24 Burst results for "Jerry Blackwell"

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

06:53 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"From getting the law wrong is better than most real-life summation writing but it's kind of the way that the scene should have ended if you would if you've been writing this for the screen About an incident like this that is so torn apart the country. That's the line you would have written. I wanted the jurors to go away with with the the final thought being one. That says that's absolutely right. That's right that if he had the heart. That was the size of non-euro girl. George floyd was still alive and it just seems to capture at all. I was very cognizant of the fact that not only are we prosecutors. Prosecutors and minnesota and minnesotans Are a wonderful people. So so let me just say that. But they're not a wonderfully emotive so And that As one kind of friend of mine. Who's inter- nineties German lutheran minnesotan. She kinda made the comment that Here we don't smile for no reason because showing teeth as a sign of aggression. It's no so if minnesota if if you have too much of the motive stuff if it's too early on a case you turn off some minnesota jurors in doing that. But i but i did want to get to the heart again To as sort of the punchline if you distilled embroiled everything down to the fundamental narrative what happened here was simply that That an officer did not care enough when all is said and done he had a duty to care. He was trained in how to provide care and he needed to put back into in. Your custody is in your care. And and that to me was was the bottom line plays out for all the counts and the charges and evidence and the experts is fundamentally he just didn't care and the brilliance of it was it was conduct and causation in a single statement. Right that was it was it was. It was beautiful and lyrical and as an advocate. It was something that i admired and enjoyed watching it very much. When did you come up with that statement. Well i'm just thinking about when it wasn't on the spot. I'll tell you that but but the night before as a revelation it came a few a few days before as sort of a revelation when when i was thinking about all the arguments about his co morbidity the size of his heart and so on i thought well. That's a lotta nerve focused on size of his heart and get an. That's a lot of nerve focusing on the size of his heart. Right exactly right. Will you've been very generous with time. Thank you for your service. I understand you may be listeners of the podcast honored by that as well. We are Yes and think that's why the case went so well learn all from you and me wondering where we're gonna get to that. I have served the country indirect indirect way. Will you both you know this when you know. We put the a request out. Wanted to talk to you. Folks was thrilled when we got the quick reply that you would come on in. I could spend three hours with you talking about the case the impact of the case. Let me just end with that Although it goes beyond the task you had lawyers in this case. But you're also americans care about the issue as we started with final question you know. What do you think this means. And where do we go from here in the country on the issues that have been raised by the conduct of mr chauvin for free. It's a recognition of the need for human empathy and compassion. I don't know what it means in terms of the larger issues going forward with Policing and police reform and whatnot Not a not a policymaker. And i guess i leave Those decisions to policymakers. I do think that just sort of as a country people we need to recognize each other's humanity more and to have empathy for each other more and not just simply decide you know whoever is saying What's being said to decide what side you're on. Ignore all evidence to the to the contrary only listen to that that support your preconceived position for me. It means a lot of that. And and even seeing the way people would would treat Folks who had testified in the trial you see different tweets and things. That people say a disparaging People disparaging certain witnesses. Disparaging anyone and you just kind of amazed by it thinking yourself you know. Would these people say this To each other's face is it okay to be saying things like this online to just sort of just other examples of of disregarding each other's humanity and and. I hope that this is something that people can recognize and see that when what are the perils. What happens when we do that. When the person who were there to protect and serve as not a person but a super person or superhuman. Where does that end. Who will does that cause us to do. And preet. i agree. With steve we jerry. I didn't know each other coming into this. We began to see each other as a lawyers who loved to try cases who fight hard and liked to win cases. I come away with this From this experience With with a new friend. And that's that's something that i've gained. I i say in public service. If you do public service you you get more than you give. And i certainly have received more than i've given in in having the privilege of trying this case and if nothing else i would like to encourage other Private practitioners on the civil side to think about ways That youtube can step into civil shoes. to Be of use in a similar cases. And you don't have to know every aspect of a of criminal law but there are things we learn in complex civil that are useful in the case of this sort message. don jerry. Blackwell steve swisher. Thank you for your service. Thank you for doing what you do. Thank you for being on the show now pre. We really really enjoyed it. So.

George floyd youtube three hours steve both German single statement chauvin steve we a few days before minnesota one kind jerry lutheran one nineties don jerry a Blackwell minnesotans
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

05:43 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Video tape is a white man's knee in the back of the neck of a black man killing him slowly over nine minutes and twenty nine seconds and you came onto the case in part because your feelings about because of your feelings about racial justice. This case was about that large degree but but to get some form of justice in a first step towards ultimate racial justice. You had to stay away from that. You find that ironic at all in a way pre but on the other hand. It wasn't just mr chauvin in the minds of the public that was on trial the criminal justice system on trial and and and the public was on the edge of the year. We can see what mr chauvin did. But where will the accountability come from and the criminal justice system and and that is where i think the public was looking having Sat through him minnesota Flannel casteel clark. A fresh in the minds still riding king Where we're seeing is not even necessarily believing Depending on who's on the jury so to me the jury was out on. Whether this criminal justice system would actually do justice In this instance. And that's really where i think. The public was was focused. And you both also made the point. And steve you especially in your closing argument to say what the case was not about an i understand. This was highly strategic as well. You said and i'm quoting a quote. This is not an anti police prosecution. it's a pro-police prosecution. Make no mistake. This is not a prosecution of the police end quote. How important was that theme. And that point. Do you think to the trial. I think it was essential. Any think about this preet what. What is the standard that we use to judge a police officers conduct. What would a reasonable police officer do under similar circumstances if this is a this is a trial against the police generally then that means none of them are reasonable and all of them then would have engaged in a similar conduct. And we lose right. I mean if if that is the standard. What would a reasonable police officer. Not a reasonable bystander. Not a reasonable member of the public but a reasonable police officer do then We have to embrace Reasonable police officers and we had a number of reasonable police officers. Come forward and testify at the trial including our chief of police. Once there was no longer any resistance and clearly. When mr floyd was no longer responsive and even motionless to continue to apply that level of force to a person prone doubt handcuffed behind their back that in no way shape or form is anything that is by policy is not part of our training and it certainly not part of our ethics or values. Did you have that. Many officers testified for that reason. Or did you actually need all those officers to testify. Everything testified to we needed every single one of those officers to testify to what they testified to Same with the number of bystanders. Seem with everything because you know all you have to do is look at the win loss record in terms of the prosecution of police to understand that there's no such thing as a slam dunk case and under resource the cases at your peril. Don't take anything for granted. Don't take any person for granted. Don't take any juror for granted. Sure you know none of it. Do you ever get criticized. We got this criticism sometimes. Suny and i don't know jerry or steve. If you've ever heard this there's some judges who will say. Stop over trying. Your case and i never really understood. The what against judge means is too much already. You have an over abundance of proof. Have you heard that and did you have any worry that people thought that's what was going on here. Of course i mean we. We heard words tantamout to that That you got enough. How many experts you need you know that sort of thing but given hard it is to convict a police officer i like an into leaping leaping over a chasm. How fast Do you need to run while as fast as you can and hardest and And and you don't want to kind of in your moderation of mr mart. And so how do you calculate modulate How much is enough. I we just knew how important it was and police officers. Speak to a proper policing for jurors and from many different angles as we're relevant whether it is From the police training point of view from From the first aid training that received any number of different perspectives on policing that we thought were implicated by the facts and the jurors need to know about from the police about the beliefs. That's right and in terms of you know criticism. I guess. I've always been willing to accept criticism. If the worst thing you can say about me or our team is that we put too much into it. That's great criticism. I love that criticism. You can you can see all the launch if if what we did however was to kind of know take shortcuts to not. Just leave it all out on the field to use a sports analogy. That's criticism that i would that that would hurt. That would cut because we need people to understand people in this community to understand that we were fighting for for for justice in this case that we were going to fight and we were to fight hard. And we're gonna fight for every single ounce of evidence that we could put in..

steve jerry floyd Suny minnesota first step both twenty nine seconds chauvin over nine minutes and first single ounce casteel mart evidence single one Flannel
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

08:51 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"What my most nervous moments As as citizens simply mighty. Mon business is driving on the street and noticing that there's a police car behind me And i couldn't remember really a time in my life where there's a police car behind me where i felt more comfortable where i felt safer where it did not feel at risk and if you're not going to be hurt then you certainly going to be harassed you're going to be stop for no reason and all agla. There'll be some callous person who gets out of a car and who just gratuitously speaks nasty way for no reason and all of which you just like just to avoid. and so. that's what for me as an african american lawyer even Protective serve has meant. That's what is translated into. And i had very few experiences to the contrary when i just randomly encountered Police no matter where. I've been in the country i've literally never had the experience of being pulled over for no reason days on the color of my skin. So that's a. That's an experience that you can describe it to me but i don't really get it like i understand which are saying it doesn't have the same meaning to me as someone who's experienced jerry that experience that you've had many many times in your life. Did that play some role in your agreement to get involved in the prosecution of this case coming out of private practice. But he certainly yes. I mean admit. I had a personal connection with the inhumanity of it with the objectification of people By the police. That way For me it's a former random violence. Even you don't know this person this individual. They haven't really done anything That's unlawful you simply targeted them for negative aggression because of A immutable characteristic. They have and the fact that you have a badge that gives you cover to do it. And and i've experienced it many times in my life And sometimes as a lawyer leaving my office with my briefcase in white collar on and still harassed the various ways by police who stopped me for no reason Or they are pulled behind my car when i come out of my building and i stopped and looked to say something wrong. They point. Get in your car. Just point to get in your car and i drive win a block and they put the light on anyway and employees over and i gotta lecturers about being three feet from the curb and i could write you a ticket mall kinds of other things that were said to provoke and And just didn't take the bait because taking it would've meant they would have justified in escalating things so so that definitely played a role For me The george floyd four so many black and brown people wasn't away emblematic And i'm not talking about the the drug addiction the so on but just that kind of harsh callous treatment is something we can all relate to experience it in degrees And we know what that looks like and what that feels like and defacto fact quite often. It goes without any redress whatsoever under the law. Just an injury that you just have to live with. Because there's nothing that you can do and you have to then go before jurors juries quite often whether a majority of people find the whole experience far to them and and that's never happened to them. It's never happened to them. And maybe their uncle sons brothers fathers and someone who behave this way. But i know things about apparently Their own people. They don't know how they will. That's why these videotapes. Not just in the george floyd case and all these other cases are important because people who have not experienced this kind of thing are now witnessing those things on videotape and as you said at the trial they can believe their own is right. That's right if you wanna just watch this and An and the trial was You'll talk more by detail in a second. But even at opening statement i mean i was intentionally so subdued in factual in the presentation in the opening Because i thought the the videos spoke so much for itself bide softened it didn't need any contribution from me with respect to vitriol or anything added to it so simply wanted to basically tee it up and let the jury see for themselves experience for themselves and for those who wouldn't otherwise believe Well seeing is believing raise issue of treatment of the hands of the cops. Now you are well known your faces will know your name is well known and you have successfully prosecuted a police officer have you had any interactions with police. Since the trial anything notable we both have obviously many interactions with the police who are all all the courthouse. Various sheriffs and other officers were at the courthouse. All the time. And and i will tell you in. Maybe steve will speak to this too but it was overwhelmingly Positive and i can't really tell you how many police officers who they're came up to say. Thank you for doing this. That when these kinds of things happen it reflects badly on the rest of us and we had police officers. Come up and say that now. Driving around in the in the twin cities. I haven't had any counter with the police and i have to say i'm grateful for that. No idea what might encounter still. I'm going to get into the details of the trial in a second but first let's talk about for moment. How you both wound up on the trial team. At some point the case did not proceed under the local district attorney's office supervision. It was transferred to the attorney. General's office in minnesota and was under the supervision of the attorney general of the state keith. Ellison and each of you was contacted by keith bells. And neither of you. I believe really knew him. I think one of you who have never met him at all never spoken to him. That was me. I'd never met attorney general before Never spoken with him and Wrong number known him for a while. I did surprised by the call. I was surprised by the call. In fact i i saw there was a you know i'm working at home. You know this is all in the context of the co- the pandemic as well. So you have all of those different things that happened. I saw that. I had a missed call on my phone and just missed it. And so i hit re dial and it was The attorney general. And i could. I could recognize his voice. He identify you. So this is keith. Ellison and i kind of laughed because i didn't think that it really was playing a joke on me and but then it became clear it really was him and he called me reached out to because he was wondering if i would be able to help him out with us case and I just remember thinking to myself. You know as you know you're prosecutor that's at some point in your career as a prosecutor if you go down that path you stop thinking of yourself as a lawyer and you think of yourself as a prosecutor. I left that office In two thousand seventeen january two thousand seventeen so give us call asking to help. With this case it stirred up feelings in me in terms of what I love doing so much. I love being a prosecutor is a really big part of my identity. And he asked if i could help with the case and And of course my initial reaction was. We'll yes i would love to do that. Absolutely edina video. I knew that The state was in a significant amount of pain. The city the state the whole country was in was in pain and just as a prosecutor. You find yourself in that position where you need to walk with someone who is going through pain and trauma whether it's a family of a murder victim or Sexual assault any any sort of crime and so that was my instinct. Of course. I did call my partners and ask them. If that was something that i could do. And they were very receptive and very supportive of Of the effort. That the firm that i belong to kind of born of of some anti semitism some smart attorneys who gone to harvard and came back to minnesota back to minneapolis at a time in the late forties. Anti semitism was high. They couldn't get hired right and and so they started their own firm and they always had this culture of allowing lawyers to follow their conscience. was In the Nuremberg trials was a was prosecutor. They supported attorneys who've Been in the east you know supporting the aclu and whatnot. And so they. They're very supportive of that is just so grateful that they would do. You think it was odd at all the given the resources of the state and the number of assistant attorney general that there must be in that office that they would go outside the office to find people to try the case..

minneapolis steve three feet george floyd minnesota each Ellison first twin cities harvard late forties both one keith african american keith bells two district attorney's two thousand seventeen january
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"For the cause of racial justice in this country are found the conversation both powerful and deeply revealing so this week. We're doing something a little different instead of taking your questions. We're going straight to my full interview with the team that secured the conviction of derek chauvin. That's coming up. Stay tuned who stands to profit from the opioid epidemic from emi academy award winner. Alex gibney comes. Hbo's new two part documentary. The crime of the century a searing indictment of big pharma and the forces that enabled overproduction reckless distribution and use of opioids. The documentary reveals drug companies are in fact largely responsible for manufacturing the very crisis they profit from the crime of the century streaming may tenth. Max jerry blackwell steve swisher welcome to the show. Thank you glad to be here. It's a real honor and treat to have you given much you have done for the country and for the justice system. I want to thank you for your service. Which by the way. I don't know if everyone knows this. Each of you is in private practice and performed your services at the derek chauvin trial for free as we say pro bono. So thank you for that as well. You're welcome thank you. I've got a lot to ask you about the trial. The nature of the trial strategy of the trial the meaning of the trial. So we'll get through as much as we can. And i almost wasn't sure where to start and i thought well why don't i start at the beginning. Which is not the trial which is not the opening statements. But the actual killing of george floyd himself last may may of twenty twenty. Both in private practice had no idea that you become involved in that case in any way probably had no idea if there would ever be a criminal case against anyone. Do you recall how you reacted to the murder itself. What reaction you had when you saw the videotape when you were still private citizens i do remember that reaction i having spent over two decades as a prosecutor law enforcement is something that i have a keen interest in a lot of friends in law. Enforcement's a real love for law enforcement law enforcement officers. And i remember looking at that and seeing did not recognizing it at all as something that should be coming from a law enforcement officer and it would really Just hit you right straight in the stomach. Great strain heart in a. And i remember you know after seeing it knowing that i would probably be called. My firm is relatively small firm. Eighty lawyers would be called to sort of conceptualize the events. Because there aren't any. There's not anybody else in my firm has same exact background as me spending that much time as a prosecutor and so i spent a lot of time over the next few days talking to different partners associate staff members about what had happened and helping helping our firm kind of process it because it really was wrenching to everybody and jerry. Having spent almost six decades as an african american man. It saying saying this i was just breathtakingly Stunned and outrageousness of it What what exactly could equal protection me you know. What is the rule of law. If there isn't some accountability for that at the same time there was kind of uncertainty in your stomach That nothing may come of this at all because we we've been at this intersection before of to be outrageous Misconduct imposed upon You know black. People brown people colored people Because of the immutable characteristic and and quite often the rule of law itself has protected that and So my initial gut reaction was The the a sense of outrage The senate that's an earthquake And what's coming. Max is a giant soon. Nami in Public reaction. And you know. I do a lot of word for fortune. Five hundred one hundred companies. And i'm one of the few people some of them know that they would Categorizes in close woke for the the the white in-house counsel so i expected. I might hear from a number of them just with their reactions What my thoughts might be it. Sure enough i did hear from From a number of them two of them in tears when they call And and one of the statements. I was told was It was so shocking to me as a white person because I don't believe that ever would have happened to me. As a white person and there it is in my face and they were simply shocked and stunned by so it was just the the sense of the shock and outrage of the whole thing and the apparent apparent callousness of the police officers involved Was just stunning jerry. I hadn't heard i hadn't heard him say that before. And i remember having that reaction to when i was watching thinking to myself and then hearing the whole call was about Suspected counterfeit twenty dollar bill. I remember thinking to myself. Well that that would not have happened to me It just assumed it was a mistake. they would have asked me about it and if it became apparent that it wasn't a mistake they probably would have given me a ticket and you a ticket and on my way and so i do remember thinking that as well did you. Steve given your experience as a former prosecutor aside from being horrified by what you saw. Did you form a view as to whether or not this was a prosecutable criminal case against one more officers at that time you know. I certainly did believe that that was going to be a prosecutable case against Chauvin forgotten his already. Well i know i. I was caught mispronouncing at several times during the trial. Between and show the first time i heard it i think someone said shaaban and so it was hard for me to switch. But yeah no i. I remember thinking to myself that you know that looked like excessive force just on the face of it based on his you know the placement of his knee on on george floyd's neck but i also had a healthy sense of reality that you know. I think that the track record is pretty clear. In terms of how many officers are prosecuted for fences like this and then how many are ultimately convicted. I don't think that i really questioned whether or not charges would be brought. I was questioning at what level and then but always always wondering if the officers involved when ultimately be convicted. Because it's just very difficult for people to accept that a police officer would have done something intentionally wrong we. We tend to try to think of any reason that could be possible. Rational explanation for what it is that we're seeing that looks so plainly wrong but we're wired to believe the police Young age at least we meaning White america not not not black or brown america that have different experiences since childhood. And perhaps that's so jerry but also let's not forget how many people of color called the police on the police when they saw this horrible thing happened. I mean i think that no matter what your your mistrust is. There still is something that makes you reach out. Even george floyd Believed the police would help him. Sure but by back. I'm simply saying there. Isn't this sort of reticence or wholesale endorsement disbelief in the idea that the police could ever do this because for me.

Steve Alex gibney Eighty lawyers Five hundred derek chauvin george floyd Chauvin shaaban twenty dollar Max jerry blackwell Both Each two part this week one hundred companies african american two over two decades both Nami
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

08:03 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"The U. S where, In the past few hours, a jury has found a former police officer guilty of murder over the death of African American George Floyd in Minneapolis last year, Derek Shevin was filmed kneeling on Mr Floyd's neck. More than nine minutes during his arrest last May. The widely watched footage sparked worldwide protests against racism and excessive use of force by the police. Well, Mr Sherman will remain in custody until he's sentenced in a few weeks time he could spend decades in jail. These people who gathered outside the courthouse chanted after the verdicts were read out. Later. The lead prosecutor in the case, Jerry Blackwell, gave his reaction. No burden, then bring George Perry Floyd's back to us. This verdict does give a message to his family. That he was somebody That is, like matter. All of our lives matter, and that's important. And I also hope that this verdict for all of the rest of collective all of us. Help us further along the road toward a better humanity, one of George Floyd's brothers. Finally he's reacted to the verdict at a news conference with the family. I'm not just fighting for George anymore. I'm fighting for everybody around his world. I get calls. I get the EMS people from Brazil from Ghana from Germany. Everybody. London, Italy They're all saying the same thing. We won't be able to breathe until you're able to breathe. Today we're able to breathe again. Speaking after the verdicts, President Biden said the time had come for meaningful police reform in America. George Floyd was murdered almost a year ago. There's meaningful police reform legislation in his name legislation to tackle systemic misconduct and police departments to restore trust between law enforcement and the people there entrusted to serve and protect. It shouldn't take a whole year to get this done well throughout the program. We're gonna be joined by guests. I'm packing the implications of this verdict in 20 minutes or so you'll hear a moving tribute from a pastor who worked with Big Floyd as he was called in Houston. Who tells us of the affection for the man who went away to Minnesota, only to be murdered by Derek Shove. In one vital part of the story is what it means for law and law enforcement. David Schultz joins us Now live is criminal law Professor Hamline University in Minnesota and joins us live from simple Thank you for talking to us. Professor. Listen, 1st 1st off as a lawyer. What was your response to the verdict? Did you expect it from what you've seen and heard in court. Uh, given how strong the case seemed to have been, the prosecution didn't exceedingly good job jumping through two hurdles Hurdle. One was showing that Derrick Show and didn't act as a reasonable police officer and was not entitled to any type of qualified or statutory immunity to use force and two they very successful and being able to marshal evidence to show the Derrick show and caused the death of George Floyd. Given those two together, this sort of, I think the overwhelming Strength of the case they put together. I wasn't surprised by the verdict. I was a little surprised by how quickly it came. I wasn't expecting a verdict until Wednesday in the United States, But obviously the jurors were very convinced that the prosecution had just Done their job beyond the reasonable doubt and came to a verdict and all three counts very quickly. So so just given what we had watched, not completely surprised, but again, like I said, more surprised by how quickly it happened. How representative on significant Is it because we here time and again from campaigners? How unusual it is for police in cases like this to actually be held accountable. What was different about this one? What was important Was it the quality of the evidence? Was it the video that made it so visceral? Or was it the public sentiment around the case? I think a lot of things have changed over time if we go back, But nearly 30 years ago, there was another famous case involving Los Angeles police officers and Rodney King, which was caught on tape for Los Angeles, California police officers were beating Rodney King and they were acquitted. And people wondered. How could this happen? It's on take. We sup. I think lots of things have happened. You know, One of them is I think what changing us demographics changing us attitudes towards policing in America? I think We had the social media which was able to circulate these videos much more rapidly, but I think also hear it really was the sense in which there is a a changing view. Towards the extent of how far the police Congar Oh, in terms of using force in America s, so this is a cultural change, which which changes the attitudes off. Of 12 men and women True, the jury. There's no question about it and the fact that we've had so many incidents like this in the past, and especially in Minneapolis. We've had so many in the last few years. I think the public just sort of reached a breaking point released this case. The jury perhaps reached a breaking point. Also, right, Kamala Harris talking about new laws, she's calling for political support for a new law actually named after George Floyd. We need a new law, or is it just different, arguably better application of the old law because it's always been illegal for police officers to murder people. Do you need a new law? I think you do in a larger sense, because I think one of the conclusions that many people could draw from this is that what just that Derek showman was one bad apple and therefore the police got him out of the prosecution got him. The police turned their backs on him like like his chief Arredondo, and therefore everything is fine. But there's a more systemic problem that many people are saying in terms of police race use of force, and this is where I think the vice president is turning to saying that Took extreme case like this to get a guilty verdict. But there's far many cases out there where that never happens. And we need to be able to address those also. I'm very briefly, Professor. You're gonna be teaching this in class. Is it that kind of case It is that I've actually been teaching a criminal law class this semester, and we've been talking about every week and going through it in detail. So this becomes on Wednesday night, United States where I'll be teaching my class again. Ah, lot of detail, and this will be one of those cases that we talk about for years in terms of doesn't represent a racial transition or turning point in American policing and in American culture. David Crystal clear many thanks. Indeed, Professor David Schultz, criminal law professor at Hamline University in Minnesota, lives on the line there from Simple little bit later in the program, please stay with us. 10. Minutes time. You're gonna hear a very moving tribute to the man himself, George Floyd from someone who knew him well. That's news Day. Yes, you listen to these day on the BBC World Service our other top story now the complete turnaround by the six English Premier League football clubs, which had said just two days ago they were joined a European Super League Now they are not. Manchester City and Chelsea were the first ones to pull out and late last night Arsenal Liverpool Ask the United and Tottenham also withdrew. The Super League was condemned by fans, football authorities and government ministers in the UK and across Europe by you wafer on league associations, so the team so the left in at the moment are Italian sides. A C Milan into my land and event is on Spanish teams of 30 Co. Madrid, Barcelona and Real Madrid. So does this European Super League still have legs? Let's go to Spain now. Speak to sports journalist Highly Castro. Welcome one. Hello. Good morning. Okay, So what do you make off this announcement or English sides?.

David Schultz Derek Shove Derek Shevin Jerry Blackwell Kamala Harris United States George Manchester City Brazil Real Madrid Germany Minneapolis Ghana UK Tottenham Barcelona Wednesday night Minnesota Chelsea Houston
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:50 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Susie Jones is a reporter in Minneapolis. She has been following the Derrick Sheldon try Ally, asked her just before the show to give us a summary of the closing arguments from the two sides. Yeah, they were diametrically opposed, That's for sure, because they both stood very firm in their own positions that Prosecution, saying that George Boy died of a low oxygen level because their Children had his knee on his neck for 9.5 minutes, nine minutes 29 seconds. He probably said that word that time John Several times. He also played a tape where he told the jurors again. George Boyd was saying on the ground the space in the ground in the pavement. I can't breathe, he said. 27 times during that nine Minutes and 29 seconds, so really bringing home their main argument that it was roll oxygen levels due to the knee on his neck, reiterating some of the probably evolved powerful testimony of the trial, John and that was Dr Tobin. Dr. Martin told then that it was all oxygen levels and Not drugs or a bad heart that killed George Boy. Then the defense took over. I wanted to interject your real quick junkies. This was a long day for jurors. The prosecution's argument took an hour and 45 minutes. Then the defense started and he took 2.5 hours. At one point, the judge, it was so long People just kind of losing focus everybody, including recorders, with detail after detail of the presentation, and the judge interrupted him. Miss Staton. I mean, just cut him off that we're done. We're gonna have lunch. It's interesting to me that the judge would do that, because have maybe this was a bad strategy on the defense's part, But you get the feeling they are so desperate to make every last claim for show Van's innocents in this case that they're throwing everything against the wall and that the judge would interrupt that. Midstream makes it sound as though it wasn't his effective is the defense was hoping the judge wasn't so compelled that he thought Skip it will have lunch. Now. That's That's a damning observation about what the defense was presenting. It seemed to be yet seem to be an admonishment by the judge. And you know, he has done that before, in case he has at different times in this trial. Abruptly ended things. You know, he did that remember with the firefighter, But the defense did get his point across. I think whether they fell on Hired years or open ears. And that was just that John. Every single piece of possible question Mark came up from the drugs from how many how what The level of drugs were That his neck didn't have any substantial, like indication that it had been injured that his, you know just every single piece with heart and how the size of his heart and Uh, head of the county medical examiner. He basically did go against the state's case and what he found in that autopsy report. The rebuttal was Jerry Blackwell, who was just amazing. Prosecutor watch and his the last thing he said, John was the defense is gonna want you to believe that George Floyd had an enlarged heart. Big heart. It was too big and he said, I want you to know that their Children's heart was too small. That's where we are six hours of closing. So he says, to Derek Children or to the jury about Derrick Show, Vin, but his heart was too small. Did he then say he was a mean one, Mr Grinch? No, he didn't know. Was that effective? I guess is what I'm wondering. Well, yeah. I mean, it was sort of the mic drop deliberations continue today. We don't know when they're going to return with a verdict. I should tell you, Susie Jones in Minneapolis that here in Chicago. The National Guard is at the ready. They will be deployed later today, pending the results of his trial. I presume you have a similar presence in Minnesota. Yes, Except for we have since March eight. I mean, the thing about Minneapolis right now. Is that just completely boarded up, right? I mean, that happens. That's happened in the last week where every single business downtown is completely boarded up, no matter how close or far it is from the courthouse. Was interesting yesterday. Matt Langer, who is the State patrol chief got emotional because he didn't know what they were doing in terms of how to manage crowd when it comes down to No interacting with people who are angry and enraged. He was sort of emotional and he said, You know, we need your help. We need to talk to you, The protester. To say, how can we do this together? How can you be furious and we not need to arrest you? Interesting line that the police are trying to navigate there, isn't it? Susie Jones, a reporter in Minneapolis, friend of ours, and she's been real helpful. Just giving us the First person view of the trial. She was there every day. Rich link off is an attorney in Chicago and a partner Bryce Downey, and link off you hear his legal face off podcast on WGN radio dot com. Rich Why did you hear in that conversation? What do you thinking about on that this morning? Well, two excellent, Thanks drunker Having it's an excellent reminder of what both sides try to do in closing arguments, and it's Suzy mentioned. It's basic. It's really basic. The state. The prosecutors try to tell the jury keep it simple. Believe your eyes. It's all in front of you. The defense of the other hands, says the opposite. It's not simple. Don't believe what you see in front of you. It's not as simple as the state is trying to say, And there's many other factors that you don't see. Right. We heard Erik Nelson talk about the length of the video that you didn't see the entire video, so it's very much a game of Distraction. And it's no coincidence that Erik Nelson win as long as he did and that the jurors were tired of hearing what he was saying, because that's the entire strategy. You're trying to throw his much at them. It's possible confuse them to an extent. And You know, let the reasonable doubt seep in somehow, so he didn't effective job. I think you're doing that. Because only one person needs to be sufficiently befuddled that they say. Well, maybe there's something there right. You only need one. Right? Maybe because a shin isn't as the state of saying Maybe all that. All I have to think about is whether the enlarged heart or whether the drug use had some positive factor. That's all you need. So he's trying to put everything on there on that jury wall, see if it sticks. And I think he did a pretty good job of it. Whether that will carry the day. Who knows? I don't think so. I think ultimately we're getting a conviction. But I think both sides did a pretty good job yesterday. You said. Ultimately you think we're getting a conviction? Is it true? The longer the jury's out, the more likely he's found not guilty. You know who knows me knows? No, please. Either side could always explain the length of the deliberations to their favorite mean that is conventional wisdom. But you never know. I mean, I've had trials where Juries have been out a very short period of time. And I thought they were, you know, going one way and they didn't go that way. So you would think that the longer they're discussing things? Yes. Lead. You know that favors of the fans because it's easy to make a quick decision based on the video, and the longer they're deliberating. They are considering all of the defense argument. So that is conventional wisdom. But you know, you never know until you're in that room. Like 55 with rich land car three. Oh, nine texted into say, What about what Maxine Waters said. Did that get mentioned? I don't believe you got mentioned in the courtroom. I did talk to Susie Jones about that off the air. Maxine Water said that maybe we need to turn up the heat. If we don't get a conviction here, she was in town for that. What a stupid thing for her to say. There's enough fuel. There's enough fire. We don't need any extra piling on here on the dynamic. She should keep out of that. That's my view. By the way, Scott in Florida wanted ask a question or make a comment. Scott, You're on WGN. What can we do for you? Yes, I could all morning, Mr Williams. Thank you for taking my call. You know what I what scares me. Whatever the result of the delicate, sharpened trying, baby. Horrific race riots will explode across America. I'm talking about what went on in the 19 sixties in places like Watch, and while Sam Delish Chicago, etcetera talking about Chicago, I don't need to tell you that already there's been.

Susie Jones Jerry Blackwell Matt Langer Bryce Downey Maxine Waters Derrick Sheldon George Boyd George Boy George Floyd Erik Nelson Scott Minneapolis Chicago Williams Florida Maxine Water Sam Delish 2.5 hours America Tobin
Out of Sight But Center Stage, Jurors Weigh Derek Chauvin's Fate

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Out of Sight But Center Stage, Jurors Weigh Derek Chauvin's Fate

"I'm Julie Walker jurors in Minneapolis continue to weigh the fate of former police officer Derek Chauvin charged with the murder of George Floyd what or who killed Floyd that's what both sides argued long closings yesterday defense attorney Eric Nelson told jurors Chauvin was doing what he was trained it was drugs in a bad heart disease heart hypertension all of these things existed before Mr Chauvin rocked prosecutor Jerry Blackwell argued it would show that kneeling on Floyd for nine minutes and twenty nine seconds and not an enlarged heart reason George Lloyd is dead is because Mr Schoen hard was too small jurors are being sequestered as they decide the case which could land show been in prison for up to forty years on the most serious charge audio from court TV I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Derek Chauvin George Floyd Chauvin Heart Disease Heart Hypertensi Floyd Mr Chauvin Eric Nelson Jerry Blackwell Minneapolis George Lloyd Mr Schoen
Attorneys at Chauvin Trial in Floyd Death Make Final Pitch

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Attorneys at Chauvin Trial in Floyd Death Make Final Pitch

"After forty five witnesses in fourteen days of testimony closing arguments are set to begin later this morning in the trial of the former Minneapolis officer charged in George Floyd's death attorneys are expected to deliver some of the same points they made in their opening statements like special prosecutor Jerry Blackwell referring to Derek chauvinist neon Lloyds neck for nine minutes and twenty nine seconds and it does not give up he delivers the rebuttal for the state but closing arguments start with prosecutor Steve Swisher then defense attorney Eric Nelson gets his turn during openings he argued Floyd's drug use and heart were to blame the use of force is not attractive but it is a necessary component of police jurors will be sequestered while they decide the fate of Chauvin charged with second and third degree murder and second degree manslaughter audio from court TV I'm Julie Walker

George Floyd Jerry Blackwell Steve Swisher Minneapolis Eric Nelson Derek Floyd Chauvin Julie Walker
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:37 min | 3 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The weekend edition. I'll be bringing you some of the best stories from the week. The defense has rested. The prosecution has rested and closing arguments will begin on Monday in the trial of Derrick Show Vin, who's accused of killing George Floyd. The defense will continue to claim that underlying health conditions and drug use caused Floyd's death. Shelvin, The former Minneapolis police officer has been charged with 2nd and 3rd degree murder and also accused of second degree manslaughter. The jury will be sequestered while they make their decisions. For more to recap this week of defense witnesses will speak to General Griffith, National reporter at NBC News. He declined to testify, which I don't think that anyone who has been closely following the case was surprised by. I know that I was not surprised by that, because Had he taken the witness stand, he would have opened himself up to a very tough cross examination. We already saw this week alone. When the defense presented their witnesses. The prosecutors were not playing around. They were very, very, very diligent, and they would have asked him to explain. Minute by minute, just like they have their own witnesses And the defense's expert witness is why he was on George Floyd for as long as he wa. So he's a client to testify in his trial. And now, like you said Monday, they will present closing arguments. And then once that happens, it will go into the dirty hands. And also this week the defense presented their witnesses They had seven compared to the nearly 40 that the prosecution brought Right when it was their turn, and one of their major witnesses was Dr David Fowler. He's a retired forensic pathologist and former Maryland chief medical examiner. So he was the main guy that was brought forth to counter act. The witness from the prosecution and he basically said that you know what the defense has been trying to lay out the whole time that George Floyd died because of his underlying heart conditions, the drug use, and then he threw in some other thing to saying that Carbon monoxide could have also played a role this coming from the police car when he was being held down. Right. He did, and that kind of threw everyone else. I think he present he presented that and testified about that. Meanwhile, under cross examination, prosecutor Gerry Blackwell got him to admit and acknowledge that there isn't even a clear understanding of whether the vehicle was even on. Most people believe that it wasn't even on and even if it were on what it that will make Derek Sheldon and the other officers liable to some extent because It was their car and who else would have been responsible to have it off? So he introduced that and the defense? The prosecution Rather, I'm sorry. They were quick to refute it. Under cross examination, and also Jerry Blackwell got him to acknowledge that he hadn't even considered any test results of whether there was carbon monoxide in his blood like George Boyd had hadn't even been tested for that, So it kind of really came out of left field, and he acknowledged that he had No data backing that that was kind of just his speculation based on his belief that the car was on and the proximity, the closeness with which George Boyd was to the exhaust pipe. There was also an issue raised of a Perik gang glioma, which is a tumor that they said they found in George Floyd's abdominal area. I think maybe on the hip they might have said so that was also brought forth and they said that you know all of that stuff together. Is what caused George points Death. But still, let's say all those things were in place. Would he have died under normal circumstances? The main exacerbation point was Eric Shelvin got his neck. So the defense had a really tough time laying all that out. And, you know, we'll see how successful that could have been, but it didn't really seem to strike the cords that they thought it was going to. It didn't seem so and from the experts I've spoken to this bar Look until we go experts and just for my own impartial observation. Not only did it not appear to stick It also ran counter to what we heard. So many experts say that the prosecution calls and also to the medical examiner. The medical examiner said that the cause of death Hey did say, you know that the restraint was At the end of the day, the main cause, he said, Yes, George Boyd was not the healthiest person but the way that he articulated it when he took the witness stand last week, and also in the autopsy report was that the aggravating factor was the pressure applied by police. So like you said, if you remove that factor, he wouldn't have died Probably So that's what it's unclear that the defense made that argument strongly. Yeah, and all those reports they determined that it was a homicide in the defense witness, he said he would have ruled it undetermined. So just kind of parsing the words there. It seems like and they also had a former officer testify also on the defense side thing that the use of force was justified. In that case, How did that fair? He did, and he also went as far as to say that he wouldn't even have qualified or classified the I don't know how else to describe it other than force, But he said he wouldn't even call it a use of force or excessive force. He said it was justified and he basically At length, made the argument that police are given, you know free rein to act more aggressively than the average person which they are, But that does not mean they don't have to still justify use of force. You can't just be aggressive to anyone. They have to pose a threat to you to the public, and he made that point and the prosecutor who was questioning him at the time, said. You know, he was even baffled, visibly baffled by that, and that expert Barry Broad. He also said that, um George Boyd was resting comfortably. And it took the prosecutor completely by. He was completely shocked by it. As I think many people were like, I don't think anybody would describe the way that George Boyd was was resting comfortably Think very broad, even had to take some of those things back under cross examination, so just little things falling apart on the defense side as we mentioned the closing arguments gonna happen on Monday. And you know, we'll see how quickly the jury comes back with a verdict. General Griffith National reporter at NBC News. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me.

Derek Sheldon Jerry Blackwell Eric Shelvin George Floyd Floyd Shelvin Gerry Blackwell Barry Broad David Fowler Monday George NBC News George Boyd Derrick Show Vin last week second degree 2nd one 3rd degree Perik gang glioma
Inside the First Week of Derek Chauvin's Trial

World News This Week

01:52 min | 4 months ago

Inside the First Week of Derek Chauvin's Trial

"Sparked outrage and conversations about race and policing in the us this week the trial began for former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin chauvin facing second and third degree murder charges as well as a manslaughter. Charge after video. Showed him kneeling. On george floyd's neck during an arrest last may the video going viral which led to protests in the us and around the world during opening statements prosecutor. Jerry blackwell till the jury chauvin used unreasonable force on floyd for more than nine minutes even as paramedics arrived. Defense attorney eric nelson. There was a reason. Chauvin felt he needed to use that force. Abc's alex perez has more with the world watching the prosecution in the most closely followed police misconduct trial in generation beginning their case showing jurors the badge of the minneapolis police department highlighting the values it represents compassion and the sanctity of life. Mr derek chauvin betrayed this badge when he used excessive and unreasonable force up on the body. A mr george floyd that he put his knees upon his neck and his back grinding and crushing him until the very breath. No listen gentlemen until the very life squeezed out of you will learn what happened and that nine minutes twenty nine seconds the most important numbers you were hearing this trial nine to nine prosecutor jerry. Blackwell emphasizing this case is only about the actions of one rogue officer blackwell then preparing jurors for what they would soon see the video. That stunned america raw unedited and played for more than eight minutes. You will see

Chauvin Chauvin George Floyd Jerry Blackwell Chauvin Alex Perez Minneapolis Police Department Eric Nelson Mr Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Derek Mr George Floyd United States Floyd ABC Blackwell Jerry America
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:02 min | 4 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The second day of the trial of Former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin in the death of George Floyd before that trial begins there, taking a brief recess and shall continue in about five minutes. You're listening to C SPAN radio while we wait for the trial to resume this morning. Here's some of your phone calls reacting to the first day of the trial of Derrick Show Vin in the death of George Floyd. Let's begin, though, with the Minnesota special Assistant Attorney General Jerry Blackwell, in these opening statements making the case against Derrick Show, then yesterday Because you will learn that on May 25th of 2020. Mr. Derek Shaman betrayed this badge when he used excessive and unreasonable force upon the body of Mr George Floyd that he put his knees upon his neck and his back. Branding and crushing him until the very breath. No ladies and gentlemen, until the very life was squeezed out of it. You will learn that he was well aware that Mr Floyd was unarmed that Mr Floyd had not threatened anyone that Mr Floyd was in handcuffs. He was completely in the control of the police. He was defenseless. You will learn what happened in that nine minutes and 29 seconds. The most important numbers you were here in this trial at 9 to 9 what happened in those nine minutes and 29 seconds when Mr Derek Shaaban was applying the successive forced to the body of Mr George Floyd. That was the Minnesota special Assistant attorney general Jerry Blackwell, making the case against Derek Shobin, now the attorney for Derek Shobin also addressed the death of George Floyd in his opening statement. Here's what he had to say. The evidence will show them that Dr Andrew Baker of the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's office conducted the only autopsy of Mr Ford and we break away now from that. Those remarks from the day first day of the show VIN Trial Derek Shobin is on trial in the death of George Floyd and those were some remarks from yesterday's trial. Today's trial is now resuming. Judge Peter Cahill has just Continue. The trial will start a little early. So that's probably good morning, Mr Williams, just a reminder that you are still under oath. And Mr Frank. Morning,.

Derek Shobin George Floyd Derrick Show Vin May 25th of 2020 Williams Floyd Derek Shaaban Derrick Show Peter Cahill Derek Shaman Frank yesterday nine minutes Andrew Baker Today second day Ford C SPAN first day this morning
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Your morning. Cliff Notes on 5 70 K l I f on no surprise That video of George floor gasping for breath essentially Exhibit A as the former Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee on the Black man's neck went on trial Monday on charges of murder and manslaughter. Prosecutors showed the jurors the footage At the earliest possible moment during opening statements after telling them that the number to remember was nine minutes 29 seconds. That's the amount of time that Officer Derrick Show Vin Had Floyd pin to the pavement last May. Yeah. Jerry Blackwell says The white officer didn't let up. Even after a handcuff Floyd said 27 times he couldn't breathe and went Limp now, Sheldon's attorney, Eric Nelson, countered. The presentation by the prosecution by arguing Derek Shobin did exactly what he had been trained to do over his 19 year career. You hear you hear the audio of him, saying That What were the exact words I can't remember. But at any rate, violent arrest is not always pleasant, but it's a necessary part of police work. Yeah. The video played during opening statements was posted to Facebook by a bystander who witnessed Floyd being arrested after he was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill and the footage, of course, went round the world and Cause all kinds of chaos and rioting and all that kind of stuff. Yeah, Fortunately, it's not that bad. There are there are demonstrations there in Minneapolis outside.

Derek Shobin Jerry Blackwell Eric Nelson Monday $20 19 year 27 times nine minutes Sheldon Facebook George last May Floyd Derrick Show Minneapolis Cliff Notes 29 seconds 5 70 K A Black
Derek Chauvin ‘betrayed his badge’, prosecutors argue

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Derek Chauvin ‘betrayed his badge’, prosecutors argue

"Former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin betrayed his badge by grinding his knee. Into george floyd neck during a deadly arrest last may a prosecutor said on monday at a murder trial that is widely seen as a test of the us justice system show. Wtn's lawyers responded by saying that the former officer was simply following training from his nineteen years on the force even as they acknowledged that the arrest caught in videos from multiple angles was distressing to watch. The use of force is not attractive but it is a necessary component of policing show. Wtn's lead lawyer said in his opening statement referring to the videos that show floyd a forty six year old handcuffed black man pleading for his life. The footage sparked worldwide protests against police brutality but in his opening arguments jerry blackwell a prosecutor with the minnesota attorney. General's office told the racially diverse jury. That officers who wear the minneapolis police badge. Pledge never to use unnecessary force over. You will learn that on may twenty fifth. Mr derek. chauvin betrayed this badge when he used excessive and unreasonable force. Upon the body of george floyd said blackwell aiming for a red conviction of a us police officer for killing a civilian chauvin and three other officers trying to arrest floyd on suspicion of using a counterfeit twenty dollar bill to buy cigarettes a misdemeanor. That prosecutors said could have been handled with a summons to appear in court. Instead of an arrest forty-five-year-old chauvin has pleaded not guilty to degree murder third degree murder and second degree manslaughter. He faces up to forty years in prison if convicted on the most serious

WTN George Floyd Chauvin Minneapolis Jerry Blackwell Derek Mr Derek Floyd United States Minnesota Blackwell
Derek Chauvin's Trial in Death of George Floyd Begins With Infamous Video

Dailycast News

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Derek Chauvin's Trial in Death of George Floyd Begins With Infamous Video

"The video of george floyd gasping for breath was essentially exhibit a. as the former minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee on. The black man's neck went on trial monday on charges of murder and manslaughter. David alexander reports prosecutor. Jerry blackwell showed the jurors the footage at the earliest opportunity during opening statements. After telling them that the number to remember was nine minutes twenty nine seconds. The amount of time officer derek. Chauvin had floyd pinned to the pavement. Last

George Floyd Jerry Blackwell David Alexander Minneapolis Chauvin Derek Floyd
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:25 min | 4 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Please the court house, Ladies and gentlemen of the jury. Good morning. My name is Jerry Blackwell and apologized for talking to you through this plexiglass, But it's probably the least of the gifts of the pandemic has given you want to learn in this case. What about what it means to be a public servant and have the honor of wearing this badge is a small badge that carries with it a large responsibility and a large accountability to the public. What does that stand for? It represents the vory motto of the Minneapolis Police Department to protect with courage to serve with compassion, But it also Represents the essence of the Minneapolis Police Department approach to the use of force against the citizens when appropriate, the sanctity of sanctity of life and the protection of the public shall be the cornerstones of the Minneapolis police departments. Use of force. Compassion, sanctity of life cornerstones in that little badges. One right over the officers Heart, Terry Blackwell Special assistant attorney general, but you're also going to learn that the officers take an oath when they become police officers. They take an oath that I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately. And as you will learn that applies to this case, never employing unnecessary force or violence, and not only that I recognize the badge of my office as a symbol of public faith, and I accept it as a public trust to be held. So long as I am true to the ethics of police service, some of the public faith ethics to police service sanctity of life. All of this matters tremendously to this case, because you will learn that on May 25th of 2020. Mr. Derek Shaman betrayed this badge when he used excessive and unreasonable force upon the body. Mr George Floyd, that he put his knees upon his neck and his back branding and crushing him until the very breath. No, ladies and gentlemen, until the very life was squeezed out of him. You will learn that he was well aware that Mr Floyd was unarmed. That Mr Boyd had not threatened anyone that Mr Floyd was in handcuffs. He was completely in the control of the police. He was defenseless. You will learn what happened in that nine minutes and 29 seconds. The most important numbers. You were here in this trial, but 9 to 9. What happened in those nine minutes and 29 seconds when Mr Derek Shaman was applying this excessive force to the body of Mr George Floyd. Way have two objectives in this trial. Ladies and gentlemen, The first objective is to give Mr Shaman a fair trial. Mr. Chavez has a presumption of innocence. He is presumed to be innocent until proven guilty. We plan to prove to you beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr Shaman was anything other than innocent or May 25th of 2020. In a second objective laser Jonas to bring you that which I'm trying to preview this morning. We are bringing this case this prosecution against Mr Shopping for the excessive force the applied onto body Mr Joyce Floyd for engaging in behavior that was imminently dangerous. In the force that he applied without regard for its impact on the life of Mr George Floyd. So let's be about focusing then on what we learned about this nine minutes and 29 seconds and you will be able to hear Mr Voice saying, Please, I can't breathe. Please, man, please. In this nine minutes and 29 seconds, you will see that it's Mr Floyd is handcuffed there on the ground Here is verbalizing 27 times you will hear. And the four minutes and 45 seconds. I can't breathe. Please, I can't breathe. You will see that Mr Chaban is kneeling on Mr Fluids, neck and back. He has one beyond his neck. And then the onus back is intimately often on on this back as you'll be able to see for yourself in the video foot. You will hear Mr Ford is he's cried out. You hear me at some point cry out for His mother, but he's been squeezed. There is very close to his mother. You will learn you hear him. Say, Tell my kids. I love them. You will hear him say about his fear of dying. He says. I'll probably die this way. I'm through. I'm through. They're going to kill me. They're going to kill me, man. You hear him crying out and you will hear him crowd. Pain. My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts. You hear that for yourself, Please. I can't breathe. Please your knee on my neck you will hear. Then you'll see at the same time while he's crying out. Mr. Shaman never moves. The knee remains on his neck. Sunglasses remain undisturbed on his head, and it just goes on. You will hear his final words when he says I can't breathe. Before that time you'll hear his voice get heavier. You will hear his words further apart. You will see that his respiration get shallower and shallower and finally stops When he speaks his last words, I can't breathe. And what way have his final words You'll see that for roughly 53 seconds, he is completely silent and virtually motionless with this sporadic movements. You're gonna learn those sporadic movements matter greatly in this case, because what they reflect, Uh Mr Floyd was no longer breathing. But he's making these movements He will learn about something in this case called an anoxic seizure. It is the body's automatic reflex, when breathing has stopped due to oxygen deprivation will be able to point out to you when you'll see the involuntary movements for Mr Floyd that a part of the toxic season. Not only that you're going to learn about something that's called agonal breathing when the hardest stop when blood is no longer coursing through the veins. You will hear the body gas as an involuntary reflex will point out to you when Mr Floyd is having the agonal breathing again as a reflex, involuntary reflex reflex to the oxygen deprivation special Assistant Attorney General Jerry Blackwell What.

Jerry Blackwell 27 times May 25th of 2020 Minneapolis Police Department Chavez Derek Shaman Floyd Terry Blackwell Minneapolis police departments nine minutes 53 seconds Joyce Floyd Ford George Floyd Jonas Chaban 9 Boyd two objectives 45 seconds
Prosecutors Accuse Derek Chauvin of Killing George Floyd as Trial Starts

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Prosecutors Accuse Derek Chauvin of Killing George Floyd as Trial Starts

"Prosecutors say former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin used excessive force during the arrest of george floyd as matt subject of minnesota public radio reports opening statements in wtn's murder trial. We're delivered today prosecutor. Jerry blackwell played video of the incident and said chauvin prestige knee into floyd's neck for nine minutes and twenty nine seconds while he was handcuffed even after he'd lost consciousness mr chevette continues on as he had the on the neck. The on the back those not let up. He does not get a defense attorney. Eric nelson told jurors that they'll hear more evidence beyond the video and said chauvin did exactly what he'd been trained to do. The use of force is not attractive but it is a necessary component of police jurors also heard from donald williams. A witness seen in police video pleading with chauvin to get off of floyd's

Chauvin George Floyd WTN Jerry Blackwell Mr Chevette Minneapolis Derek Minnesota Matt Floyd Eric Nelson Donald Williams
Jurors shown video at ex-officer's trial in Floyd's death

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Jurors shown video at ex-officer's trial in Floyd's death

"Video of George Floyd gasping for breath was essentially exhibit a as a trial of the former police officer charged in his death gets under way in Minneapolis what happened in those nine minutes and twenty nine seconds when Mr Derek Jarman was applying this excessive force to the body of Mr George Floyd former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is charged with murder in the second degree murder in the third degree and manslaughter in Hennepin county courthouse prosecutor Jerry Blackwell show jurors footage at the earliest opportunity right Sheldon's defense attorney Eric Nelson so the officer did what he had been trained to do over his nineteen year career arriving to assist other officers struggling to get flood into a squad car there are always two sides to a story Nelson disputed the children was to blame for Boyd's death twenty to heart disease and methamphetamine and fentanyl found in Floyd system the autopsy revealed many other issues I'm Jennifer king

George Floyd Mr Derek Jarman Mr George Floyd Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Jerry Blackwell Hennepin County Eric Nelson Sheldon Nelson Boyd Heart Disease Floyd Jennifer King
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

06:44 min | 4 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Recent I'm Sasha and Simon's coming up this hour. It's not just K through 12 schools that are figuring out what classes will look like as the pandemic. Easiest. Colleges hope to give students a relatively normal fall semester. It is young adults drive the recent rise in covert 19 cases. What does this mean for those campuses and we introduce you to WB Easy's new podcast Art of power. Each episode asked the powerhouse guests about their climb to greater heights and how wielding power has changed their lives. The first opening arguments are underway in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin for the killing of George Floyd show. Vin knelt on Floyd's neck for several minutes as Floyd pleaded for his life. Floyd staff on May 25th 2020 gave rise to a global revolution of racial reckoning. Meanwhile, protests in Minneapolis have been ramping up ahead of the trial and during mistrust of Minnesota's criminal justice system has many protesters, activists and observers keeping close watch on the prosecutors as well as officers show Vin's defense attorneys For analysis. We are pleased to welcome back Professor Duchess Harris. She's a scholar and historian of African American history. She's a professor of American studies at McAllister College in ST Paul, Minnesota. Professor Harris has authored several books on race in America, including most recently the Killing of George Floyd. Hi, Professor Harris. Welcome back. Oh, it's so glad to be here. Thank you for having me you've been following George Floyd's killing and the aftermath from the very start Now, as the trial begins, what comes to mind about this moment? What comes to mind about this moment is that I am currently teaching a course called Race and Law and first year students were born in 2000 and two And so for this generation is the first time they've seen a trial like this unfold because most of us think back to the Rodney King trial of the early nineties, a something that's similar to this. Yeah, You've also been following today's opening arguments. Give us your thoughts on what we've heard So far. I thought that the prosecutor Gerry Brack, Blackwell was very thoughtful. Um, he argued that, um, former officer show Vin used unreasonable force and that he actually abused his badge. Um, he reminded the jurors that George Floyd was unarmed. And, um, even though people commonly thought that it was eight minutes and 46 seconds was actually nine minutes and 29 seconds. Um, yeah, it seemed even longer. Good, even even longer. And, um, you know, um Mr Blackwell was very measured. Um, I think one of the strategies that he used that was very helpful was humanizing Mr Floyd. Um The defense, of course, is going to talk about his size, and they've already shown some of that. And one of the things that sharing Blackwell did was that he reminded the jurors that Mr Floyd said, tell my kids that I love them. Um, He also reminded the jurors that Mr Floyd called for his mother, who was already deceased. Mm. So you say they're the overall strategy of the prosecution here is is to humanize Mr Floyd, Can you give us your thoughts on on what to expect from the defense? Yeah. So we just watched, Um, the response from the defense and the defense. Um, is disputing the fact that the prosecution, um was saying that Mr Floyd was an opiate addict. They're saying that he had done a speedball. The responses to these things are very different. So opioids subdue you speed balls, rev you up, and so it's going to take until we see testimony from the medical experts as two of what actually was going out with Mr Floyd. The makeup of this jury is also mostly wife. What does that say to you, Professor? Right now. It's too early from, you know, weigh in on that, And that's partly because, um, the tone and tenor of White America has changed so much recently in terms of asking questions about race and policing, and so I would need to watch this unfold. Well, it's not just officers show Vin who's on on trial. But also the system in general, right Cause as we mentioned earlier, many citizens lack trust here in their government. What if people in the community expect Professor from the criminal justice system, especially in this case? I mean, that is true. I mean, L. Sharpton says that America is on trial. What I think that Jerry Blackwell did, however, which is incredibly brilliant says that the trial is not about policing, but it is about former officer Derek Chauvet. That there's one person on trial in Jerry Blackwell is not trying the system and so I think that by doing it on this individual person Is very effective. Of course, I'm keeping an eye on video footage here of what's happening, but and I see that they keep replaying that moment from from that day that Mr Floyd Died. How How is that impacted you as you're watching day one unfold here, Professor. I mean, is powerful. It's very powerful to see this actually happening in a courtroom and that it's being brought classed live. And so one of the arguments that Jerry Black will make is that Mr Floyd doesn't die from an opioid or revote, overdose or fatal arrhythmia. The language that he uses is is that George Floyd died one breath at a time and to say that he died one breath at a time after watching nine minutes and 29 seconds, um, and actually realizing that he dies right before your eyes. Is compelling. This is reset if you're just tuning in. It is day One of the trial of former policeman Derrick Show Vin for the killing of George Floyd will follow the trial All week. Here on reset. Today we are joined by Duchess Harris, She's professor of American studies at McAllister College in ST Paul, Minnesota..

Derek Chauvet Jerry Black Jerry Blackwell Sasha Simon Rodney King L. Sharpton Gerry Brack May 25th 2020 Floyd Duchess Harris Vin 2000 nine minutes Harris eight minutes Today McAllister College George Floyd Each episode
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on KOMO

"With the results of a new poll now, ABC. From ABC News. I'm Dave Packard. First witness has taken the stand in the trial of Derek Shove it, former Minneapolis police officer charged in the death of George Floyd. During opening statements, Attorney Jerry Blackwell said Sheldon was Heading down Floyd for more than nine minutes and didn't let go. When paramedics arrived. He has to check him for a pulse. You'll see. Mr Chabon, continuing to eight on his body at the same time. Didn't get up. Even when the paramedic comes to check for a pulse and then find one. Mr Shopping doesn't get up. The defense argues that Sheldon's actions didn't cause Floyd's death since Floyd was believed to be under the influence. Legal analyst Terry Austin with a look at the 14 member jury, it is very diverse. We have nine women, five men and four of the individuals identify as black, two of them identify as mixed race. And actually, that is far more diverse than we have in Hennepin County and far more diverse than we have in actually the entire state at a virtual briefing of the White House coronavirus Task Force, CDC Director Rochelle Wolinsky Expressing concern as Corona virus cases, rebound in the U. S appealing to Americans not to let the virus surgeon this critical time I so badly want to be done. I know you all so badly wanna be done here? Just almost there, but not quite yet. And so I'm asking you to just hold on a little longer to get vaccinated when you can sort of all of those people that we all love will still be here when this pandemic can't that colossal, colossal cargo ship blocking the Suez Canal and global trade set free. Salvage team say they dislodged the ever given. After five days of removing sand and mud and wrangling, it's bow from the bank tugboats now hauling the vessel through to the great bitter lake for inspection. ABC is Jordana Miller in Jerusalem. It's unclear when shipping will return to normal. But nearly 400 cargo ships are waiting to cross through the canal. You're listening to ABC News. Stay connected. Stay informed. 20 Minutes of nonstop news continues on CO Moh news. 1000 FM 97 7 Welcome to a beautiful Monday midday Beautiful sunshine and 42 degrees at 10 02 on Tom Mother with our top stories in a couple of 24 7 news center. The number of new covert infections here and around the rest of the country aren't falling any longer, prompting a big warning from Dr Anthony Fauci, who told CBS over the weekend when you're coming down from the big peak, and you reach a point and start to plateau Once you stay at that plateau, you really in danger of a surge coming up, and unfortunately that's what we're starting to see. And he blamed states that are reopening to quickly spring break vacations and the variants of the virus that admitted to our country. Dr. Jeff Duchin at the Seattle King County Health Department is one of the first local officials to warn That our fourth wave of infections is possible. After nearly 1500 new cases were reported Saturday, Covert case counts begin to rise, and some officials even predicted possible fourth wave as we just heard about with Dr Duchin and his come was Ryan Calvert reports. There's also Concerned about hospital beds again. Thurston County experienced a four week high in the number of new covert cases just last week, and on Saturday, nearly 1500 new cases were reported statewide. The numbers, which had plateau are beginning to rise as we raise to vaccinate, but the pace has professor Sarah Otto concerned crunching. The numbers were in a pretty bad state specifically in the province of British Columbia. She tells global news. New Variant B 117 is more severe. So it's leading to about double 64 100% of the rate of hospitalizations and I see you, and that's where across the age classes her prediction. Hospital beds will fill quickly in April there Local officials say it's a possibility here as well. Our vaccine rollout isn't enough to stop the B 117 from becoming epidemic. Brian Calvert Co monium large fire burned at least one boat advance on on its quartermaster Marina this morning, almost Frank Lindsay Fire broke out just after 4 30 video from Witness Scott Loveless shows flames shooting several feet into the sky. He says he heard a very loud explosion.

Dave Packard Derek Shove George Floyd Jerusalem Sheldon CBS Hennepin County Sarah Otto Saturday Jordana Miller Terry Austin four Ryan Calvert ABC April 20 Minutes Anthony Fauci Chabon nine women Jeff Duchin
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"COM off. All right I want to go back to the follow up for discussion here with McCarthy and Kennedy J remembering Foreign Ganja and the Awa Dante anything else before we let you go really quickly. Wait I I came into the show late so I did not realize that kennesaw buster. Jay was in the house so I wanNA give a shout out Kenny. You're a great one. As far as I'm thankful I'm really sorry I had I come into the show late All this week I really really wanted to make it a priority to get these shows because I think this is the best show and Wade and all your guests you have are always going to offer the best perspective on the great career referring gone. Yeah I'M GONNA throw in one more quick comment. I wonder if you guys hear me out and see what you thought of this In Nineteen eighty-one Ray Stevens and PAT. Patterson were on the villain side of the dressing room in the AWA. However Bay area there was no way that burn could book them as villains or as heels. They were just weren't gonNA get booed so I appreciated his aforethought in kind of going against the system and he books Ray and pat as complete baby faces out here manually. I yeah even in those March nineteen. You were offended against style Jerry Blackwell for the first time I leave there with a mask where Ray Stevens in. The crusher teamed up against the Donaldson Torah which wo usual out here so I applaud fern for having the business sense at the end of the day you had to have the business sense and Yeah the K. Part was a little different stuff. They're all three of you. I appreciate very much appreciate that Dante before you go. What years were you most immersed in following awa? You've mentioned what's what's the range of years that you watch. I'm growing up. I always had read the magazines. Do I was aware of all the Federations but they first came to our. Uhf STATION NUMBER. Twenty in. Nineteen eighty or nineteen eighty. Let's say they nineteen eighty and it was just grow for us because Shire Federation was burning out. They were looking out or they were having good cards but they just weren't having enough of them and their fan base The first card in Awa was January of nineteen eighty one. It was a battle royal and it was a big sell out. Mr Non Malini. I used to see him wearing his blackened strikes. I we went up and he would always be in the arena The next two cars were both Bernie defenses against Jerry Blackwell and so I just felt I was honored to have gotten a C. Burn wrestle You Know Jerry. Blackwell of course wouldn't have been my first phone and I would have preferred to see a boxing match. But you know just being able to get perceiver and come into the ring and put the best up with a towel around his neck. You know just really great We followed them and went to the card consistently from B. One Two bay for a I mean all the way through ray basically but the cards were consistently about six weeks from eighty one to eighty four eighty five easily then it spread out a little bit more. They moved from Oakland to San Francisco as well. The SOD buster had to come out to one occasion for four more. Not right who who in the eighties? I Yeah I say yeah from. My biggest greer was sixty and sixty seventies and late early eighties. You know. That's when I got hit hard with arteritis you know so I had. I had the canceled a lot of matches but then after that I made a big comeback. I mean as far as the health goals but I I I Russell odd after you know even Vern Awa was gone then the little shows and I I did a lot of wrestling. You know but the Dow I am done. I took my copy of the wrestler Just two nights ago and I watched it once or twice over really enjoyed. Now is a great movie. It will always be in my collection and I think I'm GONNA have to go find my old. Vhs VHS tapes and fanatic. Actually I dr vern. We would the war here Rob Dinners Gobi. Very really gotten bad. And he's getting. How come you weren't on the movie raspberries and I know that you should have been on there? Well Kinda laid but thanks a lot guys. Wait I was also at Awa Super Class three where Mr Hennig won his awa title all vertical really. Yeah so I basically I've grown up with wrestling and I basically been to every event air in the San Francisco Bay area over probably forty or so years. I'm dating myself bed. But thank you for what you do. I appreciate the time and being able to expound..

AWA Jerry Blackwell Ray Stevens Vern Awa Awa Super Class Mr Non Malini Jay Patterson San Francisco Bay Mr Hennig kennesaw Wade arteritis McCarthy greer Dante Kenny fern Shire Federation Kennedy J
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"Keller pro wrestling podcast. It's time for the weekly flagship talking current events in pro wrestling. Jani King Kong Bundy died this week at age sixty one wrestlemainia to main event her I saw a lot of his career. Both first time world-class chip wrestling showed up on my TV screen. He was in that territory in the early part of his career. I also saw him in the Awa team with crusher Jerry Blackwell when when when Awa promoters for ganja, namely were trying to find opponents who fans would believe or credible against the road warriors. So they teamed up Bundy and crusher Jerry Blackwell to four hundred plus powders together to take on the warriors. But of course, what he's most any was also part of the legion of doom when legion of doom was more than just talking animal and Paul Ellery with Jake Roberts and King Kong Bundy part of the faction, but he's most famous, of course, for his run in WWE and headlining wrestlemainia to against hulk HOGAN, and I've always felt. He had a more significant role at a important time in WWF history. Then he got kind of credit for a claim for he's one of those wrestlers who made a vented for a while and was significant figure, but I think kind of passed over in terms of conversations and in wrestling, I maybe it's just because of the time that I saw him in the age that I was in the circumstances that he was pushed that I thought he was a bigger deal in history framed him, but now's the time to give them the credit that that he is doing put it in perspective. What are your thoughts on bunnies? Crip? I'm right there with you. I had King Kong Bundy in my childhood is one of the biggest bad guys in the history of wrestling. I mean, you know, wrestlemainia to like, you know, any anyone like you had Roddy piper. And HOGAN, you know, promo versus promo the whole rock and wrestling connection thing. You know? That's what fueled the first wrestlemainia. That's what brought it to be this larger than life spectacle of an event and to follow that up. You know, someone has to face the the immortal hulk HOGAN, and and that person chosen was King Kong Bundy. So I think that speaks volumes. I I have a question for you before before your further with with Bundy was was he involved in one of those loss like union or one of those laws. So so I think he I'm looking at it. He's falls victim to a revisionist history. That doesn't include someone that that you know, has pending legal action against the WB, which I don't blame the WB. I'm right there. I mean, you know, as much as you love someone if someone suing you, you don't love them that much right? Yeah. So I'm I'm a firm believer in that and life. Now, I don't know if he did anything predating the twenty six t the summer two thousand sixteen lawsuit the class action lawsuit that he participated in. But. Obviously, he wasn't a great standing with WWE just in general. He seemed like a name that they would have brought back. I don't know. How many I've I've actually I'm just thinking this interesting to research, it how many Hoke HOGAN pay per view opponents from you know, from the WWF oh can run pre and W O, and outsiders and all that. How many of them are not in the hall of fame? You know, how many who were main event pay per view opponent art in the hall of fame yet because it was a long time ago. You would think you know, it's it would be time to put them in the hall of fame. And I don't think Bundy is. And and I think he's deserving of it, given the, you know with all the respect to Tori Wilson, for instance. Sure and honky tonk man had a good run. But I think hockey dot man and Bundy are probably in a similar category. Bundy I think tonk man was more memorable in certain ways. But I don't think I disagree. I mean, I'm friends with McMahon. And I have Bundy ahead of head of honky tonk man by a lot. I mean, he was a main event biggest of the bad..

Jani King Kong Bundy hulk HOGAN wrestling WWE honky tonk Jerry Blackwell Hoke HOGAN Awa Roddy piper Keller WWF McMahon hockey Paul Ellery Jake Roberts Tori Wilson
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"And I think that's a bad thing. Because if they're shunning see, I didn't know they were shunning the indie, you know, circuits because the Indy circuits is where you know, you can get your name out there because there's a lot of popular people through the Indy. Circuits, you know in and they have a following. And I and I think it's a good thing that if you can get performance from the Indy circuit simply because number one they have experienced working in front of crowd. You know, they've already perfected their craft, you know, and they perfected it the hard way. And you know, because you can go out, and you can find those the diamond in the rough in the Indy circuit, you just have to look for it because there's so much good talent out there. There is a ton of good talent in those Indy. Circuits, you know, and they just they I think they're just. They got their blinders onto just the guys from the performance center that they are working on. And those are like you said they wanna be able to own their performers, and that's how they're going to do it. And I think it's gonna be a bad thing. Like, you said it's gonna come back and haunt them. You know, when that's all there is is people from the performance center. You know, because I really truly believe, you know, because it helped me before gone WWE, you know, running up and down the roads doing the Andy seen all these small towns, all these, you know, driving for miles and miles. It's good. It's it's it's good experience. And I think everybody should have to go through that. And with the performance center. You're just saying, you know, you are you've got everything every tool you need. You know, you don't you have to work, but I don't think you have to work as hard as if you were out on your own, you know, running up and down the rows trying to make a name for yourself trying to get over. You know, they think is you you have manufactured. Talent down at the performance center. And yeah, not everybody's like that. They're gonna find, you know, good talent, you know, through the performance center. But I I think it's it's just it's not a good idea to just focus on guys from there. I just don't think that's a good idea. Yeah. It's it's tough to you know, if you're if triple h you think well, there's a right way to do it. And we want those we don't want to break that habits and all that. But they're just there's there's a lot of it is I think symbolic of what we talked about a lot on the show, which is Daniel, Bryan. There are things that are unconventional that make pro wrestling more interesting when they aren't like you said Bob L, cookie cutter. And I think WWE should embrace that more as a corporation, the quirkiness and diversity that makes pro wrestling so fun if if everybody is kind of in the same mould with the same teachings pro wrestling loses something I mean, the first wrestling I watched it was mad dog machine and crusher Jerry Blackwell and Jesse Ventura and Adrian Donaldson yet Vern gone yet in stark contrast to the crusher. And it was just it was Billy Robinson and bruiser Brody. It was like there was such a diversity of characters when I became a fan. And that's part of what attracted me to it. Not everybody looked like Jesse Ventura the muscular sick three guy. And I do worry..

Indy WWE Jesse Ventura bruiser Brody Billy Robinson Bob L Andy Jerry Blackwell Daniel Bryan Adrian Donaldson Vern
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"Who is mean Jean of the NHL past or presence? You know, first of all I would say that there's a guy in wrestling who didn't get enough credit because he wasn't national. And that guy's name was Lance Russell. Yes. And Lance Russell in Memphis. And if you ever watched some of that old stuff, and I periodically have looked into it. How angry he gets when the good guy gets attacked or beaten up or something like that. It is hilarious guys. Lance was great Gordon soley was never as big a Gordon soli guy is crimson mass. All the vernacular. And I'm not, okay. He was spectacular. But I would say Lance Russell was up there with Jean. He was right up there. When I was a kid, and you got the mid Atlantic in Toronto, I loved Bob coddle and David Crockett. That's what it was. I love those guys, but Russell milk and the best hockey it's different because. How many long form interviews where a player really lets loose? Can you get I would probably have to say oak because my go-to because he does it. So well after hours he does it so great and on the ice after the Stanley Cup. He does it. So great oak would have to be my guy. And I think the reason is he gets the opportunity and he takes advantage of the opportunity. You know when you are doing after hours or UC Scotto after you've won the Stanley Cup. You have to you know, what you're getting into you know, it this is going to be and the players except that. And I think that's a credit to what Scott is done. You know, what you're getting into? And you're accepting getting into that. If we can bring it back to me, gene. If you're gonna go down the YouTube rabbit hole with meaning Oakland to me, my favorite. Maybe the best one was the one he did with mad dog show. In the mad dog Awa mad dog of Sean crusher, Jerry Blackwell feud, where he's building the coffin for black while it is some of the best work by mean, gene, who is over the top fantastic. Always. Just a minute fat dog. Mad punk Sean been looking high and low for you and hear what? What was here I had to run down bad dog. Obviously some things that we've had that talk about you've been totally unavailable. Hands up if you are listening to this podcast right now in thinking, what is with these to leave. Okay. Back to questions about hockey nNcholas Orrin bowl submits. This who is the most underrated player in the league. My go-to is always Mataya SICOM..

Lance Russell Jean Sean crusher Russell milk NHL Scott UC Scotto Orrin bowl YouTube Memphis hockey Atlantic Bob coddle David Crockett Toronto Gordon Jerry Blackwell Oakland milk
"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"jerry blackwell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Perfectly fine wow you do have you do have a full plate don't you yeah yeah quickly however fabulous old at home who is the world's best big brother ever saw so hit it it it medically speaking we've got angel then our church we have got angel in our in our home and yet we we've been jerry blackwell ongoing throughout their winter winter why i'm calling you in don't have given money court and i wanted it got a huge amount but i wanted to do something with it they would benefit him when he older okay so the question is do you think over the years people will continue to provide money for ryan or do you think this is a one time uh the sign of generosity from people with a newborn i'm thinking of me a one time generosity or him thing if airborne and and knowing kremlin we were diagnosed twenty here with um when i was pregnant and we knew what would gala pike hit people to give it my taught him much with housesenate the yet it well here's the divided into here's the thing for ryan and the reason i ask those questions is that if if you were talking about an ongoing generosity from people that might lead to substantial sums it would be helped to ryan as he gets older that would call for establishing a trust arrangement and going to a lawyer who specializes as an trust and drawing up trust paperwork but if this is generosity that's more and the hundreds or small thousands i'm looking at an initial investment an.

ryan jerry blackwell