11 Burst results for "Jesse Crimes"

"jesse crimes" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

09:33 min | Last week

"jesse crimes" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"If you want to see that happen. They just had their anniversary yesterday. Roasts loving it. They're in love quit. Crime corner may i just. Is it thursday s. No way i no. that's fine. take your time. we've nowhere to be. I do not wanna shit on the people's dreams of the crime corner. I am sorry. I did not know it was thursday. I never know if you're serious. I am let me let me give you the show. You deserve jesse crime corner crime coroner crime. Okay where are you you mother. Sorry so florida teachers or this nine and bring it back to the old days. Where like old bit with crime corner. That i am just the worst at researching or completely blaming right. Nothing's changed now jane. We do when all the trouble and then yeah there you go fire away which the woods anyways. Florida teacher arrested after allegedly taking meth and cocaine before school and passing out in a burger king during his lunch. Break not fired. Also by the way but Yeah i'm talking about drew. You want your kids in school in florida. So he now faces teacher. A science teacher did meth guy. Ranuch was no stranger to the effects of chemicals. Let me do the comedy. Fuck in newsweek. They do that. Just give me the facts all decide if it's funny the carfax so he was no no stranger to effects of chemicals but when he found he was found passed out a fast food outlet burger king. He had in his system a cocktail of drugs. That would not look out of place in a laboratory so the police officer raised the alert. Cocteau so we had math cocaine and xanax. Are you sally sleeping on that. Like obviously down. I mean so. He saw forty four year old daughter at shanks middle school behaving erratically at a burger king restaurant in quincy florida. He was then taken by ambulance to capital regional medical center. Where he started to act vary unpredictably emptying his duffel bag throwing water around crawling on the floor. He also use the bathroom exposed himself to a nurse. started masturbating urinating on himself and crawling around on the floor. Not fired not fired. I've done all these sales county the show at work as a teacher as teacher science job after masturbating blocking out at burger king. Yeah nurse look man so in his bag to. They searched his bag. He had Sunglasses case with to torch lighters a rubber ring kaka small bag with about twenty five zanex pills and a crushed pills so when they asked him about it he He was charged with possession of controlled substance but and has been placed on administrative leave But the superintendent says that under his districts policy he could still return to work great. Yeah i mean. I don't really kind of a victimless crime. Here you think. Peter love yourself. Masturbated in front of people. Will you took math. Use smoked math and took cocaine. Did that your first half of ab- school right and then on your lunch break. You went to burger king and got arrested right right right right. teach here to be fair though If he was getting a double walker with chee. You do want to take a nap after that. I mean no matter. How many drugs you're on. That is heavy in your stomach. Burger right big burger Especially as some fries that. Yeah not that. I like the fries. Burger king not a fan. I just know. I don't know mr mr reineck right like how. How do you show you face. Everyone's gonna mr rain. Mr reineck face still put florida teacher arrested after ranuch last name. My mind works differently after taking meth and cocaine. Try that again. I just right out the whole sentence. I want i. I've got to see what you look. So i have a very distinct goes down the middle of the article. There is yeah. It looks exactly like like that was going to happen to him. for sure was always just so cool in class you know and he would like let us do whatever we could have fun and flirty his. Yep i bet you without the goatee pretty decently strapped strapped in. Yeah obviously he's trying to the pickle suit. Yeah the pickles. He was trying to tear his eyeballs out of his china masturbate and fucking crawl on the floor and at the police station. You know Look you got to wrap up in something like that. Maybe not give him his job back on this one. I like it was is match the suit though nice are you. The suit brings out. His is a. That's a good wardrobe choice. Costuming for this is just great. It is If nothing else comes from this at the he knows his color after this yes token zanex fine math danger zone their urinating man. You know what i mean like. Yeah his record is kinda to and two on this one burger king would probably be the tiebreaker. Because i enjoy the king but definitely should not be in a classroom again. I think we can safely say that. I was willing to give it a shot and then we got to the masturbating. Send kids to school in florida at your own risk. I mean i know. I went certain counties. I went to school in florida for an entire seventh grade right. I went there all of seventh grade. Yup it is just as horrible as you think it might get what you get what you give. Then i went to his entire college there at. Ucf yes that's different. You'll be able to handle mr reineck right. That'd be fucking chill. you're not. you're not a small child. The head of the film department at ucf actually got arrested for child pornography. So we don't. We don't love c. p. p. charge but not an chaumont and stuff. We're cool with that but just not show. Mos anna says Happy little friday peeps giving you a fiber here for for post malone stealing the post. Easteal this five bucks. Oh you win. You win shocked if he didn't rename the show post malone revolution and then just did it unlike episode. Thirty seven also. I didn't stay. I'm not gonna do that even though they offered me. Uh should to redefine. I can't get on his level no no you can't you can't you're on the level of your own jay You look great today We'll see we'll see monday right. Yes yes yes We got fake news in about thirty minutes here. Kids on this youtube channel. Stay right here with us. If you're stuck at home for cova you've been laid off or whatever the fuck is going on We're here again. I think it's the first day we've ever tried to go three live shows in a row. We'll see so we'll see how it goes but so far so good. I tuned for the next show. Feels like a real news network. I know So we're amped about that and shit later on when the sports show breaks off on. Its own you'll be able to watch fucking fights and Intimidate the dan giorgio all of us. I'll pop in. For the the ohio state ones obviously. Obviously yeah clearly. Yeah yeah yeah. We'll make thrown for daddy when. Yeah for for the buckeyes games. Daddy will be there. The doctor will be there thinking about getting one of those blow up. Docs that goes around the your your bailey at for the because they got the drink holders in it so that was nice because we sit on a couch with people you don't there's not drink holders there it allows you to socially distance and keep your beer cold so i think it's two wins. You care about this social distancing said don't worry about that at all Giorgio we don't do that we don't do that here in and i'm saying i'm not even six feet apart away from you jesse. The magic of television is but now dude. If i stretched out. I'm gonna fucking i'm six three can easily be licking your your back year calf if i lay down on the floor right now. It's weird but it's true For jessie wiseman.

cocaine florida burger king mr mr reineck Burger king meth Burger Mr reineck dan giorgio jesse Ucf capital regional medical cente shanks middle school Ranuch ohio Florida youtube quincy florida Cocteau
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:14 min | 2 months ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're back with Nicole Fleetwood, author and professor of American studies in art history at Rutgers University. We're talking to her about her new work. It's a book called Marking Time are In the age of Mass incarceration. It is also AH show at MoMA, PS one featuring 44 artists. Work. What I ask you a little bit about, you know, since we've been talking about this is my friend. My put art with a capital. A young art. Um, what is the role Of portraiture. For people for artists who are incarcerated or working with themes of incarceration. So one of the things I didn't know as I was working on this project is that you actually something I learned I had no idea of the significance of portraiture until I started talking with in prison and formerly imprisoned people. And it's enormous. It's probably the most common form of art making in prison. We have lots of portrait. On this way. I heard that you were able to see the show, so thank you, including, like Mark Laffnie Siri's of over 600. Portrait of currently imprisoned people. He's in prison in Pennsylvania, and he's been doing this Siri's called period defeat. Um, where he asked other imprison people descent for him for 20 minutes, and he makes these remarkable sketches. For him. It's really important that all 651 works that are in the show be seen as one work because he's tryingto document the toll of mass incarceration from the place of a person held captive. We also have this work by Tameka Cole is currently based in Alabama. And it's a graphite collage that's been reprinted a lot in in terms of the marketing of the show. It's a beautiful piece called locked in a dark, calm. She created that piece as a response to some abuse that she was experiencing in present, And she said anything she due to protest that abuse would have just lengthen her sentence or lead her to B. Put in the hole, so through art, she was able to actually cultivate the space for her own survival. Portrait work is so important, Tio imprison people because it's a way that they take control of their own representation. The representation of imprison people. It's so it's so spectacular in terms of like How horrifying and isolating it is from a broader public culture. It's demeaning. It's demoralizing images like mug shots in prison. I d photos So the portrait work of Imprison people is quite radical and shifting the power dynamics of who's looking who's representing, you know to actually be someone in a 6 ft by 9 FT Cell And to be creating and planning and imagining representation of other people in prison that they can then send home to their loved ones that they can use to replace like the kind of stigmatized images that the state uses to mark them as a bad person. It's like it's also Um, for many people part of like the healing work that they're doing as Condemned and punish people you know to be able to see themselves in another likeness. What is it? I'm glad you brought up photography because that was my my Next question was, you know it's one not an option for artists who are incarcerated, but you didn't crew. Photography is part of the exhibit. Can you explain me why you wanted to do that? And what are some of the images that we see And why? Why were they chosen? Yeah. Um so The show. Even though I probably about Three quarters of the artists in the show are formerly or currently imprisoned people and then another quarter or people like, say, Billy Lee Smith, Maria Gaspar. Schaja McCormack and Cave Calhoun. Sarah Bennett these air, actually, uh, these are all artists who Roland Rene, who are deeply deeply concerned about The expanse of the prison. Stay there deeply concerned about criminalization of poor people, Queer people, None white people and they've been making are about these issues for many, many years. The show for for me and for like the team of curators who worked with me on an incredible staff at PS one was really about not having these works exist in silos in separate places are like as binaries, but actually having them in conversation. It was so important that like, say Billy Smith, who's like an incredible conceptual artist and professor at Columbia. Her work is in the same room as Daniel McCarthy Clifford, who was actually in prison, and they're doing very similar things where they're working with actual the architecture er and materials that come out of prison and turning them into interesting sculptures. So In order for us to take the work seriously of imprison people. We have to see them. See that work, um, in conversation with contemporary practices that we recognize and that we have already placed that kind of value on and so for me if there's any intervention, and I wantto make in terms of the museum Is to change how we that our value systems in terms of what we consider our what gets displayed on the quote white walls or in the floors of a museum and politically for me, the stakes are really high that this project is a part of a larger movement to in prisons. It's really the exhibit is is great. A couple levels is one is because of social distancing their space to see things because there's only a few people allow in at a time. And then it's also I found it. Ah, there's so much texture to it. From, you know, Jesse crimes piece, which is, you know, set out in this room. It's almost like the Moonies water lilies the way it wraps around to the amazing sculpture made out of trays out of the trays from cafeterias. Right. That was wasn't Daniel McCarthy. Clifford was in the room with with Sable that I meant to write. Have those works in conversation like I had dreamt of having those works in conversation for a couple of years in the same space and time. Code each about their eyes like stable. You should see the work of Daniel Daniel. You should see the work of sables. You know, these are two people are like very desperately position in terms of their relationships, the president and they're incredibly inspired by each other's works. And having and this is something about like For me having the book turned into exhibition like I am experiencing the work completely anew because you know the book is organizing a linear way. Even if the Even if I'm not riding in a linear way. The kind of way people tend to read is that and I like that shell just It. It brings a whole another level of significant to the actual stakes of making art. When you are held.

Daniel McCarthy Clifford Billy Lee Smith professor Daniel Daniel Mark Laffnie Siri Rutgers University Nicole Fleetwood Siri Daniel McCarthy Tameka Cole Schaja McCormack Pennsylvania president Sarah Bennett Roland Rene Alabama Jesse Columbia Sable Maria Gaspar
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:12 min | 2 months ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Your experience of time is as punishment everything you do when you're in prison is a measurement of your time as punishment, So taking a shower, eating, waking up, that's all. A measurement of punishment, and that is such a like profound, existential experience, and I wanted to know how that shape people's creativity. Andi. I think the most exciting part for me was like the kind of like the material experimentation that took place because there's you know, there's not an art supply store that most imprison people can just walk to and get A set of supplies, so people are constantly innovating. They're taking items that they, you know, discarded items and making incredible works there finding contraband. They're using organic matter. One of the artists in the show, Todd Tar Sally, who's currently in prison. He collects leads off with a prison yard and does incredible oil paintings on these leaves. Are Jesse Crimes is formerly incarcerated Has this enormous 15 ft by 40 FT mural that is comprised of 39 prison bed sheets. He made this work over three years We have miniatures by Dingle. Espy has this incredible artist he was in for 20 years and created the incredible miniatures of like Americana. From like. All types of found items included, including, like foil from cigarette wrappers, used tea bags, cassette tape, plastic materials and the like. My guess is Nicole Fleet We're talking about marking time in the age art in the age of mass incarceration. Both the show at MoMA PS one, which is open till April 2021, as well as the book that she's written. You wrote. You said. I think you said it's in one of your interviews. I want everyone in the book taught me. Something. What's an example of something that you you never knew going into this subject that you learned Um Well, I think the thing that was like most profound for me is the The way that art can be this incredible. Facilitator, so there is incredible relationships that were created across Racial and ethnic differences inside prison and prisons are pretty racially stratified, and in part, it's a way that prison administration maintains quote order by keeping people racially segregated. But our became this like really incredible sanction space where people across racial and ethnic lines would collaborate. Together they would resource pool There was like tons of peer mentorship taking place. There's like a really vibrant, informal art school happening in a lot of prisons across the country, and that blew my mind on Dal ho. How rigor if it is like it's not, and you know, there's a lot of critique and there's like very intense, harsh critique, and there's a lot of time that people have to critique the work, so there's a lot of humor. Um And you know, I'm just a competition like friendly, healthy competition where people are growing inside prison and their envisioning, um, one of the collective's I feature it was out of Farrington Prison in New Jersey. And it was Gilbert to Rivera. Garrett Owens and Jesse Crimes. They're all out. Now. They're multi multi racial group. But they were in president planning. Like, you know, we get out. We're gonna have a big show. We're gonna have a gallery. We're going, you know, and and much of this has manifested itself over the past few years, so they were really planning their futures. And I think that art became becomes a way for people who've been You are being punished and being condemned and label quote bad citizens to really envision a future a future into like Literally create to kind of create their future and one that resist the kind of men day of prisons to punish. It's a city of the arts sort of creates a power shift sort of shift in the power dynamic. In some ways, when, when, because artist something in your artistic talent, even if you are given a number, and if you're told to do X Y Z, nobody can really take that from you. It's one of the few things that someone can't take from you is your talent. Absolutely, And in fact, many of the artists would use Their label. As quote felon offender. You know all of these kind of pejorative terms at the prison's place upon them. They would use that in the service of art making, like Russell, Craig. Actually uses his prison documents and make incredible portrait on top of his prison documents and then another artist, a jury little Oh, who was part of the Black Liberation Army? He uses all of his prison records to create these political cut collages about radical imprison radicals throughout the past three decades, you know, so the materials of the stay the peanut of materials of the state, actually. Get used repurpose to make art for a lot of people in prison. Is this sort of trope of like artists therapy as healing, But that's not really what this is about. This work is more artists expressing themselves and their experience. Why is it important to make that distinction? And can you give us a good example? I really appreciate that question because there is this like a long tradition of therapeutic programs in prisons, and I'm and I'm in no way interested in like criticizing or putting those programs down, But I wanted to approach it from like more my training as a style of American studies in art history. And to think about how often when we think about are coming out of prisons. We think about categories like outsider art or folk are but they're marginalized from Established our institutions and I really wanted to place the work happening inside contemporary prisons. At the center of contemporary art practices, largely because we have over two million people in prison. And people in prison are one of the things they do is that they create in the innovate because there's so many material constraint. So some people who are not didn't consider themselves artists before they went in. They become accomplished artist inside, in part to manage that time. As a way of like creating a relationship with oneself. I mean artist so both so deeply personal and also deeply universal, right, so it's like it resonates. In a spiritual way with people individually, but it connects people toe all kinds of other communities. And from it's been, um one of the biggest rewards of this project has been The way it's connected the artists in the show with communities international we we have people like riding from Japan, people from Spain, South Africa, who are like really connecting with many of the issues and struggles. That these artists experience My guest, Col. Fleetwood. She is the guest curator of the new exhibit at MoMA. PS one called Marking Time Art in the age of Mass incarceration is the name of her book as well. We'll continue our conversation after the break..

Farrington Prison Marking Time Art Todd Tar Sally Black Liberation Army Dal ho Espy Nicole Fleet New Jersey president Col. Fleetwood Jesse Crimes Garrett Owens Gilbert Japan Russell Rivera Spain South Africa Craig
"jesse crimes" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

08:16 min | 6 months ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on Serial Killers

"In September of eighteen seventy, two twelve year old Jesse Pomeroy was unmasked as the infamous bore torturer of Boston and sentenced to six years at the Massachusetts State Reform School, but if he showed improved behavior, he would be eligible for early release with that in mind. Jesse entered the school with a clear goal. Become the perfect prisoner. But as he was being led to his new home away, the anxiety crashed down on him. He could only imagine the bullying that awaited him behind those brick walls, his oversized freeman, Glassy White, I already marked for torment at school, and this institution couldn't be any better. He was prepared for the worst, but his fears were for not inside the school. Jesse was the feared one. Of the ninety boys admitted to the school that year Jesse was only one of two convicted for crimes involving a knife. The majority of the cohort were there for petty, Larceny, or breaking and entering. Though. He showed a taste for power and notoriety on the outside Jesse new embracing his dangerous persona wouldn't help him win early release, so he kept his head down, followed the rules, and within a couple of months was noted as an exemplary student for now he mastered his dark urges in service of his greater goal. Vanessa is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa's not licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg as we discussed last week. Jesse reportedly showed several attributes of being a sexual sadist, according to psychologist and criminologist Dr Richard and coach. Each a serial Sadist Jesse can learn to manage his impulses. He can blend into a new environment and come across as charming or even happy it's. It's possible for them to look at authority figures as easily manipulated as tools to fulfil long-term desires for years. He'd fooled his mother into thinking. He was a sweet innocent boy. Even now she fought for his release in comparison to his watchful mother, convincing the authorities at the school was child's play Jesse. was merely playing apart at the reform school. He had his sights set on an early release, but as good behaviors served more than that, it also helped them survive from. From the outside, the school's image was one of kindly parental discipline, but the truth was much darker inmates who were caught fighting or attempting to escape, were often dragged to a dark, damp, poorly ventilated room where they were shackled to the floor. Sometimes they were left there for days with nothing but bread and water in other instances, boss locked in a sweat box about seven feet, high and fifteen inches wide other methods of reform included straitjackets, gags, and flogging eventually Jesse status. Status as an outstanding inmate paid dividends, authorities appointed him Hall Monitor, and he was put in charge of his dorm for the first time since his torturous spree, Jesse was in a position of power. He reveled in it. He allegedly took advantage of his new role black mailing inmates into describing their experiences with the schools brutal punishments, the more detail they gave him the better. He finally found an outlet for his darker fascinations. Maybe the reform school wasn't so bad after all. But while Jesse found his place in the school, life or his mother was bleak ruth. Ann pomeroy struggled emotionally. She refused to believe that her son was the boy torturer. While Jesse flourished in his new surroundings, Ruth, and was the subject of gossip and rumour a pariah. The majority of her time was spent working the dress shop that she owned customers would frequent the store, but ruth. Ann Suspected many only came to get a glimpse of her rather than to purchase anything when she wasn't working. She devoted her free time to appealing her son's incarceration. She wrote countless letters to Reform School School, the courts and the police maintaining Jesse's innocence. She insisted that no twelve year old boy, her son included was capable of committing such atrocities just as she had at his trial. Ruth describe jessia sweet, young boy, incapable of hurting anyone. She also argued the Jesse's confession was made under duress, and was wrongfully coerced adding to that. She wrote that it was unlawful that neither she nor a lawyer were present during her son's interrogation when her letters went unanswered, she persisted Ruth and wrote and wrote knowing that she needed just one person to empathize with her plight like Jesse, she was. On a clear goal, and finally her perseverance paid off a state investigator who worked to examine criminal cases and evidence after the fact, read her letters and paid ruth n. a visit. When he entered her home, he felt a rush of. For the small frail woman, life had taken its toll on ruth. Anne and she looked well beyond her thirty three years, however wasn't swayed by her arguments. He remained steadfast in his belief. That Jesse was indeed the boy torturer, but getting a closer look at the matter he was convinced. Jesse's issues stemmed from the abuse suffered at the hands of his father. He also saw a woman in need. A mother who was working tirelessly to provide for her eldest son, fifteen year old Charles Charles was doing his bit to help out. He was in charge of a local newsstand, but that left ruth end to run the dress shop alone. She needed help with the day to day business of the store. With persuaded the investigator that under her watchful eye, Jesse, would-be a diligent worker at the family business he would prove. She promised that he could be an upstanding member of the community, and she gave her word that if he were released, Jesse wouldn't be any trouble. According to Dr Marzia Sirotta founder of the ruthless compassion institute parents do their kids no favors when they're in denial of their child's capacity for behaving. Behaving badly in Ruth Ann's case. She wanted to protect Jesse from receiving any in the world consequences for his actions Dr Sarah goes on to say that. When parents protect their children from the consequences of their actions there in fact abandoning them when parents make sure that authority figures never dole out consequences for wrongdoings, they reinforce the message that the child need not ever consider the effects of their behavior on others. Ruth Ann was in a state of denial about Jesse's crimes, but one over the state investigator by telling him everything he needed to hear in his report. He recommended that Jesse be released early into the care of his mother. He wrote that the boy would benefit more from working alongside Ruth Anne at her dress store then he would staying in reform school. The captain of police agreed with the recommendation believing. Jesse deserved a chance at redemption. After hearing of his impeccable record is an inmate. A magistrate was also convinced that Jesse had indeed been reformed. So on February sixth eighteen, seventy, four fourteen year old Jesse pomeroy walked out the front door of the Massachusetts State Reform School. He had served only sixteen months of his six year sentence. Ruth was waiting to greet him with open arms there to nasty and patients had given mother and son exactly what they both wanted. Jesse for his part had perfectly worked the system. He donned his sheep's clothing and convinced everyone he needed to that his contrition was genuine, and not a mere facade.

Jesse Pomeroy Ruth Massachusetts State Reform Sch Ruth Anne Reform School School Ann pomeroy investigator Ruth Ann ruth n. Glassy White Boston Vanessa Greg Dr Marzia Sirotta Dr Richard Jesse Charles Charles Dr Sarah founder jessia
"jesse crimes" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

12:55 min | 7 months ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"The searchlight series at eastern state penitentiary store excite in Philadelphia. I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like you send us a link or put it on a facebook page along with this review that makes lot We've uh here in Pennsylvania. There's a the policy is that all male going into the prison actually goes to Florida Florida. We know that because we work with people and Lavinia yes skin and then the scan goes to the person in prison and I don't see the original and if you're writing a a recommendation letter for instance. It doesn't matter that much more men when you write a a holiday card to somebody and you know what they're gonNA guys a scan of the card It it really really is Take something away honestly. Do you find that I'm not just. I'm aware of here in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. This is actually. Justin is calling him a line. Maybe we can talk a little bit more about this as well. A prisoner Connecticut Department of collection and he declined or exploited by please contact. Ttl Customer Services at eight five five what extent to agree to accept this call press zero. She refuses call. This call is from the correction facility and subject to monitoring and recording. Thank you for using. Gtl Justin how're you doing doing well? I'm here with cates. Justin are you able to hear what kind of a little closer to the screen? Thank you for joining US Justin. We're really really sincerely appreciate you taking the time and making the effort to call in opportunity. You Bet I'm gonNA mostly take the back seat and let you have a conversation. I'm going to be here my role this points. Kinda holding the speaker next the microphone jumping here and there but for the most part. I'm going to step out and let you in on your conversation about the work. You're doing together so split sticker right well. Actually I. The very first thing I wanted to do is invite you destined to read the first of the of the two pandemic poems that we published in temperature check series last week. I'm going to do a screen share afterwards after we talk a little bit and show our audience listening in and looking in what that looks like but I thought it would be great to just open with a little literature considering Were representing America today. Which is an organization if folks don't know at the intersection of Literature. Freedom of expression human rights only feels right to kick off with Palm. Okay yes sounds good I will say Sean. It is still relatively difficult for me to understand. I picked up where everything was being said but it is a little bit of a strain. Okay I'M GONNA do my best. I'm going to get the vitamin BIT here. Hope that's a little. That's a little better moving forward. Okay Yeah and if. I'm not sure if you're having a hard time understanding I hope not but I'm wearing a mask myself right now. So very clear for me we. We can hear you just fine. And we're glad that you have a masked aware this okay. Yeah sorry go ahead. No please go ahead okay. So the problem that she's talking about is titled Lockdown Language in the World that does not yet recognised total logic. Cage.

Justin Reveals Monson United States eastern state penitentiary searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly facebook Cates Meissner president and CEO America pen America Philadelphia Area Teaching Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute of Social Davids Liz Ryan Martinez Karsh Writers Vinnie
Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

PEN America Works of Justice

08:56 min | 7 months ago

Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

"I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like

Justin Reveals Monson United States Eastern State Penitentiary Searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly President And Ceo Pen America Facebook Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute Of Social Cates Meissner Philadelphia Area Teaching Davids Liz Ryan Uk High Foot Martinez Karsh Writers Matt Murphy
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Work is that it can create this. It's almost like a third party medium where sometimes if you have conversations with people people have a tendency to maybe write you off. But when you create this work, that's dealing with such a comp- complicated subject. It creates a space where people can come into it from where they're at and experience it and also potentially see something from a different perspective without feeling bombarded or attacked. It's interesting. When I when I seen some of the work of some of these artists, and at some point, I just want to say your artists, you're not formerly incarcerated artists. Right. When is that time? You know, that's a really good question. Welcome. Russell. Sorry. No worries finish your answer. And I'll shoot wrestling questions. No. It's a really good question. And I I push back against that a lot. But at the same time, you have to work within the system that you're given. And so, you know, if we try to organize an exhibition, and we say, you know, this is the OJ experience. And these are all these amazing artists like it has one one kind of feel to it. And I think it would it would kind of get some kind of attention and engagement, but to let people know that these are formally incarcerated artists and let their work speak for themselves. I think over time that's going to change the narrative it's going to push back. The we don't have to have these arbitrary classifications and artists can just be artist. But at at the current state, I feel like it is important to, you know, frame frame what this is. And then that in that framing these exhibitions these shows can help push back against those narratives future. Russell tell me about your piece in the show. I have a few pieces which one the big one the main room one the blood pieces. Yeah. Tell me about those. Oh. Basically. Is done with blood blow from like cow beef blood. So head on the idea to recreate the roar short ain't black tests. Because when I was a kid. Foster homes and stuff like that. I got psychiatric evaluations. So we've all the trauma, and like urban society, and like violence black on black crime police brutality prison violence, a lot of violence that we do is traumatizing. So are revisited those memories of the psychiatric evaluations. So that's what made me come up with it. And then I wanted to use the blood to highlight the seriousness of the situation because I if I just do like a regular pain. It'd be like, you know, people view have been forget about it real quick just like how forget about the victims of those injustice. So I wanted to use more extreme to give people attention in and some of the pieces on painted the eyes of the victims of a police brutality disturbing the people like a reminder because we become numb to like the CNN dear Dan, de out with all kinds of crime, especially with emphasis on a police brutality because it's like. No Justice being served. So I wanted to like that that is the main reason, but in this other light traumas and other violence that we do with like flipping on ourselves and each other black on black crime, and and might want if you want. Up in a prison system seen a guy who stabbed over some Cooley like some juice because he didn't give the other guys juice just use LMU story about some guy. Stay real bad about he didn't do the other guys laundry the way when it and stuff like that. So it's just like his crazy. So even if you're not a victim of the witness in is like traumatizing, what do you hope people think about after they go through this exhibit? They see this beautiful art, the thoughtful art, what do you want them to think about what he wants to talk to their friends about? Well, if they leave from personal aspect, I will want people to late carried it torch spark a flame and other people so McClay Cononica call action in the call of duty for myself to create some kind of meat change. And then hopefully like people in positions of power and things like they can make changes, or if you're not dead powerful is a person you be creative or influential whatever just like pass, the torch and hope that things change. Just like oh, look at this. We all know the issues is it'd be nice. If people just keep pushing towards resistance against the injustices and asked Jesse this question already, and it'll be your last question. How do you think art can influence policy? I think it gives people like a different look because I like the norm is the norm. But then as I this is a different way to stop in. And you'll start like Dr dialogue and things about the issues and just a different way. Like, and I can't really explain how other people's minds work. But I think our does give us a different path. It may be like an Elaine peoples in a way that they wasn't used to. I guess it'd been wrestled Craig's and Jesse Craig and Jesse crimes. The name of the show is the OJ experience at studio five to five in Chelsea the show is up now through February twenty fifth guys. Thanks for coming to the studio. Thank you haven. Come back. We'll talk to veteran journalist and CBS Sunday morning contributor Alina show. Stay with us. WNYC supporters include Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman.

Jesse Craig Russell WNYC CBS US Chelsea CNN Atlantic theater company Cooley Dr dialogue Dan twenty fifth
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Art show at studio five twenty five in Chelsea is a bit meta. It's a gallery show about the real life issues of mass incarceration. It's a companion piece to a fictional HBO movie. Starring Jeffrey right about a man's been imprisoned and the real problems in retaining one's humanity while behind bars, the moving the show share the same name the OJ experience, then add another layer of real talk to this the work in the gallery show in Chelsea was created by artists who were formerly incarcerated themselves, the OJ experience, the art show provides an honest thought provoking insider narrative about the US prison system, which now holds an estimated two point three million people joining us now to talk about the OG experiences one of its curator's Jesse crimes Hijazi reading for Russell Craig's is going to be joining your co curator, you both also have artwork in the show, which is fantastic. Tell me how this exhibit came together. I know you've been working in the space for a really long time. Yes. So basically, I just got a call one day from Devi and Trautman from the SOS agency who is collaborating with HBO. And because I've worked so closely with them over the past four or five years, and we also have fellowship that we fund for incarcerated artists. So we have this vast network of artists from across the country who have the lived experience of being incarcerated. And so they asked me if I was willing to co curate this exhibition so as you sat down and thought, okay, I need to do this. Did you watch the film? I I did. Yeah. I was like I have to see the film before I agree to co curate a show because I don't want to support a film, if it goes against some of my values, and I went and watched it, and I had absolutely no concerns after after watching this amazing film. What was it about the movie that you you thought? Yes this rings true. And. How did seeing the movie inform how you wanted to curate this whole thing? I mean, so first and foremost, it's just the the way that the movie was put together. Where Jeffrey Wright is one of the main actors within the film, and a lot of the other men who are starring in the film are actually the men who are incarcerated at the prison. So this whole idea of of creating a pathway for people to tell their own stories within this narrative film that to me was already a powerful concept in and of itself. And then the other thing about the film that I really connected with is that it doesn't rely on those sensational aspects that really in the past I've kind of driven the narratives of incarceration, so all of these prison shows that focus on violence or all these other kinds of issues that. Are real issues, but they're not nearly as prevalent as what this film actually captures which is the nuance and complexity and just the sheer genuine, human kindness and humanity of people who are incarcerated, but also the internal struggle know, it's a very complex film. And I think for me it felt like one of the most realistic depictions of what incarceration is within the prison system. So you watch the film, you know, you have the stable of artists who did you reach out to tell us about some of the artists that are going to be featured in the gallery show. So ruffled Craig is one of the artists. He's in in the main space in the show. Here's this massive piece. That's there. Some of the other artists are. Jared Owens who was actually incarcerated with. So we were in the same prison together making work and both of our works are in this show. So it's kind of this beautiful beautiful coming together. And then there's Dingle Espy who makes miniature sculptures Gill battle who carves? These very intricate beautiful ostrich eggs with scenes of prison life. There's Daniel McCarthy Clifford who made this massive installation out of prison trays and their Cheryl rolling who's doing his jump jumpsuit performance. Live in the space every night allows like an interactive performance where people are encouraged to speak with him. And then they can go into this solitary so replica and carve there. Carve their expressions or or what it feels like their impressions from from being in that cell and from interacting with with Cheryl. And then as you move through the space, there are a lot of audiovisual audiovisual elements. And so there's Mary Baxter who created this amazing video triptych of her time while she was incarcerated she was actually shackled and gave birth while. She was in prison. Shan-tien Vernon is another artist who created this amazing triptych film about young women, particularly women trans women who and all of the challenges that they face when they come home. And there is Lee Yankowski who created this beautiful sculpture Reginald, Dwayne Betts who is an amazing poet a lawyer. There was a great piece. I think it was last summer about whether or not Reggie bets would be able to pass the bar having been incarcerated in the New York Times, covered it. Yeah. And it was really it was really interesting story because it really showed how difficult. Life after incarceration can be for someone. And it's as someone who has like dotted all the is across all the TS and graduated from Yale. Even he still having deal to deal with these issues. Right, right. And I mean that that's that's kind of what this exhibition is beginning to touch on. Right. Is that the stigma of incarceration, I it's it's a terrible experience while you're there, but it it lasts much longer. Even after you, come home. And so one is affecting someone like like, Dwayne Betts who's graduating from Yale and trying to trying to practice law. I mean, imagine what it does to people who don't have those support networks or that community of of people behind them. I guess is Jesse crew talking about the OJ experience at studio five five and Chelsea the show is up through the twenty fifth. It opens today. So your piece in it is really, and I know this already the story already 'cause I actually did a story on Jesse a couple of years ago. It's amazing piece of work. You did when you were in in prison on bedsheets. Apocalypse team. That's the piece that's up. So describe for people what you did on the sheets. And then how the heck you got it out of prison. Yes. Yeah. It's a massive story. Yeah. So piece I basically created the work over the last three years of my prison sentence. So the piece took me three years to make working about twelve hours a day. But to create a piece I was I was taking imagery out of the New York Times. Just compiling all of the imagery that was available with the newspaper and transferring it onto the surface of of prison bedsheets using hair gel in a plastic spoon. Because I mean, you don't have very many materials. And it would leave the inverse image on the surface of the sheet. I a back with colored pencil and kind of blend all of these disparate images together to create these. Kind of mediated landscape of everything that was happening in the world wa was removed from it. And so for me it was a way to. When you're incarcerated the only way you're able to experience the outside world is through that mediated landscape and for me. This was a way to not only get lost in creating art and maintaining my sanity, and like my sense of humanity. But it was also revealing in the sense of what it reflected back to me when you remove all these images from their narrative sources and just visually what's represented in the newspaper, and how that forms perceptions and values and norms that have real effects in society. Now, you when you were arrested, you actually, you studied art in college, correct? Right. And then you arrested for for dealing drugs when you got into prison, and you realize okay, I'm gonna be here for five or six years minimum at what point. Did you start thinking about your article? I think almost immediately. Because when I first got indicted. You know, they were really pushing me to cooperate and tell other people, and so that wasn't something I was willing to do. And as a result of that. They they did a lot of things. Right. So I was caught with a very small amount of drugs. They increased my drug weights up to an amount that increased my guideline range from thirty months up to a mandatory minimum of ten years to life. And these are all drugs that never existed this is just hearsay evidence. And they also transferred me from the jail that I was into a solitary confinement unit. So I was locked down twenty three hours a day. And I was there for a year. And this is all pre sentence before I was even found guilty. And so like all of these things happening, they they began to take away everything they possibly could they began to dehumanize me in every single way that they could think of. And the only thing that they couldn't take for me was my ability to create and so I immediately knew that was something that was going to sustain me as I moved through the system is that something that is a common theme with the artists. I know you folks, get together you have your treats, and and different kinds of conversations. Is that a common theme? I think so I think a lot of the works in this exhibition. At their core. I believe that is what drives a lot of a lot of the works. At least the works. That were created while people were actually incarcerated. And so I know if you go, and you speak to most of these artists, they'll they'll tell you that you know, that creative outlet was one of the things that allowed allowed them to feel a sense of being productive of having some kind of meaningful engagement while. They're being warehoused in these terrible facilities. You say the word warehouse we see that statistic. And we hear it a lot point three million people to three hundred million people. Do you think it's good to keep repeating it? Or is there a concern that people get numb? To that number like that just oh, that's the United States number. What do you think? Now, I think it's good to keep repeating it. I mean, there's so many things happening in our country today. And the thing about mass incarceration is is something that is very hidden. It's a very abstract thing too. I think the general public unless like, you know, you're you're someone who's directly impacted by this which is a lot of people so one and three people has a criminal record. But I think it's really important to keep saying those numbers over and over keep having these conversations, and I even think it's more important to begin to create more pathways where people who have that lived experience can have their own platform can speak on their own behalf. And also be connected with people who are actually making policy decisions who are making the decisions that directly impact these individuals. How do you think art can help can affect policy? I think art can do a lot of things. I mean, it's it's a great conversation starter and the thing about.

Jesse US New York Times Russell Craig Dwayne Betts Chelsea HBO Jeffrey right Cheryl Devi Jeffrey Wright Trautman Apocalypse SOS Jared Owens Mary Baxter Yale Dingle Vernon
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Exhibit Frida Kalo appearances can be deceiving is a dynamic look of the artists through her life choices from what she wore to the way, she handled tragedy to our own personal triumphs Brooklyn Newseum Katherine Morrison. Lisa small will be in studio next a new pop up gallery show opening and Chelsea today as a companion piece to an HBO movie about mass incarceration, the gallery show, the OG experienced features artwork from formerly incarcerated artists will learn more about the art and the issues presented in the work from co curator Jesse crimes and Russell Greg amyloid the legacy call Lagerfeld legendary designer and director of Chanel passed away just after New York fashion week ended look at his legacy with fashion. Journalists Alina show, I'm Alison Stewart. And I will meet you on the other side of the news for all of it. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. House. Democrats were preparing to file a resolution to block the national emergency. President Trump has declared to get the money. He wants for border wall. Senator Susan Collins of Maine is the only Republican in congress who stated plans to support the resolution. Federal judges giving former Trump attorney Michael Cohen, another sixty days of freedom before serving a three year sentence for lying to congress and other offenses, the chairman of the house oversight committee Elijah Cummings says Cohen will testify before the panel on February twenty seventh NPR Susan Davis reports in a statement chairman coming says the committee consulted with the Justice department on the scope of Michael Collins public testimony lawmakers are expected to ask Cohen about President Trump's financial dealings during the two thousand sixteen campaign the president's compliance with campaign, finance and tax laws and the accuracy of the president's statements on those matters Cohen is scheduled to meet privately the following day without intelligence committee. Coming says, his committee will not ask about Russian efforts to influence the two thousand sixteen election and deferred those questions to the Intel committee. Susan Davis NPR news, Washington. President Trump is dismissing claims by former acting FBI director Andrew McCabe that senior bureau officials once consider. Using the twenty fifth amendment to remove Trump from office where they drew McCabe is made a fool out of himself over the last couple of days, and he really looks to me like sort of a poor man's J. Edgar Hoover is a I think is a disaster. And what he was trying to do is terrible. And he was caught. I'm very proud to say we call him. So we'll see what happens. But he he is a disgraced man he was terminated. Not by me. He was terminated by others. The report was a disaster. Trump responding to reporters questions about McCain's comments last Sunday during a CBS sixty minutes interview about claims made in his new book, the president fired McCabe hours before his scheduled retirement. Last March TV actor jussie smollet is charged with felony. Disorderly conduct stemming from his claims being attacked near his home in Chicago last month. Details from WBZ's miles Brian. The Cook County state's attorney is charging smell at with felony. Disorderly conduct charge that could carry up to three years in prison smell at who is black and gay is accused of falsely reporting a hate crime late last month, smart said to mand tact him in downtown Chicago using racist and homophobic insults. Chicago police arrested two Nigerian brothers last week who have been seen in the area on security camera footage, but police let them go. After questioning saying the investigation had taken a new turn sleds attorneys said in a statement that they planned him out a quote aggressive defense. They said they planned to mount their own investigation to incited leaks. A major concern for NPR news. I'm miles O'Brien in Chicago. You're listening to NPR news. A US Coast Guard Lieutenant stationed in Washington is accused of plotting a domestic terrorist attack and compiling a hit list of prominent Democrats and media figures Christopher Hassett of Maryland was arrested last week on weapons and drug charges. Prosecutors say agents found fifteen firearms and more than one thousand rounds of ammunition in Hassans basement court papers alleged the defendant identified himself in two thousand seventeen draft Email as a white nationalist fantasizing about killing nearly everyone on the planet. A former high ranking Chinese general has been sentenced to life in prison for corruption. NPR's rob Schmitz reports on the latest Chinese officials to fall under a crackdown by president Xi Jinping fun way was the chief of joint staff of China's People's Liberation army before being stripped of his posts and Tober 2017 state news agency, XInhua reports that FOX has been found guilty of bribery and assets he was unable to account for. He's the latest military figure two. Paul leader Xi Jinping's corruption crackdown in the first ranking official to be sentenced this year. The sixty seven year old the company, she do his first meeting with President Trump in two thousand seventeen China's military is in the midst of a modernization campaign and corruption within the ranks has been an important focus of president sees the People's Liberation Army at problems with officers selling ranks and positions as well as embezzling money through housing and welfare funds. Rob Schmitz than Pierre news Shanghai on stock markets in Asia shares are higher one percent in Shanghai as investors Degi just minutes from the Federal Reserve's last meeting. This is NPR news in Washington..

President Trump president NPR Chicago Trump Andrew McCabe Washington Michael Cohen Susan Davis director Senator Susan Collins Alison Stewart Xi Jinping Frida Kalo attorney rob Schmitz Intel committee
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With blood blood from like cow beef blood. So I had the idea to recreate the roar shirt and black tests because when I was a kid in foster homes and stuff like that. I h evaluations. So like all the trauma, and like urban society in violence black on black crime police brutality prison violence, a lot of violence that we deal with is traumatizing. So I revisited those memories of the psychiatric evaluations. So that's what made me come with it. And then I wanted to use the blood to highlight the seriousness of the situation because I if I just like a regular pain, it'd be like, you know, people who've you have been in forget about it real quick just like how they forget about the victims of the light goes those injustice. So I wanted to use up more extreme to give people attention. In some of the pieces on painted, the eyes of the victims of police, brutality disturbing the people as like a reminder because we become numb to like the Dan de out befall kinds of crime, especially with the emphasis on the police brutality because it's like no Justice being served. So I wanted to like that that is like the main reason, but then this other like traumas and other violence that we do with like foot ourselves on each other black on black crime. And if you wind up in a prison system synagogue is stabbed over some Cooley like some juice because he didn't give the other guys juice. Jesse was telling me a story about some guy. Stay Ruben about he didn't do the other guys laundry. Do we wanted it and stuff like that? So it's just like as crazy. So even if you're not a victim of the witness in is traumatizing, what do you hope people think about after they go through this exhibit? They see this beautiful art, the thoughtful are what do you want them to think about what he wants them to talk to their. Friends about. Leave from personal aspect. I will want people to late. Carry the torch. I spark a flame and other people so McClay Cononica call action. And as I call the duty for myself to create some kind of or meet change, and then hopefully like people in positions of power and things they can make changes or if you're not dead powerful is a person. Do you can be creative or influential whatever just like pass, the torch and hope that things change. Not just like, oh, look at this. We all know the issues is it'd be nice. If people just keep pushing towards resistance against the injustices and asked Jesse this question already, it'll be your last question. How do you think art can influence policy? The gives people like a different look because I like the norm the norm. But then this is a different way to stop in. And you'll start like Dr dialogue and things about the issues and just a different way. Like, and I can't really explain how other people minds work. But I think our does give us a different path. Maybe like an Elaine peoples in a way that they wasn't used to my guess been wrestled Craig's and Jesse Craig and Jesse crimes. The name of the show is the OJ experience at fit studio five to five in Chelsea the show is up now through February twenty fifth guys. Thanks for coming to the studio. Thank you haven. Come back. We'll talk to veteran journalists and CBS Sunday morning contributor, Alina Chow. Stay with us. WNYC supporters include Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman grasping.

Jesse Craig WNYC Cooley US CBS Ruben Alina Chow Atlantic theater company Chelsea Dr dialogue twenty fifth
"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:59 min | 1 year ago

"jesse crimes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a gallery show about the real life issues of mass incarceration. It's a companion piece to a fictional HBO movie. Starring Jeffrey right about a man has been imprisoned and the real problems in retaining one's humanity while behind bars, the movie in the show share the same name the OJ experience. Then let's add another layer of real talk to this the work in the gallery show in Chelsea was created by artists who were formerly incarcerated themselves, the OJ experience, the art show provides an honest thought provoking insider narrative about the US prison system, which now holds an estimated two point three million people joining us now to talk about the OG experiences one of its curator's Jesse crimes Hijazi waiting for. Russell Russell Craig's is going to be joining your co curator, you both also have artwork in the show, which is fantastic. Tell me how this exhibit came together. I know you've been working in the space for a really long time. Yes. So basically, I just got a call one day from Devi in Trenton from the SOS agency who is collaborating with HBO on us. And because I've worked so closely with them over the past four or five years, and we also have a fellowship that we fund formerly incarcerated artists. So we have this vast network of artists from across the country who have the lived experience of being incarcerated. And so they asked me if I was willing to co curate this exhibition so as you sat down and thought, okay, I need to do this. Did you watch the film? I I did. Yeah. I was like I have to see the film before I agree to co curator show because I don't want to support a film, if it goes against some of my values, and I went and watched it, and I had absolutely no concerns after after watching this amazing film. What was it about the movie that you you thought? Yes this rings true. And. How did seeing the movie inform how you wanted to curate this whole thing? I mean, so first and foremost, it's just the the way that the movie was put together. Where Jeffrey Wright is one of the main actors within the film, and a lot of the other men who are starring in the film are actually the men who are incarcerated at the prison. So this whole idea of of creating a pathway for people to tell their own stories within this narrative film that to me was already a powerful concept in and of itself. And then the other thing about the film that I really connected with is that it doesn't rely on those sensational aspects that really in the past I've kind of driven the narratives of incarceration, so all of these prison shows that focus on violence or all these other kinds of issues that. Are real issues, but they're not nearly as prevalent as what this film actually captures which is the nuance and complexity and just the sheer genuine, human kindness and humanity of people who are incarcerated, but also the internal struggle. You know, I it's a very complex film. And I think for me it felt like one of the most realistic depictions of what incarceration is within the prison system. So you watch the film, you know, you have the stable of artists who did you reach out to tell us about some of the artists that are going to be featured in the gallery show. So Russell Craig is one of the artists. He's in in the main space in the show. Here's this massive piece. That's there. Some of the other artists are. Jared someone's who was actually incarcerated with so we were in the same prison another making work and both of our works are in this show. So it's kind of this beautiful. Beautiful coming together. And then there's Dingle Espy who makes miniature sculptures Gill battle who carves? These very intricate beautiful ostrich eggs with scenes of prison life. There's Daniel McCarthy Clifford who made this massive installation out of prison trays and their Cheryl on who's doing his jump fruit. Jumpsuit performance live in the space of reunite allows. So it's like an interactive performance where people are encouraged to speak with him. And then they can go into this solitary so replica and carve there. Carve their expressions or or what it feels like their impressions from from being in that cell and from interacting with with Cheryl. And then as you move through the space, there are a lot of audiovisual audiovisual elements. And so there's Mary Baxter who created this amazing video triptych of her time while she was incarcerated she was actually shackled and gave birth while. She was in prison. Sean Tina, Vernon is another artist who created this amazing triptych film about young women, particularly women trans women who and all the challenges that they face when they come home. And there is Lee Yankowski who created this beautiful sculpture Reginald, Dwayne Betts who is an amazing poet a lawyer. There was a great piece. I think was last summer about whether or not Reggie bets would be able to pass the bar having been incarcerated in the New York Times, covered it. Yeah. It was really it was really interesting story because it really showed how difficult. Life after incarceration can be for someone and especially someone who like dotted all the is across all the TS and graduated from Yale. Even he still having deal to deal with these issues. Right, right. And I mean that that's that's kind of what this exhibition is beginning to touch on. Is that the stigma of incarceration, you know? I it's it's a terrible experience while you're there, but it lasts much longer. Even after you, come home. And so one is affecting someone like like, Dwayne bats who's graduating from you and trying to trying to practice law. I mean, imagine what it does to people who don't have those support networks or that community of people behind them. My guess is Jesse crimes. We're talking about the OJ experience at studio five three five and Chelsea the show is up through the twenty fifth. It opens today. So your piece in it is really, and I know this already this story already because I actually did a story on Jesse couple of years ago. It's amazing piece of work. You did when you were in in prison on bedsheets apocalypse team. That's the piece that's up. So describe for people what you did on these sheets. And then how the heck you got it out of prison. Yes. Yeah. It's a massive story. Yeah. So I basically created the work over the last three years of my prison sentence. So the piece took me three years to make working about twelve hours a day. But to create a piece I was I was taking imagery out of the New York Times. Just compiling all of the imagery that was available with the newspaper and transferring it onto the surface of the of prison bedsheets using hair gel in a plastic spoon. Because I mean, you don't have very many materials. And it would leave the inverse image on the surface of the sheet of a comeback with colored pencil on kind of blend all of these disparate images together to create these. Kind of mediated landscape of everything that was happening in the world was removed from it. And so for me it was a way to. When you're incarcerated the only way you're able to experience the outside world is through that mediated landscape and for me. This was a way to not only get lost in creating art and maintaining my sanity, and like my sense of humanity. But it was also revealing in the sense of what it reflected back to me when you remove all these images from their narrative sources and just visually what's represented in the newspaper, and how that forms perceptions and values and norms that have real effects in society. Now, you when you were arrested you actually study art in college, correct? Right. And then you arrested for for dealing drugs when you got into prison, and you realize okay, I'm going to be here for five or six years minimum at what point. Did you start thinking about your art again? Almost immediately. Because when I first got indicted. You know, they were really pushing me to cooperate and tell on other people. And so that wasn't something. I was willing to do. And as a result of that. They they did a lot of things. Right. So I was caught with a very small amount of drugs. They increased my drug weights up to an amount that increased my guideline range from thirty months up to a mandatory minimum of ten years to life. And these are all drugs that never existed this is just hearsay evidence. And they also transferred me from the jail that I was into a solitary confinement unit. So I was locked down twenty three hours a day. And I was there for a year. And this is all pre sentence before I was even found guilty. And so like all of these things happening, they they began to take away everything they possibly could they began to dehumanize me, in every single way that they could think of and the only thing that they couldn't take from me was my ability to create and so I immediately knew that was something that was going to sustain me as I moved through the system is that something that is a common theme with the artists. I you folks get together you have your treats, and and different kinds of conversations. Is that a common theme? Think. So I think a lot of the works in this exhibition. At their core. I believe that is what drives a lot of a lot of the works. At least the works. That were created while people were actually incarcerated. And so I know if you go, and you speak to most of these artists, they'll they'll tell you that that creative outlet was one of the things that allowed allowed them to feel a sense of being productive of having some kind of meaningful engagement while. They're being housed in these terrible facilities. You say the word warehouse because you see that statistic. And we hear it a lot to three million people to three hundred million people. I'm Kristie think it's good to keep repeating it. Or is there a concern that people get numb? To that number like that just that's the United States number. What do you think? Now, I think it's good to keep repeating it. I mean, there's so many things happening in our country today. And the thing about mass incarceration is is something that is very hidden. It's a very abstract thing too. I think the general public unless like, you know, you're you're someone who's directly impacted by this which is a lot of people so one in three people has a criminal record. But I think it's really important to keep saying those numbers over and over keep having these conversations, and I even think it's more important to begin to create more pathways where people who have that lived experience can have their own platform can speak on their own behalf. And also be connected with people who are actually making policy decisions who are making the decisions that directly impact these individuals. How do you think art can help can affect policy? I think art can do a lot of things. I mean, it's it's a great conversation starter and the thing about art work is that it can create this. It's almost like a third party medium where sometimes if you have conversations with people people have a tendency to maybe write you off. But when you create this work, that's dealing with such a complicated subject. It creates a space where people can come into it from where they're at and experience it and also potentially see something from a different perspective without feeling bombarded or attacked. It's interesting. When I when I seen some of the work of some of these artists, and at some point, I just wanna say your artists, you're not formerly incarcerated artists. Right. When is that time? You know, that's a really good question. Welcome. Russell. Sorry, no worries finish your SNL street. Russell a couple questions. Now. It's a really good question. And I push back against that a lot. But at the same time. You have to work within the system that you're given. And so, you know, if we try to organize an exhibition, and we say, you know, this is the OJ experience. And these are all these amazing artists like it has one one kind of feel to it. And I think it would it would kind of get some kind of attention and engagement, but to let people know that these are formally incarcerated artists and let their work speak for themselves. I think over time that's going to change the narrative it's going to push back that we don't have to have these arbitrary classifications and artists can just be artists. But at at the current state, I feel like it is important to, you know, frame frame what this is. And then that in that framing these exhibitions these shows can help push back against those narratives future. Russell tell me about your piece in the show. I have a few pieces which one the big one the main one the blood pieces. Yeah. Basically.

Russell Russell Craig Jesse US New York Times HBO Jeffrey right Trenton Chelsea Cheryl SOS Dwayne Betts Jeffrey Wright Jared Mary Baxter Dingle Yale Reggie Lee Yankowski