17 Burst results for "Jesse Hempel"

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Out of Work

Out of Work

10:27 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Out of Work

"Hello Monday honestly it's amazing. We started listening to it and then I would just like rapid fire. Text quotes direct quotes from the show to Semaj. Be Like yes this validates everything I was saying. Well I think what's really cool about the show. Is You know the premise is that it's trying to understand how work is changing. And how it's changing us the employees or the job seeker and a lot of the interviews are with you know really high profile people from all different walks of life whether they're like famous. TV people were like yeah big authors big tech executives all getting really real about what it was like for them to climb the ladder and what their experiences at the top and. I think it's kind of surprising. Yeah because you don't expect them to maybe view as uncertain certain about what's happened to their career. They feel just how we feel. And it's like a little bit like am I. Am I in the right place I will I will like what is the next. Yeah all of this anxiety that we talk about all the time but let's data's to is like because they are older than us and more successful they kind of like it's interesting to hear like the framework work for which they like define career and how they had a moment in their careers. Whether like you know what I'm I'm unhappy in this. I'm going to do something else or they they. I don't know it's just really great to hear their perspective on everything so to point out before we actually get into the interview You know we talk about this when a lot. Elizabeth Gilbert the author of eat pray love which by the way if you know Mitch like he's always talking about how he's going to go eat. Pray love first of all unless actually back on. When I was laid off I think like the day I was laid off? I applied to like seventeen or thirty. Who Even knows application black hole jobs and and then I was like okay? Where am I going this weekend? What miles do I have on? What Airlines and hotels and what would be like a therapeutic era -peutic trip that I can realistically take knowing that until Td? I won't have a patrono money. And that ended up being the dry from San Francisco Cisco to L. A.. Down thanks I can't okay. It was beautiful ahead. Great efforts on no. It's so nice but I just eat pray love. It wasn't like was it eat. Pray love like the book. No it was just me like traveling these home. Like what Mitch. Just like like going to like you know find yourself. Mitch was loving and on all of his instagram posts. It was like eat. Pray Love Yeah like I also a Taurus. So it's really all about self care so in a moment met like that. It's like okay like what is what am I doing for myself right now. That will make me feel good about the situation and then I can come back and like hit the ground running again so we got up. Got Off track. Sorry I just had I had to make you guys aware of the Mitch's e pray loving but Yeah Elizabeth Gilbert. She talks about job versus career. Very sorry John You know is job versus career hobby versus Keisha. Yeah and and it's so interesting because we kind of think about career as this very narrow thing where it's like you know if you follow your passion if you're just chasing the money whatever like your career is what you do for the the rest of your life but she kind of breaks it down. A hobby is something you enjoy doing. And you don't care if you get paid a job is something you don't really care about so you need the paycheck. A career is something that like. Maybe you're more invested in right past job you care about your career you care about the money as well and in a vocation is like something you're committing your life to you're so passionate about it it doesn't tremendous attached. Yeah Yeah and I just think that was really interesting to break down because I think so. Many of us approach career from the lens of it has to be our rights entity. Yeah and like maybe. It's just a job. Maybe that Jonah say it's okay realization that I've just come to now and it's just freed me so much as just like you don't have to find your passion and your job. We know you can have that. Like emotional connection outside of work and that's healthy too well and there was. There was this kind of concept onset in their. If like you know if you don't like your career and like if you hate your career just quit and he got a job. I love that I'm obsessed with that quote which you know there's also another episode hit on real quick which was the former head of Google carbs and she kind of talked about how she found herself in columns and at Google worked all the way up to the top and then she realize you know. Is this really what I kind of just kept snowballing and I mean identified identified with that episode. That's on so many levels like I found my job I found myself with like titles. I honestly don't make any sense but like I just did it because it was like. Oh this is an opportunity and kind of earlier on in my career. I was just like okay. I'll just go where the opportunities are an. I'm cut a path that doesn't fully make sense but I was just like okay. This is fine. This is fine and then you're like wake up and you're like wait. How did I get here? We talk about that too where we know a lot of people who come in Rhianna college and like this is what I went and this is my goal and I'm getting there and we're really we more like this is how I feel today right. You know like I don't know what that means. Next year I feel like that's generally not frowned upon and and it shouldn't be because it's like I don't know if having a ten year plan not necessarily the way I want to approach life we'll also because then when you don't make it or you something something goes wrong. You're like Oh God you put your whole all your eggs in that fast. Yeah whereas this at least like you know I just feel like Kinda can go with the flow. It can be a little bit stressful. But it is it's freeing well. We are very excited instead of us. Kind kind of recapping all the episode. We're GONNA get straight alert. I mean they're really good you should. You should listen. You should interview go ahead and head over there but but I yeah. Please listen to our interview with Jesse Hempel. Host of Lincoln's. Hello Monday today Jessi Hempel. She's the senior editor at large and the host of the podcast. Hello Monday which is put together by the editorial team over at Clinton Jesse. Thanks so much for being here really excited. You're here today. I'm excited to be here. We really we got connected because I saw you. Do you want TV kind of doing a segment about resume gaps. And how. Maybe this isn't a problem really. This really spoke to me specifically obviously because I'm growing I'm building resume cap rate now because I'm not currently working so I'm like Oh this is really relevant to me like. Is this going to hurt me and my job search but like we tweeted at you and like we got connected and we started listening to your show. And it's just so much about it that I feel like really resonates to any audience but I feel like it really speaks like both me and Cammie felt like you know for a millennial audience. It was really interesting to hear these high profile. People like talk so emotionally Louis about work. Yeah just felt great like the perspective that you don't ever. These people are at the top of their field and yet they're opening up about how what you know. They're not satisfied in their career and it was just or or maybe not satisfied anymore. They probably worth some. Yeah Yeah Yeah but the but the concept of like you know I thought it was it really said about kind of like that idea like the job versus hobby versus your career versus vocation that that's something that I feel like. We need to talk about more as we will. I I love that you start there right because This idea of what a career is is such a murky rickie idea in and people have so many different different sort of ideas from led. The career is your job in your work and it is what you should be doing over the course of your adulthood wanted to Elizabeth Gilbert's idea which is like career Sh- Maria you have to work for my age. You should do things you love. And they don't have to be paired right. Why do you I think so? Many people kind of don't have that perspective because it really does feel like you know we're primed from elementary school middle school. It's gotta be like the top of your class awesome highschool gotta get into the Best College and it's not even that it's just like no and then this is your passion like you have to find something that alliance with out eighteen. Yeah Yeah right right. I love the you mentioned that Kenny because I just think about the advice that my own parents gave me and it was like it was such good hearted advice based on their experience in the world and they told me like go to school. Go to college and find the thing you love to do. And I'd be curious if that was the advice that you guys Scott along the way for your parents percent. I don't think it's wrong. Necessarily it is worse well intentions. It doesn't doesn't necessarily make your career easier though it also makes you feel like you're sort of set up to fail if you don't find that passion like or if you fall out of love with what you thought you were passionate about right right. I mean I don't know about you all that I'm forty four right now and what I love to do when I was twenty. Two in coming into the workforce so different than what I love to do now in the idea that I could find one thing and have that thing be the thing even if I could be successful at it from the get-go which by the way is not the case for most people. The idea that I would do one thing for the entirety of my career is kind of a head scratcher. Well yeah because like I just feel like humans you evolve you change as a person college to your thirties. And I'm sure from your thirties forties like I. I am so different than the person I was when I graduated college. And it has it been ten years. Maybe maybe I don't know if it's been that long so it is. It is interesting just like this narrative errative that like these people who had very successful careers. Say No you don't have to love your career. You can't walk away from and you know.

Elizabeth Gilbert Mitch Jesse Hempel Google Semaj Jonah instagram Clinton Jesse Keisha San Francisco Scott Cisco Best College Lincoln elementary school middle schoo Cammie Louis
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Business Wars

"Feel the man's eyes narrowing and boring into him and he tries not to show his fear but he knows there's now a target on his back. A few weeks later rusty finds himself tied up in the back of a truck with other son made holdouts. After what feels like an hour. The truck finally stops does. The door opens the Sun. Made men grabbed the farmers roughly throwing them out of the truck. Let's go up against that tree now. He kicks the man next to Rusty to emphasize his point among the farmers are tied to a fig tree rusty stares at the man pushing them around around there are blonde hair and blue eyes are in stark contrast with the ethnic features of the farmers. They've tied up Scandinavians. And and Armenians have both been in the valley since the late. Eighteen hundreds growing raisins were the scandinavians were welcomed by the upper crust with open arms. The Armenians Armenians were not one of the Sun made men cracks a whip with one hand. He holds up a contract in his other. All you have to do is sign your raisins over to Sun made and all this will be over. None of the farmers move the man with the whip size. I guess we're doing this. The hard way Whipping again jr rusty looks the man right in the as the whip slashes Che's Rusty's legs and torso. He won't give him the satisfaction of wincing one by one the farmers around him give in they. They signed the contracts. They get to rusty he to signs but he has a trick of his sleeve. He makes sure to get as much of his blood is he can on the paper. What is this? We can't turn in a bloody contract. Let it go we have enough signatures for tonight. Rusty manages a small grin he may be bloody and beaten but he is still an independent farmer rusty survives the night and he never signs with Sun made the Eke out a living as an independent raisin farmer until his death in nineteen in sixty to forty years son maids power will be unmatched by the nineteen sixties. One Unlikely Lee farmer will dig in his heels. And he'll challenge son maids hold and shake up the raisin industry. Hey I wanNA talk with you for just a moment about our sponsor courts you know about courts right courses full of creative intelligent journalism. It was founded in two thousand twelve for a new kind of business leader it quartz they take you outside. The breaking news cycle the Cable News. And all that kind of stuff. You go way beyond help you better understand how the world your work and your place in both are changing for example. Have you ever wondered what Bill Gates might do if he could turn back the clock when he was fifteen. Don't you think about it. I actually saw video interview with Microsoft founder on courts talking about that very thing. Something else I saw courts was a fascinating dating piece on how Silicon Valley's becoming an increasingly powerful political force not just a tech force. These are the deep dives that you'll find in courts. These are stories that go way beyond the mainstream stories that make you think about where you and your business might fit into this changing world but look. I'm only scratching the surface office if you become a quartz member even more incredible content opens right up to you from exclusive guides video series and presentations to conference conference calls. They give you one on one access to courts. Journalists and experts courts is offering listeners of business or something very special fifty percent off off your first year of membership just go to cousy dot com click become a member and then enter code. B W with no space. That's that's Promo Code. BWI No space to get fifty percent off your first year of membership with quartz. Over the course of lifetime the average average person spends more than one hundred fifteen thousand hours at work. Wow that's about thirteen years so finding a way to make work more rewarding fulfilling filling and enjoyable is pretty much guaranteed to be a good use of your time. Don't you think linked ends new podcast. Hello Monday with Jesse. Hempel is back for season two brought to you by linked in editorial team. This podcast tackled how to get the most for Monday. Whether your office is a skyscraper in midtown or spare bedroom upstairs each week host Jessi vehicle sits down with featured guests to investigate the row workplace in our lives and uncover lessons. You can apply to your own career so whether you're five hours into your first job we're have just five hundred left till retirement. You'll be ready to take on Monday and the rest of the work week for that matter with the knowledge to shape your own future find. Hello Monday with Jesse. Hempel on apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

jr rusty Sun Rusty Lee farmer Hempel Bill Gates Jesse Jessi vehicle Silicon Valley Microsoft apple
"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Covers basis if I can't get what I need from you would meals throughout the rest of the day and if you WanNa give Athletic Greens to try they're offering a free twenty count travel pack for first time users I nearly always travel with at least three or four of these bags in other words if you buy Athletic Greens as a first time buyer you now get for a limited time and extra seventy nine dollars in free product so check out the details athletic Greens dot com forward slash tim again that's athletic. Greens dot com forward slash Tim for your free travel pack with any purchase this episode is brought to you by Lincoln's hello Monday Hella Monday is a podcast hello Monday with Jesse Hempel is back for season two in the show is full of advice practical tactical advice that you can start using today each week Jesse sits down with featured guests to investigate the role workplace in their lives how it can be integrated into your life and how to make work work for you better this season one of the first episodes is with Jerry Colona who's been called the CEO Whisper I've actually done quite a bit of work with Jerry and he is one of the world's most in-demand executive coaches amongst the startup ecosystem in the episode Jerry shares is perched meetings explains how to ask good open ended questions and you also goes through his I to daily journaling among other things journaling can really create an incredible competitive advantage and also act as an emotional rebalancing all of sorts so I recommend taking look at it giving listen more accurately so whether you're starting your first job or gearing up for retirement hello Monday helps you tackle Monday the rest of the work week with tactics and strategies that you can use check it out find hello Monday with Jesse Hempel that's J. E. S. h. e. m. p. l. beings look yep hello Monday on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts well hello boys and girls is verison welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss Show where it is my job every episode to attempt to deconstruct world class performers of all different types to tease out the routines favorite books habits and so on that you may apply to your own life my guest this.

Jerry Colona Jesse Hempel tim Apple CEO Lincoln executive J. E. S. h. e. m. p. seventy nine dollars
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

21:53 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Good Life Project

"My previous book was called Leston wonder and that was a memoir and I felt like that's the last memoir because if you sort of read running with scissors you find hello Monday with Jesse Hempel on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts it's interesting to me because when you do that though you're at a point where like you said you kind of got you've got the trilogy and the other books out there you're and you're you're absolutely known for not holding back being very honest and very raw and very real it's like well I would imagine a lot of people whoa what else could there be that you would actually say this will never come out and what it is just kind of Title I would always when people would ask me is there anything that you I mean a lot of what I've written is not flattering to me I'm totally fine with that I mean I I've made a lot of mistakes I mean yeah bad stuff happened to me but I also did awful things I did awful things I'm not gonna you know spit shine that it's just is what is when people would ask me is there anything about your life that's off limits I would always reply no no now I would nope and it never dawned on me that I was not being truthful not being transparent that in fact there was something about myself that is such a huge part of myself and has been my entire life but it's something that I had never told anyone not my husband my best friend something that my mother and I share shared my aunt which was my grandmother's sister the women in her family when I would visit down in Cairo Georgia that Swin I could talk about this aspect of my personality of my being but every day with my mother so running with scissors is about my mother in the throes of mental illness in chaos and you know she was a character and she was funny and crazy and but she was very a very different before mental illness and miss medication ravaged her mind so what happened was I was on a bus in this is what the book is about I was I was tormented in elementary school bullied all the time lots of different things but I always used to space out what they called it when I'd be blank just blank and I wouldn't have thought in my head and I'm still like that I'll be looking off somewhere like this will happen to me when I'm backstage I'll be like really I guess I look intense because I'm staring someone will say I'm sorry you look through deep thought but just want to let you know five more minutes but truth is I don't have a thought in my head so is on the bus I was eight and I was always like the hump seat so when you get on the bus I was on the beside the drivers on Dirt Road in their little bridges the bus had to go over to my house and I felt the bump on the first bridge and staring out the window and it's just a blur my eyes are now focused so it's just a blur blur of trees and then I remember they happened at the same time the second bump of the bridge and my grandmother it's like the bump the bump knocked my grandmother's head into my head and she was bloody and it's difficult to put into words it what it is it was knowledge it was something very very bad has happened to my grandmother now and the bus stopped just a few seconds later I got out of the bus Iran up the driveway rang the door Bang Bang Bang mother answers she's got the phone cord pulled from the kitchen all out to the front door I am frantic my grandmother I called her Alma wasn't that with Obama what happened to them to Alma things wrong with Alma and my Mother Cup Trahan the phones at what something happened to Allah what Snyder with Alma my mother went back to phone speaking to her brother Mercer yes mercer Chris just came in my name was Chris because I changed my name legally when I was eighteen so I was born Chris in my mother's saying okay Yup what you call me and my mother hung the phone up and she said Okay what did you say and I said something bad has happened to Alma and she said that was your uncle mercer calling from the hospital grandmother's been in a car accident and she has a punctured lung and lacerated forehead but she's going to be okay I said she's going to be okay okay and I said mom how did I knew that and my mom other this terrain just look on her face of like surprise us relief joy d Eli mischief I mean it was just and she she sort of got down order needs to my level I'm really distraught in her face is not matching the situation and she took me in her arms and she said because you a my son and I was like okay what does that mean this mom had she sits me down and she says do you know what a witch looks like the wizard of Oz like you know I like the I like the bad which better than good which seemed airheaded and stupid and my mother was like well yes that's beside the point but which is do not have green pointed green face noses in ward pointy hats which is look like me and your grandmother and Y'all Curtis and they look like you and I said wait witch she said indeed but I didn't know that until now saying that when my brother was born she thought it was something different about him but it was not he hadn't inherited the gift and when I came along she she just thought she had to normal one odd but to non which in then she had her confirmation that so thus began relationship with my mother were after school every day come home I'd sit she painted she wouldn't look at me much but she would teach me about what what this is so my mother was a very she was creative person she's artistic but she's also very scientific all women among other side were my grandmother was a scholar Latin scholar my great aunt Curtis I call my honors actually a great aunt curtis was she program satellite and she was a mathematician worked for bell laboratories and my mother had read Albert Einstein's theory of relativity I mean the day that it was translated and understood it completely and had me read it from a very very early the agent She was off physics scholar and a scientist and so she taught me okay which witchcraft most natural thing in the world it's not supernatural to hyper natural it soon she wasn't saying this is some sort of mystical thing is let me describe integration into the laws of science yes it is something neurological people do not understand it's it's an absolutely natural thing but it's personal private thing because if you tell people I knew my grandmother was injured in a car accident even though she was two thousand miles away the they are going to think you're crazy so we don't talk about it it's something we never talk about because people don't understand it and you'll be a joke and I got that 'cause I was teased enough so I wasn't going to be a joke she she taught me that you know look there's different people practice magic in different ways and there's people who are very ceremonial we're not she explained and that it is about incredible focus it is not wanting with she said two things you know this there's there's many many sides it's a complicated thing and it's not even even of course she didn't understand it all but my moments of spacing out she said that's an enormous gift for receiving in nation information about events that are perhaps happening right now but her distant or that have happened have occurred but we haven't reached that moment yet on the time line we don't understand my mother said time is we think it's the thing on our watch our watches measuring but we don't we don't understand what it is real early she talked about that was in terms of you know sort of having a sense of one quality many witches have is like a sense of something about to happen that is or sense about another person or that kind of but also of conjuring causing something to occur swing to happen and my mother in structed me it's not about wanting it's about certainty it is certainty based on very powerful focus so to hone in refined my focus yes we built together what's called a memory palace and she taught me that you know before long before the written word people will remember things by building houses in their minds castles in their minds and they would so they would design a house in their head and they would every day they would think about it so you walk in the front door to the right there's going to be this long chest how many drawers does the chest have well let's think let's give the chest six doors so in the first drawer of that chest when you walk in let's put a key in there mm all through the house so everything you know furnished and some other would then you know sometimes say Prius you know in the room with the white canopy where is the Lilac Pin and I'd be like oh well that's in the chest underneath the black cats that white box and that helped me hold an image in my mind because in order for to make something happen when you have to focus you've to see you have to see unwavering with with such clarity and such penetrating intensity something happens something happen opens and a thing occurs thing that you wanted to occur the decided has occurred occurs but not always I remember heading dream as a kid enervate about this in the book having a dreamer I'm I mean a room with people and I'm able to float over them you know like hover so of course when I wake up I'm trying that and I go to my mother and I'm like I had this dream and I could float and I'm trying to float and she said so why do you think it is you couldn't is above the room in hover and that was like because maybe I wanted it or may intent wasn't strong enough and she said enough is because you cannot levitating in a room full of people we can't do that you can't you can't do something it's not possible we knew many things that people think are not possible but cannot defy any laws of the universe however we can appear to defy laws of the universe because the laws of the universe are not properly understood but no you can't hover just like you can't snap your fingers on your face shabby which to make a baked Alaska appear on the table that's not a thing you can do in real life so that has been a pardon me all my life totally taken for granted talk about just a private thing and I never got it so whenever I would have a weird feeling about something it was like I was given information it was like I was given a professional briefing I didn't doubt it you know I was like I just acted on it so when you when you sit down great Dane next to healing and just using your words destroy your computer getting this all out and then you realize this is a book and then you realize okay so this is the one thing that has been a through line in my life since I was born I've been trained largely transfer invest so much but but not this one thing and now you know this is not just sharing this with my husband my friends but this is actually taking this one piece putting into the form of a book and putting it out into the world did you have any more I'm curious what your internal with your self talk was around that and whether it was different compared to anything you've written completely different no I've never been afraid to publish a book in this one was totally terrified the whole time dreading publication day like I've never dreaded any back because I get it I really get it on my God now he's a witch I mean I'm the thing that kids drip dress up at house at Halloween if I weren't a witch I wouldn't believe in it and I would privately make fun of people who were I mean I would I'd be like again which that's precious you know so I I it's so easy for me to get into that head space to see it's easy for me to not be me and look at me and be like Oh my God but here's the thing I actually think that the thing that we call which or witchcraft as my husband says it needs a new name and new PR agent I think it's something that that is not part of every body part of a lot of people and more developed in I it is leftover you know if you think about our very earliest days on this planet as human beings when the mother the woman was home with the children the man roommate was out on a trip to gather food if something dangerous occurred at home if you know Bob cat showed up or a bear though that woman she she needs to kind of text her hus- insane you gotta get the fuck home now dude because there's a you.

Jesse Hempel Apple
"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Journal.

"Host Jessi hempel talks to people about work like it how to change it and even how to love it subscribe to Hello Monday with Jesse hempel wherever you listen to podcasts witnesses they want to testify yesterday the trump administration sent Pelosi a letter saying it would not participate in the entire impeachment process and in blocked one of those witnesses Gordon Sunland from testifying today on the show what might Gordon Sandline no and where is the impeachment inquiry headed now welcome to the journal our show about money business empower. I'm Kate lamble and I'm Ryan Canoe Tsa it's Wednesday October ninth I think Washington has felt like everything is moving much quicker than usual our colleague Rebecca Ball House covers the White House house Democrats for the last nine months have been trying to get documents and information out of the White House and the White House's block them at nearly every turn but since the of announced this impeachment inquiry they have started moving much faster and they issued subpoenas almost immediately and they've already gotten one person to testify which is a lot better than than the track record that they had had previously and everybody is I think just trying to keep up with who all these people are because these are all characters until a couple of weeks ago nobody was really talking about one of those people that nobody was talking about with Gordon Sunland the US ambassador to the e U Gordon Somboon is someone who he was nominated by trump in May twenty eighteen to be the ambassador to the European Union and he someone who had no oh previous diplomatic experience he got rich developing hotels but after trump won the election he donated one million dollars to trump's in girl fund and we've seen a lot of donors who gave to either trump's campaign or his inauguration subsequently went on to get these plum posts in the administration including several ambassadors last week ambassador Sunland became somebody Democrats really wanted to talk to they thought he could help answer a key question for their impeachment inquiry was there a quid pro quo with Ukraine ever since the rough transcript was released by the White House of trump's call with Ukrainian resident we know that trump pressed foreign leader to investigate Joe Biden his political rival so that question has been answered the only unanswered questions and to what extent there was any sort of quid pro quo between Ukraine agreeing to investigate Joe Biden and election interference the US aid to Ukraine and a White House meeting between trump and the landscape Ukrainian president so in other words the Ukrainian government wanted to the things they wanted a meeting with president trump and they also wanted this military aid and president trump wanted the Ukrainians to investigate Joe Biden so the question is was there sort of in exchange promised between those two things right that's the question is to what extent was this presented as a if you do this venue get this the reason Democrats believe Sawn Land right have information about this is because of testimony they got last week from one of Sunland colleagues at the State Department a special envoy to Ukraine named Kurt Volker Kurt Volker testified last Thursday in what he provided to the House Fed the Democrats concerns I think the biggest thing emerged from his testimony was text messages and now we're learning more about the text messages made public dozens of text messages text messages here to show top US officials dangling a potential White House visit as leverage to get Ukraine to investigate trump's rivals so the evening Volcker testified I believe it was about eleven pm because I was about to go to sleep we got this released from the House of a bunch of text messages between Volker Sunland Rudy Giuliani the president's lawyer I guess there's no going to sleep at that point there is in fact no going to sleep at that point right I think it's about ten pages of text messages but it's a lot to digest this is already a complicated story and this added new characters and new information who are the characters involved in these text messages so the main card here's our we have volcker the US Special Representative for Ukraine Negotiations Gordon Sunland the US ambassador to the European Union The new character who is introduced is bill Taylor who was a top US diplomat in Akaev volkers text messages were sent between July and September in reading them you get a sense of the things that the trump administration wanted from Ukraine and the things that Ukraine wanted from the US according to the next the trump administration wanted the Ukrainians to make a public announcement about a corruption investigation that would specifically mentioned two things first the Ukraine would investigate Burri small group the energy company were Joe Biden's son had a board seat and second that they would look into an unsubstantiated claim that Ukraine interfered in the twenty sixteen election as for what Ukraine wanted the texts show that they were very interested in arranging a meeting between trump and Ukraine's president Wlodimierz Alinsky and the texts also show that the Ukrainians were aware that the trump administration had put on old millions of dollars of military aid that they'd been expecting and it's at this point that we begin to text messages from that new character Rebecca engined Bill Taylor atop US diplomat in Ukraine. The bill Taylor texts or possibly the most striking part of this whole release what Bill Taylor says is is really what House Democrats have been wondering so he asks or we now saying that security assistance and the White House meeting conditioned on investigations and what's on sunland called the president and spoke to him and then sunland response to tailor to save that he's incorrect about President trump's intentions that the president has been crystal all clear no quid pro quos of any kind and then he says let's stop the back and forth by text so bill Taylor I asked if this military aid in the White House meeting are conditioned on these investigations and Gordon Sunland replies call me and then the second time Taylor except his concerns about this some replies there's no quid pro quo of any kind that's right so that's what Sunland was texting to Bill Taylor but last week we learned sunland was also talking to someone else a Republican senator who frequently defense anything that's being missed in all of this and it's that I confronted the president back in August about whether there was a quid pro quo between aid and these investigate nations and trump adamantly denied that there was any kind of quid pro quo and so we asked a wide withholding and the desire for these investigations to happen in Ukraine so sunland at least according to Johnson Johnson came away with that so house Democrats wanted to talk to on this week back before his testimony was blocked what do you think they wanted to ask him I think there was a wide array of questions that they plan to ask him I think a big part of it was going to be these text messages and his conversation with Ron Johnson so some of the questions Democrats Might Wanna ask are what exactly did you tell Ron Johnson about any link between aid to Ukraine and investigations what did you talk about with the president in that five hour App between when Bill Taylor asked if there was a quid pro quo and you assured him there wasn't one were you ever told that there was any link between formation come out of Volcker's testimony so I think Washington was sort of preparing itself for another deluge of information and then head of his scheduled deposition the State Department notified the US ambassador to the European Union he should not show up for his testimony before Congress after the break the White House strategy combat impeachment starts to take shape.

Bill Taylor sunland Gordon Sunland president Ukraine trump White House Johnson Johnson Gordon Sandline Jessi hempel Washington US Jesse hempel Kate lamble Pelosi Volcker State Department Congress
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Welcome to a brand new week of the program Sottile School My name is Chris Gil Lebow your host a special announcement before we begin this week those listening in real time at least tickets to the twenty twenty world domination summit are going on sale tomorrow Guinness for those in real time that would be October eighth two thousand nineteen if you're listening maybe like church twenty-five well we had this thing called world domination summit and it happened but hey if you're in real time go to school dot com slash w. yes to learn more. This will be our tenth annual celebration in Portland Oregon next summer with all kinds of remarkable people including many of our listeners maybe some other authors or podcasters follow so if you want to come and see what it's all about just check it out again side-hustle school dot com slash wd yes also google world domination summit you'll see thousands of independent reviews okay I want to show in today's story a recent college graduate creates a clothing brand from ground up based on a popular instagram account that he acquires really interesting story here I'll tell you how it all works. He only posted about his products twice a month everything else is all about community and celebrating the city he lives in just in Portland Oregon my city as well but despite his limited promotion he now owns a retail store in addition to a thriving ecommerce business okay so we could say this is a story about jumping on an opportunity and giving it all you've got a combination of circumstance taking advantage of that opportunity then just working really hard he has a great deserves all his success we're GONNA call the story popular instagram account becomes fashionable clothing brand that story is coming up in just thirty seconds silence law school is do you buy linked in now let's talk today about Monday's many of us don't even crack a smile until noon but what if Monday or something you created with excitement or at the released a grin. Lincoln's new podcast hello Monday with Jesse Hempel is back for season two to help you do just that each week join Jesse and her guests she continues to explore the ever changing world of work how to like it how to change it and maybe even how to love it hello Monday with Jesse Hempel on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts and when Marcus Harvey graduated from the University of Oregon moved back to his hometown of Portland he entered into a partnership where he co brand Herald Design Agency that process he became an expert in clothing design screen printing in Fashion Marketing Agency started picking up clients here and there the local to Portland that's when Marcus began to appreciate his city a whole new way there are a lot of great companies in the area and he wanted to not only help them design products but elevate their brand recognition as a personal project marcus convince the owner of the Portland Account on Instagram to sell him the handle name for fifteen hundred Fox now at the time this is a few years ago and the Ad Portland Account was being run by middle aged ad somewhere on the east coast with no connection to Portland Oregon who mostly posted pictures of his aw so he wasn't actually using the account he just happened to be the one that registered at Portland at some point so marcus purchase that account and then used it to post pictures of the city because the name was so simple a lot of people have found organically some people were searching for local events or tourist hotspots some tag him and their photos without realizing it and so without much work at all Marcus got his first few hundred new followers after a few weeks he began to mention in the captions that other people wanted their photos featured on the page they should include the Hashtag Portland northwest Portland w when they posted in the coming weeks mark has got dozens of high quality images which he quickly reposted twice a day every day like clockwork with credit to the original photographer between all the tagging in back and forth engagement with Portland natives the account just grew and grew three thousand followers eight thousand twenty thousand consistent posting didn't just make for a good looking feet it created a digital community around Portland and beyond Marcus had tapped into something that wanted to exist but didn't have a hub for communication that's when he realized he was sitting on something more his unlisted followers were just as passionate about Portland is he was so in late two thousand fourteen marcus began working on an idea after seeing some poorly designed cliche and uninspired Portland themed clothing he realized he could do better hand that people deserved better that's when he created his first iconic design a capital letter P the shape of the state of Oregon making up the center hole in the letter in November a year and a half after creating the account and sixty thousand followers later marcus in a few dozen t shirts from a local screener and set up his new website Portland Gear Dot Com. He wasn't sure if anyone would want to buy his shirt design but was such a large following it seemed like a no brainer to try that was on Thanksgiving the next day was black Friday so it seemed like as good as any to tell everyone about the new t shirt he posted a quick image of the shirt mockup and told followers where they could go to order. Marcus remembers it being rainy morning. He was walking through the streets of Portland when suddenly his phone vibrated vibrated again and it didn't stop within twenty four hours Marcus it sold over five thousand dollars worth of t shirts he immediately reinvest within a few months he had made shirts in different colors then he made a sweatshirt then he created a hat with that popular appeal logo at some point he briefly considered thing alone so that you could open up some stores take out ads and scale quickly but never felt right building community organically had been the true key to success so far he knew it was the most authentic way to keep celebrating the city he lopped so he made a new role for himself he would only post about his products twice per month that would ensure that only eight posts about his products on the Portland Page Marcus had sold over thirteen hundred pieces of apparel in Twenty fifteen marcus began getting messages from local event hazars and nonprofits asking about potential partnerships once again he didn't have a big strategy was mostly concerned with authenticity to the organization or event align is goal of elevating Portland and it's people if so he would work with them to create partnered items over the years since he's creat shirts for pride a breast cancer awareness this local mental health organization breeze coffee shops and more now sitting at three hundred and thirty eight thousand followers the Portland instagram it's still marcus's number one referral source for Portland Gear Dot Com and his two year old Portland gear retail store and he's still only posts about his products Vermont.

Portland Marcus Oregon instagram Sottile School Chris Gil Lebow google Guinness Jesse Lincoln Vermont five thousand dollars twenty four hours thirty seconds two year
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Up First

Up First

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Up First

"Are An impeachment inquiry accelerates as the house subpoenas Rudy Giuliani end president trump reportedly asked Australia's prime minister to help the DOJ investigation. What did he ask for exactly? I'm Steve Inskeep with Noel King and this is up I from NPR news China's this Communist Party Mark Seventy years in power with pageantry tanks drones and missiles rolled through Beijing in Hong Kong people viewed the same anniversary differently what is China's president saying to them as they staged demonstrations again. There are some worries that Beijing might step in and shut this down stick with us. We've got the news you need to start your day support for NPR and the following message come from honest committed to better for you. Organic options for all honest products are fair fair trade certified and when you choose to drink and honest beverage money goes to fairtrade certified suppliers to help support their communities visit honest tea dot com. Tom Slash podcast to learn more support also comes from Lincoln's new podcast hello Monday with Jesse hempel back for season two each week join Jesse and her guests as they discussed the changing nature of work fine hello Monday with Jesse hampel on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen the Democrats conducting an impeachment inquiry are looking into one of president trump's closest allies the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani has been at the center of White House efforts to get you crane to investigate Joe Biden one of the president's political rivals even as the controversy has built Giuliani continues to push unsubstantiated declaims like the one we are about to hear which is from Fox News last night. Joe Biden was sent to Ukraine to impart deal with corruption and he helped to corrupt the Ukraine. He is a laughing stock. We are again no evidence of that whatsoever now. A House Committee wants to know more about the role that Giuliani Johnny has played in talking with Ukrainian officials and House leaders have issued a subpoena for documents related to his communications with Ukraine. NPR Justice this report or Ryan. Lucas has been following this as it develops good morning good morning so why was Rudy Giuliani subpoenaed as you said Julianna has been the man in the middle of this. He's been pushing these allegations allegations against against Biden for months in its subpoena the House Intelligence Committee says that it is looking into allegations that Giuliani acted as an agent of president and trump in what they call a scheme to advance trump's personal political interests by abusing the power of the office of the President This is a subpoena for records at this point. It's not for testimony. Testimony lawmakers are asking for documents related to Giuliani's communications with Ukrainians. I've asked Giuliani about this subpoena. He told me in a text message last night that lawmakers aren't even making pretense of fairness in all of this and he says that in the subpoena there's there's quite a lot to consider so. How did you get involved involved in all this in the first place? Guiliani says that he first got wind of the Biden allegations about a year ago and since then he's met with Ukrainians to as he puts it to try to gather evidence evidence that would clear his client and his client of course is president trump. A key meeting in his efforts took place in early August in Spain that is where he met with a senior adviser to Ukraine's president he gave advisor information that he'd collected about Biden and Biden's alleged improprieties important say again that Giuliani's allegations are unproven even and in fact the evidence actually contradicts it. Giuliani says that this meeting in Spain was facilitated by Kurt Volker at that time Volcker was the US special representative to Ukraine under the State Department Volker resigned on Friday he's actually going to sit down with house investigators this week for an for an interview why would Kurt Walker who works for the State Department helped set Giuliani up with Ukrainian officials. That is a good question. broadly speaking volkers role at state was to help support Ukraine crane in its in its democratic reforms. There has been a lot of negative news about Ukraine over the past year about its corruption a bunch of other things the conservative -servative media here in the US is really zeroed in on that and Giuliani has as well and Giuliani has been very vocal about that the Ukrainian government contacted Volcker and asked Tim to put them in touch with Giuliani now. It's my understanding that Volcker facilitated that in part because it would give the Ukrainians a chance to show Giuliani on their own that the new government in Kiev under presence Alinsky that it has the right priorities that they were the good guys so to speak basically Ukraine could correct the record with Giuliani and that was important and because Giuliani of course is close to President Trump Yeah Lemme ask you about a last development here so at this point multiple news outlets reporting that president trump asked the prime minister stir of Australia to help Attorney General William Bar as the Justice Department looks into why the Russia investigation started. Can you just explain what's going on there right the US attorney in Connecticut John Durham has been looking into the origins of the Russia investigation. We've known that for a while after the story broke last night the Justice Department put out a statement saying ended it was bar who asked the president to contact foreign countries and put the Attorney General and Durham in touch with the appropriate officials. This is unusual. There are a lot of other channels to do this. Normally when the president makes the request of course it takes it up a level but there's also raises questions because president trump of course has a personal political interest in the outcome of Durham's investigation. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thanks so much Ryan. Thank you all right. China is celebrating seventy years of communist rule today now. The People's Republic of China was founded in nineteen forty nine at the end of a long civil war today a much stronger China puts its power on display.

Rudy Giuliani president President Trump Ukraine Joe Biden Giuliani Johnny NPR Ryan Lucas China Beijing Volcker prime minister Australia Durham Spain Steve Inskeep trump House Committee Justice Department
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

Podcast Brunch Club

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

"When I interviewed Jesse Hempel she hosts Lincoln's podcast. Hello Monday where she's interviewed an impressive array of guests including Seth Meyers Abby Wambach Elizabeth Gilbert and Melinda Gates prior to working at linked in Jesse had no podcast experience so I just loved hearing her insights on what it was like to go from being a print journalist to podcast or if you have feedback it back on this show please email me at skied inside dot com or find me on twitter at Skype Pillsbury. If you'd like to support the work we're doing here and indict podcasting. Please tell a podcast fan or podcast her about this podcast and consider subscribing to our free email newsletter of the same name you can find it at inside dot com come forward slash podcasting inside podcasting is produced and hosted by me. SKYPE Pillsbury with massive production help from Michael ZORC ASTORGA Tron Media Media Charles quickly is our sound engineer. Rachel Loden is our researcher. Kim Lyons US advice is always invaluable in the making of this show is the managing editor at inside dot COM com special thanks to inside owner Jason Calcutta's for green lighting this project and is always to my family for putting up with me and finally thanks to all of you for listening listening. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Just a heads up. One of Sky's upcoming interviews will be with Madeline Baron of in the dark. You can find the inside podcasting podcasts wherever you listen and you can subscribe to the newsletter at inside dot com slash podcasting and follow sky on twitter at Sky Pillsbury. That's sky with an e at the end happy with thing..

Jesse Hempel Pillsbury Sky Sky Pillsbury twitter Seth Meyers Abby Wambach Melinda Gates Rachel Loden Kim Lyons Skype Madeline Baron Elizabeth Gilbert Michael ZORC Jason Calcutta Lincoln managing editor researcher engineer Charles
"jesse hempel" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on This American Life

"Bostian reporter for tight if speak German he has a book about all this called in German. One hundred eighty degrees stories against eight. He's looking for a publisher in English. Caro- by the way after splitting up with tobacco mets do the planning to get married to this year coming up a bio. Everybody knows your name and that is exactly exactly the problem. That's a minute Chicago public radio when our program continues support for this American life comes from Lincoln's new podcast hello Monday more than three quarters of Americans report severe anxiety on Sunday nights but what if Monday became something we could look forward to Lincoln's new new podcast. Hello Monday with Jesse Campbell is back for season two to help you do just that each week join. Jesse her guests as they explore the ever changing world of work how to like it how to change it and maybe even how to love it find hello Monday with Jesse Hempel on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts asked American Life Amarah Glass Today's program beer summit stories about people who disagree trying to get along eighty by the magical healing power our of beer. We arrived at two of our program to loggerheads so we got a tip about this story from a source. I had to say we do not get many story. Royal ideas from bank explains yeah so a couple years ago. I called this guy in Indiana. Boba high pede here in South Bend Mayor Bridges. How are you good apologize running behind schedule today. It's NO I. I hear you have a whole city to run so our this was way before. I started running for president these days. I don't imagine he does a ton of our long chats about the direction of the Democratic Party with reporters. That's that's what we are dealing and in the middle of that. He mentioned this thing that happened in southend. I went to an event not long ago. The Klay Democratic Club which is another sort of that's on the north side of town and it's it resembles a dive bar it's a place you can go for the concert and and and card game and the controversy because about half of their board voted for Donald Trump. Democratically digit was so matter of fact. It took me a second to register egistered. Just how wildwood he saying was that at one of the oldest largest most important democratic club in his hometown half the leadership had voted voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen. Keep in touch in other words. It was like in the tiny world of this one bar you had with the entire. Democratic Party is going through in in some key places like the Mid West a bunch of Democrats deserted and the Democrats lost and the rest are left trying to figure it out. Are they mad at those. Those people sure can win. Those people back what the heck is going to happen with those people so a little while ago. I went to the Klay Democratic Club to see how this was all working out there the Klay Democratic Club. It's sort of like an American Legion hall all across with a Bingo Hall Cross Neighborhood Bar Pool cost a dollar twenty. Five Beers are two fifty because it's a private club you can smoke which is a well exercise right. There's a stage in the back for drawings band Karaoke night as a kid from Wisconsin. I would say it's pretty much. Everything bar should be behind the stage. There's the club's logo a red and blue donkey with the name Klay Democratic clover it. There's tables that the club moves around depending on what's happening and at the bar their regulars who always seemed to be in the same spots regardless of happening every time I stopped in it was smarty on the right end of the bar in the middle and then down at the far left into the Bar Liz Liz mccombs the knights of Elections Dan. They'll be pat down here bands and food. It's a huge event out here. This whole thing started Liz told me on the eve of Indiana's Indiana's last presidential primary may second two thousand sixteen. This was Monday night. Donald Trump was in town holding a big rally in South Bend just a few miles south of the bar headed on all the TV's we are just hours away from a critical vote in Indiana so everyone's watching the coverage of trump on the bars. TV's drinking there was Salata offhand comments and things like that because we were Democrat so definitely want to do for lack of better words dissed the Republicans and trump and then it was over the rally ended when the rally was let now and they had it on the news so so the eleven o'clock news and somebody said Oh my God that's Ross and it was right there on the TV in the crowd streaming out of the trump rally. Was this guy that everybody in the bar recognized a guy named Russ Thomas. Everyone recognised rest because he was a longtime member of the Klay Democratic Club but on top of that Russ Thomas was the sitting president of the Klay Democratic Democratic Club and then everybody. Can I be blunt. They're all hell. No everybody was saying and then shock and awe..

Klay Democratic Democratic Clu Donald Trump Democratic Party Indiana Boba Liz Liz mccombs Russ Thomas president Jesse Campbell Caro reporter publisher Jesse Hempel South Bend Mayor Bridges Jesse Lincoln American Legion Chicago Mid West southend
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"<hes> but you're also all over the world which is just mind boggling and so gratifying to see that so thank you for tuning in. I can see all on my handy little map. I really really appreciate it so today. I speak with jesse hempel. She is the host of hello monday which is lincoln's podcast it combines interviews with people like abby wambach and seth meyers with original reporting from her team at linked in and i wanted to speak with her about the making of that show and it was also super excited to talk to jesse because for one thing i've followed her career for many years she wrote for publications like fortune and wired for almost two decades but also because she lamey was relatively new to podcasting and so i just loved are back and forth and i hope you enjoy it too <hes>. We really get into the nitty gritty of what it's like to build a podcast from scratch rach for the first time. I really hope that you enjoy it. I know that i really.

jesse hempel abby wambach seth meyers lincoln two decades
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"From the editorial team at Lincoln. I'm Jesse Hempel. And this is Hello Monday. A show where I investigate the changing nature of work, and how that work is changing us. I remember my first office. I had just become a writer at fortune and the office was the reward it had a window that looked out on Rockefeller Center and a glass door that slid closed, and I thought it was a good first step. I'd grow more senior in time. I'd get a bigger office closer to the editor in chief. Well that I part happened. I became a senior writer, and then I left for another magazine in a more senior role, but my office. Well, fortune is as fancy as ever got my next office was smaller, and it didn't have a window. Then I moved to a cubicle by then I did most of my work on a laptop or phone here at linked in. I have a white desk that transforms into a standing desk when I push button, I sit between two guys I like a ton. But we don't see each other that much because we're. Are constantly ducking into conference rooms are phone booths are going down to the cafe to get our work done. And that first office seems like a lifetime ago to be honest. I don't even miss it. But I can't believe how much it's changed. So this week, I hosted Liz borough. She's the vice president of workplace strategy that we work. She studies the way we use space in pushes businesses to use it in new ways and mostly I wanted to know from her are open offices here to stay. Here's liz. So I want to start by asking you what your office looks like in our headquarters in New York, we are living lab, and we're testing out new ideas of how people work and just recently, we decided as a location to give up our desks, and that sounds really scary to a lot of people in a lot of people were afraid of that even we work, but we replace that idea with a team home. So we have the team home concept, which means every team that could be. Anywhere from eight to thirty people has a very long table that is there is and it's a permanent location that they can come to and meet, and then we have other kinds of work settings that are available to everyone. So it's very much about equity in abundance. We have an area where you can have an ergonomic workstation with an enormous screen. You can hook into you have nuts. You have phone booths. You have a library actually two libraries where you can be quiet. We have lounges and cafes. And we have projects bases that you can book. So if you need to like nest somewhere for a while you can have that so viral into work at we work in. I'm part of your team. There is a table where I can loosely expect to find most of my peers who are there that day milling around, but nobody has a place to put that footage graph of their kids slash dog slash favorite thing. Right. We don't have a sign dusk sunny more and the identity of yourself and the identity of your team is allowed like with in your. I'm home so different teams decorate in different ways, but all those personal effects, basically, go in your backpack or on your computer and the plane is basically sort of like, this is where you get to have your personal moment of expression. Yeah. Exactly. We've talked a lot about identity and expression. And I think it's really hard for people to imagine letting go of that personal space and those personal effects and even paper. Yeah. Let's just back up to like how your team members responded where people uniformly psyched about it. No never. I mean, no one's ever uniformly excited about any office change, like even even within we work. You know, people are just on different points of an innovation curve team home worked for some people better than others, and they were more or less excited. Even the way that we rolled it out wasn't all the same some teams still need privacy and confidentiality. So we took some teams like HR legal security, and we put them in like the. Revelant of sixteen person office. So they're still collaborative and team oriented, but they have four walls around them. If that makes sense it's like the idea of a private office for many people, right? That makes a lot of sense. I know that I have heard that this works in sort of pendulum fashion. And I'm wondering if there's gonna be a swingback if we're going to go back from tables as a concept to offices with doors that close, I definitely think that indicates are fighting back, and you know, that that started with the publication of quiet. I don't know if you're familiar with that quiet by Susan Cain. But she really led this charge of the intervertebral like quietly speaking up for their rights one manifestation of that was we need spaces to focus. We're not always going to be about collaboration. But we're going to express ourselves in different ways and contribute in different ways. And yeah, I mean, I definitely think in the future. Going to see a wide variety of solutions for wide variety of different work, styles and work needs. There's all sorts of positive effects of having a private office. And I'm sure as a writer, you know, you're like I need that space. That's where I do my power work. But there's give and take between that and a what everyone else is getting and be the overall aspiration of what the business is trying to do. So we're trying to look at you know, your work is so important, and to do it most effectively and efficiently is something that we really care about. But we're also trying to look at every square foot and make sure that it matters in the most significant way. So what we're going to see is a lot more flexibility in the footprint both in terms of the length of a lease as well as how you use the space inside of an office. So for example, you might have a private office. But when you're not there, it flips into a meeting room, and that way, it's. It's used more often. And so we're getting more. We're leveraging that's where footage in positive way. We'll we work is in this interesting position because you have so much office space around the world, and you are able to gleam information about how people are using that space in real time are already doing that. Yeah. So a great example for like real time feedback is meeting rooms everyone can relate to a meeting room at something you need to book, hopefully, your company has an online booking system. But we work we can book meeting rooms on our app. So we on the back end can see what is the most popular space being used. And then in future locations, we can open up and make sure we have the right skew mix of the size of the rooms and where they are in the floor plates. But also as a member immediately after meeting you can rate your meeting room experience. Just like an Uber app rating rating, your driver, so anything under three stars allows you to give a comment and those. Comments come in on a weekly basis. And we have a team that's sifting through that and using pattern recognition to see where there's a theme that's emerging. And if it's like, everyone doesn't like this room because technology doesn't work or the wallpapers weird. We can immediately fix it. Right. Seem that would help you get away from a problem that I have experienced many times in my career where like you do not have enough places for six people to get together. But that executive conference room for twenty five people who get together once a quarter is mostly always empty like what do you do about that? So that's a really good example of something we see especially with our enterprise clients that we've been working with and we're we're looking into their current space, which might be twenty years old. I think twenty years ago, everyone's like, we need enormous conference rooms, that's what we need. So there's a ton of that inventory. And then you see two people meeting in that space. So don't have you know this. But like the most popular size meeting is two to four people. All right. We're taking a quick pause here. Coming up after the break. Here. From Lincoln's news editor Andrew Murphy on a brief history of office design. Today's show is brought to you by sun basket. No matter your lifestyle, sun basket, caters to your kind of healthy, and that makes a huge difference for someone like me. I get home from a long day of work. And I've got half an hour. Maybe to get the baby in bed and between my wife, and I to figure out who's gonna make supper with a delicious meal plan like paleo carb conscious gluten free Mediterranean diabetes. Friendly N vegan plus quick and easy recipes I can enjoy a dinner full of organic produce in clean ingredients in a little as fifteen minutes. Try mouth-watering sun basket dishes, like healthy, shrimp pad Thai with rice noodles and sugar snap peas or fresh fettuccini Primavera with creamy Fetisov's. Those are just a couple of eighteen weekly recipes to choose from everything is pre-measured in easy to prep. You can get a healthy and delicious meal on the table in as little as fifteen minutes. So go to sun basket dot com slash Hello, Monday to get eighty dollars off. That's basically getting dinner on the table for less than nine dollars. Serving fair I four weeks. Visit sun basket dot com slash Hallo, Monday to get eighty dollars off today.

writer fortune Lincoln Rockefeller Center editor in chief Jesse Hempel Liz borough Susan Cain New York vice president Andrew Murphy executive news editor fifteen minutes eighty dollars twenty years nine dollars four weeks
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

09:37 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Visit mattress firm dot com slash sale. All right back to my conversation with Angela erents Angela hadn't considered working in tech until she got a call from Tim cook at apple so tell me a little bit about how you went up. Yeah. I mean, Tim, and I had a lovely coffee when I was home one Christmas, and it was lovely. But then you go back to burglary and my teams around the table, and you know, and we're killing it in just bought the beauty business back. And it just told the board. We're going to double again in five years, and so life is good. And so it was a pretty easy. No. And then we actually rat on the west coast on business. So and I don't know somehow someone found out I was going to be on the west coast. And so they called again and said would you have a Cup of coffee, and would you meet a couple of other people? And and I was very honest. I wanna waste your time it cetera, but went to infinite loop, and then medical of executives and met, Tim. And and there was something he said at that point again as you're praying for signs in life, and you know in clarity and guidance, and and then I had done a Ted talk on human energy and building trust. And oh, thanks. And so by the time, I got to him. He said, I listen to your tedtalk. And he was so calm, and and so deep, and and just the way that he said he said, he said, you know, you're supposed to be here. And I had how do you know that he goes, I don't know. But I just I know you're supposed to be here. And it was just it was a I'd never had that in an interaction with another person, especially his level. And it made me really just just rethink that you know, and I was over nine and a half years at Burberry at that stage. Was I supposed to be there after ten years was I supposed to go back to American try something new, and and and I was on my own accord, incredibly insecure, I'm fifty four it's apple for God's sake. It's the biggest ghetto it. You know, a company I've admired for years and years and years, I don't speak that language. I am not a left brain, engineer, operator, etc. I mean, I just I could do everything I could talk myself out of it forever. He probably didn't own very many hoodies at that point near life, zebra. I don't think I'd hardly worn blue jeans to work. What was your first day of work? Like, you know, the first six months are incredibly exciting. And I think you're just honored and proud and grateful, but but I also fairly silent because I need to listen and learn, you know, my dad used to always say he used to always say, it's I think it's maybe Mark Twain, quote, but you know, better to be thought of fool than to open your mouth and relieve them of all doubt. And so it was like haunting me in the back of my mind. And so I just listened and listened and listened and actually I linked in post on it. I said. I wrote the first hundred days, and how you how insecure you feel and what if teaches you anything at teaches you that? They wanted you for a reason. So get in your lane. Bring your gifts to the table, right? You're used to being the CEO in an industry that you grew up in for thirty some odd years, you're used to knowing everything. Now, you go into senior level, and you know, nothing, but no, wait a minute. You know, what you do? And it's a Titanic retail business at that point fifty five thousand employees all over the world. And so no, wait a minute. And then you go back and you say, but okay. So so maybe I'm here because I'm a leader. And maybe I'm here because I'm a I can I'm a brand builder. I wouldn't go as far as say visionary. But I thrive on looking out two or three years and feeling what's coming and warning everybody and then uniting everybody around a strategy to to be prepared for that. And right. So then you get you go through that. Because I also think that as humans were in eight Louis insecure, I think men and women alike. I think women will admit it and men won't. But that's another story. I think that's so true. I kept expecting and I keep waiting for that to dissolve as I grow up as if the wisdom of my adulthood, as it deepens will remove that, insecurity. It's not happening yet. Yeah. No. I don't think so either. But I think what you do is you get stronger and more confident in who you are. And what your gifts to this world are? And then you keep yourself in a narrower lane knowing that if I stay in this lane, I will make the contribution that I'm supposed to make while I'm on this planet. Right. I tell my kids it's kind of like waterskiing you'll wanna be over here. You want to be in that real smooth place and try and get yourself there. Right. And then life just takes off. Yeah. Well said so as we are talking here today, you are at the end of your tenure very close to your last day at apple. So as you look back on your time there, what have been your biggest lessons? It's funny. I have been this last couple of days also writing my final Lincoln post, and and I I've actually been thinking about just that same thing. But what I wanted to do was not take it as my lessons. I wanted. Wanted to take it as the lessons that I learned from seventy thousand people, and so the three lessons that I got from them were one never forget where you came from. And what I mean by that is no different than at Burberry. We looked back because that's your found Dacian. Right. That's who founded the business at cetera. And when I came into apple I'd go out in the field. And they talk about we'll Steve center job was to enrich lives and Steve said this and by and I could have thrown all that out. But no, let's codify that let's protect that. The second thing was move faster than you could ever fathom because they're waiting. And they see how much their technology is changing everything they're living on Newbury. They're staying there. BNB right. They're living on YouTube and Instagram they expect your leadership to be just like that. Because that's the world they're living into. So you can't wait. I told the leaders very early on move fast and the team is begging for it. And then the third one was never forget that you have a greater responsibility that it is not just about operating stores. It is not just about selling phones, you have a much greater responsibility. And maybe that's what Steve meant when he talked about enriching lives. And when he talked about liberal arts, and technology and the impact it could have on humanity. I didn't dare use the word humanity. But I would talk to the teams about the impact they could make in their community. And that's why the today at apple experience which. Is free of charge teaches it's not a coincidence that it's only teaching liberal arts at make you a better video aquifer or photographer or app developer or musician because I do believe that that's what you're going to need in the future. But I also believe that maybe liberal arts was a little bit of what was missing in the stores. So you gotta look back. You have to never forget where you came from. You're just coming in as a steward at a very short period of time. And you're going to turn the baton over, you know, and I always say I never asked for title. I never ask for a raise. I've never asked for anything. All I've done is always tried to do what's best for the company at that point in time and everything else just falls into place. So I think that I my counsel to the next generation would be be self lists. And you will make an incredible impact. Angela relies heavily on her intuition. But I think she owes her success to the way in which he has pared it with logic, right personally. I've got an uncomfortable relationship with my own gut. It's often, right? And I'm trying to get better at trusting it. But it's hard. I want to hear from you on this. How do you balance intuition and recent send us a voice memo to Hello Monday at Lincoln dot com or post on Linden using the hashtag Hello Monday. If you enjoyed listening. Subscribe and rate us on apple podcasts. It helps new listeners find the show and join me next week for a conversation with we works. Liz borough. She's in charge of researching what offices will look like in the future. And I want to know one thing will open office plans ever be over. Hello Monday is the production of Lincoln the show was produced by Laura sim with reporting by Maya pope Chapelle the show is mixed by Joe Georgie put unsee Eddie Ondo is head of ETA twelve. Video Dave pond is our technical director especial. Thanks this week 'til listener Angela CONNER who sent us a voice memo about time management after listening to our episode with Adam grant, the way, I manage. My time is to make sure I'm actually the one managing it. I don't allow people to tell me we'll these are the two times that I can meet and that I have to accept one or the other. I'm was by putting tin Barron. Pachyderm Dan Ross is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jesse Hempel. Thanks for listening.

apple Tim cook Angela erents Angela Burberry Steve burglary Angela CONNER Mark Twain Lincoln Ted engineer Liz borough Jesse Hempel CEO Dave pond Dacian YouTube
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Conversation with Melinda gates, when did you leave Microsoft? So I worked at Microsoft for nine years. I started in nineteen eighty seven and then I left right before the birth of our first daughter Jen in nineteen Ninety-six. And was it very clear to you that you wanted to do that. Or was that a hard thing to do it was beyond clear to me that I was going to leave. And in fact, I write in the book about how surprised Bill a little bit with that decision. So we got pregnant and we were on a trip in China. We obviously both knew I was pregnant was a fun personal trip with other couples and on the way home, we took a stop in Hawaii to have a little bit of personal time alone. And so Bill, and I then started to talk about okay, what's life going to be like now with child we we wanted to have children, and I said, you know, am going to quit Microsoft, and I just Florida. He was like what you're going to quit Microsoft because he knew how much I loved my job, and how much pleasure I got out of it. And he liked me being there, and I just said to him at the time. No, no, no, look, if you're going to be the CEO of Microsoft. Would be different. If you were in a different company in a lower level job. You are the CEO of a company if we want our children to have the values that you, and I have both discussed during the time of our dating and our engagement in our early marriage, somebody has to be home. And you know, I knew he was traveling a lot in gone a lot. And so I made that decision and it surprised him. And as Bill says when Melinda makes a decision, she is certain of herself. And he encouraged me after the birth of Jenn though, hey, you should start to find out what your other passions are because you do love the piece of work, and he really helped me he helped nudge me into finding my other passions and keeping that side of me alight. And I am so glad for that. You mentioned that there was a point at which you decided to step forward publicly and get as involved in the public image of the foundation as he had been behind the scenes all along when was that? And what was that like, well, I was just beginning to step forward. Some probably in two. Two thousand and three or two thousand and four I was starting to do some speeches, and I tell us sweet story in the book where Bill and I were both speaking to a global health convention that happened to be at the Seattle convention center. And he was going to speak first. And I was going to be speak second. And we both thought it was important that we both speak. And I was so nervous so nervous. And I said that to Bill at home, and he said, well, what are you most nervous about? I said speaking in front of you. And he said, well, what can I do? And I said, well, we're going together. And we're leaving together. I said why don't you after you give your speech leave drive around the block and come back and pick me up. And that is exactly what he did. He spoke, and then he got in his car drove around the block downtown several times. And then he came back and pick me up curbside. I did my speech. It went really well, and we went home. And so that was one of my early forays into speaking. Then as the foundation when Warren Buffett's money came in we announced that in two thousand and six the three of us were speaking to the press about what that would mean. And as I got prepared for that. And started. Doing that in spoke about it. I realized how passionate I was about the work at this, very detailed level. And I think in some ways answering those questions helped me realize how deep I was into the foundation even more deeply than Bill was because he was running Microsoft, and I started to realize after that I needed to build my skills, start speaking more. And then really it was in two thousand twelve way came out very publicly on behalf of contraceptives. I was leading an initiative with the UK government and other partners to raise over two billion dollars on behalf of contraceptives for women, which I totally believe in. And that's when I took a very public facing role that I knew I would never turn back from and in particular, you grew up in the Catholic church, and at that point, the Catholic church spoke up about your decision to do that. Because you were quite a public figure. How did you square that for yourself? Yes. So in the two years leading up to July two thousand twelve when we made this announcement, and we were garnering the resources we are figuring out. Our plans I had to really wrestle with my Catholic faith, and I spoke with many people former nuns and priests scholars I spoke with my parents deeply about this and my belief in contraceptives, their belief and contraceptives, and I finally decided after a lot of self reflection time in quiet that if I believe from my faith in faith in action, I needed to live my values out in the world. And I had to live my beliefs out in the world, and my belief is that contraceptives. I know save the lives of women and children, and I use them myself. And if I want to be a fully integrated person in society and walk the talk and have my faith in action. I had to speak out for what I truly believed. Even though my church doesn't believe it in. So after I spoke out in a did it took a lot of courage to do that. But after I spoke out than the Catholic church in their big Romana paper that comes out in the Vatican newspaper came out and said that I was misguided misinter-. Formed at cetera. And I expected they would say something, and it was interesting because one of the US publications wrote shortly thereafter that it proved I could take a punch in the gut. And I never thought of it that way, but I thought yeah. Okay. They they spoke up for what they believed in ice spoke up for what I not only believe in. But what I know from my deep travels around the world, and I honestly have this belief that if Catholic priests traveled, and we're out in the places that I am townships rural areas villages places where women and men are telling you about women dying in childbirth because their babies came too soon, and too often I actually think they changed their belief, but they're not as out as much as I am. And so I have to live what I believe in. If you enjoyed listening. Subscribe and a sun apple podcasts. It helps new listeners find the show and remember we'd like to hear from you. How do you choose what to share about yourself at work, send us a voice memo to Hello, Monday at Lincoln dot com. Or post your thoughts on Lincoln with the hashtag. Hello monday. Hello mondays. The production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Laura sim with reporting by Caroline Fairchild. The show was mixed by Joe degeorge foot. NCA Biondo is head of editorial video Dave pond is our technical director. Our music was by putting tin bear in pachyderm. Dan, Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jesse Hempel. Thanks for listening.

Bill Microsoft Catholic church Melinda gates CEO Jen Lincoln Hawaii China Warren Buffett Jenn Florida Lincoln dot com Jesse Hempel UK Joe degeorge pachyderm US Dave pond
"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Cut on Tuesdays

The Cut on Tuesdays

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on The Cut on Tuesdays

"This episode of the cut on Tuesdays brought to you by Hello Monday. A new podcast from Lincoln more than three quarters of Americans report severe anxiety on Sunday nights. But what if Monday became something? We could look forward to Hello Mondays a new podcast from Lincoln's editorial team. And it's about work how to like it how to change it. And maybe even how to love it even on Monday mornings. Hello Monday is hosted by Jesse Hempel. You could find it on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. This episode of the cut on Tuesdays is brought to you by Spotify. You already know that Spotify has millions of songs and playlists. But did you know that Spotify also has hundreds of thousands of podcasts, including this very podcast for free. Now, you can stop switching between apps and enjoy your music and podcasts all in Spotify. Download the free app today. From the cut and Gimblett media. This is the cut on Tuesdays. I'm your host, Molly Fisher. Brain drugs are a subject that I've talked about a lot with my friends at the cut and also with my friends outside the cut at bars and on late night texts. Everybody has thoughts about the chemicals that are helping them manage their mental state. Whether that means something legal illegal prescription over the counter or of the hippie herbal variety this week. We've got a story that gets at the power of brain drugs in a way. I'd never heard before it comes from our friends at the nod, and it's about brain drugs, but also about racial trauma, and it begins where many drug stories begin on the couch. So I'm sitting on the couch, and there's nice warm. Fuzzy blankets sitting on the couch for me, and then I grabbed the pill. I actually think it was a blue pill does like the matrix like oh red pill blue pill. And I take it. Then I lie down on this coach and just listen to the music and wait for the effects of the drug to kick. You. I know what you might be thinking. This woman sounds like she's about to get high at a party. But this is actually all a part of a research study a study that will help determine whether taking that little blue pill in therapy could help black people cope with trauma. From Gimblett media. This is the not a black culture podcast. Brought to you by black. Mrs biggest fans, I'm Brittany loose. So the woman who was about to take that pill. Her name is Sarah, and she's a therapist. We'll get into what exactly was in that pill later, but taking that pill was part of her training as a therapist in a research trial, a research trial, that's exploring possible treatments for racial trauma, and I didn't really know much about racial trauma until I talked to Sarah. I mean, don't get me wrong. I've always known that being a black person in America can be traumatic. But I didn't know that there's a mental health term for what everyday racism can do to you to help me understand what exactly racial trauma is Sarah told me a story from her childhood. It's a story. I think a lot of black people can relate to. So I grew up in Kentucky southern girl girl from the countryside foreshore. So being from the country there's not much to do. So you just hang out with your friends on any given. Day. And so it was just another day like a Friday night where I'm hanging out with with one of my girlfriends, and we're probably listening tilling Dixie chicks. I listen to country music by we're just like talking about school things that nine year old girls have conversations about and she starts talking about like. Oh, yeah. So my mom is just so shocked that you're you're so well, she says you're so well behaved for a black kit. And that you're so good. And you're so smart, and from her experience black his are always bad or louder get into a lot of trouble, and she laughed it off. And I laughed it off to just because I didn't I didn't have the language to articulate what was happening or the understanding to know what was happening. But I just knew in my body that something was weird. Something was off when you say new in your body. Like, what are the feel like frozen us? It was like everything kind of pause. Everything was still and that was the end of the conversation, and then we proceeded to maybe eat pizza or watch a movie desert experience still affect you. Oh, yes. I think these experiences don't go away. Sometimes they become residue that just becomes part of your experience. And sometimes they creep up in moments where where you don't want them to. I know this. Frozen feeling a few years ago? I interviewed a white woman who wants to Mike was off just casually said that black women were bitches with bad attitudes. But that I was okay. I had to do the mental calculus of whether or not I could pop off on her at that moment. I mean, I was at work. I just started a new job, and she was a friend of a colleague. And by the time decided I could say something the moment had passed for a long time Sarah handle these moments the same way. I did you push the experience to the back of your mind. Maybe you talk about it with friends, sometimes you even laugh about it. But never too much beyond that, you never really acknowledged that it's a wound or hurt kinda how my family deals with mental health issues is to pray about it. And I come from a lot a lineage of strong black women. And I think this this idea of like, the strong black woman and how you kind of have to sacrifice everything. For your family. And then then like your needs can come second to everything other than the family. So I think that growing up a lot of those beliefs in values were really instilled in me to be the the strength into kind of have this this fight. And like you gotta do it by any

Sarah Spotify Lincoln Jesse Hempel severe anxiety apple Molly Fisher Kentucky America Mike three quarters nine year
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Lincoln dot com. Also Jesse and I won't be posting updates on linked in about upcoming episodes ideas that we're working on. And we want to hear from you. So follow us on Lincoln as well. I'm Caroline Fairchild. And I'm Jesse Hempel. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed listening. Subscribe and ready a son I tunes it helps new listeners find the show. Hello mondays. A production of Lincoln. So show is produced by lower sim with reporting by Caroline Fairchild. The show was mixed by Joe degeorge, Florencia Iriondo is head of editorial video Dave pond is our technical director. Kyle ranson Walsh. And James Mullen. Are Hello Mondays very godfathers the music. You've heard in this episode was by pachyderm, Dan, Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. We'll see. This week. How do you feel as a first podcast? Do you feel any regret of me being the first or any first podcast, you feel like I've been engaging in deeply? But in getting over it my biggest challenge right now with podcasting is trying not to sound like a sixth grade teacher when I'm reading the script. I'm reading loud in with enthusiasm in my wife is like it sounds like someone I know. But not you. I bet if your wife listen to this you'd say no that was definitely you again. I don't know the real you. I don't. But it seemed very natural to me my wife. I do a lot of this. I'm not saying this because I'm here. Let me finish the sentence. And then explain what I meant. I do a lot of charity events. So all right. So now, you all understand why I realized as I was getting closer there sounded like I was talk about what a wonderful person. But the reality is my wife, and I go to a lot of events, and I am asked to sometimes go up and do comedy at charity events, and obviously in New York. There's so many great ones and we love doing it. And I was going up to the last one in my wife's that don't yell, and I said what she goes you yell at these. Just don't yell you have a microphone, and it's so funny because my wife is a lawyer she is not adjacent to show business in any way shape performance. I walked up. I realize oh, I do yell idea. When I get into a ballroom. I forget I have a microphone and yell as though they all need to hear me. And so I guess at the end of the day what I'm saying is we should, you know, listen to our wives. I definitely agree on that one. And and I have another question the topic. So you also have to small babies, and you have a crazy schedule, and my wife just had a baby not so long ago. Thank you. I've been sick since that baby was born. How did you? How did you not get every cold and? Flu or at least not let us see it. While you were busy me on TV. I've been so sick for the second baby has made me sicker. I basically wake up every morning just hockey up phlegm it has been and just on and off for like six months. The only thing I will say is if you just have to be not sick for an hour a day, the adrenaline you get from an audience who is excited to see you that basically serves as a B twelve shot that gets you through it the only days at a really hard. And there are a couple in the winter where even on Twitter people said, oh, buddy. You got your voice shot. I I have lost my voice couple times. And that is those are the only ones that are impossible. But other than that, you know, I'm only ever missed. I've only missed one show for the birth of my first son and knock on wood. And the second they were both born on Sundays and the. Second one I was going to miss Monday as well. But the story was so good as he was born in the lobby of our apartment building that even my wife. I said, I think I gotta go tell the story and she correctly knowing she was the hero. The story said he were allowed to go. I only missed one day. That's pretty great. Yeah. And I do want you to think you will keep getting better at this. But ultimately, it'll be a little bit downhill from this. Keep that minimum that come on any that my heart of hearts.

Lincoln dot Caroline Fairchild Jesse Hempel Kyle ranson Walsh James Mullen Florencia Iriondo Twitter Flu Joe degeorge New York editor in chief technical director Dan Dave pond Roth six months one day
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"We spend a lot of time at work. The average person will put in ninety thousand hours over the course of a lifetime. That's about half the time you are awake for fifty years for me. That's a lot of time to be riding the elevator running late to meetings and trying to find my way to that mythical place in boxer. Oh. And every once in a while, I stop and ask myself, am I doing this? Right. This career thing I'm Jesse Hempel. And you're listening to Hello Monday. A new podcast from the editorial team at Lincoln each episode. We'll investigate Howard changing the nature of work, and how that work is changing us. I've spent the last sixteen years writing about tech I've reported on how it's changing work at places like business week fortune wired and now here at Lincoln tech gadgets. They never really interested me. I've always been drawn to tech because of how it changes people the way we live and work like when I started reporting in two thousand three I carried this business card with my desk. Phone number today. I can't even remember what my number is today's job market looks so different from the one that my college prepared before back in the late ninety s and that changed hardly feels dramatic compared to what's coming. Artificial intelligence self driving car. Cars augmented reality. It leaves me with the central question. What can we be doing right now to make sure we still have jobs tomorrow? And that they're good jobs jobs. We feel good about each week. Aubrey you reporting and interviews from people you've heard of and many you haven't people who have started companies or you're a founder you have to convince a lot of people. The what you're doing isn't crazy people who've navigated layoffs this week number twenty worked crazy jobs on part time schedules. If it's not something that I can make work with my life. And I don't care what it is. Like, you could offer me the presidency. I'm leaving and in the process figured out something new about how to make a career work. So join me March fourth or your coffee. Don't forget your keys, and let's start the week. Hello monday. Find us on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Aubrey Howard Jesse Hempel Lincoln apple founder ninety thousand hours sixteen years fifty years
"jesse hempel" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"jesse hempel" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Michael oria and this is the gadget lab podcast. I'm joined as always by my co host RL desk, senior Societa, wired, Howdy, and the other co host the other co host. Our other co host, of course learn good, senior writer wired, Hello. Hello. This is the weekly podcast retake you through all of the top tech topics of the week break down the gadgets, the apps, the services that you need to know about, but it's not just about gadgets. It's also about our relationship with them and how they impact our lives. Right? And this week we're gonna try something a little new on gadget lab. I, we're going to take you through the news of the week, all the things that you need to know about what is happening in the wired world right now. And then we're going to bring in our wired colleague Peter Rubin who is going to tell us everything you need to know about Facebook's efforts to take over the world by convincing you to wear computer on your face. No, but really Peter and I were both at the Oculus connected vent earlier this week, and we tried the new quest VR headsets. So we're gonna talk to Peter about that. Then at the very end, we're gonna give you recommendations just as always. So let's go ahead and get started. Okay. So first news topic earlier this week, Instagram co-founders Kevin system. And Mike Krieger resigned system told in your times that he in Krieger are planning on taking some time off to explorer. Curiosity and creativity. Again, building new things requires that we step back, he said, and understand what inspires us and match that with what the world needs. Now it's worth noting as our own editor in chief Nick Thompson tweeted that day that now the founders of Instagram, what's up and Oculus are all gone from Facebook and all. Those were pretty major acquisitions for the company and wall system said that he in Krieger are quote unquote grateful for the time at Instagram. It might not have been as clean of an exit as the prepared statement would lead you to believe. Recode reported that the two left amid frustration, agitated with Mark zuckerberg's increased meddling and control over Instagram. So system was widely viewed as the product visionary at Instagram, and now he's gone and there are reports of the increased interference with the absolutely vice think this means for Instagram, businesses. Usual? Yeah, I disagree. I think it's gonna be a shift. I think. I mean, I do think that this is a different kind of departure than the one we saw from Brian act in the co, founder of what's app who quit earlier this year over some disputes with Mark Zuckerberg, I think this feels a little bit different. I think it's believable that the Instagram co-founders just kind of were ready to leave, but I do think that they're leaving it an interesting time where Facebook is trying to integrate Instagram with the main. They're trying to integrate Instagram more widely with what's up there trying to connect all of their products into this more cohesive ecosystem. And I do think that's going to change the experience on Instagram. Possibly for the worse. Yeah, I think that that that shift is largely has largely already occurred. You know, we've been seeing sort of Instagram features being added to Facebook and a Facebook is Asian of some of the things that happened on Instagram. Instagram's still feels like its own little world that made not be as much. I think that that changed that may not feel it may not feel as much like Instagram is a separate part in the future, and that change has already sort of started happening. I think I agree. I think it's I'm used to feel really silo from Facebook. And now a lot of features and the ads frankly are starting to mirror the experience that a person has. And Facebook, of course, it's still pretty different from the news feed as a product, but there are increasing similarities. I think Jesse Hempel wrote this for wired and there's a PC should absolutely go right on Meyer dot com. But the way she described it as these tech visionaries, no just went to leave the party. It's not cool to be the last person. Hang out at the social media party. And I think that I in Krieger probably was the right time for them to make an exit, whether or not hate to say time will tell hate saying time whether or not we see fundamental shift and Instagram now.

Instagram Facebook Mike Krieger Kevin system Mark zuckerberg Peter Rubin Michael oria Societa writer Jesse Hempel founder editor in chief Nick Thompson Brian