no chance of ever catching up number three declare that the technology that you can't do is evil and promised to do more of it number four write a letter to Congress number five profit and quote. Though as Gary, record tweeted quote. This tech is not that complicated pretty soon, a commodity in tech firms. IBM Did the right thing before they are on the wrong side of this, the others will follow the consequences for abuse must be high and people in companies, personally liable for surveillance of society and quote. To which I'd say, yeah, but are you honestly saying that IBM would walk away from a multibillion dollar business? If they thought they could own it? And I don't know about that. Still maybe I'm being too cynical, and this is a credit. Where do sort of thing quoting Jessi Hempel? This huge IBM move will force other large companies to take a stand even if they're silence is their statement and quote and as Evan. tweeted quote while some companies think it's enough to tweet support for social justice while marketing tool for oppression IBM gets out of the facial recognition business in states, opposition to mass, surveillance and racial profiling and quote.

IBM Congress Arvind Krishna Chris Anderson Jessi Hempel CEO Representative Gary AI Evan.
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

02:02 min | 8 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Is our editorial program manager. John DOE is head of original audio and video. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. We also featured music by putting bear. Dan Ross this the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel see you next Monday. And thanks for listening so this might be a base question but do you like the Internet and Twenty Nineteen. I like parts of the Internet and twenty nineteen and I think parts of it I I believe in free speech but I. I think that social media really dropped the ball when they decided to let anything go. I think that allowing hate to flourish has done us a disservice allowing false information to flourish has done us a grand disservice and I wish more people would take care of the spaces that they create. Because you know we're not allowed to litter. So why do we allow litter into our social media spaces? It's just really disappointing. They really shouldn't Islamaphobia Homophobia misogyny racism of all kinds. These are not acceptable ways of thinking and behaving and this idea that we should tolerate. It is absolute nonsense and I wish more people would just say that and stop wrapping themselves in the First Amendment. The First Amendment doesn't mean you can't think that way it means that there are consequences when you you can say whatever you want but you know you're not free from consequences just because of the first amendment. It sometimes seems that. Some amendments are more important than other certainly more protected in hidden behind absolutely and also it's who gets to use those amendments because oftentimes. I blocked trolls and they say you're silencing me and I'm like I don't have to listen to you I don't know you I don't Oh you my time the get a grip and it's just absurd. It's just a bunch of men children and they need to go back to their mothers..

Jessi Hempel program manager Dan Ross editor in chief Lincoln
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

16:28 min | 9 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Hello and welcome to bonus episode of inside podcasting show in which creators discussed their craft. This installment contains an unedited chunk of tape from my interview with Jesse hampel the host of Lincoln's podcast Monday. I had so much fun speaking with Jesse last year. And if you haven't listened to my original interview with her. I encourage you to do that before. Listening to this all. Put a link to it in the show notes in that first installment it felt like we discussed just about every element of being a new podcast her to be honest. The discussion was kind of therapeutic for me in this segment. You'll hear more about Jesse's career as a writer before she became a podcast her how she made the decision to leave traditional print journalism. And how much editorial control? Lincoln has over her work here..

Jesse hampel Lincoln Jesse writer
How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

Inside Podcasting

16:28 min | 9 months ago

How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

"Let's start at the beginning. I as I said you've had an extraordinary career as a journalist but I'd love to know how you ought the writing bog were you. You know. Extremely curious a child yeah. It was extremely curious as a child but I also just was always a writer just from the beginning of time I was a writer I wanted to grow up and write poetry and science fiction and I went to college and I got a degree in poetry and remember coming out of college in going into the Barnes and noble which was Believe it or not the big corporate media of bookstores back then. Because that's how old I am and I looked in the big book of First Year. Salary is and I looked up poet. Remember 'cause I was with a friend and that friend was a nurse and she looked up nursing. It said fifty thousand dollars a year and she thought sweet. I'm set and I looked. Poyton said twelve dollars a year. Yeah and I knew I could not survive on twelve dollars a year and I was going to have to take the writing and do something with it. That was going to help me pay the rent. And that's really how I got turned in the direction of journalism. My mother is going to enjoy this because she is a poet and she can vouch. that You can't really make a living which is a shame. Do you still write poetry You know I don't. I still read a lot of poetry. I feel like my work is colored by the early work. I did around the construction of language but no I don't like a lot of poetry. I hope your mom's still. She does your mom she does. She doesn't she's she's published books and she was actually a poem. I was in a textbook at my arrival. High School so She's once in prizes and things like that. That's the only time you really make any money. So so when you made this move did you. What was your first job? Not Business Week somewhere else. No so I did a lot of different things in my early twenty S I. I ended up going to graduate school at Berkeley for Journalism. Had A great program and I came out when I was about twenty eight and at first I wanted to be a foreign correspondent and I went to Hong Kong and I did some writing for time time Asia and then I discovered business and I discovered business journalism and I got extremely passionate about it because I quickly I learned that if you want to understand how the world is working and you understand how business works he will. You will do a lot better at understanding how everything else worked. And so I went to Business Week and while I was at business. Week I met a very young mark Zuckerberg. Wow and that is really the start of how I started. Writing about technology I started writing about social networking in two thousand four and two thousand five. So we're you just assigned to detail you gotta go talk to the sky or like. How did that all happen? And what was he like Well so I'm embarrassed to tell you this because it's not gonNa make me out to sound like the smartest lady in the room by. I was a huge user of friendster and Earl Ya Ya Ya Ma and mice space and I thought that my space was really innovative. Was just something that I hadn't seen before in two thousand five at that time. Most of my colleagues were much older than me and none of them were actually using services like this and so I asked well. Can I write a little story about my space? And my editors honestly probably at the time just to give me something that was a passion project so I would keep doing the sort of grunt work that I was doing as an intern. Then said sure you can write a story about my space and I did. And then Rupert Murdoch did me a solid and paid five hundred and eighty million dollars for it and everybody looked up and it was my goodness. That must be a business. Didn't Jesse wouldn't you going to write something on that? And we quickly pulled out that story and made a bigger that became my first sort of big story and it was called the mice base generation. And why that slightly embarrassing is because as part of the big story on my space. I made a phone call to this other website that no one was paying attention to call facebook And of course my bet at that point that facebook was just you know the boring version of my space. Did you say something like that in the story? I don't think that of course many many more stories later I did. I chronicled really the rise of facebook in the rise of all of those Social software companies that served to connect to each other so that we could talk to each other on the web. The way that we didn't have you continued to talk to mark Zuckerberg over the years about how things have progressed willow. In a reporting capacity I continued to report on facebook during my time in the profession up until I guess the last big story I did on. Facebook was in probably twenty sixteen and a haven't spoken to him at all in the last couple of years so then of course we know that you go to Fortune I fortune. I and Ben Wired to have that right. Yeah so yep that's right. So as a writer I went from BusinessWeek to Fortune. I spent a lot of years at fortune. Had A great time there on really learned the craft and then I went to wired and I was at wired for the five years really until I came here to Lincoln. How fulfilled were you by that work? Oh Gosh that's a doesn't the truth. Is that the thing that mattered to me. Most was to become a better writer and better storyteller and become better at telling other people story so K. Sky I feel like it is almost more than a job is calling for me. I love the the whole process of figuring out how to tell a story and I love the trust that someone else puts in you when they invite you to tell them their story and really most of the time that I was a writer writing for magazines. I have been able to do that But you know sky as well as I know that that industry has changed so much over the last decade. It's so much So I definitely got to a point where I was looking to grow and I was looking around me and I had written a lot of magazines. Stories are a lot more magazines stories to be written but I was like well. What can I add to this like when I look forward ten years at this company that I'm at which at that point was Conde Nast? Is there a job for me that I can see that? I can't do today but I could grow into and I did stop being able to see things in my own industry. That excited me. Does that mean that you would have been eventually doing less writing and more managing or would it have taken it away from the core of what? You're enjoying yes. There were managing the you know as a as somebody working as a sort of early to mid stage writer and reporter in the sort of more traditional media industry. Often you get to a place in your career where there are two doors. There is the editor door in there as the writer door. And if you choose the editor door then you may go into a series of roles that involves Making other people's work beautiful and also managing people on and I chose the writers door I wanted to remain an independent contributor telling stories in doing that kind of work I guess when I say like ways that I could grow I meant sort of exactly what I'm doing now. Opportunities to try storytelling and other mediums on an opportunity to have bigger and better stages to do that.

Writer Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Fortune High School Friendster Hong Kong Editor Asia Poyton Ben Wired Rupert Murdoch Berkeley Intern Conde Nast Jesse Lincoln
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

13:01 min | 11 months ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Flies to three hundred cities that's three hundred cities where people sing in the car. Poorly three hundred cities where people miss someone in one of the two hundred nine cities in. Delta. Isn't flying those three hundred cities merely to bring us together but to show us. We're not that far apart in the first place. Delta keep climbing from the editorial team at Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel and this is hello Monday. Our show about the changing nature of work and how that works changing us every once in a while. When Brian gets to feeling like just too much my wife tells me that she's going to quit her job. I should to. We'll move out of the city. She'll carve wooden spoons. Alright somehow will make a living out of it. You maybe have some version of yourself and for most of us it feels like a fantasy but then you meet someone who just nails. It goes for it. I guess this week our Matthew Swanson and Bobby bare they children's books books that maybe your kids have read. Matthew does the words Robbie pictures ten years ago. They ditched the grind and moved into a barn in small town Maryland. In the time since they've started to small presses they've published more than sixty books and they've had four kids now. They're plotting a new adventure. They're getting ready to drive across the country in a school bus Robbie and matthew made.

Matthew Swanson Jessi Hempel Delta Robbie Maryland Brian Lincoln Bobby
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"From the editorial team at Lincoln I'm Jessi Hempel and this is hello Monday a show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing yes I I started watching Laura Linney when she played Marianne Singleton in tales of the city it was a nineteen ninety-three PBS miniseries based on you know it's hard to imagine now that lgbt people are on the screen all the time that's show was really different my dad is gay I am you it was one of the first TV shows that I could kind of see my own life tales Laura's first TV break in her career took off from there she's one Golden Globe awards four emmys her credits include the Truman show love actually you can count on me many many others earlier this year she brought back to also the city and we are all waiting or at least I am for the next season of Ozark sometime next year whatever you do for work chances are that you get some kind of feedback on in it but when you work in the Public Laura does that feedback becomes a whole industry cultural criticism I wanted to talk to her about how to handle that criticism when it's coming from all directions the pros but also the amateurs the people on the street or on twitter how do you balance working on feedback but also focusing on the work I was really impressed with her take on this here's Laura so Laura the first time that I remember watching you on the screen was in the early nineties anywhere Marianne singleton tales of the city yes and now I'm so excited to get to watch again be married as wild senate yeah so what can you tell us about when you were first cast in that role I was you know fresh out of drama school I went to juilliard and was film and Television was something that really intimidated me it was not an area of of the arts that I really thought that I would that I would belong to not of a snob factor but just out of fear really you know that it just was a world that I didn't understand that I wouldn't be good at but I wouldn't enjoy and I was somehow cast entails in this wonderful part and I remember there was a day that I was filming with Parker Posey in the grocery store of the Safeway and there's a scene where we're take these two carts and we're going down the frozen food aisle and I'm in a one piece denim jumpsuit and she's in this fabulous Parker Posey outfit and I had so much fun I had such a good time and it was the first time the penny sort of dropped and I went or maybe I can maybe do this maybe this is something that you might enjoy doing that I might not suck at 'cause I was sort of first and foremost the theater actress and always had grown up in the theater my father was a playwright I grew up in New York City my whole life was the theater and it was all I ever cared about so all of a sudden see that I was I had an attraction to something else was the first uncomfortable for me and took me a while to sort of figure out how to handle it all so I wanna go back to that early sort of first stage career when you're coming out of Juilliard what did you imagine that a successful career for you would look like I thought it would be regional theater or off Broadway show that was it yeah yeah and and now I thought that would be great right great I mean it would be great and yes it is great yeah has been so much broader it has been a way beyond what I could ever have imagined I'm very glad I didn't know so what what have you learned if you distill my God three decades God you learn a lot you know I've learned to hair and then be very flexible I've learned to prepare as much as I can for each thing that comes my way and then throw it all out the window and walk into it room and be open to something else what does it mean to prepare and how has how you've prepared changed for me it it has changed drafts stickler as I've worked in three different mediums of film television and a play and the theatre for me it's always story I so I tend to re script I tend to try and listen to the script and have the script tell me how to prepare and that's a combination of experience hopefully some sense of talent and a little bit of faith and I know it sounds a little odd when I say you have to listen to the script tell you what to do but it will as it as the more you read it the more you get to know what it will take shape it will take on a life of its own and it will become very clear like how's the best way in so so there's a lot for me there's a Lotta script work at first which means breaking down the entire script as far as just the architecture the script then going through it again source personalizing every reference that is made so that I know exactly what I'm talking about then you sort of look seen by seeing chapter by chapter than you look act by act look the whole thing so there's a lot to look at just with a script is very much like a blueprint that architect would look at can't or a score of music you know it's the first step it's the foundation but it's the first step when you're listening for that that's scripted Love the language telling you that story yeah sometimes it's the language that tells you you know people speaking different rhythms depending upon and emotionally were they are you know you can see on the page if sentences are not complete if they jump around that'll give you an insight into someone's ecology how much does intuition factor into how you make your selections about your role yeah for me it's a big part of it sometimes it's and sometimes it's completely irrational you know sometimes I'll read a script and it will be mediocre at best and I'll sit down with the director and I just like them I'm like okay let's go like I'll help you do this I'd love to help you do this right you know sure you know sometimes it's wanting to work with a friend sometimes it's a scripted as terrific and you don't know anyone else involved and you just take a you just jump in so you sort.

Lincoln Jessi Hempel Laura Linney Marianne Singleton nineteen ninety-three PBS three decades
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"New listeners for our podcast is to advertise another people's podcasts and so <hes> that is what we do to the extent that we had a budget to promote on our show a lot of our resources went to that early on and we <hes> <hes> we work with an outside partner <hes> cadence he supports a lot of podcasts and we'll occasionally do trades where we will <hes> <hes> is a host will listen to talk about another cadence podcast and that host will do the same for us <hes> and usually that is a hundred percent at the time that is driven by the things that i'm passionate about so for example <hes> i listened to michael lewis is podcast and i promoted it on ours in exchange for him doing that with hello my name <hes> that's because i've loved michael lewis for twenty years. Yeah i think he's degraded is super smart. How about cross promotion between the the website and your pocket readers versus listener yeah so every monday we publish a newsletter and the newsletter has to transcript script of the episode and also has <hes> many ways for us to tell a reader on linked in that they should go and listen to our episode and it also so has avenues to engage our listeners in talking to us about the episode they just heard so we encourage people to post about it on their own profiles as with the hashtag hello monday they actually do that and that is really cool to see and if you search hashtag hello monday on the platform you can see all those conversations begin to surface purpose <hes> also on the show and unlinked in the platform we invite people to call in to leave us voice memos at hello monday edlington dot com and they do that. Sometimes they do that with a voice memo. Sometimes they actually just upload their comments. Directly atlanta linked then and then i will sometimes take those comments and thoughts and feed them into the actual episode so if you listen to the credits of our episodes often you'll get a listener comment tucked into the crow. That's very cool. It's fun so this morning. I came across a post that you your season has wrapped so we should tell the listeners. It's not that they can binge. Listen to the whole thing right now and at the end of the episode you can tell them where to find it came across a post that you made about all of the learnings that that all the takeaways and we can talk about it however long you like but one thing that stood out to me was you you mentioned. That episode sewed about vulnerability. I think it was with angela not sure and i remember you saying in that episode the oh you had a complicated relationship with your gut but yet during this interview. I think that you have said twice that you you made a decision based on something up saying that was in your that as i wonder if like have you gotten better at it. I so love that you isolated that to ask about because for me personally. That is the thing that i've taken away from seasonal. No i work at a tech company. A tech company's all about data right <hes> and yet coming from a media company which is so driven by emotion in taste to attack company. The thing that i learned ironically was how to better listen to my gut interested in i i i saw it evolved throughout the season. Whenever i embraced a subject or a section of an interview that just was the thing that mattered to me the most. It also seemed to perform the best. Isn't that interesting are you. Are you a person who's led to make decisions by you. Got you know i would say hey that i think that at least as far as the podcast is concerned. I am still very tied. To what can i control like in control my questions nations. I can control the research i do. I can control you know. I think these i'm still new. I it's like that makes me feel like i'm secure in some way <hes> so trusting. My gut feels a little scary on the other hand. I'm having to make some questions based on my gut. Because how can you possibly passively no the exact right music that should be played like the producers sent me a bunch of that music links guest rams like why i think this one kind of sounds like the right one one you know i. I don't have anyone next to me to say oh no. No no no no. No you know so. I'm having to do that and it's scary ya ah particularly when you haven't done it before i so remember when my producer god bless her. She sent me like twenty links to small pieces of music. I was listening to them all all and i was like i don't know maybe this maybe and then i put something in the first time and it was the kind of of music that actually should be played underneath lake a thirteen year old reading her diary about you know the saddest thing that ever happened to her. My producer was like jesse. Your podcast is supposed to be happy like you've got to do better so it is also a good thing to engage people who are who have domain expertise and things like music like check in with your friends who like me yes gauso also all of those all of those micro decisions students that feel so overwhelming your gut is totally prepared to help you with those and it will eventually total a show that comes together why i'm glad that you were having that experience agreeance and i. I hope i got there soon. I think it's coming. It's coming. What what advice would you give to a podcast or who's just starting out on his or her her podcasting journey. I mean asking for our friend. The best advice that i could give is that you should listen to one or two episodes of every show that you can find <hes>. I don't care if you don't think he liked basketball. The ball listen to an episode of podcast show about basketball. Listen to you things that you don't think that you are naturally interested in listen to anything with the large following rolling and if it's something that you always used to listen to listen to it over again with an eye toward format and with a with a questioning mind asking who is the audience for this. Why is this working. Why is the onions connecting with it. It'll be something there for you that you can take away and put it into your own. Show yeah yeah yeah. That's great advice. I didn't follow it. I need to go do that retroactively <hes>. I don't believe that i mean i listen to lots of podcast of course but i didn't listen to any about basketball i did. I did not cast a wide enough net and i think that's really good advice because you'll get ideas from all of them. Yeah i think that's true what what high costs have inspired you or meant something to you so i'll give you three. I loved reply reply all early on me too. <hes> i just think they nailed it. <hes> they took every subject under the sun one shot at through the lens of tac and were smart and funny about how they dressed it at the same time i love oprah soul sunday uh-huh am not shy about saying that i think that oprah is such a smart businesswoman when it comes to content and how to repackage that couldn't agree more finding her in podcast forum was just the the best way to imbibe her. You listen to all the hassle. You pick the ones where you like the cast. <hes> i think but over the years it's sort of my comeback podcast. Yeah you get on the subway or in the car and you listened to all the episodes of the one you're listening to and you don't quite know you're like. I want something that that's my oprah mumia. My other oprah moment is like two in the morning when i'm worried about something can't sleep and just need to be calm down about life because every single go podcast is basically like her hand reaching out sitting itself on your shoulder and being like it's okay. You're going to be okay. I have loehmann's. That's a good idea. Okay and then the third podcast that i would give you is a podcast called if these ovaries could talk and i like this podcast because i found this podcast because i am newly a mother i have baby. I now and i think you thank you. <hes> and i have a female partner so we're we're gay parents which by the way in two thousand nineteen is like not even exciting anymore. Totally mainstream seem like the gap is selling our children t-shirts <hes> <hes> but during the period of time when we're making our family somebody pointed me to this podcast and it is to women in brooklyn who interview alternative families about all the things that go into figuring how to be an alternative family from the biology legiti of how you make your family to what it means to parent when there are two moms or two dads or whatever it is i would imagine that might legal help level for like doc you know uncle so and so or i mean do you yet have like your family. Listen to it. They sort of understand a little bit about that or yeah. Although i have to say i sky i also have gay dads and my sister is gay and my brother is transgender. That's my family. Actually is your target audience for this podcast. Totally i'm but but here's why i love the show from a format perspective <hes> it may not speak to you in terms the topic but these these women have found a niche of people who really care deeply about them and want to hear what they have to say and i think there's a lot you can learn from that as a podcast or that. You know we actually hello monday. Podcasts at targets are fairly broad audience but many of the podcasts that i i love most like the one that you are creating know exactly who they're listener is and they talked to that listener. You're listening to a podcast <hes> <hes> in in the same way that these women their listeners are like other l._g._b._t. People trying to make families and the inside jokes are lovely and relevant and the advertisers they've been able to cultivate are very specific and targeted and very interested in hitting this group of people and you know this podcast probably three seasons old and it seems from the outside. I do not know these women <hes> it seems like it is if not their dominant revenue source like a a large revenue source for them <hes>. Maybe it even pays all their bills an that. I just think that's really cool. This has been such a great conversation and i have enjoyed it for so many reasons. I always like to close by having my guest share with our listeners where they can find you and where they can find your show. Oh thank you for having me sky. I enjoyed the so much and when you are famous in seven seasons and i hope that i can tell other people that you had me on your off uh-huh. Oh all remember don't worry so you can find you can find lincoln's hello monday on.

basketball oprah producer partner michael lewis atlanta angela lincoln jesse brooklyn hundred percent thirteen year twenty links twenty years
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"There's also this other thing that has to do with trusting your own curiosity <hes> mhm and if you're listening to if you're listening to my show if someone's listening to your show sky they're listening because they really identify with you. Entrust you as the host and there are listening because in some ways their curiosity you're there curiosities are kind of match to your own curiosities and so i also also think that the show is gonna work better. If i put away the things that i absolutely must hit and just stop and try to be with this person and think think okay. We'll what's the thing i'm curious about <hes> and and if i'm curious about it it is also probably true that everybody else's too and they're going to come with me on this journey <hes> <hes> i guess like my nightmare about that like the nightmare that you have your school naked like my the the equivalent nightmare is that i'm going to be in that space where i'm like following that through line and then i'll just have a complete brain freeze like what would you do if you had a complete train free. I love how you say that is if it's a hypothetical it doesn't happen all the time right. That is i mean first of all that is what editing is yeah second of. All that will happen a lot less than you think it will and and third like you you know i i find the line that i just come back to is. Oh my goodness dennis. I was listening so much to what you were just saying that. I need a moment to think about where we go from right right. That's a very good line. I like that <hes> and then you know they pause and they they feel like their egos been slightly massaged and <hes> you know and then you always have a couple of like you know combat yeah <hes> yeah of you like waiting in the wings just in case you really you really freak out. I feel like i'm having a little bit of therapy session here on top of everything else that's going aw how how did it feel to you. When you like like like you said all this work. You've made this move and now you're your pod like the podcast is gonna launch the next day like describe to me how you're feeling at that moment like i mean i remember that i was <music> pretty panicked. Remember waking up at five am because that's what time i thought that would listen to the first episode in the in the podcast store and just being terrified. There is a window of time of course between like when you can download the thing and win it socially acceptable to think that even my mom and dad would download it. It's not five a._m. By the way like you have to wage elise breakfast i am <hes> n n getting any feedback doc for how people received <hes> and and it is a weird moment because by the time you get to that moment you as the person who has produced it here so sick of it but episode for a couple of episodes i mean you've probably listen to them a hundred times. All you can hear is like what you didn't do or the editorial decisions. You didn't make you cannot hear it as a whole ended. Also it feels little dead to you and at the same time you you we know that the world is just coming into it. The world is just forming. Its relationship with it. It's scary. What was the feedback it. It was immediately <hes> exuberant on which poses its own problems right because then you think oh my goodness i have to do this again next week and you know when you write a cover story for a magazine <hes> you know maybe you work on it for two three months and then it goes and then maybe you know maybe do smaller things and maybe six months later that happens again. The thing about podcasting casting. I've found is that each of these shows feels like it takes for me the equivalent of like the energy and the ideas that go into a big magazine magazine project but then you're on the hook for doing it a week later again and that at first before i learned to modulate. It took a lot of creative energy. I find that when i'm doing to a week which like i'm actually doing that this week as it is it is it's draining at the end of it. Are you producing them. I'm as well. I am but not at the same time so we've decided to go through record them all in sort of then go into production. We weren't sure how that was going to go with that. So that is actually helpful. <hes> yeah sorry. I didn't mean to bring it back to me again and i obviously did but sky actually think you should like one of the one of the things is that i got the most as feedback over the course of the season was how important the hostess to a show and this. It's not meant to be ego driven. This is just the truth amend. The people will come to your show the first time because of the guest is there like oh my aunt mary's the guest on that show <hes> mhm but the only reason they'll come back to the show is because they care about you and so you have to develop yourself as a character and yes. You're doing that what what better way to do that than to converse with guest rather than just you know. Ask your guest about their right. You know i guess that plays into one of my worries which is like there's certain podcast. I listened to where i feel like. The host really talks over. I won't name names but <hes> really talks august and and i find myself saying <unk> up. I want to hear what the guest has to say <hes> right and so. I worry that that's that i'm going to somehow develop that tech and i. I really don't want you but but i agree with you absolutely that if i can if i can give the audience audience reason to continue to come back even when they aren't interested in the guest then i've probably done a good job i've done something right a- and especially in this kind of podcasts where i resume a lot of people who will end up listening to it are who are listening right now i should say <hes> are people who are thinking about doing a podcast or podcasting themselves that hopefully this back and forth between you and me is helpful because it's working out some of the things that might be in their head as well <hes> that is what i i think i could use as a podcast host. I wish this podcast existed before. I started making my show last march when i was trying to wrestle with the questions sounds that you and i have already started to talk about yeah yeah. It's interesting. It's it is helpful and i think as podcast host. Do you feel this way. You're or not surrounded by other podcast hosts all the time. At least i'm not in my in my world so i don't have a lot of people who are doing exactly what i'm doing. Who i can run on ideas by i mean you can do it online <hes> but that's why it's it's so helpful to have this conversation with you. <hes> i think that's right you know so if you're a journalist and you work in a newsroom you can go consult your colleagues on craft yeah and i at least where i am in in some people work in places yeah studios where you have access to many other people doing this but here elegant no one you know unicorn with a podcast host after my name instead of like programmer or developer lincoln yeah <hes> and so i and i've i've proactively cultivated relationships with some podcast hosts who i really admire and and try to get some of it that way but a lot of it is just you you stumble along and you figure it out yeah yeah. Maybe we need to start up podcast host <hes> support group will can. I ask you a question sky so i'm really really curious. What the experience of becoming an expert at podcasting through the newsletter was like for you because you really just rolled up your sleeves and learned about this as you went. Why why this <hes> the reason was that i was dissatisfied what i've been doing before not because it wasn't great work but just because it was no longer making i was no longer fulfilled with by my work and i wanted to find something else that i was passionate about because i have been very passionate. Also i was in technology. I've been very passionate in the earlier days and then i sort of lost that passion as has the landscape in silicon valley had changed and i think a lot of people's motivations for being there had changed and i watched a lot of people move out of san francisco and this and anat and it just all added up to me feeling a little less rod. I wanted to find something else to do with my time that i could really where i could really feel that passionate passionate again dan and then i was wearing my headphones all the time <hes> and loving podcast but having no idea how to get involved in the industry history and wishing that i lived in brooklyn or new york <hes> and and i subscribed to a whole bunch of newsletters and inside type podcasting sent out a newsletter and at the top of it they said because it had been a non bylined more sort of generic newsletter and they just sat at the top of it. We're looking for a writer and honestly on a whim. I wrote back and i was like why could help out and then and then it turned into a five day a week gig. They're getting paid to just really quickly. Get fully up to speed which i was already kinda doing so. It didn't feel like a departure for me. I was already so passionate about it that it didn't didn't feel like work. It often does not feel like work. That's that's amazing leasing. I love it when you're in that growth curve on a new topic on a new industry where it's just like drinking s it up. Yes you know it's a wonderful wonderful. Guest is a wonderful thing yet like my kids are going to sleep. Why can't for two weeks and normally i think i would. I'd like take that off and i'm like no. I'm gonna do the newsletter letter while they're gone like. I be sad if i wasn't like i want to be in the loop. I wanna be paying attention to what's going on in my industry. Okay enough about me. Though <hes> a reader of ours had the following question which i think you've seen on twitter. How does detroit planning for the podcast differ. We're from writing articles for the website. And how do you think about cross promotion so i'll take both of those questions separate so at editorial planning for the podcasts cats. I'm thinking season to season about themes that i want to explore and then i sit down. I know i have thirteen episodes and at the very beginning of the season i fill out at the calendar with my dream names <hes> and then i- i pursue them it is mostly <hes> mostly league me going out to people but occasionally i accept pitches that come at me <hes> it's. It's a little bit tricky. I do get a ton of pitches from <hes> really interesting. People who either are too similar to something we have already done or who are you know have followings but not the sizing caliber filings of the guests that we've we've been having <hes> so getting in kind of the right guest is a little bit tricky and that's why it works best when i go out and pursue somebody <hes> that is a little bit different than lincoln's written editorial. <hes> are sort of written editorial happens around the news product that you and i talked about earlier and it also happens around a couple of big special projects that we do every year atop companies project in atop startups project and there is also a lot more back and forth worth and room for working with people outside of linked in on those projects we accept and love pitches for those projects <hes> we have video series attached to those projects we except love pitches for the for the video series and then the cross promotion piece..

lincoln twitter big magazine san francisco detroit mary writer dan anat programmer brooklyn developer two three months six months two weeks five day
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Let's have caroline go out and do a bunch of reporting and then come in and talk with me about it and so by the time we get to about the fifth episode food you hear that right. You're just carolina having a conversation and we also figured out gosh. This little segment comes at the end. It feels kind of tacked on. Let's try putting it in the middle of the episode and so by the middle of the season you hear that segment migrate to the middle of the episode and it is incredibly reassuring to me sky to hear you say well. I didn't really notice that's what we want yeah. I didn't want you to not notice by the end of the season. You just feel more engaged. I think he gets a really great thing for a podcast host or anybody trying to create a podcast to realize that you can introduce and you should introduce changes every show that are tweaks to try to make it better and then of course you have the data in real time to know if it's better your downloads either go up or stay the same. Your engagement rates either go up or stay. Stay the same or draw right right. That's really interesting and reassuring to know that making at changing things up even when running is something that is okay you to do so you know from one of my tweets that i would love to know how you landed seth meyers. Maybe he's like your best friend from high school <hes> but but also you know all of your guests were compelling <hes> he he was your first at <hes> and in part. That's why i mentioned him but i would love to know how what your criteria were. When you created your hit list and how you how you landed them one word hustle hustle them. I would love to tell you there's a magic to this and so i will say that the lincoln platform is very meaningful meaningful to a lot of people because we reach half of a lot of people and we have this channel beyond. Just i think podcast discovery is very very hard right now and so we we had this channel beyond apple's itunes store spotify or wherever to help things be discovered so there's <hes> but i you know i knew generally only that i wanted to talk to a broad variety of recognizable names about what they learned in their careers and and from there i created a list of just generally people i was interested in that list was probably a hundred names long and <hes> then i went knocking and i have to say the one. The most important thing i learned is <hes> people really love podcasts. They loved the format format and if you don't knock the nobody can say no to you and so i just asked people and more people than i thought said said yes and then a by about the fourth episode i started getting incoming. I started getting people reaching out to know gene so and so is about ready to do a book in his about going book tour you know so and so got this project and wants to do it <hes> and then the you know i would say right now. My guests are it's a balance between incoming and outgoing. That's really a nice place to be yeah. So editor is the hope yeah so. Did i have to ask specifically with seth meyers does he jump at the chance to be on your show. We'll jump. Jump is not the right well. I would like to think so. Let's say let's get a jump in his office. We can say truthfully you know in seth meyers. Ours is like seth meyers is such a great kind of guest for us because people know him in his capacity as an actor is a celebrity but what they don't know about him is that in order to keep a show like his show up and running and developing you have to be very very savvy business person and specifically you so you have to be thinking about talent in really interesting ways and so we're getting somebody that people know really well on a topic that they haven't heard him and that what is the topic that we care the most about and that was the compelling thing for us. I think it was also the compelling thing for him. <hes> you know we were able to get through do we were able to get to him in the way that <hes> like. Many of us are able to get to folks which is generally like you know some. Somebody had a friends. Yes you knew a person who had you know knew someone that kind of <hes> to get in front of him but then it was our pitch that made him wanna come in an and be on the show with us and what we offered him was the opportunity to talk at length about something that was intellectually interesting to him. The other wonderful thing about podcast that really appeals guests is there. Are you know when you are a person and you're going out to do media <hes> often you are asked to speak in like you know clipped formats at three minutes segment on the today show or in you know you're doing interviews for articles also <hes> it is not a frequent occurrence that you can sit down over the course of a long period of time a half an hour and explain yourself <hes> really talking and i think that that really appeals to people did you choose half an hour specifically without a goal. We want want these episodes to run about a half an hour <hes> yea ideally i'm looking to do something that is just under a half an hour every once in a while we go oh over <hes> and my general philosophy on this which by the way i have no data to prove so this is this is my okay says that <hes> and people are listening to me on their commute and that a half an hour give or take is sort of a bow as long of oldest combat as long as it can right right okay so yeah. I'm sort of wrestling with this myself some curious at so at first. We got a lot of emails from people being like oh my goodness that was so short. It was only a half an hour. I wish it were long ago and so i went i went to my producer and i was like we gotta make it longer. They want it to be longer her and she sat me down and she said no jesse that means we are exactly at the right lane. They want more than to feel like they wish wish it. Were never want them to say that was the right. That's very interesting very interesting as i sit here and i look at my stop watch and we're or at thirty eight minutes and i still have so many things i wanna ask you well. I don't know if you have found this at all sky. I know at the beginning. My interviews were quite long. <unk> interview somebody for sixty minutes seventy five minutes in order to get the twenty two minutes that i really and one of the things that changed over the of course the season was that i sort of like i almost i almost drank in the spirit of the show and what it needed in order to succeed exceed and by the end i had a sense of it. I had a sense of the cadence of it and i could go in and get that interview in twenty five minutes good for you. Okay okay well. That's something for me to aspire too. Well and you'll be able to you. You'll look back and be like why did i talk to jesse lawn well. I feel like i'm enjoying the conversation conversation truly <hes> do you get nervous before you interview people on your podcast i get yes. I do get nervous. <hes> i'm embarrassed to say i do get nervous when i interview people who are outside of my realm so so i have covered technology and tech in media for decades yeah and people who have made their living in that even if they're significant personalities like i had melinda gates on the show angela errands on this show. I just wanna get into it with them. I am excited to talk to them. I i feel like i grasp what they do. <hes> hello monday has taken mean a new direction in my career which has has introduced <hes> people who who have big names that they made outside of media and tech like abby wambach or seth meyers and yes. I get really nervous when i sit down to interview them and you can always hear it in the first ten to fifteen minutes of the interview because i sound very clipped and like i'm reading my questions and it takes a long time for me to relax in the conversation. I have not noticed that either but i'm sure you're your own worst critic <hes> well in the power of added yeah yeah exactly exactly thank god for the editors editors. How do you prepare for interviews to do two things. The first is that i try to learn every last thing i can about them. <hes> for example ahead laura linney. I've recorded with laura linney earlier this week for a show for our second season will and <hes> yeah it was really amazing and so i started where you start which is google and i probably spent most of a day reading every last thing i can find about her trying to discern from that what she seems to be most passionate about talking about because it's been my experience regardless of what your show is about that if you can steer your interview into the realm in which somebody is passionate then the interview has an energy of its own yeah so it's trying to figure out what she most cared to talk about <hes> and then the other thing is before somebody arrives. I try to have a sense of the theme that i want to explore for the episode so that i'm not fishing which is good for my time and their time. Do you write down your do you like what do you have with you in the studio because i know that you do most of yours in person right i do. I think that i may change that up over time <hes> i i it's funny. I interviewed adam grant and it was remote. He was interviewing from his home studio and we know how each other already so we had a pre existing relationship with helped a lot <hes> but i actually found that when we weren't face to face <hes> there was a certain certain ability that we had to talk talk to each other that it was almost easier. I can't explain that exactly <hes>. What do you find. Are you doing most years person money. I'm doing no almost all of mine are remote <hes> because you know we're here in california most everyone john is a new new york certainly not everyone but a lot and at first i thought oh this is going to be a problem and then i heard someone say that terry gross like as a rule like really wants people to be remote and that gave me a little bit of hope like okay. She wants them to be remote. So i guess she feels it gives it more intimacy and i didn't have a choice and so when i started doing the interviews i did realize that you know it was nice to not have to worry. Sorry i have to say about like if i wanted to look over my notes and i wasn't looking right in there is or you know he gives you the sense of leg. Here's your domain and can you can do anything you need to do with it to get what you need from the interview without worrying about your body language. I think that that is right. <hes> i still would prefer to do my interviews in person and i think that might be a hangover from my days as a journalist <hes> because because when i was working in print and by the way i still consider myself a journalist. I still write. I haven't written this much the spring because i've been very busy with podcasting casting but i will go back to doing more of it this summer <hes> and i find that when you're doing sensitive work it really does help to be with somebody in person so that they have the body language in the whole you know the whole everything that it means to feel comfortable with another person yeah that's it it turns out that i i actually love <hes> recording remotely and i will probably do more of it for the second season. I was afraid that it would take away from the interviews but instead it does it does add it at a certain thing. Yeah yeah yeah it. Does i think you know i want to do a little bit more of the opposite and have the experience of more people coming in and then see sort of just in terms of building my own on skills as an interviewer like can i feel comfortable in that scenario. Will you just asked me if i wrote down questions. Yes yes thank you and there. There is an the answer to that which is that i write down my questions. I seriously write them down. I have a question. I have an idea of last question i take them into the room. I'd put them on the table in front of me and then immediately forget about them and never look at them again and i actually think it's probably important for process for me that i take the time to actually write down the questions on it. Also a gas communicates to the person that i'm interviewing. Hey look i take this seriously like not jumping into the seat and going wherever i go ooh <hes> but i went an interview is going well. I never look at that paper yeah. Oh that's great. I'm very admiring of that. I aspire again. I aspire to be where you are <hes>. I think it's like a security blanket. You know bring your questions in. Yes <hes> but i agree that like when you're having when you're having those is conversations that aren't tied to the paper. Those are the ones that you're probably gonna look back when you listen and feel like those were the best moments in the show <hes> yeah so so.

seth meyers jesse laura linney carolina melinda gates apple abby wambach editor producer google california spotify terry gross adam grant new york itunes seventy five minutes thirty eight minutes twenty five minutes
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"<hes> but you're also all over the world which is just mind boggling and so gratifying to see that so thank you for tuning in. I can see all on my handy little map. I really really appreciate it so today. I speak with jesse hempel. She is the host of hello monday which is lincoln's podcast it combines interviews with people like abby wambach and seth meyers with original reporting from her team at linked in and i wanted to speak with her about the making of that show and it was also super excited to talk to jesse because for one thing i've followed her career for many years she wrote for publications like fortune and wired for almost two decades but also because she lamey was relatively new to podcasting and so i just loved are back and forth and i hope you enjoy it too <hes>. We really get into the nitty gritty of what it's like to build a podcast from scratch rach for the first time. I really hope that you enjoy it. I know that i really.

jesse hempel abby wambach seth meyers lincoln two decades
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I mean, look that was an experiment, and I remember actually so yes, oh bunch of people wrote in and I turned their commentary into second PS Senate put that out and then that got more conversation. Yeah. That was that was super gratifying, you know, when I think about that piece. I actually think about a very long I'm like. Seven hundred word long message that I got from an an engineer working at Facebook who just read this on linked in and just felt like he had so much to say about it that he needed to get in touch with me insure it, and like the level of participation in my work. I think that I I think he reads wired to and I think that he would read this to you. But he would have had no way to interact with me. So like, my the thing that I will learn how to do at Lincoln is then take when something like that happens figure out how to give it to you the the audience in a meaningful way. And I don't know that I figured that out yet. Like that that follow up piece. It was okay. In the old days. I would just if someone wrote me relenting note, I'd say, can I publish this? And they'd say, yes. And I'd read a paragraph on top of it. And you know cynically it made eight us is cheap and easy way for me to make content. But I'm like, look I'd rather often I'm often I'm retailing someone else's thoughts and ideas anyway. So let's so let's just present it straightforward. They'll do a better job. And also it's easier for me to post you've been covering Silicon Valley inciteful leave for a long time. What is the one do over you want? Whether it's a story or a theme or an idea something you missed. I'll have love that question. Trying to come up with the lake job interview answer to that question where the word promise that I just care too much later if you want if you wanna think about it for a second. I mean, I can answer I can answer my versions. This is the one that I mean, many of us are grappling with I'm still really grappling with which is you were talking about how there was this period where we were all excited about sort of the disruptive nature of the internet. And specifically I would think about this media, and how existing media companies we're going to be blown up or changed radical ways. And I still am really interested in that. But that's kind of the only ones I was using to think about Twitter and Facebook, and I really wasn't thinking about what it meant for the people who were using Facebook. I was thinking more sort of what does Facebook can do to NBC or Disney or the New York Times, and how will the New York Times distribute their stuff, and you know, that's been my focus for a long time. And it's worked that. Well. But I think I did miss a big story. And I think a lot of us did. And by the way, you can see vox Berg in real time going what he's talking about. Facebook's not involved in the elections after the election. I think he meant it. It was he didn't have his head around that idea. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I, of course echo. What you have to say on that. I mean, I I was for a long time in the beginning of the web two point oh era. I was as obsessed with what the future might look like the people that I was writing about an optimistic beyond measure about the inventions. They were introducing a positive in their capability to connect us to each other. And they didn't ever consider the necessity of friction in connection and how friction serves us. And now it's been all of my time thinking about how to introduce the kind of mission that will serve us. You've got a piece relatively recently of that seems like your attempt to sort of counter the counter, which is we work..

Facebook Senate New York Times engineer Lincoln vox Berg Twitter Disney NBC
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I think about podcasting blogging when I I I mean, it's, you know, there was a moment when everybody could blog, and then we quickly realized that that just meant that everybody could self publish, and no one is reading my blog. No, one cares. What I have to say I'm gonna stop doing it. And then a handful people figured out how to do. Do it as a job and some people turn those into businesses. Right. That's kind of where we are now. Right. Well, so I've got this podcast. It's called Hello Monday. It launched beginning of March. We have six episodes out. It is a podcast about the nature of work. And how that works changing us as we do it. It is so much fun. It is really truly experiment for Lincoln. But Lincoln because it is a tech company and has the resources to do so can invest in trying to make these spearmint work and. For you guys. Right. You've whether or not this particular iteration works, the idea of giving your audience something they can put in their years on their way to work or wherever they're going that that is somehow has a practical utility, or at least it's just interesting you now that I think that you know, we want to reach professionals wherever they are on helping get smarter about what they're doing during their day. And there are lots of times when professionals are not in front of a screen there at the treadmill at the gym. They're walking to work there commuting. And this is a great your kids. Never never all. I mean as somebody who has a new baby, I can tell you that I think that may be possible to ignore my like to think of a future in which I can ignore him for just a little bit. Turns out there is downtime with the kids haven't discovered it yet to I'm not gonna give you more parenting advice other than telling you, nor your kids, which does not seem good idea. I wanna talk about some stuff, you are you are creating at Lincoln. In the piece that really struck me was last fall the headline for any can riff on it. You wanted Silicon Valley to outgrow its Sheryl Sandberg's. Yeah. We'll I. So I love that. You referenced that piece, and it was a time. Last fall when Cheryl Sandberg was under a ton of fire by the press for her management's at Facebook over the course of the last couple of years after not being really taken to task after not being mostly. Of the criticism of the previous two years was centered. I think correctly at Mark Zuckerberg. This winter I sort of washed it as an outsider because keep in mind like I didn't really cover Facebook tomb. I wrote about it. I o pined about it as it were. But our coverage at wired when I came back to why from backchannel really belong to a team of people. We had who are really gifted and all over it. And so that freed me up to just watch right? But yeah, there was a period of time during which no one would talk about Cheryl Sandberg, and that led to a New York Times piece in the fall in everybody has something to save, Cheryl. Sambergen? I didn't wanna come it one way or the other on her management or mismanagement. I wanted to point out something that I just noticed because I've covered tech in the valley for two decades, which is from the beginning of the web two point oh era. There was this moment. When suddenly these youngsters with laptops, could like they had never been able to before start these mostly social services and VC's wanted into those companies so badly. I mean, if you. Got into Facebook. You were good. If you got shut out of Facebook. You are invested in Twitter Facebook any of these things early enough even the ones that didn't end up being successful. Like tumbler if you were early you could do that was major career you made your career, right? And so what that meant was that. Sometimes VC would make these really terrible deals terrible for the company terrible for the eco system where they would basically give all the voting power to the kid founder, and I do mean kid founder. I mean, you know, these people were in their late teens in their early twenties..

Facebook Lincoln Sheryl Sandberg Silicon Valley founder Twitter Mark Zuckerberg New York Times Cheryl two decades two years
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I mean, like when Dan came to Lincoln, Dan was the journalist he was tasked with building team when I came to Lincoln Dan, had built a team of more than fifty people working around the world on several different news products was a totally different situation. I think the only thing that a similar is that Dan had a really clear mandate, and I have a really clear mandate. And I think having a clear mandate helps you be effective at the thing that you're doing. So what is what is the mandate and just to get in for context? One. Here knows what Lincoln is. And I think everyone listening here knows that Lincoln is a giant company that's owned by a much bigger company, Microsoft, so what does Microsoft slash Lincoln slash, Dan. Roth want you to do that too? Stressed me out so much the way that you. But no, my job is to come to link, Dan and continue to write about and create media about big ideas in the same way that I was doing it wired. And so most of those products are actually to be fairly similar wired. Probably the most well read things that I wrote in the last year and a half were ideas driven pieces about the nature of how technology companies are changing their personality. So their personalities are changing, and what that means for the people who work at them. And that's a very logical story for me to tell it linked into the business slash practical slash cynical side of it. Right. They are a company that makes money from advertising improper Justin gage in general. I want people to spend time on length in and they want you to generate stuff that will bring people to in and help them Stanley because they're interested in what you're asking. In stop me, if I'm I'm wrong on this. I think what you're asking to some degree as why does Lincoln care about paying? People to create original content for the platform. You can go even further back like why do they care about? You know, why if it's just a job posting board? What why do they care about anything that isn't just about selling job postings? Clearly, they want people to hang out on the site because they get more engagement there. And then to why pay Jessi Hempel, and sort of getting the readers to do it for free, which is also something they do have. I'm going to tackle those questions in the order that US him. So Lincoln is so not just a job posting site..

Lincoln Dan Lincoln Roth Jessi Hempel Justin gage Microsoft US Stanley
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Rebecca, Jessi Hempel. Who's wearing a green address? It's called address. A great, thanks. I realized I was trying to say something positive made none of positive you gave a a full answer to my question, which I appreciate, but I have questions. I'm very interested in career changing myself. I'm just interested in how it works. No. And I did want to mention that Dan Roth has been on this show before and Dan had also done really well as a writer Bennett wired, and then went to create this content business at Lincoln. So that soon there's a connection there. I love that. You said that he was a wired, and then he came back to fortune any came back to fortune to run fortune. And I was so excited to work with him. And we got to know each other. We were friendly and then in twenty twenty eleven he came into my office. He shut the door. And he said Jesse. I've been thinking that maybe I'm gonna go to Lincoln. Do you think that's a crazy idea? And he'd obviously everybody else there before me and everybody else had told him. It was a crazy idea. And I told him absolutely should go do that. Yes. You should definitely go to Lincoln and in the back of my head. I also was like wouldn't do I wouldn't do myself. He has three little kid. That's that's seems like a great opportunity for him. He should go do that. And we've been in pretty regular Kutch of her since as that has evolved. I can't remember if we talked about I mean because he was he had a minor here from lengthen when he was on. I was little a little tight. But I I I remember we talked about this probably I'm sure we did. But I clearly member seeing him like a year after taking taken the job, and he was sitting in the office at the impair state building. And he was not happy, and he was not happy for the obvious reasons. You would think someone who'd grown up and built a really good career and aditorial would be unhappy. When they went to tech company wishes. It was a tech company the culture of media that's worked out, but I'm assuming that some of that was in your head when you when you went over as well. Well, not really because he went over twenty eleven and I went over and twenty nineteen knows where I mean that is like a couple of generations of sort of iterative of what it. Means to be journalists inside a company in the company has figured out. Why it wants to have a journalist there slash if it wants to journalists or sometimes they hire journalists go. Whoa. Whoa. This is not what we wanted at all. Journalists just be quieter clad over there the articles but stop don't cause trouble high. Yeah. I mean, it's it's a funny flirtation, right?.

Lincoln Jesse Jessi Hempel Dan Roth aditorial Rebecca Kutch writer Bennett
"jessi hempel" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"jessi hempel" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Did they talk about the implications of that about sharing more with them which is really the thing that facebook almost exclusively talked about at least for the first fifteen twenty minutes of its presentation the week before so i thought that was pretty pretty stark contrast and i do think that the reason that they showed all that stuff and they made such a big splash about it was a strategic to sort of get away from the sort of like you wave your hand over here and you wave the shiny object over here to distract the person while you re trying to grab their wallet you know in a way google was saying look at all this great stuff you can do android yeah that's that's a cynical take mike but completely agree with you and it is sort of surprising the sort of difference in the tenor between f eight an iro right people were sort of very critical of everything soccer berg and his friends announced at at facebook conference and people really looked at that with the lens of privacy security data protections and one week later that's all out the window because people really hyped about cool new things like look what you can do with ai ai i mean to you go to google credit this stuff they should off is really cool and i can see why people are sort of buying into that distraction because the demos were very impressive they they were canned there was some of them were staged of course but they were impressive one thing that are calling jessi hempel tweeted that i think is worth noting and i'm gonna paraphrase it because i don't have it in front of me but this idea that.

facebook google mike berg soccer jessi hempel fifteen twenty minutes one week