9 Burst results for "Jerry Brown Nigel"

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Daughter. And Nigel just as a person who's constantly interacting with inmates at San Quentin. Do you want to know what they're incarcerated for what crime? They were convicted of or would you just as soon not knowing just judge them based on what they present to you in their interactions with you. I I don't ask unless it comes up is part of the story. I'd rather not know I'd rather deal with anyone actually as they are in front of me at that moment. But the things that you do in your past do add dimension to who you are in this moment. So sometimes it's important. I can give you an example. There's a man that I worked with for quite a while. I was very fond of and at one point he revealed to me that he had raped quite a few women, and it was very hard for that to not. Change the way I felt about him. I had to really work through it. And think about it. And he said the thing that all women fear is that I raped women because I could and to hear the next to take that in and to not be afraid into not judge a person, but to just sit with it and think about it and think about this was thirty years ago. I just had to do a lot of work around that. And it's fine. I'm fine working with him now. But that was a case that challenged my desire to not know, and and to how to deal with the knowing once it's been presented to you. So in that case, I didn't dig in. That was something that was falling tier to me was the custom among men, and San Quentin views we know what somebody is in for an do you ask or is that considered wrong to ask? So are the that goes into likes what they call politics in prison. And where you know, you may have certain prisons that it matters what you're imprisoned for like an and and this is a difference on the race. Ace level. Like, you may have guys that are Hispanics or whites who when they get to a certain prison. They're racist. Like, let me see your paperwork. Let me see why you're here. But you may have the African Americans who who go to prison and answering places and you don't get that question. So I think far as African American culture and prison think nobody really cares. Why you imprison? Can I ask how your relationship is changing? Now that you're both outside. Well, I mean, it's it's it's it's cool. You know, I go over to Niger house hang out with her husband rig. He spent his vinyl. He got. Collection of vinyl. It's we're able to go out now. Share food. In prison. You can't share food with people you have to wear the same clothes all the time. There's all these restrictions. So now, we're I mean, we're friends and work colleagues. And of course, I joy all the little moments. I I was I was going to Niger house the other day, and I was our early and I stopped by his late. I don't know if it's lake is something that day is the bay. I just stopped over there. When sat on a rock and just watch the water for about an hour. It was so kickback and Couve. Meaning I take advantage of all these moments now, I don't I don't I don't take them for granted. I enjoy every second of every day and other teams we always we tried to always keep this as equal as possible. But of course, when someone's imprison the other person's not there's so many things you can't do. So now, we just have the opportunity to travel together to do something like this together. Instead of me, representing it Earl on and I can represent it together. And we will one of my goals has been for us to travel to other prisons, and I never wanted to do that with. Out early on. So now, we can actually do that. And even hopefully go to other countries too. I wanna thank you both so much Orlan again. Thank I want to congratulate you on for your new freedom and Nigel and earn a one wish you good luck with the retooled version of air hustle now that earners out. I look forward to. The new as yet unannounced host will be with you. Yes. And I look forward to your interviews with people who like you are transitioning back into society from prison. Thank thank you. Both so much for talking with us through welcome. Thank you. Thank you, Terry gross. Speaking with Earl on woods, and Nigel poor about their podcast ear hustle, which features interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin or LAN woods was released from San Quentin in November after his sentence was commuted by governor Jerry Brown. Nigel poor is a professor of autocracy at California State University in Sacramento. To new interpretations of the complete works of felonious monk have been released arranged for jazz quartet and for solo guitar jazz critic, Kevin Whitehead says, both catch monks playful spirit. Pianist

San Quentin Nigel Niger Earl Terry gross daughter. jazz critic Jerry Brown California State University Kevin Whitehead Sacramento professor thirty years
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Newman's Own foundation Workington nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's Own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's Own foundation dot org. This is fresh air weekend. I'm Davies in for Terry gross. Let's get back to Terry's interview with Earl on woods and Nigel poor the co hosts and co producers of ear hustle a podcast, featuring their interviews with men incarcerated in San Quinton airline was both host and inmate but was released in November after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I went to San Quentin as volunteer teaching photography. Nigel. I wanna play an excerpt of an episode that you were very prominent in playing because it's about knowing where the line is when you're interviewing prisoners and sometimes to have to ask something that's going to make them uncomfortable. There's a story you did about how people like you from the outside who come into volunteer because you start at San Quentin volunteering teaching photography before you started doing the podcast ear hustle. So there's there's a rule that pertains to the volunteers who come in. And they're not allowed to have like close relationships with the prisoners anything that gets really intimate or emotional not even talking about physically intimate, but just emotionally intimate is is against regulations. But apparently, it's like if you if you fall in love, the prisoner and the volunteer phone love, that's fine. As long as the volunteer. Ear or the staff person is no longer going to be working there in any capacity. So you're interviewing a prisoner who he an one of the volunteers fell in love. And so she stopped working there in any capacity, and they got married eventually the marriage fell apart. But after you recorded that interview, you found out something about him and decided like you could not play that interview. Unless you asked him another question as I wanna play the part where you return to ask him that difficult question. So here's Nigel poor co host and co producer of the podcast, air hustle. There's something have to talk to you about up at hard some just gonna be very blunt with you is that. Okay. Sure. Okay. So we do stories about life inside prison. We we don't really do stories about people's crimes at all. And so I found out what your. In prison for I was hoping I could talk to you little bit about it. How do we tell stories and leave out that that part? Yeah. I don't I don't know. I don't I don't I don't know. I mean. I try to be like open and honest about my past and the things that I've done including what I've done to get to prison. No, I think the scope of the the number of people that that could possibly listen to this. I'm just really nervous about about that. Yeah. I don't know why you're thinking can I tell you that are just going through my mind about it might help you. So one of the things is that I really believe that people change like, I take you as the man you are in front of me, and I listened very carefully to how you talked about your relationship, and how much you thought about it. And how painful and joyous the whole experience was for you. And so when people listen this story, that's what I want them to take away that here's this person. Who's in a difficult situation? They've they've actually met this person they fell in love just like anyone else. Would it didn't work out. Unfortunately, you N thinking like, here's this guy who's very self actualized. And then what worries me is like so people believe with this vary like this guy, skewed view things not skewed not sued. But then someone will search you and be like did they just feed me a bunch of bull? But if we could just talk about it and come to some understanding about what's our responsibility. What's your responsibility? So I've tried to trying to partner with you here. How how do we present this? You guys are killing me. You guys are token poking and prodding. Do you feel like we're being unfair? No, I don't feel you're being unfair at all. And I don't know what my hesitancy is. So on December seventh nineteen ninety four. I'm murdered my ex girlfriend the mother of my now twenty five year old daughter.

Jerry Brown Nigel Newman Terry gross San Quentin San Quinton California Davies producer Earl partner twenty five year
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. My guests are Irwin woods and Nigel poor the co host and co producers of ear hustle a podcast, featuring interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin airline was both host and inmate. But he was released an ember after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I started going to San Quentin as a volunteer teaching photography. Can I ask how your relationship is changing? Now that you're both outside. Unanswered where I mean, it's cool. You know, I go over to Niger house hang out with her husband, Rick. He spent his vinyl you gotta. I was just he was just peeling back. One of the. Yeah. Yeah. Obsession we get? I mean, it's it's able to go out and share food. Yeah. In prison. You can't share food with people you have to wear the same clothes all the time. There's all these restrictions. So now, we're I mean, we're friends and work colleagues. And of course, I enjoy all the little moments. I I was I was going to Nigel house the other day, and I was our early and I stopped by this lake. I don't know if there's a lake is something the other day is the Bay I just stopped over there. When sat on Iraq rock and just watch the water for about an hour. It was so kickback Couve. Meaning I take advantage of all these moments now, I don't I don't. Take them for granted. I enjoy every second of every day and other teams we've always we've tried to always keep this as equal as possible. But of course, when someone's imprisoning the other person's not there's so many things you can't do. So now, we just have the opportunity to travel together to do something like this together instead of me representing it early on, and I can represent it together. And we will one of my goals has been trust to travel to other prisons, and I never wanted to do that without early on. So now, we can actually do that. And even if they go to other countries too, and she even got mad at me the other day because I left dinner with everyone, and I went to the movies by myself, go see vice I know, why don't you invite me? We get to see each other on different color clothing 'cause in prison always had to wear blue. And I always wore black. You had to make sure these days. You can't find into what the guys inside where? So you can't wear blue which is what they wear and then I saw him in this awesome orange. T-shirt that had some Brown in it. It looks good on you. Yeah. So I want to ask you each to choose one thing that you would like to change in in the system of of in the prison system or mass incarceration. An airline since you served so much time. Let's start with you. I personally would like to eradicate California's three strikes law because I think that there's a lotta people sentenced under this law, which everybody thinks it's twenty five to life. Now, people get up to a thousand years to life for something that they've done in their past. And you may be incarcerated fifteen twenty years. You may be a changed individual all the way change would never commit another crime. But the law don't see your rehabilitation. So you'll never get the opportunity to be in front of people to present the person that you are today. And I have a lot of friends as imprison that has two hundred years three hundred years to life for maybe attempt to second degree robbery, and they won't get that aptitude to present the person that they are today. So I believe that crimes have sentencing under you know, what I'm saying person can get certain a certain amount of time for the cry. That they commit the rest of it is just enhancement so me personally, I would eradicate the three strike law in California. And I believe personally that that will ease overcrowding because there are a lot of people in prison that deserve to be out. And you basically just described your own situation when you were incarcerated because you got thirty one to life for attempted second degree robbery. Did I get that? Right. Yeah. And that was because you've got such a long sentence because one crime had you convicted on two counts to that counted as two strikes, correct Nigel. What about you? Well, I would like to see more programs created that allow people inside and outside to work together as colleagues, and I think it would help demystify a lot of the assumptions that people have about who's in prison, and who should be there. And it would give the people inside the opportunity to stretch themselves. Intellectually and emotionally so just creating more of a connection, and you're describing air hustle, isn't that funny? What does that mean? More self absorbed. Oh, I think it also means that you're doing things based on what you've learned from personal experience. So yeah. Yeah. I wanna thank you both so much an airline again. I wanna thank I want to congratulate you again for your new freedom and Nigel and I wanna wish good luck with the retooled version of air hustle. Now that line is out. I look forward to. The new as yet unannounced host will be with you. Yes. Look forward to your interviews with people who like you are transitioning back into society from prison. Thank thank you. Both so much for talking with us. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. Airline woods and Nigel poor the co creators co producers and co host of the podcast ear hustle, which features interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin or LAN woods was released from San Quentin in November after his sentence was commuted by governor Jerry Brown. Nigel poor is a professor of photography at California State University in Sacramento. Tomorrow on fresh air. My guest will be writers Sigrid Nunez, her latest novel, the friend when the national book award for fiction, and is about to be published in paperback. It's about a writer, whose friend and former mentor kills himself. She inherits his dog a one hundred eighty pound great Dane who like her is grieving I hope you'll join us fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our senior producer today as Roberta shorrock, our technical director and engineers are view Bentham our associate producer for digital media is Molly seavy nesper..

Jerry Brown Nigel San Quentin California Jerry Brown Irwin woods robbery Niger Sigrid Nunez Rick Iraq national book award producer Danny Miller executive producer Sacramento writer California State University Roberta shorrock Molly seavy
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes from this station, and from creative planning and independent wealth management. Firm has advisers are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more, creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined and from K Buxbaum in support of the David Gilkey and ULA tomato memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments. This is fresh air. My guests are erlin woods and Nigel poor the co creators of ear hustle a podcast, featuring interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin airline was both co host and inmate, but he was released in November after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I went to San Quentin as a volunteer teaching photography. Nigel. I wanna play an excerpt of an episode that you were very prominent in. I'm playing because it's about knowing where the line is when you're interviewing prisoners and sometimes to have to ask something that's going to make them uncomfortable. There's a story you did about how people like you from the outside who come into volunteer because you started at San Quentin volunteering teaching photography before you started doing a podcast era hustle. So there's there's a rule that pertains to the volunteers who come in. And they're not allowed to have close relationships with the prisoners anything that gets really intimate or emotional, and I'm not even talking about physically intimate, but just emotionally intimate is is against regulations. But apparently, it's like if you if you fall in love the prisoner and the volunteer fall in love, that's fine. As long as the volunteer or the staff person is no longer going to be working there in any capacity. So you're interviewing a prisoner who. He and one of the volunteers fell in love and. So she stopped working there in any capacity, and they got married eventually the marriage fell apart. But after you recorded that interview, you found out something about him and decided like you could not play that interview. Unless you asked him another question as I wanna play the part where you return to ask him that difficult question. So here's Nigel poor co host and co producer of the podcast, air hustle. There's only have to talk to you about you up at hard. Okay. It's I'm just going be blunt with you is that. Okay. Sure. Okay. So we do stories about life inside prison. We we don't really do stories about people's crimes at all. And so I found out what you're in prison for. Talk to you a little bit about it..

Jerry Brown Nigel San Quentin NPR David Gilkey K Buxbaum ULA California producer
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. My guests are erlin woods and Nigel poor the co host and co producers of ear hustle a podcast, featuring interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin airline was both host and inmate. But he was released in November after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I started going to San Quentin. Volunteer teaching photography. Can I ask how your relationship is changing? Now that you're both outside. I mean, this is cool. You know, I go over to Niger house hang out with her husband, Rick. He spent his vinyl you gotta. Connection of. I was just dribbled out. He was just peeling back when the Beatles. Yeah. Yeah. Obsession we get? I mean, it's you know, it's able to go out now. The share food. In prison. You can't share food with people you have to wear the same clothes all the time. There's all these restrictions. So now, we're anywhere, friends and work colleagues. And and of course, I enjoy all the little moments. I I was I was going to Niger house the other day, and I was our early and I stopped by this lake. I don't know if there's a lake is something day after day is the Bay I just stopped over there. When sat on a rock and just watch the water for about an hour. It was so kickback cooped. Meaning I take advantage of all these moments. I don't I don't I don't take them for granted. I enjoy every second of every day and the other teams we've always we've tried to always keep this as equal as possible. But of course, when someone's imprisoning the other person's not there's so many things you can't do. So now, we just have the opportunity to travel together to do something like this together instead of me representing it early on, and I can represent it together. And we were one of my goals has been for us to travel to other prisons, and I never wanted to do that with. Early on. So now, we can actually do that and even to other countries too. And she even got mad at me other day. I did because I left dinner with everyone. And I went to the movies by myself to go see vice I know, why don't you invite me? We get to see each other and all different color clothing because in prison early always had to wear blue. And I were black you had to make sure these days. You can't find into what the guys inside where? So you can't wear blue which is what they wear and then I saw him in this awesome orange. T-shirt that had some Brown in it. It looks so good on you. Yeah. So want to ask you each to choose one thing that you would like to change in in the system of of of in the prison system or mass incarceration. An airline since you served so much time. Let's start with you. I personally would like to eradicate California's three-strikes law because I think that there's a lot of people sentenced under this law, which everybody thinks it's twenty five to life. Now, people get up to a thousand years to life for something that they've done in their past. And you may be incarcerated fifteen twenty years. You may be a changed individual all the way change would never commit another crime. But the law don't see your rehabilitation, so you'll never get to be in front of people to present the person that you are today. I have a lot of Francis in prison that has two hundred years three hundred years to life for maybe attempt to second degree robbery, and they won't get that opportunity to present the person that they are today. So I believe that crimes have citizen under you know, what I'm saying a person can get certain a certain amount of time for the cry. That they commit the rest of it is just enhancement so me personally, I would eradicate the three strike law in California. And I believe personally that that will ease overcrowding because there are a lot of people in prison that deserve to be out. And you basically just describe your own situation when you were incarcerated because you got thirty one to life for attempted second degree robbery. Did get that. Right. Yeah. And that was because you've got such a long sentence because one crime had you convicted on two counts to that countered is two strikes. Correct. Niger? What about you? Well, I would like to see more programs created that allow people inside and outside to work together as colleagues, and I think it would help demystify a lot of the assumptions that people have about who's in prison, and who should be there. And it would give the people inside the opportunity to stretch themselves. Intellectually and emotionally so just creating more of a connection, and you're describing air hustle. Isn't that funny? I don't know does that mean we're self absorbed. Oh, I think it also means that you're doing things based on what you've learned from experience. So yeah. Yeah. I wanna thank you both so much an early on again. I wanna thank I want to congratulate you on for your new freedom and Nigel one wish you good luck with the retooled version of air hustle now that earners out. I look forward to hearing the new as yet unannounced host will be with you. Yes. And Earl and I look forward to your interviews with people who like you are transitioning back into society from prison. Thank thank you. Both so much for talking with us through welcome. Thank you. Thank you. Airline woods Nigel poor or the co creators co producers and co host of the podcast ear hustle, which features interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin or LAN woods was released from San Quentin in November after his sentence was commuted by governor Jerry Brown. Nigel poor is a professor of photography at California State University in Sacramento..

Jerry Brown Nigel San Quentin Niger California Jerry Brown robbery Rick Earl Sacramento California State University Francis professor fifteen twenty years three hundred years two hundred years thousand years
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Station, and from creative planning and independent wealth management. Firm has advisers are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more at creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined and from K Buxbaum in support of the David Gilkey and Zabiullah tomato memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments. This is fresh air. My guests are Earl Woods and Nigel poor the co creators of ear hustle a podcast, featuring their interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin airline was both co host and inmate, but he was released in November after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I went to San Quentin as a volunteer teaching photography. I want wanna play an excerpt of an episode that you were very prominent in playing us because it's about knowing where the line is when you're interviewing prisoners and sometimes to have to ask something that's going to make them uncomfortable. There's a story you did about how people like you from the outside who come in to volunteer because you started at San Quentin volunteering teaching photography before you started doing podcast, era hustle. So there's there's a rule that pertains to the volunteers who come in. And they're not allowed to have close relationships with the prisoners anything that gets really intimate or emotional, and I'm not even talking about physically intimate, but you just emotionally intimate is is against regulations. But apparently, it's fine. If you if you fall in love, the prisoner and the volunteer fall in love, that's fine. As long as the volunteer. Here or the staff person is no longer going to be working there in any capacity. So you're interviewing a prisoner who he and one of the volunteers fell in love and. So she stopped working there in any capacity, and they got married eventually the marriage fell apart. But after you recorded that interview, you found out something about him and decided like you could not play that interview. Unless you asked him another question as I wanna play the part where you return to ask him that difficult question. So here's Nigel poor co host and co producer of the podcast, air hustle. They have to talk to you about a up at hard. Okay. So I'm just gonna be very blunt with you is that. Okay. Sure. Okay. So we do stories about life inside prison. We we don't really do stories by people's crimes at all. And so I found out what you're in prison for. I was I could talk to you about it..

Jerry Brown Nigel San Quentin NPR Zabiullah tomato memorial fund Earl Woods David Gilkey K Buxbaum California producer
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Interviews with men incarcerated in San Clinton. Can I ask how your relationship is changing? Now that you're both outside. Well, I mean, it's it's it's it's cool. You know, I go over to Niger house hang out with her husband rig. He spent his vinyl collection of buying them. I was just triggered off. He was just peeling back. One of the beating. Albums his obsession. I'm we get. I mean, it it's, you know, it's we're able to go out now able to share food to food because you know, in prison, you can't share food with people you have to wear the same clothes all the time. There's all these restrictions. So now, we're I mean, we're friends and work colleagues. And of course, I enjoy all the little moments. I I was I was going to Niger house the other day, and I was our early and I stopped by his late. I don't know if there's a lake is something that you had today is the Bay I just stopped over there. When sat on a rock and just watch the water for about an hour. It was so kickback Couve. Meaning I take advantage of all these moments now, I don't I don't I don't take them for granted. I enjoy every second of every day. And at the other teams, we've always we tried to always keep this as equal as possible. But of course, when someone's imprisoning the other person's not there's so many things you can't do. So now, we just have the opportunity to. To travel together to do something like this together instead of me representing it early on, and I can represent it together. And we will one of my goals has been for us to travel to other prisons, and I never wanted to do that without Earl on. So now, we can actually do that. And even hopefully go to other countries too. And she even got mad at me the other day, I did because I a left dinner with everyone. And I went to the movies by myself to go see vice I know. Yeah. I wanted you invite me. We get to see each other and all different color clothing because in prison erlin always had to wear blue. And I always wore black. You had to make sure these days you can't fund into what the guys inside where? So you can't wear blue which is what they wear, and then I saw him in this awesome, orange t shirt that had some Brown in it. It looks so good on you. Yeah. So I want to ask you each to choose one thing that you would like to change in in the system of of of in the prison system, or in mass incarceration an airline since you served so much time. Let's start with you. I personally would like to eradicate California's three strikes law because I think that there's a lot of people that's sentenced under this law, which everybody thinks is twenty five to life. Now, people get up to a thousand years to life for something that they've done in their past. And you may be in cost rated fifteen twenty years. You may be a changed individual all the way change would never commit another crime. But the law don't see your rehabilitation. So you'll never get the opportunity to be in front of people to present the person that you are today. And I have a lot of friends that's imprison that has two hundred years three hundred years to life for maybe attempt to second degree robbery, and they won't get that opportunity to present the person that they are today. So I believe that crimes have citizen under him. You know, what I'm saying person can get certain certain amount of time for the crime. That they commit the rest of it is just enhancement so me personally, I would Iraq Kate the three strike law in California. And I believe personally that that will ease overcrowding because there are a lot of people in prison that deserve to be out. And you basically just described your own situation when you were on car serrated because you got thirty one to life for attempted second degree robbery. Did I get the right? Yeah. And that was because you've got such a long sentence because one crime had you convicted on two counts to that counted as two strikes, correct Nigel. What about you? Well, I would like to see more programs created that allow people inside and outside to work together as colleagues, and I think it would help demystify a lot of the assumptions that people have about who's in prison, and who should be there. And it would give the people inside the opportunity to stretch themselves. Intellectually and emotionally so just creating more of a connection, and you're describing air hustle, isn't that funny? I don't know does that mean we're self absorbed. Awesome. Means you're doing things based on what you've learned from personal experience. So yeah, yeah. I wanna thank you both so much and Orlan again wanna thank I want to congratulate you hooked on for your new freedom. And Nigel an earlier I want to wish you good luck with the retooled version of air hustle now that earners out. I look forward to hearing the new as yet unannounced host will be with you. Yes. And early and I look forward to your interviews with people who like you are transitioning back into society from prison. Thank thank you. Both so much for talking with us through welcome. Thank you. Thank you Earl Woods and Nigel poor or the co creators co producers and co host of the podcast ear hustle, which features interviews with men incarcerated in San Quinton or LAN woods was released from San Quentin in November after his sentence was commuted by governor Jerry Brown Nigel pours, a professor of photography at California State University in Sacramento.

Jerry Brown Nigel Niger Earl Woods robbery California San Clinton Orlan San Quentin Iraq Kate Sacramento San Quinton California State University professor fifteen twenty years three hundred years two hundred years thousand years
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Father through a crime committed long ago coming soon to theaters. Support for NPR comes from this station, and from creative planning and independent wealth management firm. His advisors are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more, creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined and from K Buxbaum in support of the David Gilkey and Zaba ULA tomato memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments. This is fresh air. My guests are erlin woods and Nigel poor the co creators of ear hustle a podcast, featuring interviews with men incarcerated in San Quentin airline was both co host and inmate, but he was released in November after his sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel. I went to San Quentin as volunteer teaching photography. Nigel. I wanna play an excerpt of an episode that you were very prominent in. Playing us because it's about knowing where the line is when you're interviewing prisoners and sometimes to have to ask something that's going to make them uncomfortable. There's a story you did about how people like you from the outside who come in to volunteer because you started at San Quentin volunteering teaching photography before you started doing the podcast era hustle. So there's there's a rule that pertains to the volunteers who come in. And they're not allowed to have close relationships with the prisoners anything that gets really intimate or emotional not even talking about physically intimate, but you just emotionally intimate is against regulations. But apparently, it's like if you if you fall in love, the prisoner the volunteer fall in love, that's fine. As long as the volunteer or the staff person is no longer going to be working there in any capacity. So you're interviewing a prisoner who. He and one of the volunteers fell in love and. So she stopped working there in any capacity, and they got married eventually the marriage fell apart. But after you recorded that interview, you found out something about him and decided that you could not play that interview. Unless you asked him another question as I want to play the part where you return to ask him that difficult question. So here's Nigel poor co host and co producer of the podcast, air hustle. There's something you have to talk to you about. Okay. Okay. So I'm just gonna be very blunt with you is that. Okay. Sure. Okay. So we do stories about life inside prison. We don't really do storage by people's crimes at all. And so I found out what you're in prison for. I was hoping I could talk to you a little bit about it. How do we tell stories and leave out that that part? Yeah. I don't I don't know. I don't I don't I don't know. I mean. I try to be like open and honest about my past and the things that I've done including what I've done to get to prison. No. I think the scope of the the number of people that could possibly listen to this. I'm just really nervous about about that. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know what you're thinking. Can I tell you something started just going through my mind about it might help you? Absolutely. So one of the things is that I really believe that people change make I take you as the man you are in front of me, and I listened very carefully to how you talked about your relationship, and how much you thought about it. And how painful and joyous the whole experience was for you. And so when people listen to this story, that's what I want them to take away that here's this person who is in a difficult situation. They've they've actually met this person they fell in love just like anyone else. Would it didn't work out. Unfortunately, U N thinking like, here's this guy who's very self actualized. And then what worries me is? So people believe what this ferry like. This guy skewed view, not skewed nuts. But then someone will be search you and be like. Did they just feed me a bunch of bull? But if we could just talk about it and come to some understanding about what our responsibility, what's your responsibility. So I've tried I've tried to partner with you here. How how do we present this? You guys are killing me. You guys are. Oaken poking and prodding. Do you feel like we're being unfair? No, I don't feel you're being unfair at all. And I don't know what my hesitancy is. So on December seventh nineteen Ninety-four. I'm murdered my ex girlfriend the mother of my now twenty five year old daughter. And Nigel just as a person who's constantly interacting with inmates at San Quentin. Do you want to know? What they're incarcerated for what crime. They were convicted of or would you just as soon not know just judge them based on what they present to you and their interactions with you. I I don't ask unless it comes up as part of the story. I'd rather not know I'd rather deal with anyone actually as they are in front of me at that moment. But the things that you do in your past do add dimension to who you are in this moment. So sometimes it's important, and I can give you an example. There's a man that I worked with for quite a while that I was very fond of and at one point he revealed to me that he had raped quite a few women, and it was very hard for that to not change the way I felt about him. I had to really work through it and think about it. And he said the thing that all women fears that I raped women because I could and to hear like to take that in and to not be afraid and to not judge a person, but to sit with it and think about it and think about this was thirty years ago. I just I had to do a lot of work around that. And it's fine. I'm fine working with him now. But that was a K. Case that challenged my desire to not no end to end to how to deal with the knowing once it's been presented to you. So in that case, I didn't dig in. That was something that was volunteered to me early. On was the custom among men in San Quentin. Do you usually know what somebody is in foreign d you ask or is that considered wrong to ask? So I think that goes into likes what they call politics in prison. And where you know, you may have certain prisons that it matters what you're in prison for like. And and and this is a difference on the race level. Like, you may have guys that are Hispanics or whites who when they get to a certain prison their races. Like, let me see your paperwork. Let me see why you're here. But you may have the African Americans who who go to prison, and they had certain places, and you don't get that question. So I think for African American culture in prison. I don't think nobody really cares. Why you in prison? So something I found really interesting is that the group that is multicultural and not segregated by race. Or ethnicity is the group that's into like the nerds the group that our intellect sci-fi fantasy and stuff like that. They're called seven our partners those partners. Those are your partners. Yes, we. So I always go over to the air. I call them mail service. Always go over to the fantasy game guys. And I'll just sit there for a minute. And try to see if I even come close to understanding was going on on that table is a different world. It is told they see something that I can't see I I don't think I have the vision to see it. So they're they're brothers are the people who live in a similar world fantasy as opposed to defining their brothers as being, you know, a a skin color or ethnicity. Right. Right. And this is just what they accept anybody. You know, it's like I think they're not under the constraints or the precious to not accept people. How did you learn how to? Keep your calm and. Live in the kind of confined situation, you're in during the more than two decades that you were incarcerated you have to stay sane in a situation like that. And you also spend time in solitary where it's very hard to stay sane, right? I'll say I've always own this second term. So the first term is where I did all the solitaire stuff, but on a second term after once you receive a life sentence. There's no guarantee that you will ever be released from prison. So I think would would would kept me sane is dad. I had the philosophy where I am going to live to the best of my ability every day that I have left on. This were on his Irv. No matter where I'm at. So be it prison AMAN joy my day every day because at the end of the day. This is all I got, you know, I don't know what tomorrow. But I know what was happening today right now. So I'm enjoy and I think that's a share philosophy philosophy with everybody lesson prison is that you have to just deal with what's going on today. You know, and and and just not let the pressures of prison just get to your core and crush you. If you're just joining us, my guests are erlin woods and Nigel poor the co host and co producers of the podcast, ear hustle. We'll be right back. This is fresh air. Support for WNYC comes from the New York. Historical society marking the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the fourteenth amendment with black citizenship. In the age of Jim crow on the African American struggle in the fifty years after.

Jerry Brown Nigel San Quentin NPR producer California K Buxbaum David Gilkey New York Zaba ULA Jim crow partner WNYC twenty five year thirty years fifty years two decades
"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"jerry brown nigel" Discussed on The Takeaway

"He also has housing that's been set up by a really great organization called restore. So he said, but I can't say that the case for a lot of people who who get out. I mean finding a job as he said is incredibly difficult finding housing especially in the bay area is a challenge. So I'm really happy for early on. But of course, we. We both of us think about what will happen for other other people who get out, and in fact, as we move forward with your hustle. That's one of the areas or really gonna talk about is what is the reentry process like for most people in what are the challenges in the day stories of that? I wanna ask you about the future of your hustle in just a second. But interestingly in that same episode, we just played a clip from early on. And you were talking about how much movement there's been at San Quentin. And it seems like there are lots of people getting out earlier than they expected. We know that governor Jerry Brown has granted more pardons in California than any governor since the nineteen forties. Are you seeing real changes in sentencing laws, and and more of an increased effort to get people out of these sentences that just seem endless, well, I am not a policy person. So what I would say is just anecdotal. I haven't necessarily seen a change in the sentencing laws, but there has been quite an exodus of people from San Quentin specifically from Saint Quentin with Jerry Brown doing. Commutations. We work down in the media lab. And there's been so many men over the last year who have been getting out. So it does feel like a change. I don't know if it's a policy change. But I do believe that obviously it's clear. Governor Brown is commuting a lot of people wanna talk a little bit about San Quentin itself. I've reported in a jail before it's not easy to get access to these spaces particularly to set up an entire podcasts. And have it go for this long? What was that process? Like to get San Quentin to agree to do this. Yes, we always want to make clear that San Quentin is very different from other prisons. There's so many programs that happened in there. So the administration is comfortable with people coming in and out, and I was volunteering inside the prison for quite a few years before we started the podcast, and I made it my business to get to know people and get support of the administration in Lieutenant Sam Robinson. Who is the public information officer, there is incredibly supportive of these various programs without him. I'm we couldn't do it. But you know, I always tell people that it takes three Ps to work in prison in that's patients. Politeness in persistence, and without those three things you're not gonna survive there because you aren't necessarily anyone's priority. You know, you have to make things happen on someone else's schedule. And we've just been really determined to do this and made kind of our dream come true in there. But I don't know how easy would be inside of other institutions curious also with the host, well, at least the co host going on to this next chapter in his life. What happens inside San Quentin with ear hustle? Is there someone else who might want to take over are there? Other folks who are interested in the in working on the podcast and doing other podcasts perhaps. Yes. So we went through a, you know, a hiring process, and we have a new co host that will be coming on to work with me inside the prison in Orland. I will continue to work together. Doing reentry stories. So your hustle will be changing direction, but it will definitely be continuing with new people. But also. Stain on Nigel poor is the co host and producer of the podcast, ear hustle. Her. Co host Earl on would serve twenty one years inside San Quentin state prison and last week. His sentence was commuted by California governor Jerry Brown Nigel thank so much and best of luck with the new show. Thank you..

San Quentin Governor Brown host and producer Saint Quentin California Sam Robinson Nigel Orland officer Earl twenty one years