20 Episode results for "Jeremy shop"

Howard Bryant, ESPN Sr. Writer

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

13:04 min | 10 months ago

Howard Bryant, ESPN Sr. Writer

"Joined by one of our favorite and most frequent guests he is the author full dissidents notes from an uneven playing field he's ESPN senior writer this is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Shop in October sixteenth something like that Lebron James is very much in the news of course for the way he called out the Anti Player anti-black response in linking the players fighting for social justice here with them last years of course who has been a champion of social justice issues here in the United States this week he's getting criticized seeks obviously at the intersection of sports and society and as we sit here speaking it's Wednesday morning what is China nearly two weeks ago and there's been a backlash gets Lebron your Lebron is someone had my feeling is to one of the reasons why Lebron and the players were receiving so much backlash is what I just considered to be a very errol Mori the Houston Rockets General Manager criticized Maury For the tweet that Maury said that sparked the firestorm about Hong Kong doc fighting for Social Justice in Hong Kong I mean what is the reason for that link considering that so many companies do business in China so many leaves to come to the players they're the most visible ones they're gonNA go steph curry and they're gonNa go to Lebron James and they're going to ask the players what they think of this so understood that the Lebron certainly wanted or response from Adam silver and I don't think that was inappropriate at all I think that was actually wise I think that in the regard that he and the players rightfully understood that Darryl Maurice tweets we're going to have an avalanche compartmentalize three things I think the first thing is you have to sort of recognize that I think Lebron is right yes I completely disappointed with his response for a couple of reasons but not completely but ultimately I think he's wrong but I think he has gate I actually had no issue with that at all the second thing that had to be that had to be understood in this is that a lot of different quarters about his response what do you make of it Howard well I think I was just worth compartmentalizing a few different things first of all I think runs around Sir are involved in in in China and that they have relationships you've got the ATM A WTI they're both over in China right now doing the I was going to create an avalanche that was going to fall on them and the responsibility suddenly because we know that the players have they are the front of the League they are the face the league no one's GonNa be tracking down you know Tillman for data or no one's maybe tracking down Joe JOE CY or more to ask them about this they're going almost the entire Asian swing is is a large part of it is in China the women's year end championships with Naomichi Ozaki and so Williams and Simona Halep and all those great players about Lebron is that at the end of the day whether it was his original comments whether it was just follow up comments or whether it was the follow up to the follow up he never really acknowledged and actually body they're all gonna be over in China for their year end championships so the fact that you automatically going to link a high and dry in that was something a cloud kind of hung over him for a period of years you could say even his winning championships in Miami until he decided at the end of the day I think that you are dealing with the human rights issue at the very least you had to acknowledge that and that's where bothered me it was very smart of him to say listen when these things happen regardless of how they happen we're the ones who are GonNa take the fall on this we're going to be the ones asking questions for something that we didn't there are things where you wonder well why didn't Lebron expressing some way You know his his reservations at supported for standing up for themselves here so now you're going to throw them into the geopolitical situation that is not necessarily something that they may be heights around the world that that that nobody gets involved in and to to link the players to every global issue around the world a lot of people not that anybody needs any more ammo is that's the same arguments a lot of white people using the United States when you're thinking about you've got people are getting killed over there and he never really acknowledged the fact that no matter how much this inconvenience hammer took money out of his pocket or made the League look bad me as as tune-ups every struck me as penalizing these players for having the nerve to stand up for themselves in America and especially when they weren't even largely route were criticised nearly a decade ago when the press conference to announce that he was taking towns to South Beach and he left Cleveland how can they even be expected to be at the forefront of social justice how can you how do you become how do you protests what you've become is it not his fight easily he could have said that and that's fine is it something that's over his head absolutely didn't bother him because they're losing money sure all of those things are true already. I think that one of the things that we need to do when we're thinking about complicated subjects is to think critically about this complicated subjects I think well hey you know you guys fought in in Ferguson or if you've thought Eric on forever regarded how come you're not fighting for Hong Kong is nonsense because there are so many different we didn't consider the ramifications of sending this tweet a and he seemed to apologize for it now we've seen Lebron James in a very I put the players in a bad spot at the end of the day you do also have to acknowledge something really really awful is happening over there and there's a human element to that return to Cleveland in the context of the legacy of one of the most famous athletes of our time arguably the most famous very minimum about what's going on in Hong Kong and he talked about business and he talked about being a businessman and how this you know he said Daryl Oh versed in I thought that was unfair to the players but the third thing that I think also needed to be understood in this was book I asked the question these players are multi billion dollar components to a global economy was to save the world at every every turn we don't need celebrity necessarily always have an opinion on things I think Lebron James as much as he these are the real issues that are going to take place can can you be the protests and the power at the same time and these these tensions never go away invested or interested in geopolitics of Hong Kong and China and doesn't even know he doesn't know how much Daryl Morey knows so I bet you he's educated on Mrs he accused other people and that's okay that's okay we all don't know everything about everything so in terms of legacy more there are more informative sources out there to learn from and I and I think it's important for everyone when you're trying to learn but you also if you're going to be a champion of these things you have to think beyond yourself because I think that the the real ammo that he gave watch I think it's important for them to care about them I think it's important for them to be citizens I don't take my political views from Lebron James and I don't think most people in society should either I am I gonNa see this as time goes on these players become more than athletes as US Lebron's he's the bronze coinage and you are profiting from Working in China the way the Lebron James is is there an obligation to know what's going on that they also want to be the power they

Lebron James Hong Kong ESPN China writer Jeremy Shop Daryl Morey Cleveland Ferguson Daryl Oh Eric billion dollar two weeks
Tim Howard, U.S. Soccer

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Tim Howard, U.S. Soccer

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. Tim Howard has had one of the great players in the annals of American soccer. He's arguably the greatest American player ever. Now his career after two decades is coming to an end at the end of the MLS season. It is a pleasure to welcome back to the sporting life. The great goal keeper the great Representative of soccer 'specially here in the US. Tim, how're Tim? Thanks for being with us. Thank you have awesome. Tim you've decided at this point. Obviously that this is why now. Oh, you know. This is always kind of a a Mark on my horizon, you know, but not only what I'd be turning forty. But my my contract would be ending. Right. And so I don't know things kinda come together. And it's been it's been one hell of a ride. You know, I suppose, you know, when you're an athlete as as you've covered many. I think we'd love to we'd love to go on forever and ever. But that's not how this works. Right. So I've been very fortunate and lucky and blessed to be where I am after all this time. So feel like timing is right. So you weren't watching the Super Bowl team saying to yourself. We'll jeez, he's older than me. Maybe maybe stick out for a couple years. Well, yeah. To be honest, feel great. You know, I do I really feel good. But time to time for me. I think is you know, we have to we have to make that decision in our own mind our own hearts, and what that looks like on our own career landscape. So it's great to watch Tom Brady. Witness occurs full time. So that was fun. But and I'm slightly envious. But for me, it's this is the timing was right. We're speaking with Tim Howard, the great American goalkeeper. The iconic American soccer star, so many people remember in particular one night at the World Cup in Brazil and twenty four teen when he almost single-handedly staved off a very talented Belgian team, I think they're still writing tweets about it. There's still memes out there about it. You know in that moment, and I was fortunate to be there and to speech you afterwards in although the US didn't win. It was such a remarkable performance. It was such a transformative and transcendent performance that in some ways, although that point Rory three five years old and had had a remarkable career. It was kind of life changing wasn't it a little bit. You know? It's funny that that moment, so polarizing for many people myself included, you know. There was a little bit of a union Yang for it. You know, at thirty five you're hoping that as a goalkeeper, you're right at the peak of your prime, and and you hope that you play well and that tournament I played well, and it was a combination of a lot of things. So that was great. And then you know, we lost the game which is heartbreaking for all of us. But I had you know, it was one of these things where it was nice that I played so well recognized that but like, but like I've been doing this in the permanently for you know, over a decade or nearly a decade. And it was like, I don't know if it wasn't a surprise to me, you know, where else like sometimes I have to like kinda raise my people like it was a good game. But I've been I've been doing it for a while. Now, you know, but that's exactly right people who are paying attention. We're not surprised. I mean, although it was as I said, you know, this magnificent performance on this incredible stage biggest stage, but your career, you know, at Manchester United your career, then especially it ever. Even for a decade all that you achieved in the Premier League. It should have been surprised anyone. But for an American audience, if it was kind of introduction to in some ways, I think that as a team, you know, we we saw the momentum building we went to self after into ten and people are excited about that. And then we went down to Brazil. And that really, you know, soccer, Stephen America will fever caught on with, you know, especially a part of a generation who, you know, brought such passion to the American soccer, Sean, we're speaking with Tim Howard. The great American goalkeeper who is retiring at the end of the MLS season. He's been with the Colorado Rapids last three years after spending his prime in England from two thousand three all the way up through two thousand sixteen at Manchester, and then at Everton, and I gotta say Tim, and I warned you before the interview that it'd be flattering you, and I already have. But I don't know how you could possibly respond to this. But people always ask. Ask me like who the athletes in your career, and I've been doing this for twenty five years you've most enjoyed dealing with. They also ask who are the worst. We don't have to talk about that. Now, I always tell them, and I say this insincere gratitude and appreciation Tim Howard is number one. Because Tim Howard wasn't just great. He wasn't just important to the assignment, we recovering the US soccer team, obviously. But he was always available. He was always gracious, and he mattered any still gave everybody the time of day, which is rarer than we would want it to be your relationship with the media over the years in the way that you approached your obligations, if you wanna put put it that way or your responsibilities or ever you deemed it as leader of this team. How did you view your role as a spokesperson as one of the faces of US soccer lottery? I've always tried to be real, you know, and I think that part of the media now. Right. So it's it's an and trying to time to learn and get better and something I really enjoy. But what I what I've always come to. What I was started. And ended with was if I could if I can be real, then then people will ultimately creature that they won't always agree with it. You know, and and get a lot of a lot of fans, you'll get a lot of haters as I say, but more than anything I wanted to when when asked the question give it straight up, and then that can be dissected any which way people wanna die second. But I always feel good about me being able to look in the eye and tell you exactly what it was. And so a trauma best to do that. I've had some really good people over the years giving great advice, and you know, one of those was look they're always gonna have a good game. When and when the time comes that you don't have a good game. You, you know, you look someone in the eye, and you stand up there, and you, you know, keep your shoulders high. And then and then people will ultimately appreciate that the end of the day. So I've tried to do that say Tim, and again, I'm gonna marry nobody nobody was better at that. Nobody. Accepted that responsibility to greater degree than you did. And I certainly appreciate it. We're speaking with Tim Howard who will turn forty in a few weeks, and is retiring at the end of the season before we go, Tim. I I did want to ask you, you know, your career over the last twenty years really spans this remarkable period for soccer in the US. It's a twenty year span in which the average American sports fan. New went from knowing nothing about global soccer in the game to now, you get you walk through the streets of the US, you walk into little towns in the US and kids are wearing Madrid jerseys and Everton jerseys. I live in town where every kid's got an Everton jersey, you know, Manchester United and Manchester City there's this awareness of the game. And part of it is, you know, satellite TV in part of it's the internet, but the growth is it's no no bounds. Really? As part of that movement is part of that change weird. You think you're leaving the game as you walk away. Now at the age of. Forty six. Great point. It's I'm lucky, right? I I grew up watching the MLS in its first season, you know, on the astroturf giant stadium. I bought a ticket in high school. And you know, I went to watch those guys. And then I was I was able to poor about team. And so when I when I look at the the scope of my career to see where soccer was in America to where it is. Now, I see the stadiums soccer specific stadiums. And all the all the fan bases that these teams have but that only care about their team. They're not just like, hey, we love everybody know, they hate everybody other than their own team now, and you know, it's really special these big major ownership groups and television deals, and you know, I'm I'm excited to be a part of it on the other side now because of the growth of the game and how much passion is their him. Howard retiring at the end of the season after an incredible twenty year career, you could certainly make the case that he's the most accomplished American soccer. A player who has ever lived and unquestionably in that conversation. If he is an actually the one, but again, it's just been a pleasure dealing with you for so many years, Tim, and I hope we can continue to talk. And now that you're member the media look forward to some time getting chance to work together. Thank you for joining us, Tim. It really means much. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Tim Howard soccer US MLS ESPN Brazil Representative Tom Brady Manchester United Rory Manchester Yang astroturf giant stadium Jeremy shop America Colorado Rapids Everton
Dan Schachner, Puppy Bowl Referee

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Dan Schachner, Puppy Bowl Referee

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop tens of millions of Americans will be watching the Super Bowl this weekend. And tens of millions of more people around the world will be watching the Rams and the patriots showdown, but in one of the great counter programming strokes of genius in the annals of television programming. There is an option available for those people less interested in pro football. And I'm talking, of course, about the one and only puppy bowl, the great puppy bowl. And we're joined now by man who will be refereeing the puppy bowl for the ninth consecutive year. Dan, Shak ner the puppy bowl ref, Dan. Thank you for being with us. Thank you for having me. It's the pleasure Dan, the people's about to start, and you know, the eyes of the world are upon you. And you've got that whistle. What are you thinking? Well, what is what is the most important thing? You're saying to yourself about what's going to transpire during the course of the puppy bowl. It honestly depends on what point in the game. We're at if it's the first quarter. Puppy bowl is is is is all about showcasing many different dogs as possible they're all up for Dopp shin. They're all the somehow play football game. But in the first quarter, we stick the small breeds second quarter larger and so forth and so forth. So in the first quarter when it's totally poodles and little yorkies and dachshunds underneath my feet. Then the all puppies, literally might my number. One thing is don't step on them. Don't hurt any animal because there's between ten and twelve on. You gotta imagine the field is twenty feet long only and ten feet wide. And they try to stuff, you know, between ten and fifteen dogs in their my job is to stay out of the way call and clean game. And of course, find out you know, and called the touchdowns in the field goals as they happen responding, Dan Schechner, he will be working his ninth puppy bowl as the game's referee on Super Bowl Sunday. You can watch the puppy bowl on animal planet. The puppy bowl. Really is a thing at some level kind of started off as goof, but there is a serious side to it. Why do you think it's appealing to so many people? Yeah. Great question. You know, when this started fifteen years ago animal planet. No, we all know we can't compete with the Super Bowl it when it comes to rating so animal planet just being a small basic cable networks said, listen, let's just grow up a bunch of puppies onscreen. Let's. Pretend they're playing football and see what happened. So you're one. It was literally just that. It was a green carpet. Couple of hash marks lined out. You know, probably sprayed with white spray paint. And off we go with every year. It's been growing the people actually tuned in the reason why I think people tune in his number one, we're not directly competing with the Super Bowl. We're on three hours before where I like to call us America's best pre-game option because we can only agree the puppies door -able. It's something that brings all ages of family together on Super Bowl Sunday. And it still allows you to you know, watch the other game. If you're interested this year and pats and Rams go for it. Enjoy yourself aren't game. We'll be long over by the time. The big the other big game. I thought it was for some reason I was laboring, and I've watched the puppy bowl. I always give direct counter programming. But I obviously, I'm wrong. Yeah. We still we still play. So it's a two hour event starting at three o'clock eastern here New York, and you can watch game. It's two hours. It's over by five o'clock, and then we will. Repeat? So you are watching the game. And suddenly, it is a blow out by let's say, let's hope the Rams because I happen to hate the past. Then MO partial all football teams. They're named after animals being an employee of animal planet, but if you're bored with that game, you can switch over to us because we'll still be on repeat for the ensuing hours of the day. So we do Bill ourselves as as counter programming and in all seriousness after the Super Bowl, we are the number one program on that that weekend. We are the second most tweeted about thing that weekend after human football. So we take a lot of pride in that. Every single one of our dogs are up for adoption. So literally all the dogs. You see are homeless dogs from shelters and rescues that are looking to be adopted by the time the Super Bowl, excuse me. Puppy bowl airs, it's our Super Bowl. Of course. By the time, we air every single one of these puppies does get adopted. So we're really excited and proud about. That fact amazing. It's a great story. We're sticking with Dan Shak ner who's the referee for the puppy bowl, which you can see on Super Bowl Sunday. On animal planet. This is ninth puppy bowls, the referee, and you know, of course, you saw this coming with all of the officiating controversies in the NFL particularly on conference championship game weekend. We need your perspective. Well, what was it like for you? As in official watching the official struggle the way they did on Sunday of conference championship game weekend. Yeah. I watched that very carefully. And I just saw of course, they came out and apologized for for the blown call look every you know, I have a lot of sympathy for referee. So I'm going to actually take their side a little bit here and say, listen it when it comes to the NFL there's several of them, but when it comes to puppy football. There's one of me, and I certainly don't catch everything. So in full disclosure. I'm sure I've blown calls before. I'm sure I've missed calls before it's something that kind of comes with the territory in this case and their case, I think it was a miss pass interference call. We have paws interference. When it comes to. Football. A lot of puppies using their paws. On another. We do call a positive fear. But I'm telling you, I've missed I missed at least half of them. I'm not I'm not saying, no pun intended. But I I am not. I'm not trying to be a perfect rep here it is still a human game. And even though we do have no joke. Puppy bowl twenty different cameras trained on the field with access to instant replay slow. Mo we have a director in the booth. It's of course, calling stuff. The we still miss calls from time to time every year is the prize. So I do side with the refs on this one. And I hope that you know, I just hope in the future. They they do little better job. I've got to say, Dan, you know, it's only January. It's like January twenty third when we're speaking. And I think that last answer you gave is going to be the highlight of the show for the year. I don't know how we're going to possibly surpass it. Here with a big smile on my face. Oh, great. Oh, yeah. There's angles puns. You can do, you know? You know, humans have illegal formation. We have a legal firm -ation when a puppy decides to take a little, you know, call of nature on the field. We have a million ways to say we could just say fouling the field. But we get more creative. We use the terms turn long or turn and inches or tinkle on the twenty. But you know, the way that estimates. Fifty different words for snow because they know I have fifty different ways of saying, you know, dogs PM PU pooping on the field because you have to be endlessly creative in this job. You know, I I was hoping this wasn't going to take scatalogical turn. But perhaps sorry, we're speaking. We're speaking with Dan shack ner, the referee for the puppy bowl away. What we think about the Super Bowl? We think about the great plays in the annals of the fifty two previous Super Bowls. You know, you might think of David Tyree in Super Bowl forty six that miraculously helmet catch. You might think about that. Julian Edelman catch a couple years ago or or Philly special just. Last year. Patriots games have given us so many beginning. What are the what are the iconic bold face plays in the history of puppy bowl from your recollection? Yeah. Yeah. We we have quite a few. There was a okay in probably eleven we had the dog on double touchdown. Where literally remember the rules of puppy bowl are very simple a chew toy needs to be dragged into an end zone or kicked. We don't care which end zone. We're not particular. Because again, they're untrained puppies. They're between three and six months of age. We can't expect them to be show dogs, and and football exactly where we want them to be in fact, if it were one of those like Winston Stor dog show type things it'd be somewhat boring just be trained dogs doing what they're humans, tell them. We like the untrained one. So in people eleven it was pretty amazing. We had the dog on double touchdown were two dogs. Simultaneously was the gun was Augusta in Fonzie Augusta reversed field twice until finally running down. The ball the length of the field into the into the end zone at the same time funds to the exact same thing of the other side. It had never been seen before. We did. Check the tape. We we the officials say the directors confirmed it and we call a double touchdown each team and fluff received one touchdown score. So that was that was something I'd ever seen before in puppy bowl nine. We had our I know. Yeah. We had our first field goal. We never knew the dogs could actually kick balls. So that of course, introduces the possibility of doggy soccer, which I'm sure somebody animal plannings working on. But in the meantime before we get to the puppy World Cup. We do have field goals happening. No. They don't go actually up through the upright. They actually just land into the end zone. But as long as puppies making a good effort to kick the ball. We're gonna. Yeah, we're gonna wear them three points. And then of course, there's the crazy moments. Like we do have a water bowl in the middle of the field. Because wanna keep the the dogs hydrated and occasionally you'll have a dog will just sit in. A water bowl for at least, you know, half a quarter. So you know, we we give the morning if they refused to get out of the bath. You do. Call them for the bathing recept him back five or six inches. Then there's really nothing else. I can say that could possibly top anything that you have already said, I I'm being entirely sincere enough ac-. She when I say, it has been a true, pleasure and enlightening having you here on the show. Dan, Shak ner is the referee and has been for the last eight puppy bowls. He is calling his ninth. Puppy bowl is a referee on Super Bowl Sunday. We wish you the best of luck may all the calls that are reviewed. Go your way. Thank you, Dan. Yes. Fingers crossed. Thanks for having me guys cruciate it, I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

football Dan Rams ESPN patriots Jeremy shop Dopp shin Dan Schechner Dan Shak director NFL Dan shack America Julian Edelman David Tyree New York soccer Bill
Michael Phelps, Olympian

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Michael Phelps, Olympian

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. We're joined by a man who has won twenty three Olympic gold medals. He is the most decorated Olympian of all time. It is a pleasure to welcome back to the sporting life, the one and only Michael Phelps, Michael thank you for being with us lowers. Thanks, michael. Michael Bevan spoken and while you're thirty three. Now, it seems to retired from swimming. What's day in the life of Michael Phelps? Look like these days was the last time we chatted in Beijing. We might need. I think I think I think you're no so yes, that was the last time we sat down for an interview sit down interview. Right. And like that little little garden. I remember that little. Yeah. Garden after you'd one your eighth record-setting eight there, which it was. I remember the interview. Well, I'm surprised that you do because you did about five hundred that day actually, just look at the photo that. But but but a day in the life is a little different now than what it was no visions of Milorad cottage or anything like that. No, right. I don't have any of those anymore. No, I it usually starts starts at about. I guess the boys get up at about seven AM, and we we get breakfast gome form. So it it just it depends on what they want. I mean, I'm usually the chef in the morning. So the boys ask for pancakes pancakes, they went they eggs. It's kinda really whatever. And then they get one one goes off to school. I get get a workout in. I get some work done and dinnertime comes around. So that's kind of the day the day in the life of me. I I still do a lot of work traveling with with some sponsors and stuff. And and you know, really still talking a lot about mental health. A lot about water conservation still trying to build my son brand we have another kid on the way, we got. We got just about anything you can possibly put on a plate. We got it on there. And and it's kinda really all I know, you know, for me throughout my career. I've always gone really from one thing to the next and never really had time to kick back and understand everything that I was going through. So right now where you know, we have a lot of goals, and a lot of things that we won't accomplish with with everything that we're, you know, kind of grabbing by the horns, and you know, it's gonna be challenging probably harder than anything. I really did in the pool. But it's just something that, you know, everything that I'm that. I that I am taking on is is a passion of mine, and it it does make it a lot easier. You know, when you don't really know what time zone, you're country in this out of the other. So and just the opportunity to continue to talk about water conservation. I think so meant so important you're working with Colgate on that. Colgate Palmolive, and you have a message about water conservation about things that we should be doing. Well, what is the gist of the message? I mean, I think that you know, for me this is this is our third year as a family working with Colgate. And and you know now. Going to family of five, and you know, really understanding even more about, you know, the the importance of conserving as much water as possible. You know, I think I think I think I just read something today that it's it's forty fifty states have a potential of of not having access to water in in less than a decade. So you know, that's something that you know, it's kinda scary. You know for me as a human being. But also as a dad, you know, in thinking about how much water wasting on average per week, you know, the average person's going through nine hundred cups of water week. And that's just that that breaks my heart because it's you know, for me water, it's been such an important part of my life and will continue to be entering an important part of my life. And you know, I just think that we all should be able to do some little like continue to do these small things that end up making a big difference. You know, I think we've done so much the country of last two years, but you know, for me, I think it's pretty sad to see that. And we're one of the worst countries in the world when it comes to conserving, water and. It just shows that we can all do so much more together to really make not only our country, but the world a better place to give access to clean water. I mean, you think of somebody like a country like India has one point four billion people, you know. And I wanna say I heard something that it's it's around ten percent of people have running water, you know, at one point four billion people think about that. And of course, climate change water. Conservation becomes only more important. We're speaking with Michael Phelps the twenty three time Olympic gold medalist, obviously natural fit for the twenty three time. Gold medalist and swimming to be talking about water and water conservation. And you mentioned Michael the boys. What are they now? Three in one. Is that right? If I got it, right? Booms booms will be three in the beginning of may in Beck's, just turn one. And then the next the next child will be here except timber Tober. Do we know the gender? We don't were. We're trying to wait as as long as we can. I'm not somebody who likes surprises. So I don't know how long I'll be able to wait. But you know, I think the the likelihood of us having another boys probably pretty high since it's I think if you if you already have to the numbers like seventy percent likelihood of having a third. So, you know, it's it's gonna be good. No matter what we're we're. We're super excited Nicole night always talked about having wanting three. So, you know, the the chance to having two healthy boys now, and hopefully third, you know, before the end of the years is something we're looking forward to. And I mean, just watching the two boys now together as a treat, you know, being able to see him play together kinda rough house a little bit. And you know, just kinda grow off it's kinda wild. It's it's every morning. There's thousands of toys just bread out everywhere, you're stepping on things in the middle of the night. It's just it's it's it's a fun fun journey. My my boys are definitely teaching me. The real definition of patience. I thought I kind of knew how to grasp on it. But they are they're making difficult. So being in the pool that many hours requires patience. I mean, swimmers need to have some some degree of patients. Don't they? I mean, we start a black line. So I guess it's either patients or we have to have a goal that. It's gonna make us stare at that line for four hours of the day. You know? It was it was it was kind of quiet in there when you're by yourself. So I would I always saying I song in my head or I did a lot of screaming underwater 'cause nobody could really understand this systemic -ation. We're speaking with Michael Phelps the twenty three time, which sounds ridiculous Olympic gold medalist, of course, foreign away number one all time. And like you retired the first time after the Olympics in London in twenty twelve at that time, you weren't married. You didn't have kids you're only twenty seven years old twenty six years old. Now, you're you're in a different place in retirement at that time, you struggled you floundered and retirement with mental health issues with focus. How is it different this time? I mean, I think when I retired and twelve it was really just it was me getting away from everything as me having the break that I always wanted just just to to kind of be me and really kinda let steam off, you know, I think for so long. I was almost like the boy in the bubble. And and you know, I I guess I felt trapped in a way, and and, you know, coming down from that high of of being in Beijing where you know, you accomplished something that nobody has ever done. It was hard for me during those four years to find motivation. And and you know, I just wanted to leave. I wanted to close the door on on my career, and and really just get the hell away from the pool. And and for me, it was, you know, going through, you know, the struggles that I went through really helped me just learn a lot about myself. And who I was and why sort of tick, I guess and. That you know, led me to wanting to come back again. And and, you know, honestly, it was, you know, those three to five days of me being in the room of, you know, my bedroom at the house, and, you know, really not wanting to be alive, and and, you know, being able to get to the end where you know, I felt like there had to be so many other roads that I could go down to to give myself a better chance to to get the help that I needed, and and, you know, once I found myself checking into treatment center, and and getting that help you know, I was able to look at myself in the mirror and find that self love. And and you know, just be happy with who. I was you know, I think I I saw myself as just this summer, and that's really all I saw myself for a long time. So you know, now being able to have the chance to retire on my own terms and finish. How I wanted to come back. And do what I wanted to do. You know, I think that's that's what I wanted. I wanted to hang my suit up when I wanted to hang it up. And and you know. I didn't wanna have that. What if moment twenty years down the road? And I think looking back, you know, just you know, almost three years removed. It was it was definitely one of the most enjoyable rides have ever had in my career, you know, just being able to climb to the top of the mountain again and proving to myself that I can do it. And I can't do anything that I put my mind to and and you know, for me, it was just a dream come true to be able to look up in the stands. Now. My first born there, and my family there, and and to have them, you know, share that that moment that experience with me. Well, there's no question. Michael Phelps to do what he sets his mind to speaking twenty three times Olympic gold medalist who won six Athens, see one eight and Beijing he won four in London. Anyone five more in Rio? Unprecdented unsurpassed unapproachable, you could say record of the chief -ment and before we let you go, Michael. And we pre she'd have the time to catch up here. You talked about fatherhood. It had occupies you now on how focuses you. Now. You you've you've had a complicated relationship. Drought. Your life with your father? Fred. That relationship. How does it inform the way you approach fatherhood? You know, for me that was something that, you know. I carried a lot of resentment, you know, throughout my career throughout my life and throughout my career. And and, you know, for me, I was very lucky to to be able to just tell my father how I felt and and you know, the things that bothered me from from growing up, and we were able just to express those things in person, I think that was something that, you know, ever, I guess we'll forever change the relationship that we now have, you know, being able to go from point where you know. I don't talk or see my dad, you know, really for twenty years. I it's difficult, and it's it's it's tough, you know, for anybody. And and you know, especially now with myself ping father. I can never imagine that. So, you know, I'm very thankful that that my father, and I were able to work through some of the things that we had and and we're able to have a cordial relationship. You know, we're able to talk and text where you know in the past. That was never it was never an option. You know? So I mean when when when you become a father things change and your outlook changes. And and you know, I think it's it's just something that always be very thankful for that. I had that opportunity to you know, to to talk with him, and and you know, to to kind of have a father son relationship, but it was it was something that was so challenging for me as a kid growing up. Those the world knows where you were Sunday morning. There's there's a picture maybe a few that have gone viral of you kind of sizing up some of Tiger Woods pots as you're standing behind him on. The course at Augusta National which your relationship like with tiger. What was it like seeing him do what he did on Sunday? Which was so remarkable after eleven years in kind of majors wilderness. I'm somebody who who loves sports, and who loves just watching greats be able to overcome obstacles. And and you know, I I've had the privilege to get to know tiger a little bit. And and you know, it just kind of having that chance to see him on Sunday Saturday and Sunday for the first time at at Gusta. You know for me, I was a kid in a candy store. It's it's still it's still so fresh, and and honestly homeless speech us a little bit a way, you know, just being able to see somebody who. And understand, you know, almost a little bit what he's gone through ups and downs that he's had throughout his career. And now being able to climb back to the top and approve the show everybody that he still can do. And he still is Tiger Woods. He's still is somebody that people should be worried about if he's in the fight. You know, like that's somebody. You know, I think that that, you know, it's just truly incredible. And you know, he just go, you know, I think that went on Sunday kind of in my opinion, you know, without a question without a doubt classifies him, as you know, the greatest of all time if anybody else had any doubts before I think that should summit right up. I mean, I've always thought that guys has been go. He he is a go, and and the chance to see him get back have his kids there to see that to see how you just embrace that moment. You know? It's it's just it was it was epic. You know, it was something that you know, the sports world was probably dying. See in the world of golf, and I mean, he's back. And and I knew he was back last year. And he's somebody that if you want to bad enough, there's nobody that's gonna stop him. You know, he he knows how to do it better than anybody. And, you know, especially at that level. And it's almost like I think the one thing that was really cool for me that I really watched super closely. This time was how he is on the course, because you know, obviously, if you're in his presence, you feel it, you know, like, you just know like somebody's lingering around even if you can't see him like you just feel the greatness that he that he brings. And and you know, I think it's really interesting how how in control he is over every single little small thing. That course, you know, every single step. He takes almost so calculated. And I think that's something that, you know. A few people really have control over a few greats in the sports really in this world have have control over. And I think it's something that's so powerful and something that's so amazing for me personally to see in somebody like him how how he is on paying attention to every little small detail that's going to play a big role in what he's doing. And that is so important, and that's what makes him so great. You know, there's there's that big difference between good and great and the great Stu things, and they don't want to and they pay attention to every little small detail, you can imagine. So it was just you know, seeing him back. And I mean, I for me there that was my first time there I've never played. The course never seen. The course. So seeing the undulation of that course, live TV does not do Justice. I mean, it's just some of those fairways feel like I feel like you could ski down them. Those folks seen. I'm sure someone will invite you to play there some day. I I'm shocked. You have been there already. But I gotta say Michael fascinating. Here hearing one of the all time greats the greatest in his sport contemplate and and demonstrate his appreciation for another great in one of the all time greats in his sport. It's been a pleasure. It's always a pleasure. Michael speaking with you, congratulations. We gotta keep we we got we got to catch up before. Man, come on. It's been a long you have an open invitation, sir. Thank you. I love it. Thank you German. Appreciate y'all y'all. Having us on this morning. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Michael Phelps Michael Beijing ESPN Colgate Michael Bevan Olympics London Milorad Beck India Rio golf Tiger Woods Nicole Tiger Woods Jeremy shop Fred
Jerry Kramer, Pro Football HOF

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Jerry Kramer, Pro Football HOF

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. It's been a sad week on the landscape of sports with the deaths of two important figures in sports, the hall of fame quarterback, Bart Starr, the MVP of the first two Super Bowls and first baseman, Bill Buckner near hall of Famer as a player in his long Crear with the cubs and with the dodgers, and with the Red Sox among many other teams will be speaking with Peter gammons about Bill Buckner is legacy later in the show, but first were joined by Bart Starr's teammate his blocking right guard. His fellow pro football hall of Famer Jerry Kramer, Jerry. Thank you for being with us your amidst, but you're Bangla you on almost every occasion. This, this one is not fun. I understand Jerry. Thank you for being with us. I mean you in Bart spent so much time together you were so close. And when he died earlier this week, I was looking at your book in Serie. Replay and reading some of the things that you wrote about part of the time when inst- replay was written in nineteen sixty seven nineteen sixty eight and, and I noticed one passage in which you said that Bart raised his voice to the team that was something that was very, very rare. In fact, in your entire career together only raises voice once in a game, and he said something like, come on, Jerry. And after the game he apologized. What, what kind of man was Bart Starr? Healers about all the manor is in Germany apply. It guy to begin with essentially quiet in a group of rowdy loud ball players. And so, in the early years, we didn't understand bar Woz. He had his backbone or spine and his character. So there's some confusion about it, and tact part, probably didn't start full-time till the certified here. We had four or five other quarterbacks of doing that same time, but I think always have thought that one incident kind of open the door to Bart SARS character or there was all about what kind of spring he had and is my body is a game against you Pago are classic. Of course and. Bart's had a tendency to throw the ball underneath a little bit and coach wanted him. But throw a couple on balls to safeties back a little bit. So they hold off through a long pass down the right sideline. My defensive tackle turned around and started watching the ball. I'm watching the ball March. Lots in the ball arts got his hands it side. Totally relaxed totally. Unprepared for coming and Bill coming. So he takes about a five yard charge and hits. Barton amount with a farm, just a. Blow and noxious Bart back about five years on his keister and said that'll take you that other take care of us star you bleep bleep bleep. And Bart Starr, got up and said, believe byu Bill, George. We're coming after you and I said, look over need Splendors, live, billets barge, lift up until his nose upper lip and it was blown down as jersey. And I said bar, you're better, good sewed, up your rating, like stock all he said, shut up and getting the huddle. Yes, sir. Me. I got a little league called the play. And we went down the field. Six seven eight plays. Mar lading all over everything. And we scored and Bart went to the sidelines with all the rest of us. And he, they laid him down on the bench at that time we weren't delicate about those kinds of things. So they just sodium up there on the benches upper lip lip with, with almost into the nose and took out eleven stitches. And when the they came out we went back in and Bart went back in, in songs, funny, what all messed up, but he didn't miss a play the. Yeah. And that moment was crystallized in my mind, I well, we don't have to worry about how tough Mark star is. Of whether you can take it. He's stuff as he needs to be. So he was he was at that moment. I think in everybody's mind a starter. In a guy, you could depend on the guy you wanted to go to war with, and there was another incident that close Lombardi had, you know, hair-trigger trigger little bit, and he'd jump on anybody at any moment. And he jumped on one time jumped on me number of times, you know, but jumped on Bart and Martin into the into his office, and said, look, coach, ended the cat with you, which none of us would to accept Bart and coach. What's up? And he said, we'll close your tooth me out in front of the guys. And then you follow job is to me and privacy if you want me to lead the guys if you want me to be your quarterback, then don't chew in front of them. Two men privacy and. Maybe it'll work better. So that's the kind of guy he was, and he was just such a good person. Jeremy just it's hard to say how good he was what he did. But he was in a very it was so good. I didn't believe he was real just. There, there had to be something there that we're speaking with Jerry Kramer, the hall of fame right guard who won five titles with the Packers and with his teammate and friend late Bart star in the nineteen sixties. And I remember Jerry speaking of, you know, how good he was. I think my dad used to tell me, you know stories from you guys that I think Bart took it. It's his job. In some ways to keep the young players away from the info. The bad influences mcgee's Horning steer them down another path. Yeah he did. He was. He was such a consistently appropriate person have a breakfast with ladies and luncheon with businessman, and the beer that night with the guys one or two. But that was it, but he would have put was. You know, the guys were having a berry that appear. So I just I said, no this, you know, I've never run into anybody quite this consistently good. And I don't believe it. I'm gonna catch you one of these days of a watch Jeremy, I watched him for years, just in every situation, you can imagine and he was perfect in every situation. And I finally said, you know, the guy was just a good guy, and he lives his life. Please other people and he was so comfortable with. Fans with everybody was with because he was comfortable with himself, and he believed in himself, and he was a good human being in good goodness. Seems to make you happy, it seems to be something about it. That makes you comfortable with yourself and comfortable with the world and comfortable with those around you. So he was an exceptional person in that way. And he could he could get a little angry, and he could let go a little bit. But that that was good part of him to carry. Of course you're from northern Idaho. But you've lived for the last fifty years in the Boise area, and that's where Bill Buckner chose to live after his playing career ended although he was a kid from northern California from Napa, California. He he was now. Doors been an avid outdoorsman like you. And you got to know Bill Buckner as well over the years. What were your thoughts when you heard that he had died on Monday? Unlike a kick in the gut your may was just on top of March debt. Just there to apart. And it was I'm I met Bill at a function, the charity event humanitarian hall of fame actually, what it was in. He said, Jerry been hunting ducks out by your old ranch. And the or there's a guy out there that's got all the world is a lot of porn, you know, just a tremendous number that's everything around him, but his head is place. And I said, yeah, I know my neighbor, would you like to meet him? I killed a meeting. So actually very opendorf with my friend, and I took him over to meet Greg, and they hunted together for the next ten years. I hunted with Bill it out golf with him and did charity events and much like BART's kind of a quiet guy, but consistently helping out he just. Couldn't do enough for the community. Couldn't do enough for the people of Boise. She'll sit nice man. I, I really enjoy his friendship and his company and always enjoyed being with him. Third quite a bit of golf together. And it was just a and knew he was struggling he was having a problem. But I didn't think he was even close to having on. So it was kind of a surprise and, and really kicking the gut, Jerry. No, I know it's been a hard week and losing your friends sports star. Bill buckner. We always appreciate your insights, love you. Thank you again Jerry for coming on the show this week. I love you jomie and always my pleasure to area voice. Thanks rally may on I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life, every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app, beginning at six. AM eastern time.

Bart Starr Bill Buckner Jerry Kramer Jeremy shop ESPN Boise golf Germany Bangla Red Sox Peter gammons MVP football cubs dodgers Mark star Barton Idaho byu
E:60: The Missing Piece

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

E:60: The Missing Piece

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop one year ago. The head coach of the UNBC men's basketball team wine Odem was facing a daunting challenge. And it had nothing to do with you NBC's opponent in the first round of the NCAA tournament. Virginia the top overall seed, it was a family story. The story told by tissue Thompson for e six. March sixteenth two thousand eighteen. The number one seed for junior Cavaliers taking on the sixteenth seed. You be see retrievers backs out to sure he'll try a free for the. Internment history, a sixteen seed has faced a one-seat one hundred thirty five times and they've always lost. Until now. Sixteen. New MBC knocks genius. What we did at and UNBC is upset for the ages. They're always upsets. For you in BC coach Ryan Odem celebrating in the locker room with his son was the real victory. Conor shed me. How tough is and how he can bounce back. If a kid like him can do that. And there's many others out there that can't as well. Away from the glare of that epic win. The Odem family battled. Puzzling. And frightening opponent. And went from little things to all the sudden it was like, we're we're kind of paralyzed here. More. See your son struggling than not be able to help. I looked over. And I said, oh my gosh. Like, this is what's wrong with Connor Ryan's wife. Lucille, it was the missing piece. Here. He is basketball. His always been part of Ryan Odem life. Remember, this guy's flow there at here. Growing up his favorite team was the university of Virginia where his father Dave was an assistant coach and Ryan was a ballboy. If you were lucky enough, you gotta ask to do it. And I loved every second of it as a bowl, boy, he could stay on our bench and help us with a water. No, he chose water at the guest bitch. And so he heard Dean Smith talking to his team. He heard Shosh isky in his early stages. Talk into his team. Ryan attended Hampton Sydney college where he still holds the season record for three pointers when he graduated in nineteen Ninety-six he decided to join the family business. Good middle. Got move it over the next fourteen years Ryan held six different assistant coaching jobs, but we're not shooting the right one that we're turning the ball over. In the middle of it. All he and his wife. Lucia started a family. Conor the elder of their two sons quickly took to the family sport. Small always there. It's not like judgy or anything. It's fine. It's relaxing in two thousand fifteen Ryan was an assistant at the university of North Carolina Charlotte when halfway through the season he was named interim head coach but the team went eight and eleven under his watch. And Ryan in the entire coaching staff were go. It's a brutal moment in Floyd and have a wife and two kids, and and you're trying to figure out. All right. What what do I didn't acts probably the worst point in our life with everything going on? But it turned into a blessing because that in turn brought Ryan home, and he saw the little bit of things that I was telling him about with Connor that I was concerned with. I don't know. He was washing the hands. And I'd say you need to hurry up come on. And I'd see him in their washing and washing. And he wasn't listening. Lucia began making recordings to document thirteen-year-old Connors behavior. It's almost like he's just had these glazed over is like he's present. But he's not present. It was not like anything I've ever seen before. And so it became, you know, that's that's a little odd. I wonder why he's he's doing that. He's feeling the need to be cleaned like that. Yeah. We need to go ahead and go on. On. What are you are? You are not really. Shoes wash pace evenings. Now for the Mari wasting time. Telling me what you have to do it. Connor was eventually diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder a condition where someone cannot stop recurring thoughts and becomes trapped in a pattern of uncontrolable behavior. In Connor's case. He couldn't stop washing because he was terrified of germs neurologist resign AAA. Type of anxiety. These kids feel is probably coming from part of the brain. Where you have primal fear comes from the fighter flight reaction. So it'd be the same type of ID would feel if the house was on fire or somebody coming at you with a machete. It's like a washing machine. That's all they can think about it just goes over and over and over again. And so they can't get that thought out of their head. I can't. Until you really sit there, and you see somebody who has OCD, and they can't not do what they want to do. Like, you don't really understand what it is. Twenty minutes shower turned into an hour to two hours to three hours. Yeah. You'd had trouble getting out of the shower. He would kind of get stuck. That we need to go. While they're jail. I know. Eat it. I know to get out. So I just kept giving into the temptation to wash. Hello. Here. Connor was prescribed different medications for his CD, but they were ineffective. We have you know, scans done on his brain anything, you can possibly imagine. We did it psychiatrists psychologists, therapists. We did it all couldn't go to school. We couldn't do anything. But he could play basketball. And that was the one thing, you know, I Rana cly that Connor could do he couldn't really do anything else? But then even basketball became impossible. In the summer, and we were at nationals and I had a game. And I was in the shower for three hours and couldn't get it the game. He couldn't get out. And we couldn't get him to the game. And you know, just floods tears and just kinda distraught. It morphed into other things other than just the shower. We couldn't even have people come into our house. He would clean the whole house and kind of say like mom like they can't be in here. The hardest thing I think I've ever dealt with in my life was knowing that I couldn't fix my son. I've never had any adversity like this. To see your son struggling like he was not be able to have the expertise or the ability to help it's gone from here to here where else could it go? The answer would arrive just as Ryan took on his next coaching job job that would eventually lead to the greatest upset in NCWA tournament history while the family began to unlock the mystery of Connor's illness. I just said oh my gosh. Like fizzes what's wrong with Connor? The sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Surprise ryan. It'll burn all these time outs. What's in may two thousand fifteen Ryan Odem became the new head coach of division two nor Ryan university. But off the court his son Connor was battling OCD in doctors. Couldn't figure out how to stop it and going to a little library at the end of our street owes wife Lucia the book saving Sammy was the only book that they had on CD and within the first five pages. It was at night. And I was lying in bed beside Ryan, I looked over. And I just said oh my gosh. Like, this is what's wrong with Connor? The book explained how a mother discovered. Her son's OCD was connected to a previously undiagnosed strep infection. The immediately had CONNER tested. Sure enough his strep was through the roof. That's the odd thing, you know, because he had no sore throat. Connor was diagnosed with pandas pediatric autoimmune neuro psychiatric disorder associated with streptococcus. If someone has pandas they've got elevated antibodies, which instead of fighting off the strep virus it attacks your body, and it attacks your brain attacks, part of your brain, which can trigger Zayed's and OCD. Most children react to infections like strep throat by getting a fever and feeling ill. Well, a small percentage of kids seem to react differently. And have a sudden behavioral change and develop these characteristics symptoms. So OCD, Dr resigned. Triple letty was one of the doctors who treated Connor in is a leading expert on pandas he would later discover that in addition to strip Connor headline disease, which he believes can also trigger pandas. He figured out the missing piece. Triple Eddie says the medical science of pandas is not yet settled. But in Connor's case after a combination of antibiotics for the infections in months of intensive behavioral therapy, the oh CD symptoms began to subside. Finally, Ivan answer, though, I know that like my words are caused. I mean ironically from germs, but we know now that I'm not just crazy. In two thousand sixteen Ryan cut the attention of division one school with a long history of losing that school. Was you NBC and it's basketball color commentator. This John Feinstein the program was in tatters of they'd won seven games year before Ryan got here. We're gonna win together. We're gonna lose together. We're gonna grow together. And we're going to support each other under Ryan's leadership you MBC so immediate improvement winning twenty one games in his first season. We've always got to be in position right here. In two thousand eighteen the retrievers made it to the American east conference championship against for Mont. Winter goes to the tournament. With just seconds left. The scores tied at sixty two. Jerry smiles uses the ball screen with three seconds to puts it up. New Lakers sooner than shot shot. The ball was going in the fields. I started running around the room like a kid. Now, the former ballboy for UVA waited to find out who he would face in March madness. The number one overall seed is Virginia taken on UNBC that's Friday in Charlotte. Let's move on. I thought it was ironic. You know, that we're going to be playing in the university of Virginia who I've got so much respect for and. You know, I grew up there. Three days before the game UNBC was on its way to Charlotte, and they were joined by a special fan. Connor who had just finished their fee was finally well enough to go along for the ride. We welcome you to Charlotte North Carolina for exclusive first round coverage of the two thousand eighteen men's basketball championship between the number one seeded Virginia Cavaliers and the sixteen C U N B C retrievers, the atmosphere in that place was like nothing I've ever felt. Shubert watching hit the three you right in Virginia bitch in the first half. You BC managed to hang with the Cavaliers teams went into halftime tied at twenty one. But in the second half, Joe Sherbourne and his teammates. Would it up? Team gets up down shoot threes. And when you're a small team was playing number one. The country you to be able to make threes. With tonner in the stands you in be started the half on a twenty two six run. To try it free for the right way. And it goes from bad to worse for Jinya. This can't be happening sixteen seat dominating one seat. We may have history tonight. NBC played the game of their lives. ABC color commentator. John feinstein. They made it look easy are going baseline bounces it into the right corner. Open three for Jordan. Sixteen. BC? Virginia seventy. Fifty. The team celebrated Connor was right in the middle of it. I'm not gonna lock from them. Is like I cannot believe that we just did this. And he was just proud. What we did it. And at you MBC is upset for the ages. They're always upsets. Yeah. They're always upsets, and you know, when you see your child overcome something, this traumatic and this hard, you know, it takes a special person to do that. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Connor Ryan Ryan Odem NBC ESPN Virginia OCD BC Lucia basketball Cavaliers Conor Odem MBC John Feinstein Jeremy shop NCAA Ryan university Thompson Dean Smith ABC
The Sporting Life: 3/6/20

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

37:20 min | 5 months ago

The Sporting Life: 3/6/20

"Great News there's a quick way you can save money switch to Geico. Geico could help you get great coverage at a great price and it only takes fifteen minutes to see if you could save fifteen percent or more on car insurance go to GEICO DOT com today and see how much you could save. Welcome to the sporting life with Jeremy Shop over the next hour former. Nfl General Manager. Mike Tannenbaum describes why the NFL's potential new playoff structure could mean traffic changes for the League. There's two H is not apply at the end of the year health and home field. And you're the one team that has the home feel manage and you have the body get healthy. I think that's going to give you an advantage. Over those other teams so it will make the regular season hugely consequential plus former MLB player. Bill ripken defense. Old School Baseball Thinkers. It just seems over the past few years all the talk about the new metrics and all the analytics that are entering into the game did almost the connotation out there that the old school guy never use numbers or information and I just to establish that. That's not true. Also author your own. Weizman describes how the Philadelphia Seventy sixers process divided the basketball community about the way they went about their business. Stay off this entire culture war that drove people on every side Matt and I think that's kind of what makes the story interesting a little different. This is the sporting life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. Welcome to another edition of the sporting life later in the show. We'll be speaking to the longtime Major League infielder an Emmy Award winning baseball. Commentator Bill Ripken. But first we're GONNA talk some NFL with our own. Mike Tannenbaum a longtime NFL executive one of our NFL insiders. Thank you for joining us here on the sporting life. Hey great to be with you. Jeremy How are you? I'm great I'm great and and it's always a pleasure having you on the show. You have such keen insights. What's going on so I'm going to lay it all out there. Is Tom Brady? Ever GonNa play for the Patriots again. I believe so. I think when the rubber meets the Road Jeremy I think he stays there. They have good offensive line especially if David Andrews they're talented center comes back they could franchise their guard. Joe -TUNI- so when it's all said and done I would think that he'll be back. I know other C- Differently but We will find find out soon enough. If it's not New England for Brady and there have been so many other destinations that have been thrown into the conversation. How do you handicap it? If it's not New England I say paper. Tennessee makes a ton of sense because micro their head coach. He was defensive coordinator New England John Robinson knows him from his days in the New England. Front office I think when teen that's radar that makes a ton of sense to me is Tampa Bay because last year they were eighth overall anti France a tenth of a difference in their last eight games. The really good receivers in Chris Godwin Mike Evans. I got a couple of good tight ends and OJ. Howard Cameron brats. So I think Tampa Bay Bacolod sense as well. And what does that mean exactly In terms of the future of James Winston. Yeah it's a big variable heading into free agency there so anything so like about James. Obviously the three touchdown passes but I was raised in this business. That oftentimes your opponent going to lose the game before you ever have to win it. And obviously the thirty interceptions seven pick sixes if they just had a B- quarterback last year with that underrated defense. They would have competed for a playoff position. We're speaking Mike. Tannenbaum the former. Nfl Executive who is now an ESPN NFL. Insider and that raises the question. James Winston situation. He's not the only one out there. At what as an executive For Front Office and coaching staff. When when did they have to make the decision in terms of the development of you've invested in? You used a high draft pick on at the quarterback position where you're GONNA you're all in or it's time to to move on. How how hard is it to make that Decision Mike? Jeremy that's where the decisions to make. When when do you give up on the young hopeful ascending player and in particular? When you look at the quarterback position rich Gannon Vinny Testaverde. You know to a certain extent you could make the argument for a Ryan Fitzpatrick. Sometimes it just takes awhile and he has projects talent so I think it's a painful difficult decision but I think you back to his days of Horror State. He has turned the ball over a lot and If I was Tampa Bay given how well they played defensively. I would make a change at this point in the year and we're talking in the first week of March to combine his over. The draft is still what like six weeks away something like that. What does it look like in? Nfl Front Office At this point on the calendar by far the best time of year this is for your strategy together and juxtaposing free agency and the draft. And what I mean by that when you look at the middle class of the veteran wide receiver market and just to pick a name Robbie Anderson in my opinion. He lost a ton of money based on the depth of the draft position because if you need a representative wide receiver you can certainly get one in the third or fourth round this year's draft not pay Robbie Anderson type and then go spending your money someplace else. This is a year in which there is a seems beyond a consensus. It's unanimity they. Joe Borough should be the number one pack. How do you feel about that? Conventional Wisdom and the fact that it's entirely unopposed. Well there's two concerns have one is urban. Meyer knows a lot about Cormac. Playing Joe Borough study started his career at Ohio State Jeremy and transfer because he couldn't beat out Twain Haskins. That's a little bit of a concern during housings is certainly a good player. I certainly wouldn't put him in the elite category and then secondly he had one. You're a fantastic production. And my and I would take Joe Bird just to be clear but if Justin Herbert was playing quarterback at Lsu behind that Lyon those weapons not so sure how much different the result would have been silly. Where is Herbert's stock right? Now it's extremely high with me. Because of his character. His production has prototypical size. If you look at how the season in particular PAC twelve championship game against Utah Rose Bowl against Wisconsin. Mvp of the senior bowl threw the ball very well last week in India so I think he's competitive. I think he's answered the Bell Every step of the way and I don't know what he's missing so it's going to have to show me why he should be a top five pick we're speaking with Mike Tannenbaum in my The combine as I said is over. Who who gained the most combine whose stock went up the most after that experience? I would say maybe An boost priority high candidly. But maybe MCI Becton three hundred sixty four pound offense Lineman from Louisville who ran a five one. That's faster than Jimmy Garoppolo at three hundred sixty four pounds crazy. I mean that that like if you really just think about that I mean that's insane so He was a good player. How into it but just to see that happen is fascinating. I'm curious and maybe it's because I'm I'm going to speak to him for for outside the lines tomorrow in Atlanta. But I'm going to talk to Jalen hurts. Who's had one of the most interesting college careers anyone's ever had of course at Alabama than it Oklahoma? This season runner up for the heisman. Trophy as graduate transfer over there didn't have to sit out He's been a winner. But you know you mentioned Joe Borough. Getting benched for not winning the job against Wayne Haskins at Ohio state. Obviously he lost the job to tour at Alabama. Apparently he had a great combine. What are your thoughts about? Jalen hurts very intriguing to me. The axiom the tape sets the floor and the character assistance ceiling it really applies to him from standpoint of he threw the ball better than I thought he broke. A Lotta tackles playing quarterback at both Alabama and Oklahoma. I would love to take him in the third or fourth round see work ago. There was another player. Josh Dobbs who drafts in the fourth round by Pittsburgh he gets traded Jacksonville. Very intrigued player. That keeps getting better and better. Josh Dobbs has incredible character. I put it up there with. Jalen hurts and hurts his really really intriguing to me. Of course everything we're talking about. These could all be moot points if things don't go well in terms of labor negotiations at this point or over the next twelve months and where it stands now as we speak on a Wednesday march fourth we understand a full vote of the rank and file the two thousand players approximately in the NFL. Pa is coming soon on the proposal that the owners offered up a couple of weeks ago. Where do you see this going? I hope it gets done. I've negotiate for years Jeremy. I don't think it's a perfect meal but there are no perfect deals. And when you look at apples to apples player. That's coming in this year as a rookie from an increase in minimum earn an additional four hundred and ninety five thousand dollars and sixty percent of the. Nfl makes the minimum. So there's some give and take in there obviously with the seventeen games but we look at the last less padded practices. I think that helps. Obviously one less preseason game not overly consequential but certainly helps You look at some of these health sort of proxies that they have in there in terms of additional coverage. They have places where players could get free screening for. I believe it's life or at least for twenty years so there's a Lotta subtle things in there. In addition the additional roster spots in practice squad players so again do I think it's a perfect deal. Jeremy No but I think it's it's a it's a pretty good deal for both sides. It's interesting to me Mike. Right because you could argue the biggest story in sports this country over the last twelve thirteen. Fourteen years has been the advancement of our knowledge about the effects of brain trauma and football's been right in the middle of that story and anecdotally anyway. This point a couple of weeks after the C. Offered up this proposal by the owners in the League I it seems like the younger players. weren't superstars. Who aren't rich are going to be willing. That's the way you know. It's been handicapped so far to sign off on that seventeenth game and the extra playoff games. Now there's some things on the other side of the health equation you know. We're GONNA limit practices. May maybe take away one of the preseason games I understand. Does it surprise you. Will it surprise you Mike? If the players agree to more games even set against the backdrop of what we now know about head trauma and also. I should say what we don't know. Well that's a very interesting point. I think more than the number of games germy. It's about how we play in practice. I think Roger Goodell's been excellent As a thought leader in this space in terms of the game is a lot safer just in terms of where you could hit a player. Helmet-to-helmet contact How we practice is dramatically better. There's a lot less contact overall in practice. So I think we get away from the actual number of games and really keep focusing on how we play when we do. Play is more important and I think We've gone to a place where the game still exciting. It's the best sport in the world and it's just again. I would argue that perfect but it's dramatically safer than it once was. Were Speaking Mike. Tannenbaum the NFL executive now works with us at ESPN `bout the State of the NFL the CB negotiations And the vote that we were expecting to take place soon from the whole rank and file and it's different this time around. I heard Dominic Foxworth used to be the president of the NFL PA when he was playing talked about how. I think ten years ago. The last time the negotiations were taking place that you know. There was a united front presented by the players in even if ultimately he didn't agree with something they decided to vote together to show united front this time around we had the executive committee of the PA voting. I think six to five not to pass long of the proposal to the rank and file. Then we add The player reps themselves voting in the other directions. Seventeen fourteen to one. And now we're hearing split among some of the big stars saying no the guys who've made a lot of money already Who would you know if there's a work? Stoppage would presumably lose year of salary. Because they're not going to get back on the back end and we're hearing the younger players were paid less. Who think maybe they'll be started a few years saying no. I'm I'm willing to play that extra game For a bigger share of the PIE does the does the division lack of united front. This time around. How does that strike you? I love these. Smith's what he said which is democracy is messy. Everybody has a point of view and the executive director of the and look you have whatever it is sixteen seventeen hundred numbers not gonNa make it unanimous on their front and again. I think there's a lot more good in that deal and bad and I think they're going to have discussion and I would challenge a player if they don't like the deal. Okay no problem which your suggestion. You're not just GONNA walk in wave a magic wand and tell thirty two hours sixteen games but we want everything else here my understanding and I don't know all the numbers intimately Jeremy but I believe there's a digital six and a half billion dollars so difference between forty seven percent forty eight point five percent of total revenues. Yeah that those numbers were hearing something like that exactly so therefore I seen some of these high profile players have a problem with the system but again what your idea. And how are you going to be able to implement speaking with my Tanenbaum and Mike in terms the practicalities for front offices? Now as we're in this kind of CBA limbo were so much. Could be changing in the near future possibly. How does that affect the way? They're thinking about the draft about free agents about transition tags in franchise tags. I mean. Can they do anything now? Right now it's a hurry up and I've talked to lot of my friends around the league. They're just waiting ill. There's some teams that have fifteen twenty three. Nobody knows what the rules are. You don't know if you're writing a contract for sixteen game season or seventeen game season. Those are all things are going to have to be factored into to the variables in terms of executing the contract. Once we know what the rules are in terms are are we in the last year the collective argument or we you know in the first year of a new or this could still be the last year with a new ten year extension tacked on so until we know what the player vote is. There's really not a lot to do. Yeah I mean I mean I I don't know the calendar intimately the way that you do but it would seem like there are some very big issues at hand and until the resolve. We know what's going to happen. The future for instance like you know it's hard for Tom. Brady to make a decision or anyone to make a decision about Tom Brady. Because of the domino's have how salary cap worked. Who else could be signed or franchise that kind of stuff right? It's it's it's complicated. That's exactly right and until we know what the rules are again. I think we're being a big holding pattern from your perspective. Mike having done this For so long and being so closely associated lead for so long now covering the League you know a few years ago people talked about. Nfl Fatigue when they ended the Thursday game. And you know ratings ratings dip there might have been more related to the political situation people's interest in the presidential election two thousand sixteen all that we don't know exactly but there was a feeling like you don't kill the golden goose. Don't give him too much content but it seems everybody thinks I mean. I shouldn't say everybody seems a lot of people think that seventeen is just a no brainer. From the owners. Perspective and lease perspective and more. Playoff Games are no brainer. You feel the same way. I think it's what we've seen as it's the one product that has withstood. Basically the dvr meaning that a lot of shows can get shifted or their stream bid on Netflix. Or WHATEVER OUR PRODUCT. One product that has ratings have remained incredibly strong inconsistent. And because of it there's such great demand and we could sit here and talk about gambling. Fancy football the sports whatever. The reasons the numbers objectively will back it up based on any metrics therefore the theory is we have incredible product. It's been consistent for a long period time. Why not add to that product incrementally and with that will flow these incredible numbers that you've already alluded to Jerry and then therefore the pie will be collectively bigger for everybody and that's really at the NBA. The rationale behind it like we've had this incredible run and everyone has had a participate to make it successful. Beat the players. The owners sponsors are broadcast partners here in espn amongst many others and then therefore. Let's keep growing the Pie. Which again has benefited everybody involved? How do you feel about only one team in each conference getting a by? I don't like it because if you look at the. Nfc You could take Philadelphia San Francisco Green Bay. Maybe the rams you could argue but say plus or minus five percent. You have three or four teams. That are lumped in there together and the one team that gets to buy. There's two H. Is that apply at the end of the year health and Homefield and when you're the one team that has the homefield manage and you have the body get healthy I think that's going to give you a disparate sort of advantage over those other teams so it will make the regular season hugely. Consequential Mike we lean on you for your insights and your knowledge. Thank you so much for providing them again here on the sporting life. Thanks Sir appreciate this. Sporting life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. It's been a long time since money. Ball Michael Lewis's blockbuster bestseller about the remaking of the Oakland A.'s. Changed the way so many people think about baseball in the last twenty years new statistics do analytics ways of looking at the game. Have fundamentally altered our concepts of excellence on the diamond. Well Bill Ripken is here to say slow down the former major leaguer and Emmy Award winning analysts is the author of a new book state of play the Old School Guy to new school baseball bill. Thanks so much for joining us. We'll appreciate your time Jeremy Bill. What kind of tensions are there between? What you identifies old and new school baseball theme for foremost if you're dealing with a true old school tree. There's probably a couple branches on that tree that are borderline bullyish and I think if you're dealing with the extremist new true New School Tree. There's a couple of branches on that tree that have a little bit of smugness and arrogance that go with it and I believe that they branches that I mentioned old and new. We'll never get along and probably shouldn't get along with anybody else in their tree as well so The one thing that I wanNA do sit out when I wrote this book was I just wanted to establish the fact that old school baseball guys have always used numbers and information and it just seems that over the past few years all the talk about the new metrics and all the analytics that are entering into the game it almost gives the connotation out there that the old school guy never use numbers or information and I just wanted to establish that. That's not true. Not just that bill but also it kind of leaves the impression that all those generations of being in the game and the tens of thousands of games played in in coach and manage. Did nothing really to inform these guys about what really matters in baseball right. I mean there's it's kind of. There's almost a bias against that kind of experience where there's no question areas and I believe in. It's not the entire new school because I don't think you can ever drop the label like that. But the extreme sides of things kind of look at the old school guy and basically discount the experience. I like to refer to it this way. The old saying you can't teach an old dog new tricks. I don't believe that I believe you can teach an old dog a new trick. You incentivize the old dog. Well enough now. The new investment puppy that's come into the world with all the energy and the eagerness there's something about him that I like but there's also something true that that dog doesn't know what the old dog already knows and I don't think you can discount what experience actually need sticky with. Bill Ripken the Emmy Award winning baseball analyst for Melby Network about his new book just published state of play. The old school guide to New School Baseball and the book reminds me Bill. I think I was hosting outside. Allies like fifteen or sixteen years ago. We're talking about essentially the same issue but a long time ago. It and Michael Lewis from moneyball was on one side of the Discussion and Jim. Fregosi was on the other side. It got it got pretty nasty as I recall. At least in my memory stayed in our memory you knew forgo see well. It seemed there was no way for these two sides to find common ground. Is that still the case or or is there as you suggest your book. A place at which both sides can meet and benefit from each other's perspective. I think there should be a place and I think the two guys you were talking about kind of borderline on the extreme side of old and new but I love information. I love numbers in fact if I dismiss anything in the book That's regarding a new statistic or a new theory or anything else I use numbers and I use information back that so I just don't make a blanket statement that I'm not going to use this. So the idea of having young Intelligent people entering into the game is a good thing but they still have to understand that that old do that might be down in the clubhouse. It's running the game will use any information that's given to him if it's into his baseball world and I don't want him to be viewed as rigid or unwilling to change. If some of the information he sends back upstairs and says look. I can't use this. Go back to the drawing board. That's where the experience comes into play. But I guarantee if you give any crusty old baseball guy more information that he can use the inside of his thinking The inside of the box thinking that he has is going to grow. And then we're all better Ford so I'm all into new ideas new concepts and things like that but it has to be applicable to the game. Give me an example bill if you can of an area in which the old school in the new school fundamentally disagree about something. Well I disagree with a lot of the new terminology so the nurse statistics that has something that's waited created or adjusted attached to it because to me those are three qualifiers. That mean that it's not a real number I believe the old school guy still believes in the run batted in as a key component to your lineup construction and the new school theory doesn't believe in the RBI. And I'd like to look no further than the twenty nineteen world champions Washington nationals where Anthony Rundown by the way the best hitter had starting their lineup led the league. Rbi's and the four entering one soda still at one hundred. Plus Rbi's even though the Ren Dome led the League so there are ways that you can go about your lineup construction. But there's something that's still works with that old school. Look of your three four guy in your line up for better than the other three or four guys you put yourself in a pretty good place to win now. Of course your father. Cal ripken senior. I think in the eyes of many people who remember him when he was in the game and he was managing. There was something about him. That just kinda screamed old school. Whoa IS THAT. Is that a fair representation Characterization Bill. I would think so I think crusty actually gets in there. Some just in their weather gets in there but it was very no nonsense when it came to the baseball world but yet he always used information. That was the information that was at hand and seniors thing. That probably still stick with me as much as anything and I put it in. The book is if you catch it pitch it and hit it better than the other team you win and that's still holds true in today's game and I think that we've gotten a little bit carried away with all these different things that are trying to enter into the game and if we forget about the basics we can be a smart as any team out there but if we don't execute all the little things on a baseball field. We don't have a very good chance to win. We're speaking with. Bill ripken about his new book stain of play the old school guide to new school baseball. And it's interesting because of course Your Family Your Dad and yourself your brothers so steeped in that Orioles Way Which was an organization that changed the game going back to the fifties with richards and then the sixties with weaver and so on anything about David Johnson who of course was with the Orioles and then became kind of the first manager. You think of like with the printout of computer printout of statistics making decisions in the dugout doing double switches and all that because Oh my God. He's harnessing this new technology. The Orioles really are are cutting edge. When you talk about this subject in. I guess a late old school way. Aren't they well? I think information is the key and you mentioned Davey and yes thinking about using the computer. I remember playing for the late. Johnny OATES And he had a index card in his back pocket. He didn't necessarily need the computer to put things out. He did his own little research and he would have as simple as yes. No attached to the person's name hitting in the lineup compare doing the relief pitchers it was coming in the game because he already did the research and you already put the stuff down on his note card so the fact that now we have ipads in the dugout and people are constantly looking at it That shouldn't mean that the old school guy yesteryear didn't do his due-diligence beforehand and he knew it and part of the things that the old school guy knew was. He paid attention to the games that were played prior to that and his brain was the actual total recall and necessarily didn't need it on a piece of paper. Thank you for joining us. It's a fascinating look at really what people talk about when they talk about baseball now the stats the new school. The old school bill ripken's new book is State of play. The old school guide to new school based Bill. Thanks so much for joining us. Jeremy Thank you sir. Next on the sporting life author your own Weizman describes how the Philadelphia. Seventy sixers process divided the basketball community. Something about the way. They went about their business. That audit entire cultural war led contro people on every side math. And I think that's what makes the story interesting a little different. This is the sporting life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. Sports are supposed to be about winning. But sometimes it's about losing to win or is it. Is that even really farewell. That question is the subject of new book. Tanking to the top the Philadelphia. Seventy sixers in the most audacious process and that's a loaded word. In the history of professional sports. The author your own Weizman a bleacher report joins us now your own. Thank you for being with us. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it when we talk about the process when we talk about the seventy sixers of the last Half Decade and their strategy. What are the most important things to bear in? Mind The most. That's a good way to phrase that they see. I've done a few known trays that yet. most important thing. We tried to be different here on the sports hub. I respect that the most important things to bear in mind is. I think one is that this is not. They were not the first team to think that tanking and even the loaded word you so the process taking also. They're not the first team to think that taking a good strategy sports have this incentive system as little work that if you're bad you get good draft picks and there are a lot of reasons for that whether that's smart or not as a whole separate conversation in terms of parody thing But they're not to move that and yet something about the way. They went about their business off this entire culture war that drove people on every side Matt. And I think that's kind of what makes this story interesting and a little different. I mean in basketball. It's it's an obvious strategy right because there is so much value potentially at the very top of the draft and declines so rapidly. Unless you really know what you're doing and you've identified somehow diamond in the rough that nobody else has but scouting is so advanced now. There's so much group. Think about these things anyway. At this point it seems obvious in basketball that this would be a strategy. So why why was it? Why does it continue to be so controversial when we talk about the seventy sixers? Yeah and it's funny because like you're saying it's obvious like one of the math. That hanky did. Math is even like it's just he went back and he's not the first person like you went if you look back and go through every championship teams. Sam Hinkie General Man. He actually sent me the general manager. Correct yeah the The he the guy the architect of the process right so he went back and looked at every championship team beforehand and near literally almost every single one has a guy had the superstar and a superstar taking top three pickles. You know Michael Jordan Shock whether it's came on donkey all these guys. It's not the teams that win in the players. That win at the smog. As your question what was different about this people found it. It was almost like people. And it's funny. 'cause I don't know why I don't necessarily know why I have some theories. T never he went out of his way and the sixers went out of their way to never go to never say this is doing and yet something about it and how public they were about it or how up front. I guess would be a better work. They were about it. It's like it's like letting everyone in on all you know we we're all we all know. This is okay but like you know what's actually acknowledge this at least attend. He wasn't pretend so. It's the old lesson in sports candor. Kills exactly which is ironic because one of the things that he got criticized as he wasn't very candidate though. There's a bit of a misnomer like he wasn't doing many press conferences talking a lot with the background. Nina people WANNA wear. Meaning you know you're talking reporter they can use you creation. You're just can't you can't And I think that set off and then you have all these other things going up younger. You know. This happens as sports are being covered in different way and you have younger. Fan Base younger writers coming in and bloggers and glance the old guard. And we all covering Stewart's the general manager perspective and some people push back on that yet that everyone's a GM as fantasy basketball and you have all these ways to go out and too many this the sixers and incubated presented that new wave coming in. We're speaking with your own of bleacher. Report about his new book. Tanking to the top The Philadelphia. Seventy sixers and most audacious process in the history of professional sports. You described as the most audacious is it the most successful That's a good question The the most successful I would say I mean this is. What's funny is that he got short circuited. Right like he was he was pushed out. I guess it was two and a half about a little over two and a half years in ownership who signed off on his plan Basically the noise got great. League wasn't happy. They certainly were had no issue with ownership or alert. Happy to offer ownership might about who could come in and work alongside probably eventually we'll play Sankey And the Klang got short circuited and even still the sixers ended up. I mean you can criticize. But they ended up with two superstars Joel embiid and Ben Simmons like the math. I always do you know I mean it's a process first thing that's what he would always say and you and you don't have to buy this but the idea that championship is you know. People out of luck to win a championship Where the Win One? It's kind of a separate conversation but the mass I always kind of go back to is the forehand sixers fans sort of the team was kind of stuck in mediocrity. They had two and a half to leave really bad years and for those three years. They've had about another three plus. Let's say at least another three going colors games or years. Where everyday matters is he's in matters and the sixers are contenders? So is it the most successful now birthday? 'cause I mean they missed on a bunch of drastic but I think you know we're going black and white did it work. I would say I mean here's the thing right you're philosophically you know if the fans understand what the objective is in the end. They know what the process is supposed to ultimately produce. If they don't mind you know then then why shouldn't a team as long as its objective alternate lately is to win? They're not throwing games. It's not the nineteen nineteen white socks. Why does the League have a problem with it and I understand that somewhat a rhetorical question? But but let's let's explore right now. I agree with you right. 'cause like so. I write this even like the the biggest criticism herm Edwards thing. You play to win the game right violating Mac but the counter would be playing to win the game. Just worry about the actual championship. Not whether we win again in November against the Pistons Right. This is our best way to do. That is a different game and analyze. Plank built differently and I agree with you. I mean you know I think you I live. In New York. Knicks fans would would be very excited. Be told you know we have a plan process exactly right like locking schemes luther instead of a plan which is just like these guys want to come to New York. They'll sign when they're free agents and we've seen how that worked at right exactly exactly lots of teams losing Dirani part about the sixers. I think it was only one year. They were losing. You know. We'll say they're punting seasons and yet the only fish of the worst record I think one year when he was there like teams would end up with worst records. Which just shows that you know in the NBA. Plenty of teams. Get to the bottom without trying to get there. So there's arguments you made that you like. There's getting to the bottom on purpose with the with the goal of helping you get to the top Yeah that's smart so why yes again you asked. Why would the League office be against it? I mean other things that happened to like there was a Jalil okla force which I talk about the SAGA TV ratings one. Answer I suppose in the people who don't have a vested interest in the seventy sixers don't WANNA watch You know a a B level Amateurish team on the on the court when they've got you know. Tv contracts there were billions of dollars. Were speaking with your own white spin about his new book. Tanking to the top and again UNA philosophical level. You know there's been a lot of talk in last year. I guess mostly the load management term. You know players and load management and the question about how that affects competitiveness and what it says about NBA teams and the value of regular season. Tuesday night games or Wednesday night games. Whatever they happen to be d. Do you see a difference between the load management conversation and the the tanking US strategy Schweitzer's I think it's I think it's all representative of the issue. Not The issue combative. The thing that's combating against each itself in Professional Sports with you can be competing agenda. That's right on sensitive and the one hand professional sports are funky business like it's you have thirty different teams but they're really all partner and its partners in one business and the business matters yet is also the idea. Winning at each team wants to win and those two things growing the business as a whole and each team wanting to win those are different incentives. And they don't always work together and I think till entering the tanking like that's what happened and that's where professional sports are Funky. Because of that but they do have those two superstars. We've been talking to your own. Weizman about his new book tanking to the top. The Philadelphia Seventy sixers and the most audacious process in the history of professional sports fascinating. Look at something We've all been talking about last several years your own. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it. Thanks for having joined us. I'm Jeremy Shop and this has been the sporting life on ESPN radio or on every Saturday and every Sunday morning at six eastern time.

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The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Andrew Zimmern, Celebrity Chef

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop, the final four will be tens of thousands of troops fans to the hapless where our next guest reigned supreme as the chef king of the twin cities. He's one four James beard awards. He's a star of just about every medium. You could think of he is the one and only Andrew Zimmerman Andrew thank you for joining us. Good to be with you last year. I saw you. I was privileged to get a chance to spend a few minutes in your comfy very busy week at the Super Bowl. The beginning of twenty eighteen how does the mania preceding the Super Bowl compared to what's gonna come up with the final four, Minneapolis. Well, it's the I just got back from Utah, and I walked in Iran in the MS P airport, and when I had left none of the posters the signing of the welcome. And all of that. Was was on display when I left, but it was there when I arrived, and it it it for those who live in a city that hasn't hosted an event that the whole world kind of tunes into it. Really it. There's a lot of civic pride involved in people especially here in the midwest. I don't wanna be cliche, but sometimes cliches true for reason, we take these things. Seriously, we break. Volunteer records, we roll out the welcome wagon. I think in a way that maybe some cities on the coast with a little bit of Donna Shalala because there's so many exciting things going on in those cities made on embrace so fully. So Minneapolis, the twin cities are ready to embrace all the fans that come here. It doesn't approach Super Bowl level by a long shot in terms of grabbing the daily. Consciousness of the of the average twin city in the Super Bowl. You know, we we pitched it, you know, we formed a committee with Maryland Harrelson. You know, we pitched it, you know, years before the the game came here we won the the we were ordered the right to host the Super Bowl. And there's a massive undertaking much, much, bigger nuts, and bolts wise, and I was lucky enough to be involved with that that Super Bowl event here. But we're really excited about the final four on a personal level. I can't wait. I think it's just going to be an absolute blast much better than being in the metro as it was many many years ago. I think didn't Chris wasn't that the Duke Christian Leitner team that was here. In minneapolis. I'm I'm trying to recall my basketball history of top of my head. I don't remember they won the title in consecutive years. Ninety one in ninety two I against. I can't remember the second one was against Michigan. The first one they beat in the final they beat UNLV in the semi's. I can't remember who they'd be the, but it was a longtime co all the phone call tweets and angry. But I think later with the old metro anyway, we're excited have everybody. We're excited to have everybody here, and it's going to be warmer than it was for the Super Bowl. I can get. Degrees right now at sixty five and sunny, so Donald should should be very excited. I gotta tell you speak with Andrew Zimmer n- Zimmer and the great chef restaurant for a TV personality, author and the face of Minneapolis too, many people which will soon be playing host to the final four one night at the Super Bowl last year. It might have been the ninety SPN at a party at one of your restaurants. And then I went to a steakhouse, and I walked into the restaurant, and I had on a big park because it was minus five degrees Fahrenheit, and it was snowing. And I said, where's the coach check? It was nice new kind of angled steakhouse in Minneapolis. Forget the name. It was good. And I said, we're the coach they said there's not a co check you just put your coat on that rack this Minneapolis. Nobody's gonna steal your coat. I'm like, okay. If you say, so so, of course, I put my coat up there. Three hours later after this long dinner. I walk out my code. Has gone. And it's my pin degrees code is gone. There's a pile of two hundred other coats, my code is not there. I say to the the hostess, you know, I guess it was the hostess or the manager. I said what about my code? They said nothing we can do about it. Sorry next morning. Some person found I guess they found my credential in the code they call the SPN, and they got the coat back to me. But they were too embarrassed to say who they were. So anyway, that's my story about Minneapolis and friendliness it's neither here nor there. Now the Super Bowl was in Minneapolis in nineteen Ninety-two for the first time. I was I was at that one. The Redskins beat the bills in the food scene was not what it is. Now. Bliss. Changed a lot. It's remarkable. Well, you know, I mean, it's and it's not just Minneapolis. I mean, it's Milwaukee, and Indianapolis and Kansas City, and they're all these these smaller cities in the middle that where people who have a dream of opening a restaurant, and I'm talking about everything from someone who wants to make great barbecue to somebody who wants to do really emphasise, astronomy, rents are cheaper. We have very successful. Find dining restaurants that that pay rent for a month. What it cost operator restaurant for one day on central park south in New York City, and we have millions and millions of residents here who are very savvy until the big tech explosion several years ago, Minneapolis or Minnesota was home to more fortune five hundred companies than any other city in America. Seem had a lot of traveling executives. You had a lot of people now in the why call it the food network generation when great pictures of food pop into your device on Instagram. You could walk something on YouTube of Japanese chef creating some incredible piece of, you know, food artistry, you know, just with a couple of clicks on your on your hand held device or phone. It's it's changed the game. When it comes to what the audience is expecting. So the food especially in our town. I think is an I'm a little biased. But I think the twin cities is the hottest food destination in America right now, we have so many awarded restaurants here. Gavin case in left in yoga balloons, empire in New York City and Kane Lear now has three restaurants here, we have incredible Asian restaurants here of all stripes. You know, if you want something Vietnamese. As got a high. You know, if you want something sort of, you know, pan Asian you can go to Popo view, if you want something Chinese good of our place. Lucky? Cricket and Kim's has hybridize pizza and get the mies restaurant called young Joni that has an incredible Speakeasy tucked away in an alley down behind the restaurant. You know, spooning stable Bellcore great steakhouses 'cause people like to eat here in the twin cities. But they're dozens dozens of of restaurants. We may not be as broad and deep as I mean, we definitely aren't then, you know, as New York or LA or Boston or Houston or by AMI, but the food here is extraordinarily regardless of price range, and I think visitors to the city are going to be really excited, and if you're coming for the whole weekend you're getting here Thursday or Friday, you're not leaving until Tuesday. Right. So you wanna lot? Unless you're team Louis stent, then you might find a way to get home. We're speaking with Andrew Zimmer. And and of course, many people know you as a champion if that's the right word of bizarre foods, what what are some of the bizarre foods that that people in Minnesota grow up eating. Well, it's you know, it's funny. I always liked the idea of our show is as being about. I mean, look some people see it as fat white guy goes around world eats bucks. I want that. Because if they if they want that kind of entertainment, that's fantastic. But you know, I really wanted to challenge people to start thinking about you know, what's unique in different cultures. Why is something that odd us here in in America? Somehow, you know, beloved in another country, the the the skating, the one dish that comes to mind here, the twin cities, of course, is, you know, the Scandinavian staple of Luda Fisk. They're terrible. Eight terrible. My friends. In Scandinavian countries, especially Finland Norway joke with me that more Minnesotans eat it than Norwegians and Finns combine. What would it reminds them of the old country? They need it the nostalgia. That's why. If exactly right. And I think it's a way for grandparents to show up the grandchildren at Christmas time. But for those that don't know, it's it's salt cod that has been treated with lies has become sort of fish jello. And it's just it's just absolutely awesome. Leach. So they use lie. We're speaking with Andrew Zimmer and the James beard award winning chef restaurateur raconteur champion of bizarre foods, and before we let you go Andrew, and we create your time. I know you have a new children's book project publishing as e and the lost city of over. If I'm saying oral fear, I should say, can you tell us about it? Well, sure, I was you know, you know, I'm dad, and there were great angst ridden teen novels that any teenager could relate to and for the under seven year old set. There were fantastic cardboard books that do great job about teaching. You know, the the the sandbox rules that we all should pay attention to when we're little, but it didn't seem to me that there was something for the seven to thirteen year olds that really reflected the way kids were thinking feeling and talking today. And so I put. Real life characters into an Indiana Jones style rollicking, you know, you know, adventure time traveling back to find the secret of how to turn lead into gold from the old magicians and fear before the evil. Doers who follow them back through the wormhole were able to get their hands on it. And people can you know, go to Andrew Zimmer dot com or to as e world explorer dot com, where they can see a chapter in the book and some of the art it's number one its category on Amazon, it's incredible kids book, and I would encourage people to go and grab it for for kids. If you don't have a child in your life by one and donate it somewhere the profits of the book Goto, no kid hungry. So you're doing a good thing by buying it. That's trivia, we didn't even get a chance to talk about disc golf, maybe another time if have you back off and Andrew Zimmer. Anytime I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Minneapolis Andrew Zimmer Andrew Zimmerman Andrew America ESPN New York City Jeremy shop James beard Minnesota Donna Shalala UNLV Utah Maryland James beard award basketball Michigan Iran Redskins
Claressa Shields, Unified World Champion

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Claressa Shields, Unified World Champion

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop, Saturday, April thirteenth Atlantic City. A fight that some people are calling the biggest ever professional women's boxing, featuring the four division world champion colossus shields whose eight no with two knockouts against the longtime champion. This is in the middleweight division, Christina hammer who is from Casares, STAN. And it's a pleasure to welcome back to the sporting life. The champ Clarisa shields. Chris thanks for being with us. Now, tell me about your opponent. What makes her formidable? Well, every that this thing about my pony. She's from Germany her name's seeming, hammers she twenty four no with eleven knocked out. And she has been the reigning champion. In our wake lays with believe two of the belts for believe. Now. Now eight years, and how do you match up against her? I like Overmach I mean, she's five eleven on five nine we buy one sixty. She's been a champion for eight years. I've been undefeated for seven on top of winning two Olympic gold medals. And I just feel like I'm stronger her, you know, definitely better skilled speaking with Theresa shields. She is a world champion two time Olympic gold medalist. She's considered by many people, not only the present. But the long term future of her sport women's professional, boxing and Chryssa fights out of Flint Michigan. To receive never lacked for confidence. You haven't lost a fight as you said in a very long time. Over the last couple of years as you've become a more familiar name to the casual mainstream sports fan. How would you describe your development as a fighter in the ring on development of rain came with my development on our side of it? You know, I had a lot of different surroundings. And I've been around a lot of different fires. So into a lot of different countries. I've been almost ten different countries and beat whoever the country number one fighter was and death with that is just. I did learn so many different stuff and so many ways to win. I think that's what makes me unbeatable. And I think that every five people know like, you know, some fights you get with some fighters, and they may show up, and they may not show what you know, they may thro printed or they made buck. But with me, they know every time that I'm gonna fight I'm gonna make it if she wanna be pretty in there. I'm gonna make it ugly and rough even though I may look good. She's gonna feel like she's getting a healthy daughter. And I think that's kind of where my skill has went like, even though fast, and I'm sharp, and I have a great jet is that our also put my my Kim down and turn into my Tyson too. So I think that's making me big draw women's blocks in just how grown over time. You know, when no matter what kind of fight. I'm always aggressive. I'm always short, and I'm always dominant every fight speaking with Chris's shields. She owns three of the middleweight world titles. Her oppose. On April thirteenth Showtime fight at nine o'clock eastern time, Christina hammer who fights out of Germany. But is a native of Kazakhstan owns the other major belt. What why is this? Why is this fight so important to women's boxing, the entire sport not just for you, you know, women's boxing. We've never had that super fight where it will to women at crime who are both young and both strong and both healthy by against each other. You know, it never been this is kinda equivalent to leave and wolf to fight that never happen. This is the Christy Martin. We'll see your Weicker fight that never happened. You know, right now where women Jainism this is the biggest we've been ever, you know, we're on multiple different TV networks. There's multiple different stars. You know, who are opponents are and just with this fight, you know, she also hosts belts and she's been undefeated for. What eight eight years old and built in. I'll just turn pro only two years ago after I won one my second Olympic, and I won titles at one hundred sixty eight and now I'm going to be the undisputed title and midway. So I'm kinda vision champion right now. And when you have five like that, you know, this is not like a a grudge match where we're both older we're both in our prime right now. And and you're gonna see women with the skill level of men going there fight against each other speaking with Frisa shields the middleweight world champion who's fighting Christina hammer on Saturday thirteenth in Atlantic City. She's eighty no in her brief professional career with two knockouts. She's the two time Olympic gold medalist in women's boxing. Of course. And Chris you're still only twenty three. No you've. You know, you've you've already had a remarkable career as an amateur now is a pro when you look into your future in this sport. What do you see for yourself? Well, I just had a birthday from tweet four now. Oh, hey, birthday Claris. I didn't realize I'm sorry. Patrick's today. Oh, okay. Well, happy happy birthday Saint Patrick's Day. Thank you. I will say that. My career. I've always been at the pinnacle, boxing, you know, I won the national championship in the USA. And then I won the pan-american games abroad. Then I wanna world championships, which is a high you can win in the emerets. Well, no if the Olympics, so I've always been the pinnacle of my career, no matter at what point in my life where I was at no matter what age, and I've always been at the top. And you know, right now this new goal for myself to become undisputed April thirteenth is like after. This is always more history. You know to me that it'd be great history. I'll be the second woman to become undisputed the seven person in the world in boxing ACH and become undisputed. But then his like, I wanna be undisputed at another way class. And I wanna you know, have a super fight against another unsuited champion at one hundred fifty four and faces to your bracket after this. Many people say is the best pound for pound women's women fighter in the world. Yes. The senior Brock. It and he at one forty seven we're not too far apart. And wait, you know, go down one way class, and she comes up one way class. We have a undisputed match two hundred fighters fighting at one hundred fifty four pounds, which I willing to do is all about, you know, the Riskin where her today she's willing to do. But I have to get Kristina Hamm rows away for. So there's there's one his to be made just a step. There's just a step going up the mountain. We when you're fighting a big fight like this. And so many people are paying attention through. Are you thinking just about outcome? Just winning. However, you do it kind of Allah Floyd Mayweather or you hoping to do it with power with style pleasing the crowd. You know, I like to never put that kind of pressure. Show. You know, because I know that I have power the girls that are fighting that I had nocco power. But I always make my always my first goal is to win. And it doesn't matter. How you win to me? That's always been the first goal. No matter. We'll fight. I'm in who was against. There's always the first goal during the fight. The second goal come. We can get the Mack out. We'll get the knockout. But if I can't get the knockout, and winning superior fashion or winning, you know, that kind of fashion, then I'll just be dominant and went out around. But it's really a hard to, you know, break girls down. We've only two minutes, you know. And you know, I'm I just fart eleven two minute round of day. We're only gonna fight ten and it just like, you know, I it's different. But I'm not gonna put that kind of pressure on myself. I know that I can definitely hurt hammer and I do not ground, but I'm not going to go on there with that mindset. I'm going there, and you know, win my. My my my fans are going to be pleased about how that Boston and box Gardner and Bangor up. I not go out a winner. The winner in my book through suits. Always a pleasure. Thank you again for joining us here in the sporting life. We look forward to seeing the fight Saturday thirteenth. Thank you. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Christina hammer ESPN Chris Olympics Atlantic City Jeremy shop Germany Theresa shields Saint Patrick Chryssa Kazakhstan Flint Michigan Boston Christy Martin Weicker Bangor Kim Kristina Hamm Frisa
Ryan McGee, ESPN

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Ryan McGee, ESPN

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop and this week, it is a pleasure to welcome to the show. What are the most beloved figures ESPN? I'm not exaggerating and not blowing smoke. An old friend of mine. One of the very few people in the company who started out on the production side at the very entry level position of production assistance. And it is now a world renowned journalist on camera personality. Reporter on the digital side author bovi vaunt, host of Mardian McGee, which I think follows this show on many ESPN radio stations. I mean those few that carry the sporting life. We welcome the great Ryan McGee. Thank you for being with us. I'm done. That was great. I'm gonna just clip that off of it. Use those ringtone great. I love the fact that you use some French term that I don't know what that means and. But I. So play the bumpkin with me McGee. You know, I say, that's, that's like part of your butt. I doesn't fly with me. I know exactly just how sophisticated and worldly, you are. And how well versed. You are, especially in the romance languages. It is and, and I spent speak of the romance languages, I was in a used bookstore and Omaha. Nebraska just a few days ago. There was your father's book. And I was like an antique bookstore, and I should've perched it instead purchased a college football book was written in nineteen eight. I'm a little a little confused because you said, speaking of the romance languages, was it a French or Portuguese version of one of my father's books? Was it Romansch? If belt romantic, when I read it years ago, maybe maybe I remember it wrong. We're speaking with the great Ryan McGee, who was fresh off, as you just heard in Simon in Omaha Nebraska, which, which is almost kind of like dead center, middle of the country. I guess Kansas City might be technically closer to the geographic center of the lower forty eight but I think Omaha is being right there as well. It was one of your favorite events and an event that I think we can say is actually penetrating the national consciousness, in a way in the last years that maybe it had it in the past, I'm talking about the college World Series. What makes you love it? What what's great about the college World Series? Well, Jeremiah favorite sporting events or the ones that are owned by their hometown? You know, I love in Annapolis five hundred the Daytona five hundred about the Rose Bowl in Pasadena officer, the masters in Augusta of the Kentucky Derby, but I love the events that have a home base and have had that home base. Forever. And how the city just just they believe love it. And so what ends up happening is you have these generations of fans who've attended these events over the years, and the first call will series. I attended was with my father owned Father's Day weekend, and we had because of ESPN cable television. We were college sports household, and we were all like man, one day would it be great to get to Omaha my father and I finally did in two thousand one. It was everything we dreamed old Rosenblatt stadium on the hill. It was the sexually were sitting in the stands of those crazy technicolor plastic seats. They had a Rosenblatt and we're sitting with a family. That was the great grandfather the grandfather the father, and then all the great grandchildren, and they all had on hats of different schools that had nothing to do with the Brassica. It was just schools that they had grown up watching LSU Miami USC, Mississippi State. You name it. And so I just fell in love with it, and it still. Even though we still call the new ballpark, it's been nine years, there's still that just just charm to it. And you just don't really experience that a lot of sporting events. We're speaking with Ryan McGee about the college World Series. He wrote a book about it. I think when you were still in grade school, right? I mean it was published in two thousand seven something like that wasn't it Ryan? Yeah. It was published impulsively nine and it was a worse, my worst selling book, and, but I'm still proud of it, and I actually found it into worst, the nastiest antique store in the old market in Omaha. I did find a dog eared paperback copy of it, and the Gasol angry at me, because I just grabbed it and signed it without asking. Well, you're, that's what you're supposed to do when you write a book. That's what I was always taught. Because they say then, you know, they can't return it to the publisher. Obviously, this is different situation because was published ten years ago. But they say you know, if you happen to be in a bookstore, where your book is on display sign it, sir tissue. If you have to because it might be a wives tale and old wives tale. Then they. Can't return it to the publisher as where they all unsold stock, or whatever. So it's basically like, making somebody by the book on your books signed my boss on the copy assigned the compass under Ella man about two weeks ago on, you know, your jerk, WTI aged, Jeremy shop on with. Thank you. And I used to you can tell the truth because it's unlikely but he's listening but I would go round bookstores I beat I wouldn't be jerk about it. But, you know, you kind of move your book to the front of a disabled, you know, to the to the expensive, you know, now, those things I mean, they have been for a long time, the publishers have to buy that space. It's not like you walk into most bookstores and it's curated, it's like we're putting this book here because you love it. It's because they gave us X amount of dollars to put it there, which I thought was an injustice. So I took it matters in my own hands. And I'm sure you did the same I did. I had a book just earlier this year with delahoya junior and are about a year ago and. I was we were competing with Tim tebow, a co worker of mine on the SEC network, and we couldn't get past Tibo have enough. I mean, does he really have to? We couldn't get past them on the bestseller list, every books are went into I will take all t-boz books and movement to whatever, and I'll take all juniors books and put them up front. And I would text a picture to people say, please make sure Tim sees this did it work. Did it did it move your head of him? No. Never did. And it's just another line that I stand behind Tibo in, because that's, that's all of them. I never got up that high where I had to be concerned about who is in front of me. But my father was very frustrated because he had two books that he wrote that were number two New York Times bestsellers instant replay with Jerry Kramer, which was on for a very long time, of course, that seller lizards snapshot as you well know, not about cumulative sales, etc. We could go into that. No. It's, it's, it's the fuzzy math of all math. I learned I learned that, that no Gernot made it on the list for about a half a week at the bottom of the. List. But we made it and that's all it, my times the times list just the mooresville North Carolina times. But it was the I was skeptical. I was just asking I detected some attitude there. Viki Ryan McGee us just been at the college World Series I suppose it's incumbent upon us at this point to mention that Vanderbilt won in a deciding third game on Wednesday night after having lost the first game in the best of three to Mishkin which was making its what which was hoping to win its first title since nineteen sixty two and, and from what I understand, I'm not an aficionado but I do have a basic grasp of the concept that it's colder in the northern part of the country and unusual there for to see northern teams get this far in the college World Series. What made Michigan special it just doesn't happen. I mean, the last time a quote unquote cold weather school with a call. In college baseball, the last time one of those schools won the title was Ohio State in nineteen sixty six there's a, a tremendous stretch for the big ten from the mid fifties until nineteen sixty six where Minnesota Michigan Ohio state all racked up called World Series titles. And they just vanish and that was the rise of southern California. That was the rise of Texas, the rise of Arizona, Arizona state, and then the eighties nineties, it was the southeastern conference. That's when LSU start showing up. And that's what Mississippi State and Arkansas school, start, flooding Omaha and so for years, it was the case, it was a much different Sportin. It was a regular season. It only lasts less and less than two months. The calls will Sears was typically over in early June. There wasn't an expanded into AA tournament. And so, yeah, it's super unusual. This Michigan team is led by coach. Eric Bach edge who was an assistant Vanderbilt wasn't assistant Clemson and he attacked this job by saying. We're not gonna use cold weather as an excuse and we've seen teams before Notre Dame the will series Indiana made the college World Series but it doesn't happen very often. And we've never had a team a quote unquote cold weather school. Become right up to we had their cleats up again. Against the trophy a chance to win the national championship as they did on Wednesday night, Omaha. So it was unusual. And now the question is, will he stay because we have seen schools make a run like this before. And then the southern schools of the sun, belt schools, California schools call and they say, why don't you come down here to a place where you could do this, all the time box told me on Wednesday night, hills are dug in he believes that he can finally break the co where the curse convince other schools in the midwest northeast. They can do it too. Speaking with Ryan McGee about the recently concluded college World Series. Vanderbilt emerging with was it. It's third overall title, or it was its third appearance of college World Series in the last nine years. What's the Mathis our second championship? Yes. Oh, well tell Vanderbilt. So Vanderbilt has kind of become the gold standard for this kind of new age college baseball. Which is it's the same thing. They're trying to sell them in west northeast. Now they use Vanderbilt is. Zampa. Listen Vanderbilt in the twentieth century Vanderbilt only made three incidentally tournament appearances. Now they've made fifteen out of sixteen since the Tournus century, and they've won two national championships, and they're in Omaha, essentially, every case, I think David price, and now we've got Tracy rockers son. Yeah. Yeah. Kumar Kumar rocker, and, and one incredible arm and one incredible talent in attacks the plate like you would expect someone with rocker DNA to do it. And so what they have done their Tim Corbin head coach and what he has done. There is it's a no excuses program, and there's Vanderbilt, always kind of the afterthought in the southeastern conference. Always quite frankly, lots while they even in the southeastern conference. And now you know, I would argue that college baseball is second the second most below sport in that conference behind football and Vanderbilt now is the standard LSU makes Omaha. Aw, occasionally now, you know, and it's a big deal when these schools get there, and they don't really win titles anymore Vanderbilt as the standard bearer for the southeastern conference and in the world, I grew up in Jeremy shop. I didn't think that would ever see that. But now has over your see with Ryan McGee and I should say Ryan, I regret this. But the only time I was ever in Omaha for the college World Series at even make it to the stadium. I didn't get to see game. I went out there to see David CG. The former major league first baseman an interview him about performance enhancing drugs. He happened to be there because his son was playing in the college World Series. This must be like twelve thirteen fourteen years ago. I mean, I it seems David ski has a son, who's like thirty five seems impossible, but I think that must be case, I guess, I guess I missed that before we let you go at someone who is spent so many years at ESPN show, many different roles someone who has an appreciation for the history of the place for. Or the culture of ESPN. What does it mean to you to see bobbly retire? Well, I'm happy. And I'm sad. You know, a someone tweeted this out, so that now understand truly what were bitter sweet means and that's half eel. I'm happy for Bob because he's happy. I mean you know that and he's happy looking into his future. He's happy with what he's done in his past. But, you know, Jeremy, you both kind of made that crossover move from, you know, one day you're in the building working on production and the next day, impossibly Hannah ju- microphone, and I'll, but I'll never forget. I was there for a job interview in the summer of nineteen Ninety-three right out of college and nervous wreck and wedding on Al Jaffee to come down and get me from the lobby of building three and I'm sitting in the lobby and look, look, the built, the campus was not attractive. Then I'm sitting in the lobby and there's Jack Edwards and Charley. Steiner Dan, Patrick, and they're all walking through the lobby just going to work like regular people. Ambulatory people walking through the lobby stars. They're just like us. And my hands are shaking IRAs, Robin Roberts, and bobbly of all that group was the only one who he walked past me. And he pats me on the shoulder, as he's inevitably walking across the street and go to McDonald's, which through every day, he taps me on the shoulder. And he says, do you have a PA interview today? If is production assistant, and I said, yes, and he said, you'll do great. He said, just oh, pass out and just get walking, but it was a moment that I needed, and I, I was loosened up and told him that store before, but, but I but a year later, I'll start working at ESPN, and then sitting on the set with him at outside the lines, the couple of times that I that I was fortunate enough to do that it was such a tremendous honor. And I just you cannot there's impossible to overstate what he is meant to ESPN and, you know, it's another another seventy nine. Hang it up. I heard that seventy nine or term much more in the last few months, and I ever had before. Well, that's it's a tremendous. That's a great story, right? Is what I should say. And we're going to communicate it to him. We won't talk about that time you messed up running prompt or forum, that was a different kind of reaction. I'm sure I have actually I do have a good bobbly prompter store to, and I'll save that for you next time in Manhattan eaten Chinese food with too much to drinks next time at the hall of fame in North Carolina. Ryan McGee the one and only. Thank you, sir. Thank you, Jerry. I'm Jeremy shat, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life, every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app, beginning at six AM eastern time.

Ryan McGee Omaha ESPN Vanderbilt Vanderbilt college baseball ESPN publisher LSU North Carolina California Jerry Kramer Michigan Jeremy shop Jeremy shop Mississippi State Rosenblatt stadium Nebraska Mardian McGee
Doug Glanville, former MLB Player

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

14:07 min | 10 months ago

Doug Glanville, former MLB Player

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Shop here in the middle I love the baseball postseason the Washington nationals are going to the world series as we sit here now we don't know if they're going to be playing the Houston Astros or the New York Yankees but it is the the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on e._S._p._N. radio and E._S._p._N. APP beginning at six A._M. Eastern time history since moving from Montreal we think of a team that never quite of course got there that underperformed that world of sports right now we welcome our old friend our colleague Append Man Doug Glanville Doug thank you for being with us my pleasure thanks for having me for them and you have to compliment Dave Martinez on getting the right strategy at the right time speaking with Doug Glanville the former major leaguer about the baseball players back in two thousand right when it was their first season without Alex Rodriguez after he had gone to Texas the anticipated offensively they have a very good lineup and they have three of the best starters out there right now that can go toe to toe with any rotation so Dave Martinez their manager was on the hot seat and they were able to reset for starters a few key hitters were hurt at the time they got held couldn't handle pressure when it was applied what there's one obvious difference this year but but you can't hold me about and you know I it's hard not to think of these nationals and in some ways think about the mariners a beat them down and I mean you know not so certainly played some of the best baseball when you look back to June forward and no the cardinals in fact they were trailing every single inning the entire postseason against the national it's so that the nationals are much better team than he at the same time sort of in a good way and at the you know the pitching of found a way to gel even though their bullpen had struggled ethically during the year so and I think the playoff format has served them well because you have all these days off and what you're allowed to do is apply rest Disney to his own where he's in the CY young conversation so all that came together and you found a team and they back into this that was number one in the National League in on base percentage so they work counts I had a good win against the Atlanta braves and that's the team that certainly could of knocked them off but to be shut down offensively as much as they were to constantly be trailing in the eighties starters went eight nine innings they're finding ways to do it by mostly focusing on their starters in relief so with these days off that plays very well the biggest contract at that point in the history of sports and the team although it didn't reach the world series one was at one hundred sixteen What did you make of the nine elation of the Saint Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship series you know it was it was shocking I mean the understand how to get on they drive in runs they also had top three pitchers who struck out over two hundred dollars a season three in their rotations absolutely there's no question that Harper's an impact player he came with a monstrous price tag over three hundred million dollars Harper? What what's the difference with this year's nationals now they they were nineteen and thirty one earlier in the and that now there's seemingly no hope we're gonNA make some noise in this world series and certainly whoever they play as not playing their best baseball they're they're gonNA have their hands full we think of the nationals up until this point in there thousand one two there were a lot of changes but is there something about like the guy that all the buzzes about leaving that forces the rest of team perhaps to elevate itself in some ways I season games or something like that record and and having in there's something about it and Bryce Harper has been a great player he's not and you know he's a he's a fiery guy he's he's all in and he's you know sometimes finds himself in trouble with the umpires or just the frustrate the best player in baseball over the last years it'd be my trap but is there something about he's there are parallels to be drawn about how team can fine of course each row came to that team into the starters started they're coming to the Stephen Strasburg who early on his career was shut down before the postseason because of an innings limit and he came in you did they were able to use some of their starters in relief so sure Relief Strasbourg Strasbourg released survey so they're they're kind of old school in that way because Leeson's boil over highly competitive a lot of that on papers translated generally well in terms of his performance but he's not like you said but my child who has three hundred every year media darlings all these things that doesn't necessarily mean this is the guy that's GonNa win a championship and it's worked out exceptionally well harper goes out the door on themselves in the world series speaking with Doug Glanville about the baseball postseason the nationals going to the world series Washington in the world series for the first time in almost ninety years going back to the old senators and the rebooted senators and Doug you have some exciting news this fall who are at UCONN you're starting a new program which get started in the spring you're in kind of an observational role I understand this fall starting in the MVP conversation phenomenal season

baseball Doug Glanville ESPN Bryce Harper Relief Strasbourg Strasbourg Montreal Houston Astros Jeremy Shop Washington New York Yankees Stephen Strasburg UCONN Washington MVP Leeson three hundred million dollars two hundred dollars ninety years
Chris Connelly, E:60

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Chris Connelly, E:60

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop as ESPN order last twenty years working flat twelve years in the show e sixty for me, where the great pleasures has been getting to know and work with and being able to call the person joins us now a colleague Hughes one in only the virtuosic Chris Conley. Chris welcome to the sporting life. Again. Thank you for having me Jeremy's creek with at the time to you under any of whatsoever. Typically, we talk during the summer for the show about the my wish series, which is made such a great impact on so many people and on the way that we tell stories ESPN, but we're not talking my wish on this occasion. I really just wanted to have you on the show because I don't get to see you as often anymore. We don't do roundtables free sixty and that brought us. Early in the morning a Sunday. Right. That really you funding morning up in the morning. You know? Well, typically we tape on Friday, but we don't have to get into that. Now. We're we're we're speaking to my colleague, Chris Conley. The e sixty correspondent the twenty twenty correspondent I like to use the word the the polymath Chris Conley? And there are too many people we can call polymathic in the world of sports reporting with all due respect, many, people know, you, Chris, of course, initially new as a music journalist in entertainment journalist at Rolling Stone in kind of the the late heyday, the rock and roll era if that's the right way to put it. Way to put it. Yeah. That's that's probably through big shoulder pads. Hero. Well, I I was just gonna right before the Akron of LUSA before like hair metal to be really big. But no the eighties where the unions were a complicated. And and if it's time on the chart, so I was grateful to to I was over France for a lot of what happened who who were the. I mean, this is impossible. Silly question asked because you talked to everybody you've interviewed everybody in sports, and entertainment and beyond. But from that era when you were young reporter coming up right out of college, New York, kid thrust into that world who are the people who made the biggest impact on you that you covered. I I was very grateful at the time to be able to cover than fledgling been who you know, they were just coming out of double. And then they they were different from a lot of American bands different for the British fan at a different point of view. And they were a lot of fun to talk. To and and had a lot of interesting ideas about a lot of different things. And so you would enjoy hanging out with them listening to music going there shows which were extremely exciting. And then they were just fun to hang out with. And and so I you one of those weird conferences I remember being on the road with them in Germany at a rock festival. They played their this same weekend that Doug Flutie through the path handy. So I'm Gerard failing. Yeah. I'm the only person this particular Duesseldorf hotel to have called sports phone from Germany to find out the score of that game winner. Find out that you charge that to him chart setback to them that call I'm I'd probably say for myself. That's all I remember. And so, you know. We would probably still be, you know, you know, the only thing that ended our hanging out was dial one two nine seven six one three one three one three one three yet. And I got right through. You know to find out what had happened? Hockey to Chris Connelly, the ESPN and ABC news. Correspondent the longtime music journalist the editor chief premier magazine for me. It's just so much fun. Whenever I get chance to hear your stories about growing up in New York in the in the seventies. And being in this business for the last now almost forty years time speeds up the older, you get and I remember my dad used to tell me, you know, it seemed like a flashy went from being a boy wonder in the business to kind of you know, a gray veteran. It's imminent. Yeah. I you know, I I used to play on the lawn. And now, I'm in people get off the lawn. That's kind of. You know, what I'm actually thinking about doing a segment like that? Or not L every week get off my lawn, and I'm fully embracing the KOMO thing. But this isn't about me for you. What still what still excite you about doing a great job? Why wouldn't excite you? So I'm kind of taking the steam out of my own question. But what are the things that still excite? You will you know, what it is a great thing that we have the opportunity to do what he thinks people are really interested, and we're like one of the places the left on the on the landscape where we really get to sit down with someone, and you know, her what your story and register with them the idea that were in for the long haul like Domi all of it. I wanna hear all of it, you know. And so the opportunity to do that letter with someone who, you know, been in sports for a long time like Bobby Valentine literate. Someone is just coming up for the NFL draft or something. Stories, and we you know, we get to ask some questions, and they're nice to answer them and people go through a lot of very powerful things and to your house somebody. I mean, many of our stories goes in minor about people who have gone through crisis. You know, we arrive and talk to people who either going through crisis. We're venture prices and sports play some sort of role along the way, and that's really a privilege, you know, that's really a privilege to hear the resources wholeness, the belief that a lot of our subjects have as they sort of fear with their tails and that never gets old. And there's no reason to worry here. Our bosses definitely are not listening to the sporting life and regular basis. So I feel comfortable saying that we have these great great jobs, and we get to do work that I think we both consider meaningful and that sounding pompous about maybe sometimes consequential. That sometimes like people get in our senses for what we've done, right? That's the other thing that happens. Sometimes, you know, you have to say what you really think. And sometimes get a little blowback for that. You know, I I I was on. I was on ESPN story going for Miami to Uruguay one two story, and I saw rock ban on the flight with me. But I couldn't tell what rock band it was and the lead singer of the rock band came up to me and gave me the greatest opening line. I think anyone has ever gotten. He said to me, I don't know you. But you hate me. What did you write about him? What did you say what you said about this? But you were going down to do the I hate to put it this way in the shorthand the cannibalism story. You don't have to tell us live to write the story of the rugby team survived the plane crash after eighty day. So here was this. I Chris could place him 'cause that was embarrassing. And then I realized it was the lead singer reproach. Oh, it was Steve Luther from Todo. And at the time he said to me, I don't know. You hate me. I remember I had actually probably maybe I'd written a bad review of them one five years ago. Wow. I is it always amazing healthy in skinned. And the memories some people have for the for any kind of like, nobody likes to be criticized, and nobody likes to be ripped in the pages of Rolling Stone, which is the bible that industry. So I guess you deserved it. But it's amazing. Right. You have people hold onto these things or. In the profiling hurry. The profiling I went back to my seat in pretended to be fleet. What about with you? How come you never read about talented people always what the Olsen twins guy? Why are you? I, you know, I pretend to be the pilot came out of the cockpit and said to him if you don't stop talking like this. We're dropping you off in Peru. Oh my God. A fate worse and being with Conley on the plane. In peru. That'll. Jason. I'm just joking. It's it's not a slam against Peru. I hope everyone understands that. All right speak. You could still play Uruguay just gonna say. So I'm trying to do my reentry. We're speaking with a great Chris Conley? And Chris I would love to speak to forever. But you have better things to do before. I let you go though. I mean, when I think about people have had great careers in this business. You're clearly at the top of the list, and the fun and de gratified the way the industry is going are people going to have jobs as good as ours in the future. I sure hope so I keep I keep thinking about all the fun. We have. And I am not only did we have fun and enjoy game Selby stories that we could make a living doing, you know. And I feel like there are a lot of rate writers out there and a lot of journalists, and they're they're getting the right and participate and throw be great sites that we see. And I just wish them the same. Good fortunate. We had in simply only being able to do the work, but being justly compensated for it, you know, being able to start a family where being able to have the life they want. That's what I see. I see people way more than I just wish that the compensation system for them was greater, you know. So they you know, they could be building that way while they're telling his story you, and I and those of us who are generous and extremely lucky and hopefully we're able to convey that while we can do. Will I'm glad that we got a chance even through this mode of communication to catch up with each other. It is always a pleasure. What is their say? Except Chris Connelly is one of the best. There's ever been in the business a mentor role model, and it's great heavy on the show, Chris, and I hope we can do this basically every week. But you're you're too busy. So I'll catch up against soon. Cooking to really hit the big way. So thank thank you for being one of my very few Instagram followers. I'm proud to work doing I I'm the one who likes all those Bros stuff. I'm not gonna there's a live uncertainty in this business right now. You know, you have to create options is kinda late out of the good look. Yeah. Chris joy baseball season. We'll talk soon revenue circle talking. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Chris Conley ESPN Chris Chris Connelly Jeremy shop Peru Rolling Stone Uruguay Chris joy Germany Doug Flutie Chris I France Duesseldorf New York Bobby Valentine New York Instagram NFL Hughes
Michael Holley, NBC Sports Boston

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

12:03 min | 7 months ago

Michael Holley, NBC Sports Boston

"Hey this is Kirk herbstreet. Welcome back to this great college football rivalry earlier today we miked up the huddle. And here's what we heard. He didn't what town it is ready for this game. We're not say smoke. Say Sausage pins in Akron told to fire up that grew that is one intense home gate. Eckrich you do you these the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Shop for many. It was a shocking development seem in New England patriots. Go Out in the first weekend of the NFL playoffs. Of course for the last twenty. A years bill belichick and Tom Brady together. A fashioned in unsurpassed dynasty and our next guest is someone who is chronicled it all the away from the beginning up until now he is Michael. Holly the Longtime Boston sports reporter writer savant and the author of Bella check in Brady to men the Patriots and how they revolutionize football Michael. It's a pleasure to welcome you back to the sporting life and it's a pleasure to be calm yes about. It doesn't have to be true but I enjoy it. I enjoy it very much. Thank you so Michael if you will. We're talking now. A few days after her. The Titans victory at Foxboro eliminating the Patriots throwing into uncertainty to say the least the future of the franchise. Hi's as it pertains at least two arguably the greatest player in the history of the game. Where does things now stand? That's a great question Jeremy. It's it's another transitional transitional points for the Patriots they had one After the two thousand nine season you know Bill Belichick and done a documentary for or NFL films and in the middle of that two thousand nine hundred fifty seven the sideline and he said he said it. Tom Brady who was coming back from knee. Surgery said I just. I can't get this team to play the way I need them to play and so that next year. They drafted Cronk They traded Randy Moss and it was a completely different era patriots. The football so from two thousand ten to two thousand nineteen now we're two thousand eighteen and another big transition is coming but this is the first time that the transition may include. Tom Brady Essay may include Tom Brady because Jeremy I know some people think that it's over for him here. I don't think so. I think I think eventually they will figure it out and he will be back with the picture. Wow well that's certainly yes Uh not the opinion of everyone out there but you are more informed. You know this situation as well as anyone you really think he's going to be back. I guess the question question is how much does bill belichick want him back. Well yeah okay. That's a that that is the question that's one of the big question and I would say say A fair amount. Because I know there's a thought that and and it makes a lot of sense the thought that hey. Tom Wants to see what it can do without bill bill. What's to see what he can do without Tom? And if you win a championship without the other then that proves the All time greatness but bill dollar check is he's practical and that's one of his strengths and weaknesses. He's very practical. And so sometimes when people want him to be a boat you know they want him to look at this. Look at look at look at the emotions of this. He can't do that so when you look at the quarterback options options that are out there for him and the quarterback that he has now you go into old school scale and Tom Brady is better than you. The alternative and not only better for better than the alternatives in two thousand twenty. Probably better than the alternative in twenty and twenty one so I think I think he will eventually realize that he wants to go back to Tom. Brady and the reason I keep saying he will he. He being Bella check it. Because I think Tom Tom Brady has made it clear. He wants to return to New England. He has been on Jeremy. He's been on like a three year public relations campaign of making. It obvious that he wants to stay time. He's asked he says I WANNA play until I'm forty five and blessed to play for Robert Kraft and coach. Bela checking every call. Some bill always call them coach coach spell check right organization I'm so fortunate to be here. So He's alerting people you don't have to read between the lines. It's obvious it's there screaming. I WANNA be here if I'm not here. It's not my call. We're speaking with Michael Holly. He's the author of among other books Belichick and Brady to men the Patriots and how they revolutionized football would these the relationship like at this point in time. Twenty a years together these two enormous Pivotal figures in the history of the game. What what is what is their one on one? Interactions like in their larger relationship like business like Business like the business. Mike is not Is Not to buddies. It is not the kind of report that I think about other long-term sports relationships. It's not the kind of back and forth play full sarcastic relationship that Gregg Popovich had with. Tim Duncan for nineteen years. There's this is okay Tom. I'm GONNA help you with this. What here this is what I see? And even when they're talking one on one it is very it is coach player. And and Jeremy Up a question because I think for this transition to work two thousand thousand twenty and beyond maybe two thousand twenty two twenty one or if Tom Brady plays and if he indeed plays until he's forty five the next three years. I think this relationship has to change a bit like Brady has been almost in my opinion to respectful and so now at the end of his career. He saying. Where's my contract? WH WHY can I get a contract extension. or He's looking around at his weapons and and he's silently seething over the weapons that he has but I. I'm suggesting that don't be your forty two years old. You're you're a grown man. Now now you're not the happy to be here. All shucks twenty four twenty five twenty six year old quarterback. You're buried man. You've got a family so you've been successful. It's time to be a little more aggressive in their relationships in the relationship respectful but have have more of a voice. You know what you want. You've done this for a long time. I think you need to clearly articulate. What's need to bill belichick? Now he may not listen but I think that's an element of their dynamic. That has been missing for so long. And so now when he talks I people are are reading And they're trying to interpret what he's saying when he shouldn't come to that he should just be a lot more vocal at a lot more direct. So I think that has to change from from his perspective and I think Bill Belichick has to be honest enough to say that he has he has not done a good job in the last last couple of years of building around Brady and that maybe that sounds like coddling a player. But it's not you look at the the the the top quarterback now. Patrick Mahomes is transcendent. But Andy Reid. Is that a good job building. Allowed him he throws a great deep bombs. So what are they have. They have the fastest team in the league. You have you know tyreek hill recall harpen. You GotTa Fast Tight End Travis. Kelsey they just got speed over the field go to play to his strengths and the same thing in Baltimore. Lamar Jackson got these. These great tight ends and strong running game the great offensive line Kinda plays to Lamar Jackson. Wants to do and what he's good at and Bill Belichick. If you say. Tom Brady is good Between the Hash is is and not necessarily the deep ball will. What have you done between the Hashes you you eliminate at the tight end spot? Essentially this year they left him with Julian Alabama and not much else else that he can rely on so much better job next year owning that team four grady was he with Michael. Holly the Boston sports commentator he and Michael. When are we going to know more? I mean bill bell check isn't the kind of guy who likes drama Tom. Brady's not the Kinda Guy who likes drama or or this kind of suspense how long can this linger of based on the way the NFL contract schedules are arranged well. I'll tell you this jeremy if it comes to MARCI teeth I know I said I think Tom Brady is coming back. But if if they allow him to become the free agent okay that's a bad sign That's a bad guy. That's we can all agree that you don't have to wait until the last minute but they do wait until the last last minute That was suggested something is afoot. And it's not good other than talking to a couple of people last night and they throw it out there that they think that Tom Brady. Eighty is going to The Patriots will tell him. Hey go out there. And we'll let your contract expire. Go out see what you find in free agency and then and come back and tell us ooh. I would be so uncomfortable with that. I I wouldn't want that and football. I wouldn't want that in life. If there's somebody really what I would just be afraid of them going somewhere and never coming back to you with your matrix have done this before just just for context. The Patriots have done that with players before my Julian Element has has left the building and has visited other franchises. He's been in other buildings and they we're back to the Patriots and he resigned with the Patriots and Dont`a hightower did the same thing but Tom Brady. It's a completely different category. And you have somebody like that on the free agent your market even at the age of forty two forty three in August. I think somebody will overwhelm him. And you know maybe if it comes to that you know how it is when when you in negotiating and feelings get involved in Egos get involved. The right thing to do is not only clear to you because 'cause you've been so bruised from negotiating that sometimes you can. You can make the fish and set. That are more of a response to someone else then. all right. This is the best decision for me so I can see that if it gets too late March or early April. And he's going somewhere. I could see him going somewhere else. If it comes to that but I don't I don't I my instincts say no. He's going to be back with the Patriots now. Some people in Boston rename I think like Faneuil Hall and the Pru. It basically all the landmarks. The Tom Brady Senator Make December twelve twelve twelve. Tom Brady Day. We will see what it takes whether bill spellcheck even once that Nobody knows more about the situation in the history behind the Belichick Brady story than Michael. Holly Michael Thank you so much for sharing your insights. It's Oh anytime I really. We'll talk sir. I'm Jeremy Shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on e._S._p._N.. Radio and E._S._p._N. APP beginning at six A._M. Eastern time.

Tom Tom Brady bill belichick Patriots Jeremy Shop Michael Holly football NFL Boston New England Kirk herbstreet Bella bill bell Lamar Jackson Akron Holly Michael ESPN Randy Moss Gregg Popovich Titans Robert Kraft
Mike Tannenbaum, ESPN NFL Front Office Insider

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:59 min | 4 months ago

Mike Tannenbaum, ESPN NFL Front Office Insider

"This is the sporting life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Shop is a pleasure to welcome back to the show one of our favorite and most frequent guests man who used to run the jets and the Dolphins Mike Tannenbaum Mike. Thank you for being with us into Germany and hope you and your family your chase been doing as well as possible. Thank you sir. Same same for you and your family. Y- This is going to be obviously very different. It is in I guess we're calling it. A virtual draft There's there's no central meeting place Picture being made from the homes. I guess of executives. I imagine summer. Probably go to the office to. I don't know the exact details. What what are your heat. What are you hearing from your former colleagues counterparts about how all of this is going to work and what concerns they might have yeah? I think everyone feels like within reason. They'll be able to make the picture. I think where it gets a little bit more complicated with trades because we're trades you know typically Jeremy you're you're dealing with the team below you or in front of you and you're having multiple conversations at the same time so I think to the extent that trades will feel a little bit different this year. I think that's where people are. Probably the most Hung Up. What about the technology? I mean there must be concerned. Seems like never expect something to work a certain way and especially when you're doing it the first time they're going to be glitches. There could be major consequences right if if the technology would of the cell phones aren't working right or the communication between the League and the teams Goodell. I guess we'll be at home in suburban New York. I need there must be some trepidation out there. I would imagine there surely is a and that's why there's GonNa be multiple layers here in Germany and turns out. They're going to have a phone as well as video conferencing. So what you're hearing from the Lee. The League is understandably usually fastidious. When it comes to rules and deadlines but I think they're gonNA have a lot more just common sense in terms of if someone if allying drops. The video conferencing goes out for whatever reason that they'll they'll allow him team to make pick because typically if you don't make your pick within the a lot of time then the next team can jump in front of you but nobody wants to see that happen this year especially just given the fact that a lot of these decision makers will be from their homes and not you know not all. It situations are created. Speaking with Mike Tannenbaum he is the former executive vice president football operations for the dolphins general manager of the New York jets and now. Spn commentator. And I'm sure you're talking again to a lot of Executives around the league in just General Terms Mike. How is this going to how this going to work? I mean you said they're gonNA have phone lines. Obviously they're gonNA have video but you know if you're the guy making the decision in that moment you gotTa make the pick and you've got scouts and you've got coaches and yeah I mean I know. Everybody has a different kind of draft room. How are they going to manage all just the communications when they're making those calls? Yeah I think what were your she a lot of this year and Kennedy Ohio. This was done. You know even in normal times everything. We'll be prepackaged. Which is you have a pretty good sense to say. Hey if we if we have these four players on the board we don't make trade. Let's decide ahead of time here. The four we're GONNA take in exactly what order so just in case something happens and again you know we lose align. The video conferencing goes out. We will have our decisions literally prepackaged and then there's something really really weird would happen and those four players are gone for whatever reason you know then ultimately the general manager just has to pull the trigger and you know the steward of the franchise do what's best but I think you'll see you know you'll have team say hey we're going to go with these four guys these five guys in this order. I I think they're probably a lot of people out there who are going to be watching the draft who who are in some part of them for the amusement factor are hoping to see some kind of a glitch when you're watching. Are you expecting to see something like that happened? I think when it's all said and done something will happen somewhere along the lines that you know two teams. We'll call it the same play your or I mean if all those perfect then let's tip our hats in the league and more people more poorly to the great. It people but at some point you know some player. Big a call from two teams just seems like over the course of three days. And several rounds. You know something can happen. I'd say Mike many many years ago I was the host of a draft Not on ESPN It was on the Internet. I it was the initial Israel Baseball League draft. I think it was the only Israel. Baseball League draft and Dan Duquette was in charge of the League. And we were doing it. I think from Cardozo Law School in downtown New York and it was all done over the Internet and he drafted for all the teams which is a different situation of I don't really know what I'm saying. Other than I wanted to bring up the old Israel Baseball League virtual dragons and done before but it was less complicated situation and dare I say less consequential. We had Jim Nagy on the show earlier and he was saying that he thinks this is a great draft And he also said that he thinks you can get players in the second and third round. It's a special draft in the sense that the deceleration between the players are going to be available in the second and third rounds is not that great from the players available in the first round. How do you feel about that assessment? I think certain positions I think falls off quickly at corner for example I figure falls off quickly at a pass rush but as it relates to. Let's say receiver or running back. I think that's pretty much true so I think we're seeing a lot of strategy. I think we're seeing how to really really good receivers go You know in the second third round guys that could come in and play and I think that's why you go back to veteran free agency TERMI and we saw a lot of receivers not get what they wanted. Because teams are looking at this year as receivers say like we. We should help ourselves. You know later on we you were making these calls yourself. Mike and you were assessing talent at the receiver position You know They're obvious factors that way into any kind of decision like that. But what were the things that were most important to you? I think it came down to really just a couple of fundamental things Taliban character and one steps before beating your baseline town like how good of a player are you. And then the character sets ceilings. Meaning how hard are you GonNa work? Will you avail yourself to resources to make yourself the best player possible and the more you can have a high floor and a high ceiling? That was out. You know. Obviously the best case scenario but I think this year what we're GonNa see in particular is. I believe we're going to see a lot of high floor players meaning players. That aren't risky players. That should for whatever reason have at least a solid career come from big schools You don't have to project a lot because not being able to get your hands on these players as much as you typically can I think is gonNA lead to a little bit more conservative. Serve decision making so. It really benefits Those players who are national TV every week played it. Big Programs is what you're saying the small school guys This this is not a good situation for them. Correct and I think for players to really unusual Situation with injury and doctors not being able to examine the player. I think it's going to hurt him in particular Even with all the other ways that you can assess that and all the other ways. They're trying I if they can't have their own doctors it. It's just another question mark that doesn't get answered and so it affects it that I mean that all makes sense. Yeah and and and again because you're dealing with such consequential decision making In terms of taking that player in the top five I think this year that injury particular. It's GonNa be hard to track that player so high. We're speaking with Mike Tanenbaum. Formerly the general manager the jets and the head of football operations with Miami Dolphins more than two decades in the NFL NOUN ESPN commentator. As the draft approaches Thursday night. We talked about this earlier in the show as well Mike. The talent versus character equation and talent is much easier to assess. Obviously when you talk about character and when you talk about adaptability To the situations one faces as a professional athlete in the team environment. Everything else How how do you come to decisions as an executive that you feel comfortable with assessing those things? When you know so much of it has to be guesswork Character ultimately in life. Germy comes down to how you treat people that can help you. How do you treat the waiter waitress? The bus driver the cab driver and when you're with a team work really really hard to try to figure that out so that's the part that You spend a lot of time with you. You rely on your area scouts. I was in an interesting situation. Going back to two thousand sixteen where Laremy. Tunsil had a video. That came out shortly before the draft. He had obviously hit a bump in the road and we relied on his character from his area. The the Scots report was very good and he was a good personality. Made a mistake. We drafted him when he was the Best Player. Town of refresh my memory Mike. I remember vaguely tunsil video. What was it so he was smoking with a gas mask on and it just looked awful. The time the optics was terrible and You know a lot of teams were scared away to draft the player. Even though he was he was the best player on our board. He was the best player on team. Sports and Became a great opportunity for us all the way thirteen. And we've got literally the best player on the board at thirteen without making a trade. Who's the guy out there this year that as an evaluator of football talent you're excited about? Who falls into kind of the sleeper category? Well asleep very bored but I because you know Jeremy. We talk a lot about how. There's like position less players now on offense someone like deebo. Samuel or even tyreek Hill Christian McCaffrey to a certain extent. Those are positioned less players on the offensive side of the ball. I think is as soon as could be on defense. He says you're good athlete. He can move around so much I think he's a guy that really could play A number of position so I can't wait to see what he looks like at the next level. We'll what where does he ended up spending most of his time lining up the the Isaiah Sims? The great player at a Clemson. I think he'll start off. Probably a safety athletically. He could do so much he can walk out and cover receivers man to man he can blitz. He could play in the box There's very few people like him if at all and He he's. He's a lot of fun to watch it. I know you know just being around some really creative defensive coaches people like ESPN REX. Ryan or Eric Mangini. Every day. Every week that game plans to look a little bit different and I'm really really excited to see what he could do as a pro player. Well it's going to be an interesting drafts in many respects Mike. We always appreciate your insights here on the show. Thanks for taking the time for us. Okay thanks so much for having me. I'm Jeremy CHIAPPA and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN APP. Beginning at six. Am Eastern time.

Mike Tannenbaum Mike ESPN League Best Player executive general manager Germany jets Jeremy Israel Baseball League New York dolphins Mike Tannenbaum Jeremy Shop football Ohio New York Mike Tanenbaum Cardozo Law School
The Sporting Life: 10/11/19

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

35:50 min | 10 months ago

The Sporting Life: 10/11/19

"Heavyweight boxers of all time here pushed me wanted me to survive we have this instinct we want to survive I mean somebody told me a couple of years ago so jerry no matter what your father welcome to the sporting life with Jeremy Shop over the next hour Gerry Cooney describes the feelings that drove him to become one of the best crown he fought for the title famously in one thousand nine hundred eighty two against Larry Holmes Jerry Kunis new book is gentleman Jerry a contender connick architecture some really wonderful neighborhoods maybe people that are coming to Chicago for the first time get real flavor of the fabric of our communities loss Seth Berkman ring a champion in recovery in it's a pleasure to welcome back to the Sporting Life Gerry Cooney why now Jerry why why why the world is phenomenal Jerry would you look back at your childhood what are the most vivid memories for you we have been hadn't from where I came from as a kid growing up in that atmosphere of alcoholism and abuse and neglect to be make it to the number one sorry my father's sick I can't make the asked me a third time and I did the same thing I'm sorry he said okay you up the phone with me and welcome to another dish the sporting life later in the show will be speaking with the director of the Chicago Marathon which is taking place Sunday but I in the nineteen seventies in one thousand nine hundred eighty s when the heavyweight division was perhaps at its best ever he was a number one contender for the heavyweight and you know it's you you don't take a shot in nineteen seventy six got invited to the finals every Olympic trials I just had four grade me six five years to do the book with a therapist the Johnny Gradient and we had a great time fixing it and I'll tell you what life is the women's hockey to this is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Shop the historic unification of the 2018 Korean women's hockey team that competed at the Olympics when in John Offers Olive branch sheltering governor amies was we had to try to figure out every night when my father came home what was he gonNa be like and how we were going to stay away from him and and and just sit in the back of the class and never raised my hand because at home you gotTa Pete when that happened and so you learn how to survive it's not live cooney his new book is gentleman Jerry a contender in the ring champion in recovery and when you were growing up on Long Island you know I get the phone call I made the finals if the topic guys I told him I'm sorry I can't make he said he assured Jerry I said this book now you know Jeremy Is years and you know it's a lot lot went on in my life a lot of great things a lot of not so great as a kid and then at fifteen and a half my brother had left the house he ran away when he was fifteen he went to a gym and I have a lot of fun and we talk about life and one of the things you gotTa jump in the water you got to ask the question you gotta raise your hands I mean no that I had a particularly shot and jumping in the water and that's what I try and proposed to kids today you know work with often kids a lot and I hang out with them we the race unique we start finishing the same place which is grant park which is a beautiful venue on the Lakefront but we get a great tour of the city we call north and we go west down through the south side did it mean to you the heavyweight championship of the World Jeremy went so Larry Holmes and Joe Frazier I was like amazed I that was ten percent true ninety percent words I'm not good enough I'm GonNa look terrible why am I gonNa make an myself and real the fight is me so when you realized you had this gift and you had the ability to impose your will on other young men on my way since my father died when I was eighteen you know I had to find a manager get a gym trae is a lot of stuff jeremy we're speaking with Jerry things I made a lot of mistakes and you know it took me a long time to figure it out and want to get it out and say what Jerry it was very healing from no fighting yourself at the same time out of fear fear pushed me fear what fear wanted me to survive not got wins three in Europe for in Europe when in the garden against the heavyweight Russian teams I've third-ranked Russian and not gonNa make it but once the bell rang I had a fight and once I thought I was GonNa let you feel my power and I could punch one of the best fighters in the world but there were still the demons how did you get the heights while you were you know you know listen we have this instinct we want to survive I mean somebody told me a couple of years ago so jerry no matter what your father did to you you said he he gave you the then people around the Olympic Committee saying hey let's see how we can take advantage of the wheel go very quickly the first choice was the one brought up earlier and in the Boxing Ring Germany let me tell you some I was fearful every time I got in the ring I never believed myself what happened to me I was waiting so much attention in also to be unraveling it was unbelievable I mean on one side I wanted adulation I wanted to I there's nothing better launch they can fight once they get to go out into the world they take a rock and they throw it into the engine and that's what we do as people who grew up in that kind of an atmosphere we don't I during the golden gloves nineteen seventy-three I'd seven fights I five knockouts to win the middleweight title. You had this gift you became out Ken Norton the former heavyweight champion world That was may eleventh nineteen eighty one it's exactly thirteen months late and then you know in the biggest fight in my life it's almost like I I work with kids in the dysfunctional kids and you shine them up you fix them up they can eight between The Great White Hope you and the undefeated heavyweight champion the world there were it was more than racial undertones or over says Oh my God I threw the gloves homes forget it but I went down in the basement and they hit the heavy bag again understanding that somebody was gonna come on later that you fight Larry Holmes and that fight was a big deal you are on the cover of Time magazine it was hyped as a also Don King owned heavyweight division they wouldn't give me the fight then you 'cause I wouldn't silent him so I was fighting once a year during my Edey if the phone watch him I love my brother and I remember I got in the ring at fifteen having boxes little tank I have my size almost any not me around that ring and and then as I went back to the Jim two days later and they ask Irt box that kid again and I did he couldn't do that to me anymore how did it make you feel I'm Karen My self why does that happen I don't know but I wanna I wanNA make a difference for somebody going forward what was it like for you at that moment in time to be entrust ourselves in the bottom line and and that's what happened to me in the night I knocked out Kidding Norton and fifty four seconds of the first round the night I was I wanted that same success I wanted to feel those feelings I wanted to be loved and but at the same point we don't trust it we don't believe in it it's not real the problems came out with my family and the dysfunction came out of my other siblings and my mother and I I was trying to fix everybody so you know that was going on then I wanna tell you to during this time I was also living the life I had a great life I I had five or six friends I went to school with that came to Trade Jones who it was a fight being build in some ways almost as a race war what was your level of understanding of what was going on at the promotional level fit into ring a bell one saving their bill to fight so I was I was I always boogeyman in my head tell me I'm not good enough you're gonNA fail you is ranked number one in the world but he shot Larry Holmes was the night I fell apart I started drinking and started messing around staying out late and not sleeping not running so on one side of the coin had the life the other side there's a lot of stress a lot opinion also in light of all that going on you know all the the burbs why there wasn't a second site we should afford again you know I couldn't stand my management there were pulling me apart all over the dwarf yeah I five or six four partners every day wanting to kick my ass keep ahead of them and you'll when I'm in the one of them for rappaport and Jones didn't want to blow the big pay your business managers my boxing managers yes and so I'm the guy torn between everybody and I'm trying to please place the press was against me because they didn't realize that Don king was keeping me out that I wasn't getting a chance to fight some of those guys I needed to fight and the other part was that who at that time I wanted to be a fight I used to take boxing flows through sets close to the bus stop early in the morning and it's the Fox and everybody at the most I was involved with these two real estate guys Jeremy that they hated each other my only my only you grayson that was that I had one watch the other but because I was with them one time so I come out of address room again Remillard Lane is giving us instructions I'm so mad at homes and he says to me is Jerry let's have a good fight l. so it was a crazy crazy time but you know basically I had to fight I fight with Larry Holmes one of the best heavyweights of all time Jerry Kunis new book his Memoirs Gentleman Jerry Co written with John Grady after that moment in one thousand nine hundred eighty two against Larry Holmes I was listening I'm a poor kid from long now that was living the dream I was living in Palm Springs in Caesar's palace I mean it was a great I mean was it a lot of when you walk out of the restroom and roar of the crowd so that kept me alive to that made me breathe maybe WanNa be fighter 'cause I I was accepted I was watching Saturday night live and they did a skit on me I'm coming back again I'm retiring I'm coming back again and that was very everybody because you know that's the only happiness I had making people happy so it was a lot there's a lot to cope with a lot to deal with when the fight was over I was awakening to me it was a big awakening and and and that I couldn't find peace anyway I I was looking for something I time and I was excited and it was it became so much of a race fight he was so bitter or wanted to Germany's a great story I wanted to hit him with real and so you kind of try and take away the pain of that by not by drinking and and and and you know I've never had an somebody I said what did you say that for you I believe the whole thing but you know listen it wasn't a great experience I what I was looking for and when I couldn't find my managers wanted me take another fight so I said well you know what I'm GonNa take another fight and until I figure this out and you know it's in then I mean I I welcome pressure today I love it I love that that pressure Vida because I have tools today I developed tools that I should have got one should have been fighting to three or four times a year gaining experience so then when I had a shot the fight and I realized I could have been successful you twenty four years old when you knockouts television series about following five or six prospects throughout the country and travel into the city if it's in California interview uh-huh where you did not succeed what happened then what happened in terms of your career then you know Jeremy I was watching one night I was away with a girlfriend and hotel I can't believe me we we can turtle soup and lobster tail and lots of business we had no we didn't pay attention to any racism that wasn't a part of us you're always lending your time to charitable causes taking care of fighters who find themselves as they so often do unfortunately in dire straits when their career's end opinion attention I need to get some help and that's been you know that was April twenty first nineteen eighty-eight and Royal Larry Holmes Foreman wherever it is so my life is is really when I became available for life the door opened up and I show up the charitable work the philanthropic work the work that you do with with troubled youths so sick and my management I was so sick don king and I felt I felt like I feel my father was right so when the depression I grew up since the strength to make to the top but you know in China I was always trying to prove him I'm gonNA show him he's wrong and I'm I'm available if I don't understand I ask questions and that's what I learned that this is a great life we have and there's passing quickly open I I can't stop talking about speaking with Gerry Cooney Jerry you know anyone who's ran the New York sports scene knows you're always there you're you with people who are trying to get into recovery and fix their lives that's what your life centers around now Germany I have a book that you know we're talking about it it's a shame I've I'm so embarrassed but that loss because that man never blow on anyone of my days healthy doc had a couple of wins I fought Michael spinks I was drinking up to the fight I wanted to fight as a walking dead man and it's a shame it opened big Jim about four or five months ago I'm in the process of doing the movie Iraqi film about my life and also I've been been contacted about doing right hand punch up if he hits you you're going to sleep but if he doesn't he doesn't have all the tools that you really need to be a heavyweight champion Ruis listen he he and we gotta live every moment especially can what do you think when you look at the heavyweight division now and you see Deontay Wilder Tyson fury and you know we backed up Joshua he may Joshua's get lost so he's got a Lotta great guys we got Joe Joyce we got happened with Anthony Joshua get knocked out What do you think if you read wilder presuming there is a rematch the first side but through your book and we wish you only the best Jeremy Love you stay out of your wife and enjoy your family and your father's looking down on us the shell and then disappeared for a while and then after that fight was they finally found I gotta put the drink down I gotta stop drinking I gotTa start taking care of myself all the guys are watching me to find out where they can grab me at so it was hard work it was a lot of hard work but listen to me and it was I was fighting for the heavyweight championship of the world date I hope so Gerry Cooney this is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP running away the most shows on this network do not this week again we will be talking about as we do now on an annual basis one of the Great American races tender in the ring a champion in Recovery Co written with John Grady? Jerry it's always a pleasure thank you so much for sharing your story not only with us nev knocked him out and I mean I cut him and my somebody ring you I it's over and so I was I was like I was finished four speaks in eighty seven eighty eight I put it down in April and I've been on this great experience great life if one ride I'm on and I can't stop Mike fight is coming up to head away vision Germany is coming back the way it wasn't the old days Jerry Kunis due memoir is gentleman Jerry and if you're a regular listener of this show and I know they're at least a couple of people may be no more you know that we focus on track and field I was growing up that I didn't get and also wrote the book we're GonNa Learn that is that listen yeah fell down I got up with my parents but I moved forward I didn't stay down you gave you the strength to make that a top and China I was always trying to pull them all also the executive director of the Chicago Marathon explains what you know listen to canvas found any any hurt while the twice in the last round that's not the big fight you know listen while the is a great is no not the Daytona five hundred not the indy five hundred but the Chicago Marathon which involves significantly more participants it is taking place again Sunday October thirteenth more than forty five thousand runners are expected to take part and we're joined by the executive race director out of whole cloth how busy it was in the days leading up to the race marking the course getting everything set what's your life look like but now we see those records frequently set in Berlin that's the place where we see them most often take place at the elite level this year what two miles of urban roadway into what becomes the Bank of America Chicago Marathon so everything all all the stories of of that my experience as a cub reporter in New York in the ninety s covering the New York marathon and Fred Lebow the legendary figure who kind of fashioned that event so accessible it's it's very accessible for friends and family members or coaches to get to different locations via public transportation on foot so they get to see some of these great one of the most decorated Olympic athletes It'll be his he's the defending champion he'll get very relaxed here I think he wants to go a little bit faster we're GonNa Right now is we're about ninety six hours away from the beginning of the race well it it hopefully it's it's it's it's calm but You Know Jeremy to cheer point I think the last one was in two thousand two and Paula Radcliffe ran a two seventeen eighteen your expectations what we had a couple of athletes that we lost due to injury the last couple of weeks defending champion Mull Pharma's back he's he's woods maybe people that are coming to Chicago for the first time get a real flavor of the of the fabric of our community but one thing that sets us apart and you on the Lakefront we get a great tour of the city go up north and we go west down through the south side so iconic architecture some really wonderful neighbor the nuances of that go into the plan and it's the fine tuning the last few days that is what we spend most of our time on but it's a year of planning the city's involved our residents the point is Hopkinton to to Boston and then New York they started Staten Island and Finish Manhattan we start finishing the same place which is grant park which is a beautiful thing is relatively flat pretty flat we've got a couple of little bumps or anyone that's in Chicago we we crossed the river five times as a couple of go over a couple of bridges that have a little bit of a rise on but the second half of the course is when everybody gets rolling in that part of it's dead flat but it is it's it's it's hosted four world records and I know about these things what is distinctive about your race what I think Jeremy The course you know Boston is is appointed our history so you know people come here athletes come here with the with the mindset of going fast it's been a while since we've seen world record set in Chicago athletes up front at different spots but also if they have a family member a loved one significant other they can get to different locations in Behrmann and in terms of elevation Chicago we're GONNA turn the pace up a little bit with our with our Pacers Upfront on the women's side Bridget cost guys on an amazing projector I mean Paula Radcliffe to seventeen that was set in two thousand two was an amazing performance but bridget had had an amazing performance in in London when she wants and really wonderful second half of the race she has since she came to the United States in one peachtree which is conic ten k. race in Atlanta referenced. Great Fred Lee bow what what we do is we transform here in Chicago as they do in New York or Boston earn these great cities we transform what is twenty six point ask the executive director of the Chicago Marathon taking place Sunday in Chicago expecting let's get our hopes up too high though near ideal conditions all of our participants local business our sponsors so it's GonNa work out a lot of fun celebrating the forty second running this tradition carry for for people who aren't in sleep security over the past few years it's been it's been a real a real focal point of ours and all of those you know mixed into the end on a course that is meant to be fast wh what are the things that keep you up at night over the last few nights before the race actually the the gun goes off yes I'm always watching the weather from other parts of the country in the world because we have a lot of people that to travel here you know the roadway obviously it's active roadway that we will and then in the Great North Run a few weeks ago set the world best for the half marathon she says some good some good patches of training in there so this is a place where women have done great I mean debasing things turn to the marathon Sunday anyway have cruised are constantly monitoring monitoring the quality of the roadway weather as a primary focus obvious who who's carrying it if you go to our website you can you can see the broadcast partners will be on NBC five here locally in Chicago listening in Chicago and the Olympic channel nationally you'll be able to watch and then here locally all the on am six seventy the scores are legendary sports we're looking forward to a great day on Sunday what's economic impact for the city well we have you know we're you know that's the that's the upside of the of the event is you know we're talking about running and all the pieces of manageable number for us and it delivers you know a race day experience that everybody is pleased with well we're looking forward to the race where it works and it be viewed Paula Catherine Decree d'auray going back to the eighties with that Classic Race Between Joan Samuelson and injured Christianson. So we'll see I mean if she's feeling good I think Paul the mayor's office the Park District Chicago Police Department there's so many legendary events and I- conic sports franchises here so we got a great team dates wash the streaming or log in and watch the NBC broadcast love watching the marathon especially under good condition which is great for our community that's the people that come and stay in hotels and shop and go out to dinner and do all the things go to the museums and do all the things that are so important to the in which we are expecting Sunday in Chicago Kerry mccaskey's the executive race director for the Chicago Marathon which I believe is now in its forty third year Kerry thank you had one women's Ice Hockey team in the tournament playing together more than nearly seventy years after the country separated from it Oh friends relatives and those so those that number of forty five thousand increases with with the team that comes with each of the runners to to cheer them on your off well there's so many there's so many pieces of if you think about all the all of the partnerships that that are that play a role in the success of this I mean we have a large percentage of our participants that are traveling and the ESPN APP last year at the Winter Olympics astonishing thing happened when North and South Korea into the economy here in Chicago but it's what we're seeing especially the fan fast past ten years is at our participants are coming with their husband wife there's a team until with us thank you for having me Jeremy I mean it was one of those things where you know you're saying yourself how can this possibly happen you know we're we're you know we're accustomed make sure that everybody is comfortable that everybody can get running right up right when they crossed the start line and then that staging piece forty five thousand as a very it like how when and then talking with actual players on the team later on they were in flight heading back to South Korea as apted forty five thousand why is it necessary to do so you know that's the number we feel really comfortable with I mean one of our great assets is the fact that we start and finish in the active in new book by Seth Berkman team of their own how an international sisterhood made Olympic history and Seth Berkman joins us now seth thank you ordinary was this it was very extraordinary I remember I was actually with the team they have training camps in Minnesota every few months during enmity between North and south with just the very occasional FAW's which give usually it seems false hope how that and all the all the work that goes into it but the what are the one of the payoffs is the economic impact we three hundred and seventy eight million dollars that were generated event week last year stories about kidnappings perpetrated by the north against the South the hermit kingdom the the the news happens so they didn't know really until they landed that get in Sean International Airport which is the main airport around Seoul and so they're getting their baggage and talk radio they're gonNa do wire-to-wire coverage and streaming if you go to our website Chicago Marathon Dot com you can you can see how you can you can log in get up same location that's also a challenge to stage that many people we look a lot of time lapse photography and look at a lot of the you know we get a lot of feedback from our participants we want each other in a time in which they're still officially at war with each other that remarkable union that remarkable influence of events is the the plan or or things that Kinda keep tonight but we've got a great staff the city of Chicago and my opinion is the greatest city in the world put on an event we've got a great partnership with Olympics last year in South Korea so how did it happen how how how how did this sports diplomacy get fashioned ellice event record and North American record are are going to be vulnerable will she get down to the to fifteen range British British cosco that's a tall order we'll see we're sticking with Gary he kind of started months before so in the summer of two thousand seventeen South Korea named a new minister for Colts Archer means eventually the President of South Korea Moon jae-in supported the idea you had people from the UC and the IHS which is the Internet Olympic history about the joint team in women's Ice Hockey the North Korea and South Korea of fielded at the winter this kind of all of a sudden being thrown into kind of its geopolitical statement we're speaking with Seth Berkman about his new book team of their own how international sisterhood made and so they just left their final training camp before the Olympics this was about two three weeks before the Games are going to start and I had just gotten home that weekend I remember just much for joining us and good luck this weekend Jerry thank you so much thanks for having us on and we're looking forward to a great day for these sporting life on ESPN radio channel Ice Hockey Federation also kind of backing it so it started to build some momentum but as kind of things happen in South Korea when it comes to North Korea relations all culture arts and sports and kind of just very randomly he's throughout in

Jerry Kunis Chicago Jeremy Shop Gerry Cooney Larry Holmes Seth Berkman ESPN Olympics Park District Chicago Police D Ken Norton Fred Lee director John Offers Olive Johnny Gradient New York executive director connick Paul Joan Samuelson Boston
The Boeing Lesson

Slate's The Gist

31:22 min | 1 year ago

The Boeing Lesson

"Show may contain my tips for making money on bitcoin. It won't it. Also may contain explicit language and a really might. It's Wednesday March twenty seven two thousand nine hundred and from slate. It's the gist. I might ask up. So you got the laws a fair theories of markets, which is pretty much the open markets theory. Libertarian theory company theory of most of the right, and it says something like the markets will correct themselves. We don't need excessive regulation because businesses that offer products and services will be properly incentivized to me good products and services because if they made bad products and services than the customers will know it and the customers won't buy it and the customers won't patronize eight and the companies will suffer you see you see how all the incentives align and the consumer doesn't need to be protected by anyone outside that virtuous loop. I might be an interesting theory to float maybe the first time anyone ever tried sell. Anyone anything? The first time capitalism was invented, you know, I'm sure someone was there saying wait were you going to sell the? Things. But shouldn't we make sure the things aren't going to hurt? Anybody in the Lasi affair capitalists now? No, no, no, no, don't worry. Don't worry. No one will want to buy a crappy product. So no company will make one or the people who want the inferior product. They will know it, and they'll live with it that last part about some people maybe wanting an inferior product that imagines that capitalism was invented for the purposes of selling the product sunny, delight just so you would think that this idea would maybe be put out into the world once and then quickly the data would come in. Because to mention a few recent counter examples of laws affair capitalism, working out of the litter. The Dow con shield the Corvair Takata airbags Agent, Orange us. Best is good. Your radio tires galaxy seven vox and going all the way all the way back all that poison gin in eighteenth century England. So what I'm saying is you need some regulation, but then he comes to air travel. And I would think if any. Thing. Contradicts the need for government regulation. You definitely want some government regulation, but you would think that the laws a fair argument would really really fit into something like air travel because if anything goes poorly, an air travel, a lot of people would die every travel has been so safe for so long in the United States every couple years do a story on this. How long it's been since a major air disaster in the US. It's part of my thesis that things are getting better yet. We're all getting matter. But what I'm saying is you would think that broadly speaking, the laws affair idea of businesses regulating themselves, if it were to be accurately applied anywhere. It would be applied to air travel. Not that it should be. And we definitely have to have people checking and inspecting, but it seems like a good argument that if you're planes don't work, surely you're going to hear about it, and it won't be from a collection. Of studies talking about the pernicious effects of your planes, gradually, not working it won't be about something like particulates in the long. It will be about your planes falling out of the sky. Right. You're not going to get the CDC said today that even slight exposure to your aeroplane falling out of the sky over the course of twenty years could have deleterious effects on the body. Most of those facts highly concentrated during the exact period that you're playing falls out of the sky. So this is why I've been watching with curiosity the Boeing story where you have to max eight aircraft that crashed within the last six months, and the entire model of Boeing aircraft has been grounded, and you would think if anyone is incentivized to have those Boeing planes. Not crash. It is well the people flying the planes the people on the planes, but also Boeing then mind today, the head of the FAA testified before the Senate committee on commerce. Science and transportation, the subcommittee on aviation and their Daniel K L. Well, who is himself? A pilot was asked by Mississippi Senator Roger wicker what he would have done as a pilot. If he was in the cockpit of one of those max eight aircraft when the nose was dipping. She'll what should the done which should the pilot of done based on twenty one times? The system kicking in pushing the nose down. I'm as chairman, I did not fly the seven thirty seven. So I can only speak to the airplane all the different airplanes, I flew. But in when you I'm actually asking about this aircraft. Do you know if you don't know that's fine aside have to get back to you on? I on the specific there is a non normal checklist and NC runaway. It would be it would be helpful for us to know based on the expertise this table. What should have occurred in the cockpit based on that nose down input? As actually understand the ball. But it has emerged and this is bothersome. It has emerged that Boeing and other manufacturers do this too. They actually charge extra for safety features. There's something called the angle of attack indicator and a lot of experts are saying that it could have warned the pilots of the planes that crashed if there was a malfunction in the new software system they were using. And the Ethiopian Airlines plane at least didn't wanna pay extra for this angle of attack indicator. And so now it's down. And look look what Boeing has to deal with guys. This isn't like selling the undercoating for the Toyota Tercel, you would think that if this thing could stop a crash Boeing would want to get it into the hands of all the people who might crash here's another one a second fire extinguisher in the cockpit. They charge extra for that. Don't have to write or here's an insane one. They charge extra for oxygen masks for the crew. What are you going to not have oxygen masks for the crew? What if someone decides we'll go without the oxygen masks? I would hope Boeing would step in and say, you know, it would reflect extremely poorly on Boeing if the crew passes out after the cabin becomes depressurized because you didn't want to spring for the extra oxygen masks for the crew. Look listen to me. I'm the kind of traveler who has never paid a cent more for legroom or early boarding time. I mean that one I think is crazy early boarding time. What did we the Queen of England, but I do sympathize with the airlines in this case they're getting up charged. Also, it seems kind of insane an irresponsible and yes, a refutation of classic market theory. But who am I to judge? I'm the guy who would rather taste my knees on a cross country flight, then pay an extra forty bucks for the upgrade on the show today in the spill ridiculous Republican politicians take to the legislative floor and lower said floor just a little bit. But first Buster Douglas pulled off one of the greatest upsets in boxing history, beating iron Mike Tyson. And if you don't realize how dominant iron Mike Tyson was at the time or how dominant and how undefeatable he seemed to be it's hard to describe. Without getting almost mythical. There's an ESPN documentary it's in their acclaimed thirty for thirty series that catches up with Buster Douglas talks about the fight and analyzes how long the odds were for him. Not just analyze it. The doc is actually named after the odds it's called forty two one s PIN's Jeremy shop reported and co directed the film, and he goes one on one about forty two one up next. David plots. One of the co hosts the slate political gabfest ears right now to encourage you to sign up for slate. Plus, I know I know you've gotten this message before but hear me out for a second see slate. Plus, it's probably the best thirty five dollars. You'll spend this year. Not only will you get more than thirty. That's right. I said thirty podcasts at free for just thirty five dollars. But as this late plus member, you'll also get exclusive access to private cocktail hours with your favorite podcast hosts discounts on tickets to live events around the country less advertising. It's late dot com. Direct access to slate writers editors podcasters there were private Facebook group. Plus tons of extra podcast episodes in segments. Support slates journalism and give yourself a service actually us by signing up for slate. Plus today, just visit slate dot com slash podcast plus to sign up today. Again, that's slate dot com slash podcast. Plus, thank you. All right. Forty two one is the name of the new, okay? Let's be honest. It's not that new, but it is on demand. Thirty for thirty entry into the greatest upset in boxing history. It was the time when Buster Douglas in Tokyo, Japan knocked out Mike Tyson, which seems like because we know that it happened possible. But I'm telling you if it was nine hundred ninety we would contradict that assertion. Joining me now is Jeremy shop who is the co director of this entry into the great thirty for thirty series. Jeremy is also as many credits with ESPN chief among them his correspondent for e sixty. Meaning that he only does numerical shows for the all sports network. Thank you for joining me, Mr. shop, it's a booking a long time in the making. It's a pleasure that you could finally squeeze me is that that's pretty much how it worked. But here we are give me. Sense or give us a sense of the mythic proportions that Mike Tyson had already assumed by early nineteen ninety. Well, he is at this point in time. He's only twenty three years old. But he's been the heavyweight champion for about three and a half years holding at least a portion of the championship since nineteen Eighty-six the youngest heavyweight champion of all time. He unifies the titles when he defeats Michael Spinks might have actually unified them before that when he'd be Trevor Berbick. But anyway, the point is he was the unified heavyweight champion the world. He was the undisputed heavyweight champion the world and much more than that. He was considered simply invincible because he wasn't just beating people. He was crushing them. He was knocking out the likes of Michael Spinks in ninety one seconds. He was thirty seven zero at this time with thirty four knockouts. And honestly there had not been anyone who seemed this indestructible among the heavyweights perhaps. Ever. So this is the another point he was seen as invincible and atop the division in no other way. Maybe and I remember at the time the only way you can put them into context was to compare them to people who are dead or people who had retired from the sport. But it is the case that maybe he wasn't as good a fighter as pick Muhammad Ali or pick George Foreman. But the only reason that he was seen as so invisible. Is there was no one the heavyweight division wasn't as littered with talent. As it wasn't years. Clearly, I mean, you know, these things are always complicated because like, well, maybe some of these guys he fought, you know, they they were guys who would have been considered in had been considered legitimate before he beat them a guy like, Tony Tucker. You know, you know, but it wasn't. It wasn't this incredible wealth of talented heavyweights that we saw say ten years earlier where you're talking about forming and Frazier as well as Ali and Norton and Larry Holmes coming into his own and Earnie shavers in names like that that resonate more. But Tyson was fighting everybody he was destroying him and the title of the documentary forty two one those were the odds in Vegas. But could you get those odds where they readily available or was it off the board or about wagering than I do, Mike? And you know, what I will say is there were odds. Yeah. It was forty two to one they opened I think at twenty seven to one. There was only one book it was Jimmy Vaccaro book at the Mirage. They decided they were gonna take action on this fight. They put it twenty seven to one no money on the underdog. They put it at thirty five or thirty six to one no money on the underdog just before the fight. It goes all the way up to forty two a one suddenly they're getting some money on the. Underdog and bets as large as fifteen hundred dollars on the underdog at the same time. They were getting as much as according to Jimmy. He tells us in the film that somebody bet at forty two to one what is it a hundred and sixty thousand dollars on on Tyson. Right. So what was the what was the key to BUSTER Douglas's? All right. I guess we'll skip all couple rounds of the fight. But what was the key to BUSTER Douglas's victory? What did forget the names and the reputations? Tell me what the fighter who won did better than the fighter who owe the fighter who won the fight. He established his jab early. He matched Tyson in terms of Gress of nece. He beat him to the punch frequently. He refused to back down. I mean, this is the psychological element of more than anything else. But he really wasn't afraid. Right. And in all most these other guys had been defeated before they got into the ring with Mike Tyson and for. For whatever reason Buster Douglas guy, who you know, his own corner. Would tell me wasn't sure mustered his own mind that he would beat Tony Tucker. And he ended up losing wasn't sure that he'd beat Greg page, and he did beat Greg page. Always thought always believed that he would beat Mike Tyson because ties because he's a bigger, man. Yeah. Got it. He's better athlete. Yeah. And what he saw it. He was on a number of the undercard those big Tyson fights, including the Spinks fight. You only would he saw was guys weren't even trying. How did the fight change Mike Tyson? Well, for Mike someone who's identity was so wrapped up in being the heavyweight champion the world. It's all that. He'd ever set his sights on a to have that taken away in the fashion that it did. I think must have been at some level emotionally devastating. But there was so much else going on his life too. And it's so messed up, and I think Mike was also confident enough athlete to say, hey, look, all the grades of loss. You know, Louis loss Dempsey lost tiny lost. To grab you know, only Marciano never lost. Right. So, you know, he understood that it didn't mean the end of him as a fighter, but it certainly it. Certainly shattered the aura about him. How the fight change Buster Douglas. Well, unfortunately, you know in some senses. These things are all too predictable in the world of boxing. The success? Creates complications in the months following the fight, you know, his corner changes. Everybody's trying to figure out you know, how they're going to get their piece of the millions. That are coming his way. Buster Douglas gets at the time the biggest paycheck in the history of sports twenty four million dollars to fight Vander Holyfield, which is the equivalent of about forty eight million dollars day. Biggest nobody nobody's ever made money. Like that. You know, you know, the biggest baseball star the biggest football star nobody's ever made money like that. And so more than biggest basketball. It's more than Steph car gets paid. Right. Exactly. And and adjusted for inflation adjusted for inflation has literally regular than every. Athlete except maybe another boxer who gets what. You know, what may weather in breakfast, right? And that kind of stuff, but. You know, he ends up siding signing to fight Holyfield in the fall gets the big money. He's fighting Don King in court about his promotional deal. He's losing his motivation. He's got troubles at home as well. And he shows up totally out of shape. Totally unmotivated for that fight in the fall. When I if he he didn't even have to beat a vendor Holyfield. But if he put up a good fight he would have gotten maybe twenty million dollars for rematch against my Tyson. Right. But if you put up a good fight, you could argue it a couple of ways if he gets the twenty million dollars. Maybe what happens to that twenty million is what happened to the forty eight. Totally van again, if he's the kind of guy who takes it seriously or somehow confined can fight through his demons. Maybe he's also not the kinda guy and BUSTER BUSTER ends up gaining hundreds of pounds hundreds diabetic coma beats that comes back fights again in late nineteen ninety s in ill-conceived comeback attempt. And you know, when I was dealing with busters. We were putting this together over the course of last year now or so he's working in the rec center and Columbus, he's a boxing instructor with kids and adults. And I'm guessing, you know, he's making, you know, fifty five sixty thousand dollars a year something like that and Columbus city wage, and I think he's happier now than he was when he had millions in the Bank, and they literally no that's what that's the money. He lives on. He has no money. That's my understanding. Yeah. Yeah. He does make some money. So does Mike Tyson hate talking about this fight, you know, in my experience, and I've talked to Mike a bunch of bout it over the years. He does. Hey, talking about it. In fact, you know, I interviewed him in the summer of twenty seven teen about it or about a lot of things. But also about this fight. And he was good. I mean, I mean he was good talking about it. You talked about it at length. Ultimately, we decided not to include that interview in the film, and he and part of it was it was kind of fresh, but it wasn't totally fresh. He seemed to be that day. It a lot of pain. He was suffering from back pain, and he just didn't add much. We really thought to the narrative of it. I'd ask for fresher view, which would give us, but we did have this relatively fresh interviewed twenty probably about twenty minutes on the fight where he talked about it and Mike tends to overwhelm whatever. You put him in. You know, sucks the air the room, and and there's a lot of my Tyson in the film, but it's all contextual. It's all Mike Tyson from one thousand nine hundred eighty four to nineteen ninety in. Ultimately, we made decis. I'm sure some people disagree with it. But as a film this was about BUSTER. We've all heard my story. Nobody's told my story. I feel like more than I have over the years. More interviews more stories more conversation. I've probably interviewed him. I don't know sixty five seventy times. And and I wanted to this. I I wanted to keep the focus on the other guy. Yes. So I asked you how to change Tyson. How to change Douglas how to change boxing? That's a good question. I haven't really thought about how it changed box. You how a change the business of boxing. I don't know. How change certainly changed? You know, what we would see over the course of the next decade in boxing, people that use true sport. You know, every everything that happens is dependent on the last fight. You know, we talked about in your book as well. I it doesn't make a difference of Jack flicker Ben Hogan, you know, wins the US open playoff. There's still gonna be US open the following June wherever they decided that's not how it works in boxing. Buster Douglas knocked out Mike Tyson. There ain't going. There isn't going to be a Tyson Holyfield fight coming up. So this is the last thing I want to ask you, which is in my lifetime. There have been I think three athletes where this apply what am about say applies to which is they're so good and so dominant. You don't even bother comparing them to anyone doing their sport. At the time. They're doing it and those three athletes were Michael Jordan were Pele, and we're Mike Tyson. I guess you could add secretary, but he's a horse now. Now, subsequently you can make the LeBron is better than Michael Jordan case, you could make the Lionel Messi is better than Palay case, maybe with Tyson you have to go back to the past. But no one since has been better than Tyson. Or is this just romanticism when it comes to Tyson will I think now because of what happened in it's a process that starts with Buster Douglas defeating him in February nineteen ninety s I like to keep saying indeed kind of John Wayne. The eleven nine hundred ninety two Tokyo dome. Now, we look back Tyson differently. You know, I if at the time many people thought he was the greatest fighter route ever lived. Now. A lot of people say he's not a top ten heavyweight. Yeah. And it's because he lost the Holyfield twice. Lost. Lewis water is big wins. Big win is Michael Spinks another blown up late heavyweight, which is not not fair entirely, Michael Spinks. But that's the kind of thing people say Tyson. If you look back at it now, it's like, okay, he destroyed all these guys. He's exciting. But these guys were carefully picked he was he was the time managed by, you know, very savvy guys in customer and should be Jacobs and Bill Cayton who built him up into this phenomenon. And, you know, created this oral around him, which he also had a large hand in creating as well what he did in the ring. But looking back at it now, I mean, can you argue that he's better than evanger, Holyfield's Vander Holyfield beat him twice. Can you argue that he's better than Riddick Bowe? They never fought. But re bow beat Holyfield two out of three times. And. Probably would have won that other fight if the fan man thing hadn't happened. I mean, all the crazy stuff that hot happens in boxing Lennox Lewis destroys him when they're the same age. They're always going to be same age when they when they finally do meet up with each other's. So I would add to your list though, at his peak Eldrick woods. Yes tiger. That is true. I liked to sail trick though. Yes. More dramatic. That's a good point. He was in many ways the secretary of his day. Jeremy shop is correspondent for ESPN primarily their e sixty show and his documentary. Forty two one is available on all ESPN platforms. That will let you watch a documentary that has recently aired, but it's still available for viewing platform. I I think I do Jeremy Jeremy thank you so much, Michael pleasure. Pleasure. As always. And now the he'll brothers and sisters. Let us pray Jesus. I thank you for this privilege. Lord of letting me pray that I am your ambassador here today that was a clip from the holy Calvary Baptist church. No way. No way. It was the church of Christ the Lord redeemer holy body fellowship ministry. Temple appraise. No, wait, wait. I got that wrong. That was thank you for this honor. Jesus that was the Pennsylvania legislature the opening prayer by Representative Stephanie bar wits who say for it is Jesus Jesus who uses Jesus the way some people use or not I'm saying thank you that Jesus. But at issue here is not just excessive Jesus acidy not just the state rap who sneezes Jesus, but more pointedly. This was the opening of a session where hours later Pennsylvania's first Muslim woman was to be sworn in as a rep. Presentative now, some would hear all this Jesus talk and think that it was motivated by an offense to Muslims. She she apologized to Jesus for straying from his words, so many times, but you know, feel logically Muslims like Jesus to them. He is a prophet of very very respectable profit to the Jews. However, Jesus was just another Jewish guy. Who was the victim of a hate crime? They great I am the one who is coming back. Again, the one who came died and rose again on the third day, and I'm so privileged in. Not everyone is on board with that take on historic events. Just f y then there came the part where rep Borowitz did some shout outs. A few of the about to be named officials distance themselves afterwards, but let's give her the floor. God, I pray for our leader speaker Tur's leader Cutler, governor wolf, President Trump Lord. Thank you. Then he stands beside Israel unequivocally. Lord, you know, what that bit reminded me? Of someone else who praised President Trump in a similar way. So Representative borrow wits said at the name of Jesus every knee will Balan every tongue will confess Jesus. You are Lord in Jesus name. Amen. Wait. That's what Omarosa said about Donald Trump himself. Every critic every detractor we'll have to bow down to President Trump. And there was another resonance in the representatives in vocation. So this is a visual. Let me explain what you're looking at as rep borrow it stood there. She's a Brown haired woman in a flowing white garment cinched at the waist with bell sleeves. So when she said Jesus, you are only hope well are to play that video again. Apparently, the Representative was quite worried that we would forget what she was talking about Jesus. We've lost sight of you. We've forgotten you God in our country. And we're asking you to forgive us Jesus. Oh, jesus. But you know, it wasn't the only Star Wars reference on the floor of a legislative body in the last couple of days. Senator Mike Lee Republican of Utah rose to the floor of the US Senate to point out the excesses of the green new deal. And he brought visuals there was aquaman on a twenty foot seahorse said to represent no not the rise of the oceans, but how to travel to Hawaii. There was Ronald Reagan on a raptor. Not surge. Baca the extinct animal what better way to register that he thought the green new deal to be a bit fence affoil. And then came the Star Wars part how he asked if we don't have airplanes as the. Green new deal would mandate he asserted. How do we get around Alaska and a future without air travel? How are we supposed to get around the vast expanses of say Alaska during the winter? Well, I'll tell you how. So there was the Senator displaying a large picture of Luke Skywalker on these space. Kangaroo from Empire Strikes Back. It is called a Tonton and the Senator proceeded with his taunting Tontons, Mr President is at beloved species of reptile mammals native to the ice planet of Hof. I thought that argument smelled bad from the outside. Okay. So Lee made his point the GED is ridiculous. So I'll be ridiculous. That's what he was saying in terms of execution. There was some. Okay. Jibes in his speech. It went onto long. It was about it was about as third as clever as he thought it was that is okay, senators, don't usually hit so large a fraction. Now, you could argue this. Issue. Global warming is so serious. You can't joke about it. What are you the middle act and hojo's in Youngstown? I would argue that if you are going to try to be the middle act at hose and Youngstown bringing large posters is just a step away from prop comedy, sir. And prop comedy is becoming too. Even a staunch global warming denial list. But if I were being as generous as I could be to Mike Lee, I would say up to this point where he talked about aquaman and Reagan on raptor. And and the Tonton I would say I disagree generally with what you're saying. I'm not a big fan of the green new deal either. But this whole little bit wasn't horribly done. And then he got to the end, which means he got to the babies. It was literally a MRs Lovejoy. What about the children moment? He hauls out a picture of five babies, and diapers and Lee concludes that he has the solution babies. This is the real solution. The climate change babies babies babies Jews is stop just up Lee went on to say that we have to populate ourselves out of the problem. He said the courage needed to solve climate change is nothing compared. Paired with the courage needed to start a family, and then he added and problems of human imagination, not solved by more laws. There solved by more. Humans. More people. I have no visual to accompany this next point. We'll just quote from the government of Bangladesh is climate change strategy and action plan quote in an average year approximately one quarter of the country is inundated with floodwaters every four to five years. There is a severe flood that may cover over sixty percent of the country. A three foot rise in sea level would submerge almost twenty percent of the entire country and displace more than thirty million people. Some scientists project a five to six foot rise by two thousand one hundred which would displace perhaps fifty million people. Yes, people the solution. Don't know clearly will be the victim. Gms. So Senator Lee your glibness, your do nothing nece, and your repeated belief in magical thinking are not going to take us anywhere. I don't know what to say other than no, no, I'm not saying Jesus, I'm saying that you guys should pray. You can come up with something better than that. That's it for today's show with a combined record of thirty six two. And with twenty nine of those wins coming by knockout weighing in a combined three hundred thirty eight pounds and standing eleven feet ten inches tall producing the gist. The Airbnb may and Daniel Schrader and finding out of the red corner from parts on known is senior producer of slate podcasts. Terrible jeopardy's rough. Wpro. The just we lost most of that sweet podcasting money to unscrupulous executive producers, but we can still be found these days teaching elocution and interviewing to the next generation of podcasters at the Columbus, Ohio rec center. And you know, some people say we've never been happier. We are still however suing for brew and thanks for listening.

Mike Tyson Buster Douglas Senator Mike Lee Republican Vander Holyfield boxing Michael Spinks Boeing Jeremy Jeremy United States Mike Lee Jesus Tyson Holyfield Columbus Jeremy shop ESPN Senator Lennox Lewis ESPN
Bobby Valentine, Sacred Heart AD

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Bobby Valentine, Sacred Heart AD

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop baseball is fat. So we welcome to the show. Someone who has spent more than three decades player manager and coach in the major leagues in the US and some years as well in the major leagues Japan, the one and only one of the great baseball minds ever, Bobby Valentine, Bobby. Thank you for joining us. Jeremy thank you for that introduction. Always great to be with you grow. How are you? I'm great. And I'm, you know, it's not an exaggeration to say that few people spent more time round the game at its highest level here, and in Japan, a few people are more respected for their baseball acumen, and your links to the game, obviously through your father-in-law's well late Ralph Frank so deep in so profound. We're speaking on Thursday. It's opening. Day, although they opened the season Japan little while this is this is really opening day here in the US when opening day rolls around each year for you. What does it mean to you? Oh, it's just the beginning. You know, it's starting fresh watching the the flowers come out of the ground and the Lawson's out of the tree. It's it's just spectacular in the opening day Gisbey, you know, that that feeling like a kid all over again. And I know it's been said a million times, but there's only one opening day of sport. And that's the opening day baseball. I just watched two five escapes kinda at the same time. Both the Yankees and the Mets the Mets thriller the Yankees, not so much. But it was it was really good to see the real stuff on TV. Again. He said so many years in uniform as a player manager coach you spent years as well as an announcer. What is it like for you? Now. Not to have that direct link every day with baseball eve. You're the athlete corrector Sacred Heart university in Connecticut, and you've been doing that job for number of years now. But what is it like not to be in baseball on a daily basis? Well, you know, it's good, and it's bad. It's good because they're on a daily basis doing twenty four seven worrying about an entire organization professionals and a baseball team that has to do too good in the standings. But you know, the bad is that I'm not there being part of that entire world of major league baseball, you know, with eight hundred twenty three athletes ninety seven coaches thirty two head coaches with thirty two division sports. And being the director of those sports is interesting, and it's intriguing, but it's it's not like the at that highest level, you know, and in some of the bigger cities of the world, you're sixty eight Bobby and this year is fifty th anniversary of your major league debuts player you came up on look at your baseball reference page right now, he came up on September. Second nineteen sixty nine when you were nineteen years old, and that's an historic month, of course, in New York baseball history, especially with the Mets capturing their first pennant going on to beat the Braves, and the I L C S then the World Series, you came up against them as a New York guy from Stanford Connecticut on September second nineteen sixty nine. It just seems amazing me it's been half a century. You're still a young man at heart believe it's been that long since you came up. Yeah. Pitch running against a sixty nine vets. If I knew then they were thick tonight met, they really wanna would've saved his client apart or something. Like tiger me. I was a sophomore at USC was going to school daytime. And I was like enough to be in a dodger uniform at night when they played their home games. You know, that you had to be a full time student, otherwise you're in in Vietnam doing those other things so yeah, it's it's amazing. It was fifty years ago and someone asked about great opening days I participated, and I remember seventy three getting traded to California Angels playing for the first collegiate coach became a major league manager. That was Bobby winkles. He took over a team to California. I'm shortstop second place hitter opening day, Richard Nixon's at the ballpark. He refused throughout the first pitch. Just like Donald Trump refused. The trout the fish. I pitch today in Washington for some of the same reasons you remember, Richard Nixon dot us out of a war. That was never gonna add Donald Trump that got us out Afghan where there's never going in. And yet, you know, he was a twenty two year old kit taking the lead from Charlie. Finley trying to grow moustache making my year grow long because it was going to be allowed in baseball for the first time in my gosh, getting game winning hit then having to shake hands with the guy that didn't vote for the tug out if I ever knew then what I knew. Now, I would have taken a photograph with that. Also. We're speaking with Bobby Valentine, Bobby baseball is in a position where some people say it's not as relevant as it once was and you look at the ratings for the World Series. The also game, of course, ratings are down for just about everything except professional football across the board over the course of last several decades, you know, the the universe of options is expanded. But at the same time baseball's making more money than ever before. People would argue that maybe it doesn't have the same. Hold on the national consciousness that it once had but at the local level in each team's region at the major league level. It still is just important in end in the game is growing now in terms of us participation. How do you assess the state the health of this game to which you've given so much of your life? Well, you know, I did on both ends of that spectrum, you know, with the major league routine, and and also in use sports as the teen years with an academy and Stanford with us. Steal sports national sports company that I'm with trying to grow the wariness of sport in America. And it's great to see that it's growing. It's great to see more participation at the youth level. And it does come from the local stimuli. It does come from. You know, the local teams that resonate in their communities. And and that the image of a lot of these guys is getting better. I think baseball's finally starting to figure out that you don't want to paint the black guy on yourself. You know, you don't wanna always hang your dirty laundry out for everybody else to see keep it private corrected as you can. And then more those who are representing you in the right way. Let people understand that. There are some great people who are great baseball players probably playing the game of baseball better than it's ever been played before. Let's stop and take notice of the excellence, and I and I think that's resonating in some minds and hearts around the country speaking with Bobby Valentine, of course, a lot of the big news over the off season was I e lack of movement on the free agent market lack of big deals being signed. But then at the end, we get we get some some huge deals extensions for trout and Nolan are not oh, and then of course, the huge deal for for price. Harper. What will you thinking during the course of this off season, which was controversial to say? The least. Well, I'm thinking that these times are changing I remember sitting in the room with Marvin Miller, seventy two I remember voting in the room in nineteen seventy six Marvin Miller winter first CBA's were being discussed in the what what in how the players were going to gain. Were writes at the table in you know, it's been since of these things and now it's two thousand nineteen and there's been a lot of water over the dam, and I think the system has to change I think that the idea of paying people who aren't quite as capable as they once worl- whole lot of money because. And only because they they did it one or two years is not the way of the future. The way future might be the way that Charlie Finley. And I thought it should be back in seventy two that was every year your free agent that you go out in the market, and you prove your wear, and when you have a big year you're signed for another year. And that's the way it is in a lot of the real world. The only problem is, you know, we don't play for forty years. We only play for ten and fifteen and the average only four and a half years. So you know, that the economics has got has the change. But I'm not sure that it has to change in aggregate. I think he could he could change over time where the same amount of money's being delved out. It's just being given to different people for different services were speaking of Bobby Valentine longtime major league manager sixteen seasons as manager. In the majors ten seasons as a player in the majors managers well winning championships in Japan with Chiba. When was the last time, you got over to Japan, you you were enormously popular and successful over there. And I know you enjoyed your time there. Oh, yeah. Jeremy you don't have the first ever non-japanese to coach in there in managing in their league. And happened to win a championship happened to turn the baseball culture around the bid put it in in in better shape. And the only thing that I feel bad about is that baseball didn't take the lead that I was trying to get them. And that was to set their sights on more international expansion. You know, I tried to get my team to play in Monterrey Mexico a couple years before they played in Monterrey Mexico, but I tried to get some kind of understanding that if you keep the players in Japan and let the. Good players. Excel there and keep their franchises alive. And well there that eventually to be an Asian division of major league baseball. And you know, when you already have that they have in Japan when you already have the infrastructure of little league high school in professional baseball stadiums in in national newspapers that cover sports why do anything to harm it? And I think that we took too many of their players. I think that it's still a greatly still trying to strive and get better. But I think that they've they've been dealt a tough hand by so many of their not only their star players, but also their other players weaving and and coming here to to play in the one league. I think that, you know, major league baseball as well as other major league sports or understanding that you know. To be global game is what it's all about to expand internationally the way basketball and football or trying to do is really the wave of huger. And I think that we were we were ahead of the game. And I think now we're a little behind the game. And in that internationalization, you were a champion of Japanese players when there were still alive doubters here in North America. A lot of skeptics you've been vindicated certainly over the course less twenty years since each row came over as the first successful the first position player period to come over from Japan in two thousand one and now we've got a Shohei Ohtani who's doing things were his done things that you know, we didn't think anybody could do how high is the ceiling you think for him. Well, hopefully, he'll rehab that elbow and and come back to where he is where he was he's still very young. He's he's different. You know? He is a freak there. There is a feeling because no one's ever lived in that house. He he, you know, walks of different walk and talks different walk when you hit it five hundred feet and do it regularly. And when you throw it over a hundred miles an hour and do it regularly with control your, you know, your different species. And and hopefully, he'll be healthy enough to do his thing at this level. And you know, you know, show other people that he could do it. But you don't wanna think you really Jeremy's. He opened the door for two way players. I think is going to be a lot of guys here in the next five years who come in and pitching any pitched two innings and then play rightfielder the rest of the time or come in from thirty bases when the game seven the one and and pitch a couple of things because because they can there's so many players can't do that. I think you're going to see that as a little wave of. Future. How good a pitcher? Would you have been? I left it all on the noun Babe Ruth League World Series when Jimmy save you should have been pitching. And I picked inset instead, and George George Brett's brother bread team from gonna to California won the World Series broke, my heart, and I left my pitching Retz team. He was a great athlete. Can Brett Kenny Brett, yes, sir? Wow. The late Ken Brent, Bobby. It's always a pleasure. Thank you so much for joining us here to talk baseball. There's no one knows more about the game. And we're honored to have you Bobby Valentine, the athletic director at Sacred Heart university and in Connecticut. Thanks, bobby. You're the best. Jeremy, thank you. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

baseball Bobby Valentine Japan Jeremy shop Bobby ESPN Charlie Finley Bobby winkles Sacred Heart university California Mets Connecticut Bobby baseball US director Donald Trump Richard Nixon George George Brett football
Verne Lundquist, Play-by-Play Commentator

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

15:17 min | 1 year ago

Verne Lundquist, Play-by-Play Commentator

"Squirrels are known for saving. But with the help of AARP, they won't be the only ones from planning to budgeting AARP is here to help you stretch your dollar further. So take on today and every day with AARP learn how at take on today dot AARP. These the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. Verne Lundquist is one of the most beloved and respected figures, the annals of sports broadcasting he's the recipient of the National Academy of television arts and sciences lifetime achievement award a couple of years ago, but awards don't begin to tell the full story of what he is meant to the industry into the millions who've listened to his voice over the last five decades is new book is play by play calling the wildest games in sports from SEC football to college basketball, the masters and more, and it is an honor to welcome for Lundquist the sporting life, burn. Thank you for being with us. Jeremy as I told you before we came on, it's my privilege. I've admired your work for many many many years. Well, not that many. It's very kind of you to say now, there's so many incredible moments that you didn't just witness, but that you were able to describe to millions of people on television. How did you view your responsibilities as the person communicating to the television audience, what was going on in these stadiums and arenas? Why I think this is true of almost all of us who are lucky enough to pursue this craft and to make a living at it. I think especially I I would guess is a play by play guy as opposed to a studio host. I go into each counter. Whether it's football basketball golf or figure skating for crying out loud. The my hope is that something memorable will occur and. And then the challenge is to be verbally appropriate to the moment in order to enhance the appreciation for whatever it is just a place for the viewer or listener. And I've been really blessed over the years to not not just one but more than more than three or four and a lot of guys whom we both know go through their careers anticipating and hoping for something memorable and it doesn't happen. So I don't think any of this for granted. And I do believe that, you know, for the most part what I what I've had to say work to enhance what we what we just saw. Now. Of course, we're speaking with Verne Lundquist. His new book is play by play calling the. Wildest gapes in sports from SEC football to college basketball at the master's and more. When you think about the wildest things ever in sports. It's hard not to come back to Lilla Hamad, Norway and February nineteen ninety four and the events leading up to the ladies figure skating competition at those Winter Olympics. What was it like being a part of that? Well, I use this site side comment in speeches. I'm probably the only one in the room who knows Tonya Harding and Terry Bradshaw. Well, it all began on the what the that was hurt round the world that was in January sick on January six of ninety four Nancy. Kerrigan was practicing and then just patient of competing in the US nationals in Detroit as she was leaving the practice. Right. Thug named shame stand. What her on her left knee in hopes of not in a her being injured to accept that? She couldn't compete in the Olympics. And it turns out the wellspring of that hope. With knowledge a forehand of it with John you hardy and her ex husband who occasioned the whole thing that began the cartoon show that lasted for six weeks. And I it was extraordinarily. I mean, these these two young women, Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding were portrayed as contrast in people, and and actually their backgrounds were not that dissimilar. I think their personalities were Tanya was the roughing up and comer from Oregon hood who had had a very bad social life homelife, but Nancy's dad was a workman. He was a plumber and she grew up east of Boston on the Cape. And but Daniela Brinda Kerrigan just you know, they a middle class family. But I think CBS in particular, and I think all of us bore some responsibility. I would attribute that responsibility much more to the news department, then to the sports because commie Charlie in particular was coined Graham. I don't mean to disparage her at all I love her nowhere. Well, but she grabbed a singing ran with it. And she was helped by decisions made by by by the news up to and including the fact that she co anchored the evening news with Dan rather from the ice rink and little but the the day up the competing skaters was a Wednesday in late February and. And there was a found. What Scott Hamilton had predicted. It would be a time. You've finished eighth after the first the compulsory and Nancy. Kerrigan was in pursed followed by this little sprite named ex-army by you who ultimately wanted. And here's my opportunity to to give an example that hype works the ratings for that night. We had a forty eight point five share, which means almost it was unbelievable. That was unbelievable in American. Yeah. And and the estimate of the crowd, the Ewing audience has been downsized, but it was then listed twenty years ago. Twenty twenty five years ago told me. Yeah. It I I was a math major. It was listed. There may be as a hundred and twenty six million viewers now. Now, the only things I recall at that time, the only thing that had been seen by more people bigger television audience in the history of American television was the final episode of mash, and since then I believe it's been surpassed only by one Super Bowl one of the patriots Super Bowls. I think you're absolutely on the Mark and it still the non highest the highest rate of non Super Bowl ever seen by an American audience and the ad Tanya. Well, the the championship I it was bizarre as well. She apparently broke her shoelace. And I think a lot of people remember that she was late getting on the ice. And she was almost a a very competition. Bootlace broke. Doc, and but all the attention became focused again on her our intent as CBS I bring her on a leather skates her format performance, get her marks and wish her well. And then concentrate, especially on the last group of six six skaters. Well, it didn't work out that way because when Tanya asks for was granted, the re-skate because of -ment malfunction, and that was just improper onto rules that threw everything out of whack all of a sudden a young lady's name Jos asianart Canada who was expecting to compete. Maybe eight minutes later, she was said get on the ice, you're up and then subsequently all the followers were affected by. So obviously, it's a it's a big part of my career. And through it. All I forged a friendship with Scott Hamilton that lasts until this day. We're speaking with Verne Lundquist. His new book is play by play calling the wildest games in sports from SEC football to college basketball, the masters and more. And I gotta tell you earn before we move on. I was working for Iraq man in the broadcast center during those Olympics. I was the writer on the primetime show. So I was writing for Greg Gumbel. And I remembered the the excitement around the broadcast center, particularly ladies figure skating competition. There was nothing like it. Even though it was taking place on tape. The ratings were out of control, and when it was all over, and they had that footage of Nancy waiting for the medal ceremony, and she got a little testy. You remember because he was taken so long, you know. Yes. I I had no idea. You're a writer on that staff. I can't believe I never knew that. And you know, what Jeremy that gives me an occasion to come kind of to the fence of Nancy Kerrigan because that sequence was was can dance. And here's what happened the guy. I hadn't talked about this part of it. I am forever. Mansi at just lost a gold medal by one tenth of one point because Alexandra through triple in our last element in the program and a judge John Hoffman from Germany gave her the tiebreaker via ten point. She was standing backstage and right behind her was Chen Lu. The bronze finisher from from China the. The weight when on forever. It had to be a good twenty minutes before the medal ceremony began. Well, Nancy leave out and asked are cameramen. What is the delay and David Finch who's one of the best camera guys ever in the business anchors all of our Gulf goes nineteen now David said because he didn't know and he said, I don't know. I think they're waiting for off sun to put on her makeup now. I remember I remember. Yeah. But it was actually they couldn't find the national anthem ethics statement. Exactly. Like she came thirtieth. And I'm half. Norwegian apologize them the half of the scandal. Maybe it's your Sonja Henie guy. It with Vern Lindquist play by play his new book. And we spent a lot of time, obviously. So far talking about the nineteen Ninety-four four ladies figure skating competition, which was epic. But for so many people, of course, you are even more closely associated with SEC football with the master's with everything that's gone on. I got to work at some of those network sports divisions in the early nineties as a writer as producer times. And it was kind of the tail end of the great golden age of broadcast sports television. And and everybody who was exposed to it at the kind of jealous because you guys had so much fun in the budgets were unlimited. And you went all over the world. You've got to do everything. What does it mean to you to be part of that team at CBS sports almost literally got to do everything for all those years? Well, you get pumped up. I'm outta the call Shawn mcmanus's say. Volunteer. I'll come back because I think you're right. Those work, and and and especially true, Jeremy is your notation about unlimited budgets. The the the coffers were overflowing back them, and they are not now. I mean, our our executives are charged with keeping their eye on the budget. But I couldn't remember early. Now. This would be eighty two eighty three. I can remember doing Texas Tech at Texas am football game. And our producer was authorized to hire a private plane. It was not a jet, but who cared the purpose of which was to fly from college station, Texas to Dallas. So the guys the pre production team overnight in Dallas and guests. The first flight out. But let's say and that was not that was not uncommon. Great in the police escorts all that stuff. Oh my God. Vern I could go on all day. I know you have other commitments it is really an honor to have you on the show one of the greats of all time one of the most charming and well loved people in our business Verne Lundquist new book is play by play calling the wildest games and sports from SEC football to college basketball, the masters in more Vern, thank you for being with us. Germany my honor. I enjoyed it immensely. Thank you so much. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Nancy Kerrigan SEC Verne Lundquist basketball Jeremy shop AARP CBS Olympics ESPN writer Vern Lindquist Scott Hamilton Daniela Brinda Kerrigan Tanya football Germany John Hoffman Tonya Harding Texas Verne Lundquist
Geno Auriemma, UConn WCBB Head Coach

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Geno Auriemma, UConn WCBB Head Coach

"Squirrels are known for saving. But with the help of AARP, they won't be the only ones from planning to budgeting AARP is here to help you stretch your dollar further. So take on today and every day with AARP learn how at take on today dot AARP. These the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy shop. Basketball season upon us. We welcome to the show. One of the great coaches in the annals of the game member last twelve years of the Basketball Hall of fame the only coach to win as many as eleven division one national championships. The only coach with as many as six undefeated seasons to his credit the one and only GIO Auriemma, Gino. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for that introduction. Jeremy, I'm I'm even more impressed with myself now than I was before. That's saying something I mean. Let's be honest, Gino, you've been you've been doing this so long with so much success. What continues to drive you? You know? I asked myself that question quite frequently these days 'cause it's harder than it's ever been it progressively harder each and every year, and I noticed this year that we don't have quite the same level of talent that we've had you know, the last five or six years, especially we don't have the experience, we don't have the debt. So each year the challenge is different. And what I see driving me now is how how to try to put this thing together to get the same results with their completely different cast than we had three years ago when we last one or national championship and. That drive is still there that that's that drivers air every day. Some of the other stuff bothers me a lot more than it used to about coaching in college. But that drive when I go to practice it. It's still there everyday. Well, what other stuff you talking about? You know, the to me each and every year, the NCAA stuff becomes even more ridiculous. Some of the things that you have to deal with the recruiting becomes even more outlandish. In terms of what these kids are being exposed to a young age. A lot of the people around the kids have become unbearable in in what they think of that the potential for those kids are and what's real so trying to cut through all that. And you know, all these kids have I quit like the players have a union now. And I was in the steelworkers union when I worked in the steel mill this union. That the players have you know, I know they don't get paid. And I know that's a problem for a lot of people including me, but I'll tell you what their work schedule what you can demand of them. They're their unions the union in the country. I tell you that right now, we're speaking with Gino Auriemma, uconn, women's basketball coach who's won eleven national titles that you kind who created the program from scratch more than thirty years ago, you know, as the preeminent coach in women's game. There's this trial going on in federal court, which has a lot to do with the things you're talking about the money in college. It's all in the men's game. What's going on in the federal trial? The Dida stuff the sneakers, the coaches accusations. Now, you know, Patino and the Bill selves accusations. What do you make of what's going on in that trial? Well, I obviously, I'm I'm really good friends with a lot of men's coaches, some more friendly than others. And they'll tell you to to a man go tell you in in the men's game that they are not surprised by anything that they hear. There isn't anything. That's come out of that trial. That would make a college coach. I think go I can't believe that, you know, forget whatever names are being involved. They may be surprised at some of the names that are being thrown around. Maybe, but they're not surprised, and I'm not either that when there's this much money involved when you when you think about the money that the NCAA makes the money that the colleges make the money that the coaches make the money that the TV networks and make there's so much out there to potential for how much money the players are gonna make when they. When they leave college that anytime, that's the case you're gonna find that there's people abusing the system, and you know, ninety percent, I'm sure over ninety percent, probably of all the coach's coaching men's college basketball or trying to do it the right way, but they're not going to be in the newspaper. It's in the media. It's the other guys the stuff that we're hearing about Gino does go on in the women's game. No, it can't they can't again the money. You know, that's the root of everybody. You know, when they say follow the money. There is no money wins basketball there. There is no pay day for someone to invest in a kid. Like what difference? Does it? Make a kid goes to Connecticut or Notre Dame or or anyplace else in women's basketball that kids not going to graduate and make any more money. You know, no matter where they go to school. You know, the the return is is such that it's not worth the investment. We're speaking with Gino Auriemma, the head coach of the Yukon women's basketball team, which has had so much incredible success over the course of the last three decades, and Gino when I think about the the biggest change in sports of last quarter century, and you could go back farther than that. Really? The advent of title nine in the early nineteen seventies the growth of women's sports, the growth of girl sports, the empowerment of. Of the female athlete you've been central to that story when you look back at how things have grown in. How things have changed what kind of sense of pride you take in the development of women's sports in this country in particular. Well, you know, when I when I first started coaching it was by accident. You know, and it's not something that I said out to do, you know, I didn't graduate from college and go, you know, I wanna be a a basketball coach and an certainly been say, I wanna be a girls basketball coach in high school, but I ended up doing a favor for a friend of mine and next thing, you know, you're I am I'm coaching girls basketball, and I'm getting paid four hundred dollars for the season. You know, and it's it's almost treated as an afterthought, you know, but little by little as title nine started to take take hold around the country, you know, more and more young girls in high school were given an opportunity to play colleges all of a sudden started to invest in in women's sports. And I was given an opportunity to coach full-time at university of Virginia which didn't exist before title nine really took hold. So I'm a direct product of that of that movement. And then, you know, all the all the women that have worked on my staff that have gone on to be you know, coaches in their own, right? Teachers and everything else, you can imagine. And the fact that now we have a professional league all this has happened during my time as a woman. Basketball coach, and I feel like the university of Connecticut has been at the forefront of that. And we have been kind of the poster child for a lot of that as the media has taken on a much bigger role in promoting women's sports. And and I feel really really proud of that that we had you know, when they write the story of women's basketball, you know, one hundred years from now, they're going to say, the university of Connecticut, and I will always always be incredibly proud of that. Do you know you've had so much excess? Of course. So when you don't win the championship. Can you take satisfaction out of other things that you've achieved during the course of the season that doesn't end with cutting down the nets? Well, the politically correct answer is, of course, our kids grew. The right things. We gave them a great experience. We competed really hard. There were a lot of successes along the way, and then your private time you go. Thank you for the interview. And then you go it sucks losing the final four and everybody hates it players coaches fans everybody, but to be realistic. You can't win the national championship every year. Even though there's a lot of our fans, I think we should there's a lot of players on my team. I think we showed. There's our coaches think we should the real the real answer is. Yeah, you have to find other things and some years it's hard to do that. So the last two years we've lost in overtime. And on the last shot, we lost three games. And in the last five years, all of them and overtime. My regular. My seniors have never lost a regular season game that is beyond fiction that is fairy tale and. Unless you take some satisfaction out of a big comeback win against Notre Dame during the regular season, a huge win at South Carolina or an incredible win against a really really good Louisville team. Unless you start to really appreciate that you're going to constantly disappointed. So I've learned listen being realistic. Yeah. Put yourself in a position to win winning Astra champships every year. But actually think you're going to win it every year. That's ludicrous. He no Auriemma is the head coach uconn women's basketball team in search of its twelve national title under his leadership. It's been three years. That's just unacceptable, Gino, I wanna losing streak. Jeremy we're gonna have to fix that. No. It's always a pleasure. Thanks so much for coming on. I appreciate Jeremy I always enjoyed talking to you. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Gino Auriemma basketball AARP Jeremy shop Basketball Hall of fame ESPN NCAA GIO Auriemma university of Connecticut steelworkers union university of Virginia Connecticut Louisville South Carolina Patino nets Bill ninety percent
Dan Klores, "Basketball: A Love Story"

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

18:22 min | 1 year ago

Dan Klores, "Basketball: A Love Story"

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app, here's Jeremy shop. And if you've been watching ESPN recently it's been difficult to avoid the terrific documentary series twenty hours worth of tok memory on the air. Dan, clearer is basketball a love story. It's a history of the game and appreciation of the game told essentially in sixty two different short stories vignettes by one hundred sixty five figures from the game. Dan, Clorox has worked in the space before he's a Peabody award winning documentary filmmaker, and it is a pleasure, Dan to welcome you to the sporting life. Thank you for being with us. Thank you so much for having me, Jeremy emigrated Meyer of you grow wire, it it's a no one is going to respect your judgement anymore for that. But so, you know, how do you even go about how do you even said about telling a story with a canvas as as vast as basketball's, well, you know, the first decision I made because I've been wanting to do this for quite a while is not to tell the history of the game because you need. I don't know eighty hours one hundred hours. I didn't want to present myself as as a historian. I wanted to take a historical view of the game and tell it in a short story format so I- outlined those stories that interested me that I thought would interest in audience and once I did that. And it's remarkably similar this is four and a half years ago. It takes me two years to do a ninety minute film. We we did this twenty hours four and a half years, which is and I don't even. Use a computer everything as long yellow legal pad. You know? And and I I I wind stories though, short stories then came up with the list of who I wanted to speak to to flush those stories out. And then of course, Jeremy you see what can work and watch knocking to work. What you learn what you could add I had creative freedom completely. So I was able to really play and go outside straight historical story net. Telling issues of the mind issues of joy versus relief. When a coach finally wins different takes on stuff, like Kentucky, Texas, west in intricate scenes on signature moves Chris Paul describing the steel and I've rescind the crossover and Earl the spin and Bradley. Moving without the ball and LeBron going rim to rim and Durant playing the double team. So that those things evolve as we move forward, and I had a great team. I mean, you're not going to succeed without that as you well know speak with Dan chlorof- about his new documentary series, which you can see on ESPN basketball. Love story. Sixty two stories of varying length and tone told by scores of the most significant people in the annals of the game of basketball going all the way back to its origin story with Dr James Naismith and the peach basket at Springfield college, western Massachusetts, where the interesting things to me Dando. To a certain extent, unlike football and unlike basketball, I'm sorry baseball. The story of basketball as it as it sits inside the fabric of American society has not really been told. It's it's not. You know, we we've tilled a lot of that field with baseball and football. Did you see this? With basketball's kind of virgin territory. I don't know about virgin territory. But I, but I, you know, I I'm ABD in American history. And you know, that means everything, but dissertation and. So the historical view of the game is critically important to me and to telling that, I didn't want to open up which aims Naismith. Then I lose the entire audience not James Naismith. Well, I'm not saying I love him. I wanna open them up with them and the third scene in a film is PJ getting choked by by by spree. Well, and then I cut the Naismith, but the the historical view of the game the story of migration, the story of southern migration story of immigration, the story of the demographic of the immigrant coming to the east coast and traveling to the midwest and the south of very very important to understand because you know, I'm in New Yorker. And of course, we feel where the bash, but it's not necessarily true, no, racial. Right coaches and teaches evolved and they're situated in different parts of the country and the game meant different things to to young African Americans and meant different things to people in the mid west and different things to people in urban areas into urban groups, it's not an accident that the Jews and the Irish in the northeastern adopted the game because talion remotely playing baseball. So the these things mattered as did and does continued history. I show the effects of the Cold War on the game and the United States Russian and Olympic competition. I show the effects of the war in Vietnam and the civil rights movement on the game not merely on the Olympic movement and sixty eight but but actually what it's going to mean today fifty years later will there be another black boycott in fifty years. Since nineteen sixty eight history and basketball critically connected. The women's game. I went in Jeremy knowing I'm not boxing women into seven minutes story. You know, they're going to be integrated throughout the entire pieces. Nineteen women and my point was correct. The first time we put a camera on a woman. And then you hear the voice of the outsider the excluded American fats. What women were right and the just as ethnic groups were. And that's why I think the sport is so appealing to so many that in the nakedness of it. No helmets. No shoulder pads. No caps. Sunglasses. You see and feel the player, and you believe that they actually see and feel you speak with Dan Clarice, the Peabody award winning documentary filmmaker his new documentary series, which could see on ESPN. Twenty hours long basketball, a love story. And when you think about and there's so much fun in in here as well. And there's so many great characters and so many great stories, but when you're looking at basketball from thirty thousand feet in discussing its significance in in American society, and beyond if we take the national pastime as this linked to our baseball that is to our pastoral agrarian roots and football represent something about American masculinity. And all that that implies. What is what is what is basketball about? What is its hold on us about? I think it's what we discussed. I think it's about freedom. I think it's about escape. I think it's about obsession. And but freedom and escape it starts in the urban area the closed urban area. I could play on my own. That's freedom. That's a scape. That's fantasy. I think that's what it is. And then it's a the close team the smaller team not eleven not not knowing five. It breeds friendship. So it's more grass roots? If you will even than baseball even baseball so the and the socialization of the game. Game. Remember, the game was open to more and more groups than baseball and football were and even though blacks were excluded for so long and quota systems were set up. There was always progress. Always step forward always a movement forward. So that's the American spirit. That's the American spirit. We can do it. We can do it. Now, you're sixty eight years old. And I'm I'm forty nine very mine in me. All right. This is you know, we're about honesty, Hugh, I'm forty nine so baby. So the last time the Knicks won a title. I was three years old. And the first time they wanna title. I was a few months old and for guys like you who are just, you know, a generation or so ahead of me grown up in New York. I've noticed over the years all these guys that I've worked with and grown up around. My father's buddies people in the business. There's something about those Knicks teams that has a hold on them that has lasted their whole lives. Even as the Knicks of obviously never again risen to those kinds of heights. And there's something about that team the red Holzman team in two Bush shirt and Frazier and read and Bradley and Barnett that that you know, that is the root of their obsession with the game. How does that apply to you? If at all while it does. And I try to. Note this pay a lot of attention in film, Jeremy to championship teams. And and and mostly to championship teams that don't get their recognition Kansas in college Florida in college right Detroit in the pros, not the Isaiah team both coached both those teams coached by guys from Long Island, by the way. It comes back to New York. Dallas in the pros. Right Seattle in Washington. So there's something about that championship team and the connection to the community. That really matters. And and the identity the the pride of knowing we played the game the right way. There's only one champing, right? And the Knicks. They play the game the right way. And that was an days, and I go to the games. Now. I got an old guy with three teenage sons and they play. So it's fun for me to go to the game. 'cause I hang out my son's, but it's obviously not the same. And it's not the same from the stands either. You know? I mean, you you know, it's so much about entertainment now, then it was about the game. And and it didn't even matter. We have fifty gambling scene in the film and a sixties gambling scene. And Billy Cunningham says in the sixties, you couldn't even see the scoreboard. There was so much smoke in the Gaudin users. The score was a rumor, but New York as high school. That's right. New York could play the right way. And that phrase, you know, hit the open, man. And that was I mean, those teams and Earl Rosa producer on this film. Those Nick teams with beautiful and they were just beautiful to watch. There was a hominy. Another part of the film is basketball and ought form. The, you know, someone describes Almaguer as she looked as the game a game as a Broadway show, and George causes. And I looked at it as a back room brawl, you know, but that's the beauty of the game in the Knicks plate of beautiful way. You know, there's a scene out the obvious thing. Not there's Willis Reed walking onto the court. You know, it's Earl Monroe fall Frazier. What he meant to the game as a fashion and style icon relationship between the game and that but other Atlit with berko. That's right, but Bradley talks about I love this pot. The secret language of basketball as I have him describe moving with. Out the ball moving without the ball. And he says about him and Jerry Lucas, I love this. He says I would have this language Lucas, and I would say to him IGA Google goo, and he would say to me baba. And by the defend the looked at Lucas, I cut behind and got back to. The Princeton way. Thank you Dan, clueless about his new film basketball love story. And before we let you go in and it's just a a massive achievement. And you've got so many great voices in here. But obviously, not everyone is still with us. And we've lost among many others, the chamberlains and the whole spins, and and the our backs less you use who who would have been the guy you would've wanted who is not available that available because then only go with us because they wouldn't. Well, you know, you you mentioned them. I mean wilt would have been magnificent. And of course, our back. I mean, obviously, there's a ton on them and Holzman. Also, I mean, I was fortunate. Chac Ramsey was my first interview, I knew he was ill. And then I went to dial Shays, and is is a bunch that are that have laughed. Us. And, but you know, I have some footage of will that I just love. Jeremy I do a scene at the end actually at the end of the Kobe Bryant shack, Phil Jackson relationship. So it's a rock them sock them. There's no whole BAAs in this one in this scene. I mean, these guys those two did not like each other. And they're on cameras saying, but then I cut a Kobe's retirement ceremony and from onto this great song. And and from that, I cut to the retirement ceremonies of many, others Cousy Havlicek. Bokli Dr J Earl Willis Kareem, Michael, Jordan and wilt, and it shows me the person walking Wilt Chamberlain out onto the court holding his hand is his mother. I just love that footage. The only the only woman who captured his heart permanently. Yeah. I guess he says twenty thousand that seems like a lot. Well, you know, the store, you know, my dad's story about that, Dan. So he's they're taking a picture it some basketball event might have been ios right before. I guess we'll died unexpectedly, of course. And my father had this picture. He's seeing thing. It's Cousy Mike in wilt in my dad and my dad who you knew as a quick says, hey, guys, you know, among the four of us we've had twenty thousand and ten women. My father loved telling this story and wilt through my dad and says dick book is two years old. That's funny. But you know. Guys were great. I mean in in in the film, and you know, Riley talks about when we'll got to LA Riley and west and eligible can no longer really be eligible Bela. So they sat him down, and he quit. You know? I it didn't it didn't just told them. You can't play star Jimmy McMillan, and the and we'll said, so gee, Bill, Sean was the coach and Sharman says, you know, we stopped practice a AM every day and and talking about this. And we'll said wait a second. I don't go to sleep till six. This is the film. Right. So you're going to get me. If a pro you guys inside your practice ten or for the games at seven 'cause I ain't doing both. This is how will Chamberlain comes to the Lakers, man. So the first practice they're all there waiting to see because Sharman is an ex marine. He'd fight anyone anywhere right is Wilkin show up and how Sean gonna deal with it. So we'll get out of the car. I got the footage. Right. He walks into where they're ready to practice in LA. He's in his folly ball t shirt, right and sandals and sand all over his hair and feet, but he comes to practice at ten. It's so great great stuff. Dan, a tremendous achievement for five years of work condensed distilled into twenty hours of documentary film, making the new film from Dan Clarice is basketball. A love story. You can see it on ESPN of on television on the app. Dan. Thank you for joining us. It's been great chatting, Jeremy, my pleasure. My pleasure me, I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

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