19 Burst results for "Jeremy SCHAAP"

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Equivalent of headline Jeremy. The headline should not talk I'll talk to the right people talk to the right people can. This wailing. Wreck Dave. On. Campaign. Now I don't want you to waste any energy. I'll handle kids sitter it. Done. Were speaking with Norman Chad he's getting himself very exercised over snow of these things which I appreciate in terms of gambling. I'm curious. Is there a home field advantage when they're no homefield fans and how is that going to affect the way? You consider. Lines this year, which is one of those things you do I consider each game up to fifteen seconds in my head. So I don't go through all the other and I got. Important. Most important thing is definitely. Your Gut I go with Gut, which is considerable at this point even though Cova took fifteen pounds off my waist line I go with gut? Instinct I go with what I have seen and what I have known over the years. But what you're pointing out does make a difference because we do know that for instance, some places are more difficult to play. You can't even hear you know the counts at the at the line of scrimmage when they're so loud in domes like in New Orleans or Atlanta or in Seattle. So that is not as much of a factor travelers still factor when teams have to go you know twenty, five, hundred miles that's still factor and all that. But when you're playing an empty place or when you're playing the bubble, obviously, there's no home court for the NBA. That's a whole different ballgame. So you don't think of home field. Homefield will be reduced in that way I'm sure. That, the sports books and the gamblers will take that in consideration and that will change the the lines I. The very first game I was wrong I took the cowboys against the rams and I realized that it. You know it was sort of like a neutral field there'd be playing in an empty stadium and so that didn't make much of a difference I thought the cowboys were. The better team. So I thought they'd win and they did not I was wrong in that game but I did it did run for my mind Jeremy that there's no homefield advantage and they're playing it essentially a neutral site. The only thing that comes into play is is is travel and I didn't think that was a big deal I thought the cowboys would win and I was wrong. Norman, let me ask you your wordsmith. You do have a way with words a certain terseness of style twenty, twenty in a word. How would you describe it so far? Screwed. And, some people told You keep telling me when you know we can't wait till twenty twenty over. Thank goodness is only three more months whatever you know twenty twenty one could be worse if twenty twenty one is worse, it would screwed squared like I. Don't think we cover I do think that we might recalibrate where we're looking at. I don't think it's going to happen I think we'll all go back to normal eventually. If Twenty, twenty one goes back close to what we knew before twenty twenty people will be watching sports in groves. Bow Hoping that some of US would take a step back and say, Hey, there's something else out there. We should be taking a look at it a little more a little more seriously you'll gives me hope, norman, what's this picture of you on this story Norman Chad turns a bad beat into something upbeat. Smile. You know the picture I don't. Look like it looks like a belly laugh at. With Norman Chad. Yeah. You're a poker table. I've always found that poker. BLACKJACK poker and blackjack and poker as much more social than Blackjack that when I'm GonNa Poker table everything else I can shut out and at a poker table I'm a whole different personality I'm actually can be in a good mood and I try to put everybody else in a good mood and poker adjusts makes me smile sometimes. So they found a picture of me smiling and a poker table. You know it's a full moon situation during the course of counter day. I'm GonNa Poker table I'm actually laughing and talking and smiling a lot and you know. So that gives you hoping. Saw Me smiling that makes me smile makes me happy. Norman. It's always a pleasure speaking to you. We appreciate your contributions over the years to the show and I'm very. Encouraged to hear that you are on the mend. Actually the way you said, it sound like a lifetime achievement honor when you know you're throw me over the overboard working. Little liked at. Through the bull. So yeah, it's been. It's been a pleasure being on your show biannually. I've always appreciated it I'll see if I can find us really more or let's be honest. It's really more semiannual than I. DO appreciate it because I can't get you know regular ESPN people do not call me Germany's you know this person who calls me is the guy who has a Saturday show at like four. o'clock in the morning Galapagos time and so I do appreciate that you've reached out over the years to me as you have and You know you've run through so many producers and you've run through you know so many booker's who just it's hard to work with you but I, appreciate the cheap coming back to me again and again usually during Olympic years, which as we know are every two years now?.

Norman Chad cowboys Jeremy Homefield NBA lifetime achievement Cova US New Orleans Galapagos Germany Seattle booker Atlanta rams
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

07:30 min | 10 months ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Socia-. Started doing. The discussion ninety, our producer just waited the hokey pokey, not the not the Hanky polk that's the one I might have been. Did it daily for ninety days? Some people you know some people love that a lot of people hate it. They told me it was a career ender. Oh, that's GonNa hurt me what what career my ending. You know they told me look stays on the Internet forever. You look really bad. That's really gonNA. Hurt me when I'm six feet under. So I did for ninety days till I got coded and my idea of it was that eventually it would be a we are the. World like a from a generation or two ago what all the kids would join hands and they would do it together and we all get together longer get together better and also also raise money for charity, which finally I am starting October first at the whole thing was delayed right if fact I did get coded normally I would think I you know I don't know how I got covert and I had not done any interviews with you, which could have been a covert 'cause. 'cause this thing can get transmitted and a lot of different ways but Cohen sat me back either the viruses passed I. still have the after effects of it and one of them is agreeing to do the interview but I will go ahead with the Hoop Lupu charity challenge. You'll be like an ice bucket challenge that will start October first there's you're. Involved, but I'll start to do with that one is I'm going to pick a different charity every month. or every two months because I'll do it for at least a year and I will put out a challenge to to different people. So I'll start with poker people I'm going to go to more people I'm going to go to like pseudo sports broadcast journalists so I have six or seven of those listed, and you are actually in that group. So I'll put it out to the to what they will do is that they will do it takes thirty seconds and they'll they'll do Kaluka they will contribute fifty dollars for the charity and they'll put it out to other people and one chain gets broken. I'll start it again in the two new people. So that's the whole idea, and again I'll be switching charities they'll they'll switch from there'll be some food bank charities there'll be some rescue dog charities there'll be some mental health charities. My first or second charity is going to be involving a University of North Carolina. academic foundation which helps young black journalists learned become reporters and places them in reporting positions and helps learn investigative journalism skills in all sincerity norman. It's great to hear that you are on the mend, not only physically, but emotionally as well and that you're you're doing so much good with the initiative it feels weird being sincere to you though it's just like it's kind of an out of body experience. We're talking to Norman Chad. The couch slouch will be back with more of my conversation with Norman and our next segment. Welcome back to the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. ESPN radio is presented by progressive insurance cars, homes, boats, motorcycles. And more at progresive DOT com. Welcome back supporting life where again joined by the One and only Norman Chad we have. It's. It a love hate relationship is a big brother little brother kind of mentor mentor relationship. How would you? How would you describe it to someone who has the misfortune tuning in? Randomly expecting sports radio and hearing us. Instead you're close, I think three or four different. Right now of that of the possibility of what it is an all of them are close without hitting it hidden nail on the head. and you know I can't hit the nail. would be the little brother I never wide out as a mentor you never wanted So you know we're only difference in age by about I think ten or eleven years it feels a lot longer than that a lot larger than that. You're a lot smarter than me but I try try to bridge the gap with street smarts You really don't get out on the street and. With somebody WHO's driving somewhere and I know your personal drivers taking off right now so I really can't describe it correctly I do have a very deep and abiding respect for you It's almost like a like a romance of some type. Let's bromance in which we would never be under the same roof definitely absence makes the heart grow fonder in this situation there's dude that's been proven. Over. The years time and again, you know football season for you is special time of the year as it is for. So many Americans put especially for you your observations after week one of this bizarre NFL season I'll try to. As I can first of all actually years ago I used to write that football could be a studio sport people ridiculed me. I know we we love the pageantry of the fans and especially in college football how much you? But I think he would find that if we went this entire year with football played an empty stadiums that we'd also be watching. So I don't think you need the fans from that very narrow standpoint my second point I hate to pick on ESPN. Let's just go back to my old days of being a sports TV critic. You've always hated doing it. I. Know You break reluctance. Last year actually on twitter. I went through where ESPN decided that the little I down and ten and third and sixth. Graphic it would switch places on TV the team was going left to right. It'd be over in the left hand corner and when they were going right to left, it'd be over the right hand. This was one of the. Things I'd ever seen. You know we just WANNA look worried says to me. Sir I said, it seems to make sense to me right? You know guess ruly you're looking in one direction. No, it doesn't make sense. Okay. When he okay and you'RE GONNA stand watching TV 'cause you just make TV. Exchange. Watching TV, we have sort of a thick sense sort of another conscience which just looks the same spot again and again and again and again, and again like you're looking at the same spot for the twenty four second clock during an NBA game in the same place without even realizing you're doing it you look the same exact spot looking for third and five. Second Eight without thinking Oh, they're going left to right or right to left. I WILL GIVE ESPN credit actor campaign that we we protested around the country we we did rings around stadiums we went to Bristol we took down the satellite dishes they changed it before the end of the year they made it to like every other was still alive I remember that. Things there was something about there's something also about the color of the font styles. That is a more of a I would say more of a Silicon Valley Slash Ivy League type issue. So forget about the fonts right now we just got that first and ten put into the same spot as it is on Fox and NBC ABC and CBS and all the others this year, all the sports TV now because decided increasingly that on the score graphic at the bottom of the screen or wherever it is instead of just putting up the names of the teams. Like. Titans. Texans. We'll put up the logos. So actually some of the lowers are not clear. Some of them are very clear but some of them are not exactly clear when you first look at what team is that. Now, why should we have to try to figure out what team it is? Jeremy. When we look at the score, why shouldn't it just say Tennessee in Dallas? Cowboys but no on Monday night football last night on two different games I had to look at a graphics, and of course, eventually, I could figure out you know because I just want the University of Maryland what they were. You shouldn't have to try to figure them out. It should be as simple as its.

ESPN Norman Chad football Hanky polk Socia-. producer Hoop Lupu TV critic University of Maryland NFL twitter Cohen NBA Titans Tennessee University of North Carolina. Silicon Valley Slash Ivy Leagu Jeremy
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

08:09 min | 10 months ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Unless you weren't bleeding. Patriots colors to see age takeover, Tom Brady, and to see him and to see him fail. But I. also think there's a bit of vindication on the part of a lot of people here who realize that you can't play forever and you can see the Radi with slipping and there's a there's a little bit of that. Well, it was time attitude as well. Certainly. An interesting dynamic. No doubt about it with CAM CAM in Boston and Tom and Tampa Mister Bryant, it's always a pleasure and We always appreciate your insights. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you so much sheriff. Howard. Brian Straight. Talk. Wireless no commitment no compromise. You're listening to the sporting life with Jeremy Shop on ESPN radio more coming. Up Next. Welcome back to the sporting life own ESPN radio and the ESPN APP brought to you by Shell v Power. nitro plus premium gasoline. Welcome back to the sporting life We had a lot of plans for the upcoming segments most fell through. We had to go to plan B. Probably should have waited to formulate another plan a but instead we went to plan B. which means welcoming back to the show one of our most frequent guests Norman Chad Norman thank you for joining us. First of all this would be planned why so you just trying to be kind. Second of all, I want to frequent guest. You have a weekly show with two or three guests I p your bi annually so you do the math. That's true. The math biannual meet every once every two years or once every six months i. Remember. Semi annual sale you know macy's is. Every two years two years means nothing. See. It sounds like I know you're right but it sounds like every six months. It sounds like it should also mean semi annual understand I know you're. I mean were like five or six years old this country celebrated spy centennial, right? According to you that meant that we were that was our fifth year anniversary as a nation or something like that. Two Hundred Years Tell me speaking with Norman Chad the couch slouch poker legend. Sports Television legend set a I think that's a fair way of describing you. The CESKA centennial is one fifty. Did you say a word that I heard you say, what did you just say sex quiz intentional is one fifty it's one of my favorite words. If we were on a desert island together the over under for survival for both of us would be two and a half days there would be a justifiable homicide if I killed you. I think we'd get along we get along. So well, that's just not true. You know I we we play this kind of bickering couple on the radio but in we really get along quite well but I'm trying to look up this word I'm going through my photos on my phone. There's a word because I was on block island Wasserman block island. Is off the coast of Rhode Island ten miles from Rhode Island Connecticut. It's. Really cool place and I was exploring the islanders Iraq settlers rock it was dedicated in one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty one to celebrate the Tur- centennial. That's what the rocks is. True. Be tricentennial. Would you say tricentennial they see tercentenary off the top of my head I would think it's tricentennial but that's a term I've never thought of before. So you're claiming there say it's the what centennial te are Centennial Turtur centennial never heard that term before his great radio. I gotta ask you last time we spoke you were having a hard time as many have dealing with pandemic some personal losses in. Your Life. Now, I'm seeing is grueling you a whole big story about you turning a bad beat into something upbeat. With the UK Luca challenge can you tell us about your journey over the last several months? Okay. The bad beat is there something I'm beat upbeat by the way he's just a bad writers interpretation of my wife. Wow. That's a nice thing to say about somebody wrote a very flattering piece about you and and laudatory but now I understand he's very he's as his name is Jesse fully, he's a very talented individual writing is not as is number one strength. So yes. I would never say that about you you have so many number one strengths they'd be we call co number ones or maybe Kerr number ones Or. Anyway. Yes When we spoke or when I last had contact with you when I was clinging to a lifeboat and you get to me when you can that was cova. Funny Actually, I think I I'm sorry. Can You? Just, I've just I'm sorry. I was trying to answer your question I. Didn't I didn't mean I understand sometimes your question has multiple parts. So you're speaking again they're. Not. I'm merely reacting to what you said please proceed. Okay. You know actually when Donald Trump decides talked to Bob Woodward That was the third who asked him for nineteen conversations the first two were you and Charlie rose and to his credit Donald Trump said no I won't have enough time to talk if Jeremy Shepherd Charlie rose asked me questions so he went with Woodward who is much more concise with this questions. Continue please I've been begging you to continue to proceed I we're GONNA run out of time. So yes, the bad between up. He was the fact that through a series of a very bad things that had happened and including loss of income loss of job loss of life in terms of we've been separated for six or seven months because of pandemic loss of my dog who passed away I decided to for mental health purposes to try to pick up my spirits I do suffer from depression that from my home where I was by myself that I would start doing something on twitter twitter is the most toxic negative. Twitter hateful. I hate twitter yes. You know we and I I know that in your heart, you're certainly not fond of twitter you. Know what twitter can be? And I have to deal actually in poker twitter more than real life twitter, which is another level of bad twitter. It's not as bad as the worst twitter out there. But since I deal mostly in poker twitter I, decide instead of the toxic and hateful life put up something positive there and let's say twitter for positive purposes and I started doing a little dance in my home I taped every day called Luca Luca and with the dance I tried to put out a positive message that you know. In the short life we lead, we should make others lives. So miserable, we should get along better. We shouldn't judge people based on race religion or ethnic background, and I was generally the the whole thing that Uku Dance Jeremy, it's like a thirty second little stupid dance right? Just you know I can't sing and I can't dance by literally said Lean to the left lean to the right glance at the heavens and dance all night. It's time to Luka that was the whole song so I put that out. Yeah I never saw. And so some people told me that sound like the I had to look it up gloom. Palumbo Lupu poop. Lucas something similar Beluga. said it balloon PGA Okay I looked up and I didn't mean to do that and plus that's a whole different thing plus other people told me it reminded me of something that I might have subconsciously be doing so I did this in college while I was drunk it was put your left foot out which very foot but. You wanted to do. Something like that. Close to that, but that's the one I might have been thinking of social,.

twitter Centennial Turtur centennial Norman Chad Norman Norman Chad Rhode Island ESPN Tom Brady Patriots Boston Tampa macy Jeremy Shop Donald Trump Iraq Mister Bryant Brian Straight Palumbo Lupu Howard Luca Luca
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

07:23 min | 10 months ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"In a way that we haven't seen previously. Sir Leave in more. So than than four years ago when Colin Kaepernick started the movement in Pro Sports, you could say With his protesting the anthem. And we are again as I said, joined by Howard Bryant of ESPN at Howard. Before I ask you some questions about tennis which I know you were find the US Open files very closely as well, and it was an interesting weekend in tennis. Do you think the. What do you think the impact is of the player protests eight you know we hear. So often now in our society that everything is baked in, you know we're we're so polarized. We're so divided you know. or or it's you know there's forty percent one side forty percent of the other side in this twenty percent kind of up for grabs. Well, what do you think the player protests do in terms of moving the needle in the direction of their cause? I think that I think it's valuable because I think that and I don't think it's the players I I think the players are helping. Let's not forget my opinion this Jeremy I I don't know if we've talked about this or not. But my opinion on this is that the players And the United, states as you know as a corporate entity. They were reacting to protests. So what we're really seeing is we're seeing the reaction to the reaction to Minneapolis and I think once you saw those images of George, Floyd being killed once you saw those images of people in the street in New York and DC in Minneapolis I think everybody think this was the enough is enough moment i. think it was the the moment no different from say and until in nineteen, fifty five that really spurred the civil rights. Movement. I think it's no different than when Menounos four little girls were killed. September fifteenth. Nineteen sixty three and that spurred civil rights legislation. Exactly right and so and even from a from a more trivial standpoint I think it's no different than Barry von on hitting seventy three home runs and it may baseball though. Not Enough we've got a drug problem when they had to finally admit we have a drug problem and I think this moment made people probably because of the pandemic everybody was in the house. Everybody was watching everybody was cooped up everybody was reaching a point and I think that when you see George would getting killed and you see the reaction I think. that. Was the enough is enough moment and I think that could corporations in the country our company, a lot of companies around the country suddenly recognized that this was something we had to deal with at some level and I think the players followed and I think when Matt happens to get to a long way of answering your question I think when that happens. You create new baselines in this society and I think what the players have done is being done to create sort of a new baseline and it's GonNa be rough right now. But over time I think you'll see something different. You know are you going to see in racism in every single sport? I don't know how long that's GonNa last but maybe you see soccer all the time those those signs went up and they remained when you're watching the Champions League and the Premier League it's extra I. Think there are are the players going to threaten me wildcat strikes and boycotts whenever somebody gets killed I don't think so but I think that the players have certainly created a new deal with the public and with their and with the people who own sports teams that that possibility there, which brings everything back to Labor that the players are exercising a level of power. And I think there's value with Matt as well because the players are really saying especially, Naomi, Osaka the western and southern before the US, open? where she phrased it very, very cleverly where she said I don't think it's important you to watch me play tennis right now she didn't say I don't think it's important. I played tennis right now she was saying I'm not going to contribute to your distraction. And so that changes the deal that changes the deal significantly because people love to treat athletes as well. You know you're here entertainment you have no say in any of this, the players are proving that they do have to say the question is also going to be what is going to be the stamina level for the public what how how is the public going to react and I think with the players are doing is they're daring the public to not come they're gonNa say, okay are you really willing to not watch sports again because we had a problem with George Floyd being murdered by police And I think that going to see overtime isn't eventually we'll get used to a new template, but a new template is definitely coming speaking with ESPN senior writer Howard Bryant. In Howard. And by the way here, he can I throw one last thing here of course I think it's also important I think it's also important to remember something else and is I think the players are citizens I don't think they're radicals I don't think I, don't think this is going to be dynamic where the players don't WanNa play I think they wanNA play and I think they are I think that we've seen that in. College sports as well. Would players saying we want we WANNA play, but we also want to have more Sarah, and so I think that what we have to get used to and it's important because obviously generation we you know it and I know it. But maybe a lot of listeners don't know it. You know there was a time when even the players in baseball believed that free agency was going to destroy the sport. And yet the world came up the sun came up today and the business was even more profitable in the game became more exciting and we all kept going forward. So we're in a massive period of transition right now but I think it was I thought it was really significant that the players in the NBA went to Barack Obama and of course, he suggested that they go back to work. So it wasn't a radical movement. It was a moderate movement they took one day. And then they say things that they want to be heard but they're not stopping traffic they're not stopping the game they're not boycotting the actual sport. It's not like they're walking off the court in the second you know in the second quarter, they are citizens may want to perform, but they also want to be heard and so I feel this has gone much more smoothly than it could have been I mean imagine if they had walked out and said, you know what we're all Right, now. that would have changed much much more. In Howard I had planned. To Talk to you about tennis a little bit now. Of course, dominant team But but we're running short on time. We talk tennis again soon because the French Open is right around the corner, which seems like a strange thing to say in September but before I do let you go you're a Boston guy you're an NFL guy you've covered league for a very long time. What was it like? Being in in the Commonwealth and watching the events transpire as they did.

tennis Howard Bryant George Floyd US ESPN Colin Kaepernick baseball Matt Minneapolis Jeremy Menounos Champions League soccer NBA Barack Obama NFL Barry Boston
Enes Kanter: Enemy of the State

ESPN Daily

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Enes Kanter: Enemy of the State

"Jeremy SCHAAP WE'RE GONNA talk to and his canter himself later in this episode. But I I wanted to talk to you specifically because you did cover kanter story really in depth for sixty last year, and by now I suppose a lot of American Mba fans are vaguely aware that cantor is deep into this long-running feud with the government of Turkey, his native country. But most fans also probably couldn't explain what that viewed is actually about. So let's start off broadly because protests of all kinds have become kind of relatively commonplace in the NBA. What about kanter situation here mixed the so unique. Well Here. We have well established NBA player. Who is one of the most famous athletes his country's ever produced? Who cannot go back to his native country because he is someone who has every reason to believe if he set foot on Turkish soil now? You'll be arrested. Or that? Physical harm would come to him. And his canter made a decision a long time ago. that he would be a vocal outspoken in highly visible opponents of the Turkish government would sees him as nothing less than its enemy. And so what are the roots of this conflict between cantor and his home country? It's very simple and also very complicated. It's simple in the sense that cantor is persona non grata because he is a supporter. Of a man named Fatullah Doolan. Who is Muslim cleric whose lived in the United States last twenty, one years, and at one time was very close ally of president of Turkey but there has been a falling out between the two men and the respective movements. Over the course of the last decade aired one has been ruling in an increasingly authoritarian way. Silencing his critics, intimidating critics locking up opponents of his government's he's believed that Fatullah NHS movement has had too much power and he believes that ghoulish followers had too much influence particularly in the judiciary civil service in the police and that they have been working to undermine him grueling and air to honor now sworn enemies nemeses of each other. In an his canter as a supporter of Fatullah doolan vocal one at that. is considered by many intricacy as kind of traitor. How does cantor even get involved in this in the first place like you just described? An extreme religious political situation how does he end up taking side in this? Well, he's someone who grew up in fact as part of Fatullah Goulding's movement. The Movement had established schools by most counts, very good schools, not just in Turkey, but around the world and his cancer is someone who was educated in the schools someone who was associated with the movement as tens of thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of Turks have been over the last several decades. Now, as an adult kanter has continued to follow the teachings of Fatullah, Golan, who has promoted a moderate form of Islam in NS is certainly one of if not his most prominent supporter. So Jeremy described a dispute between two men who knew each other well, the president of Turkey Air Lan and this cleric Fatullah Golan now struggling for control of the country. And the date July Fifteenth Two thousand sixteen is a really pivotal one in this story. So what happened on that day roughly four years ago now? The details are still now for years later. Unclear in some respects. But what we can say is that there was an attempt to seize power in Turkey. By some elements of the military, we are coming on the air with breaking news and apparent military coup. Now, unfolding in Turkey Turkish state television has been seized by the military martial law imposed across the country. After a few hours, the coup was beaten back several hundred people died. And prison air to one immediately laid the blame at the feet of Fatullah Golan and his supporters.

Cantor Turkey Kanter Fatullah Golan Fatullah Doolan Jeremy Schaap NBA Fatullah Turkey Air Lan Turkish Government President Trump Fatullah Goulding American Mba United States NHS
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"The ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. We're continuing our conversation about race and protest in the wake of the death of George. Floyd last week. The hands of Minneapolis police. We're joined now by an old friend of mine. One of the most distinguished sports writers in America having spent thirty three years at the New York Times. He is now a writer at large for the undefeated, and he is the author of among other books forty million. Dollar Slaves William See Roden Bill. Thanks for joining us. Space Jeremy, and it was thirty four years. 'cause you know you you know you gotTA. We gotta take every inch man. One year off, I work hard for their one year. Are you telling me Pedia was wrong. It's eighty three to sixteen I I apologize I. It's a conspiracy thirty four years at the New York Times. A bill you know all those years you on the sports reporters and you and my dad would talk about these issues on the show. The issues that have been roiling the country that we've been discussing in the now. We're speaking Thursday ten days since George. Floyd died in police custody after Derek Chavanne pressed his knee into Floyd's neck that that horrific video. What what thoughts have been uppermost in your mind during this period here here? So many? My largest thought. Is I guess one of my biggest greatest fears is that we just continue in store this -Tarian ISM authoritarian? Government a totalitarian government and I'm just concerned that a lot of. Sort of colleagues, fellow America particularly, so my white brother. You know, don't really see this thing. Go see this. This threat you know kind of in denial I. think maybe what we're seeing in a way of turns out point of. Of People in the street, particularly young white kids the students. St Maybe underlines you know affected maybe a lot of that generation. Does this threat of a larger threat to their freedom, the goes beyond you know. Go goes beyond what party you belong to and that kind of stuff so. That's also my thoughts and I guess my thought though is that I seen these things before particularly again when a lot of you know white brothers and sisters involved and I've seen it, you know when you get tired. They get tired of it. They can always okay I'm tired of this. I let let me go back to be white you know, or whether it gets too hot. Let me go back to being white privilege and all that kind of stuff. So I. my thoughts I just hope this is this sustain? moral indignation more pressure. Continues We're speaking with William see wrote in and. Bill you're college student in the nineteen, sixties? Quote, unquote saw that turmoil. You saw all of that up-close. You're a football player at a historically Black College Morgan State in Baltimore. How do you compare The movement then to what we're seeing now. I think. You know again. I was eighteen nineteen twenty, so I was. You know silly and nuts, too. I think as much more broad based. Now I think that the the evils of this society are grasped by a larger group of people back at sixty eight. I remember. You know I was informed by Mohammed Ali. nobody Jim Brown and the Cleveland Summit..

writer Jeremy SCHAAP William See Roden New York Times George Minneapolis ESPN TA America Bill Pedia Derek Chavanne Cleveland Summit Mohammed Ali. Baltimore Black College Morgan State football Jim Brown
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. Welcome to another dish of sporting life later in the show. We'll be speaking to the CO author of a new memoir by Willie mates. We won't be speaking Willie mays. We'LL BE SPEAKING TO HIS CO author John Shea. About new book. He's written with maize twenty four but before that we're GONNA be talking about another baseball hall of Famer Friday night on E. Sixty on. Espn A new show. Premiered Imperfect Roy halladay story reported by my colleague and friend infrequent guest here on the sporting life. John Barr and John is GonNa join us now to talk about Roy Halladay in the reporting for this extraordinary show John. Thank you for being with us. Happy to be here Jeremy. Thank you John Roy. Halladay was one of those players in baseball history. Who who was bigger than just his numbers. in kind of the way the Willie mays was to there. Was this Aura about him He was He was tough. He was He was somebody who seemed to represent all of the competitive traits. You would want in top level professional athlete but who was he has a man. Well that's that's really the the central theme of our story. There were two Roy Halladay. There was the holiday there. There was a Roy Halladay that was projected to the world. This STOIC workhorse. Who whose work ethic was the stuff of Legend in baseball circles And then there was the Roy. Halladay away from the baseball field. And you know much of our story is driven by a candidate and a far-reaching interview with Brandy Holiday Roy's widow and she shared with us in detail. How Roy struggled with pain and addiction. He had two separate stints in inpatient drug treatment and she also shed with us how we struggle with mental health issues. He struggled with depression and anxiety. Attention deficit disorder And this is something that that you know some of those issues trace back to Roy. Childhood is his early struggles as a professional athlete But they continued to to He. It's something he continued to battle right up until the time of his death in November of two thousand seventeen so That's really the guts of what the story is about. It's it's the Roy Halladay. We never knew as you put it in the show and again it's imperfect Roy Halladay story Which premiered Friday night? You say that when he comes when he gets back to the majors in two thousand one after having been down the miners after kind of a disastrous start to his major league career. Ninety eight ninety nine two thousand. He's he's a different person. Refresh our memory. Who WHO was Roy? Halladay in those first few years as major leaguer. What kind of Pitcher was he well? He caught lightning in a bottle. In second star he was one eight one out removed from a no hitter in his second. Start as a Toronto Blue Jay but in in the year two thousand as you reference. He had an absolutely disastrous year. His ten point six four. Era over the course of the two thousand season remains the highest era in Major League baseball history for any pitcher with at least fifty innings. So think about that for a moment..

Roy Halladay Brandy Holiday Roy Willie mays John Shea baseball Jeremy SCHAAP Espn Willie mates Major League Pitcher John Barr Toronto pain John
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Wasn't even clear that time because you said on their twenty five yard line and we still haven't identified exactly who's twenty five yards. She's go without saying who's twenty five yard line. It goes on and then feel free to know the real yourself. I only discuss rules when they're on the table as low. God is Shell not it. You've been wanting to talk about this. Onside kick rule for ten days. That's on the table. You don't know what the onside kick rule was what you told me. In the first segment is if a team fails to convert on fourth and fifteen. All that happens is the other team starts at its own twenty five yard line and I'm like that's not a penalty. You just never kickoff. I'm saying you don't even need the roster spot. Now you're saying that it's not that twenty five. It's the other twenty-five that makes an enormous difference. To God's it's literally half the field of difference that we're talking about done. I mean who would come up with a rule where you get ball hats the penalty. How did you know that common-sense needs to prevail? I assume that you would know that but again it's Majel. It would be a great defense. It goes without saying is actually the only defense unless of course. The host has for clarification. And he's like. Why would anybody do that? And you do nothing to stop. I'm saying to you like if you'll recall the way the segment went. I'm saying to you. Hey Stu God's I've been preoccupied. The last sixteen hours because America's burning yet got this on the onside kick. I've been a little preoccupied and the way that you explained it to me was exactly the wrong way to explain it. I don't know which of you was more wrong you or Chris. Cody cody gave me the literal opposite of what? I wanted for a definition in this country. That is straight talk. It is brought to you by straight talk. Wireless Radio is presented by Progressive Insurance from acclaimed director marinas..

Cody cody Stu God Chris Progressive Insurance director America
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"This is the sporting life on. Espn radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy Schaap Yogi. Berra was one of the great baseball players of all time. One of the great winners in the annals of sport but he meant more to people than just a great baseball player typically would there was a lot of humor about him and some unintentional philosophy is well now lawrence. Peter is the subject of a new book by our old friend one of the great sports journalists of our time John Pasa. His book is simply. Yogi a life behind the mask John. Thank you for joining US Jeremy. It's my pleasure. John I let me start by saying Yogi Berra's one of those guys and I have like many people tremendous fondness for him and I think An appreciation for him probably more than most people Having known him a little and growing up in New York Being around him. E what more do we need to know about Yogi? Berra that we don't already know. Well I'll tell you I three I did. This book was my I got Yogi and nine thousand nine hundred sixty when I was eight years old and he was a roleplaying outfielder for very strong. Yankee teams very good role player but a rope higher. I use my father's favorite player. My father told me that this was one of the most dynamic baseball players he'd ever seen in his life and that's not usually the way we think we think of Yoga. I mean overshadowed by his persona so I really wanted to go back just at the beginning and just look at this tremendous baseball player and he was so much better and I'm a huge baseball fair. But he's so much better as a baseball player than I ever thought. I mean he was the best player on the best team in baseball history. Well he won those MVP awards when the Yankees were winning all those world series. They won the world series and forty nine fifty fifty one fifty two fifty three he was the MVP in fifty one fifty four and fifty five and this is at a time that mantle was coming into his own he was about to win the triple crown and fifty six. Ted Williams was still doing remarkable things. There was a lot of tough competition in the American league but Yogi Berra was the MVP and three of those seasons. What made him so great. two things one. He was just a tremendous hitter. Right from the start. This guy was twenty one hundred. Rbi to eighty three twenty hitter Out of the catcher slot where the catch was expected. Play defense and to call pitches and that was it and actually for the first year of yogis career There was there was a very very good chance he would have been outfielder. Not a catcher. And it wasn't until Casey stangl came in and realized if I have a hard hitting catcher Then I have something special and brings and Bill dickey fix mechanical problems. With with. Yoga pitchers hated pitching to him in his first two years. get cleaned up the mechanics And Yogi now becomes almost overnight the best catcher in the American league and one of the true talents that I had no idea how he had a near photographic memory of of Baseball. And he could tell you how to get somebody out in. The fourth inning was a man on second that we did it. Four and a half years ago Here's the right pitch and the players. Just you know turn completely turned around because that is an incredible weapon to have plus you as a field. Who's as good if not better than anyone? We're speaking with longtime sports writer and editor. John Pasa his new book is Yogi Life Behind the mask. Biography of Lawrence Peterborough. Probably one of the thirty greatest baseball players ever to live and one of only a few athletes North American major sports history with as many as ten championship rings. But when I think of Yoga John I think about some of the contradictions. You know one of the great athletes of all time but not in an athlete's body right. How did that lead people to misjudge him in the beginning? I think that his body I tell you this too One general one specific part of it literally changes baseball history. The the the general is you you look at him and you know equipment managers. When he walked into his minor league teams would give him a uniform to a ratty uniform because they thought he stayed to try out not that he was part of the team He just didn't look like an athlete. He had a toll person upper body. A short persons lower body Long arm big show's a hit his neck But when he stepped on the field He was just an incredible player. The Guy who was who is supposed to be the greatest judge of talent in part because he could look at a sixteen year old and figure out what it was. GonNa look like these twenty one named branch rickey greatest talent evaluate ever. He takes one look at Yogi and the size and tells them to lose face. You're no more than a AAA baseball player. And I need people who go all the way and so instead of a playing for the cardinals. He's hometown anti war. When the cardinals make the mistake pain from the ground Who who then become the orioles and this drives orioles fans crazy when I tell them that Yogi Berra in their his prime would have been catcher for the Baltimore Orioles He makes this gigantic mistake and he loves joke. Hours Yoyogi especially across the street neighbor. Who literally is six one hundred and seventy five pounds and absolutely looks like a baseball player and is very good but it wasn't Yogi Berra. The other thing. John Speaking with John. Pass up about his new biography of Yogi Berra and as I tried to suggest in our leading your the thing about Yogi bear. It's not just the on the field. Obviously but it's This aura about him and it and I was random a lot I interviewed on a number of occasions and there was this charm in this warmth about him although he could be tough but but people thought he was this guy you know who had this endless stream of unintentionally. Funny one liners and this kind of stuff. It actually interviewing Yogi wasn't easy wasn't somebody who actually fit the way that people people no thought of him right. You know his persona his public thing wasn't the real Yogi. Can you explain that disconnect a little bit and why it exists? Well I mean definitely wasn't Yogi was always A quiet if not shy person the only place. The yogi fell a hundred percent comfortable with on any ball field where he was always a best player and you could see through his life that people who talked for in Joe Garagiola who helped with Yogi ISM. Then it became Phil Rizzuto another. You know very talkative. Person His wife was eloquent Ron guidry later in his life be becomes the whisper and He he was just naturally that way. It was also the youngest of four. Bore isn't a in you know in five kids and then the Talian families fog you know as as most fathers of that era is ruled with an iron fist. And you know I think he learned to be quiet that way. Because you didn't talk until you spoken to. His father was a man of few words and all of the Of the of the kids In in Yogi's family were quiet sorts. But I think to. He faced A lot of discrimination. 'cause he was carrying and he faced a lot of abuse because of his looks because of his physical stature And because sometimes he would you know when he did talk a mangle the language and I think that Yogi just having such an appreciation for how it felt to be looked down upon and he could never bring himself to do that because he felt like and and that's first of all it's rare and people second of all it's really rare among athletes and Yo- gives just this guy who liked and love people and I think people felt that in just all instantly comfortable around him I saw. This must be twenty years ago. There was a there. Aren't a lot of baseball players. Who had one man plays written about them? That were actually performed on Broadway and I saw. I saw the yoga. Show Bengals Ara. I mean one of the great actors of the second. Half of the Twentieth Century Played Yogi. I did a story about saw the play. And you know I think Yogi never saw because you know it took liberties with the real story and a lot of it revolved around his relationship with Dale Dale. His son. Who's been on the show recently and it was about You Know Dale's addiction right all that stuff. His feud with Steinbrenner. Mostly the reason that And it was Carmen And unfortunately this Carmen does yes. I'm sorry Unfortunately this story didn't make it into the book. I end up having to cut sixty pages the book. But there's a terrific story of Kozara and you're right coming to Yogis House and talking about it and our figures. Hey I'm from Brooklyn I'M A. You know rebelled Italian. We're GONNA and they did hit it off but Carman Was against it from the start. And they have a second meeting at his museum where they're sitting there drinking vodka together telling stories about where it was like growing up during the depression. And you know if it was Yogi they you know they would have blast it Common walks in is very polite. Very nice you know Carmen. She was a charming woman And very politely and said I'm sorry but we're not going to endorse this. I gotTa Tell Ya I. It's funny I was. I was interviewing bank desire about the play and he was great and he's the only guy can think of who played two famous. Yankees in two different In two different productions about sports. Wow you got me on this one. What's the other one he did? Well I got him to. He didn't know was George. Halas in the remake of Brian saw. Oh and of course George. Halas played right field for the keys before Babe Ruth he was one of the right fielders in one thousand nine hundred nineteen before the founding of the NFL. I just had to throw that in there John. But as usual you you've done a spectacular job with the book. I didn't know that there was much more I could know or would want to know about Yogi. But you've certainly achieved that and he is such an iconic figure new such a great player and I think the book is a great service to to baseball fans sports fans and Yogis more than that of course wise Yogi more than that again. It comes down to his. Humanity was so accessible Advertisers Love them because people just looked at Yogi and and instantly light and trusted them. And as you know trust is advertising advertising goal he was also just. He was walking history. I mean the man lived through the depression and World War. Two the the the baby boom D- Moved to the suburbs. He was one of the first television stars. He was He did movies. Movie Reviews He wrote books. There's a great little museum in Montclair New Jersey about him. I mean this guy you know. Ninety years from you know from the beginning to end just lived phenomenal life and and with that Captives humility always just feels like a man of the people which basically is what he lives..

Jeremy Schaap Yogi Yogi Berra Baseball Yankees John Pasa American league writer and editor John US Espn depression New York Carmen And Ted Williams Peter MVP cardinals Phil Rizzuto Joe Garagiola Ron guidry
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"In two thousand seven he and his wife. Mara released their first wine under their label. A cabernet Sauvignon wine. Spectator magazine ranked it. Fifty fourth on their list of the world's top one hundred lines in the summer of twenty teen bledsoe opened a fifteen thousand square foot state of the art winery. We're super proud of our new facility. This is the first real party we've had a chance to have here and break the scent. I think he takes great pride in the fact that this is this is baby that he built and it's successful and it's not just a football player. Making wine hopeless that eventually that this is all vineyard out here because I just think it'd be so stunningly beautiful fool thing is that it's really allowed me to feel. I don't know the competent. Something with time comes healing. Twenty eleven drew bledsoe return to Foxborough to enshrine the Patriots Hall of fame. Where did more to take the pages from where they were to where we are? Now Ladies and Gentlemen Heydrich Hall of fame quarterback Drew Bledsoe the reaction of the crowd when he was introduced. People Love Them. People will forever hold very high positions. I came here as a twenty one year. Old Kid out of Walla Walla Washington. You embrace me as one of your own. He made those first seven or eight years of my ownership very special. I'll forever be grateful to that. Loyalty is important to me about. Drew was when he was the first round. Pick in Nineteen ninety-three. This organization was the worst in a league easily and He was part of that nucleus that that made this organization competitive. The thing that I did that I'm proud of from those years. We went from being awful to being relevant which that's a big jump and then to go from being relevant to being arguably the greatest dynasty in sports history is really astounding living in the shadow of dynasty perhaps would have driven other men to be consumed by all the what ifs but for drew. Bledsoe the glass that has been his life is in half empty or merely half-full. It's brimming over. It wasn't happy. Maybe you didn't have this other career of doing the wine thing and thriving off. That didn't have that. I could see him dwelling back in the past available. Jealousy said mean anything in your life. No now really doesn't. I'm genuinely happy for Tom. And I can say that completely honest him genuinely happy baby wanted to call you young any. I know that now. Remember me for getting hurt. And and for Tommy coming coming to implant maybe if Tommy had sucked would have been different. You know I mean seriously Tommy you gotta go on and just win when everything. I'll never convince myself it was the right decision. We would want a lot more suitable if you'd have like eight of them If I if I stayed on the field the fact that you could joke. Abadan says something right t-shirt to spend time being better handle on it that way you know I'd been able to be a piece truly wouldn't trade my life for anybody in the entire world. Thanks for having joined us. I'm Jeremy SCHAAP. This has been the sporting life on. Espn radio join us again next week. We're on every Saturday and every Sunday morning at six eastern time..

Drew Bledsoe Walla Walla Washington Spectator magazine Jeremy SCHAAP Tommy Gentlemen Heydrich Hall Mara Tom Patriots Hall of fame Foxborough football Espn Drew Abadan
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Here's Jeremy Schaap jury. Tarquini wasn't just one of the best coaches in college basketball. He was one of the most compelling and he was certainly one of the most controversial he eventually would be selected for the Basketball Hall of fame. He died five years ago and now a new book has been written rebel with a cause the true story of Jerry Tarr Canaan written by his son Danny who also of course played for his father. Unlv Danny thanks so much for being with us here. Well thank you for having me on. I was not only play from. I was as ballboy. I was an assistant coach for him and I was actually much matter so I thought that I would be the person with the best information that That craigslist book. I can't imagine that anyone else would be better. But let's start with The title rebel with a cause the true story of Jerry Tarquini. That suggests that there is a false story or false narrative about your father out there. What is that narrative well? My father's current interviewed him on a few occasions. You understand that. There was a lot of stories written about him and most of it wasn't true and Some people the people that actually have you got to know. The program got till the players. You had a pretty good understanding of what was going on. But there are so many other stories that were written just perception. And maybe people's impression from what they heard. What I did was my mother had scrapbooks from all of my fathers seasons that he coached I so I use those scrapbooks to go back and go to all seasons I have all the documentation from the NC toy not only a court documents but their investigation notes and so forth was able to put together the factual basis. And all. That as I mentioned I lived and breathe in was a part of much of my father's career in a number of other areas and then I heard the different stories. My father had cold funny. Stories of is recruiting Instance stories and other coaches recruiting stories. I try to put all that in the book. I think the the readers will find that really interesting and funny and also wanted to get my father sense of humor out there. He was really acquitted. Person had some great one liners. Some of them have been made public others. He had told us as a family. And I put all that in the book speaking Danny Tarquini in about his new book about his father. The legendary coach Basketball Hall of Famer Jerry Tarr Canaan. The book is titled Rebel with a Cause The true story of Jerry Tarquini and it has just been published five years after Jerry Tarr Kanaan's death the legendary career at Long Beach State a specially unlv also at Fresno. Danny this is a broad question. But how would you describe your father to someone who never met him but only saw him on TV? The thing that most people don't know about my father was that he was just really great people person and he was that weight with people across all different spectrums of life. He was able to relate with an motivate and bring together the poor inner city black kids that were donated college basketball at that time. Like no other coach He was able to really get along with a great relationship with his fellow coaches and colleagues which many coaches could and then you also was able to relate with the boosters and others that were involved in a big part of the program and so forth he was he just understood how people were he would fight with people he he understood when did just let them give their speech a perfect example would be you put him in a bar. You let him tell stories about Basketball and and and his career and he'll be the happiest guy on there. He's told which seen him where he's been in. The Bar and a fan will come to coach. Why didn't you get the ball over Larry Johnson and and he would have done better about one that game and my dad will sit there and say is that right. That's a great point. The Guy will go home and tell girl clinico coach. Talk what to do and take credit for I. I gotta say the teams you're in. This is far from unique opinion. But the teams That your father coach. Unlv particularly in the last two years the nineteen eighties in the first few years of the nineteen nineties a team that won a national championship and then lost the following year and rematch with Duke might still be considered the most talented college basketball team ever put together. When you agree. Well you know I. It depends what you call talent if you look at the end of digital players that are on that team. They don't compare to say that one's Kentucky when they had all those first round picks and you look at the NBA careers if somebody other teams heck dukes Players that beat us that you're much better NBA clears than the ones that UNLV. Well what the UNLV was able to do. Was they put to get players that had spread so abilities and they emphasizes abilities and play together as a team for example. Larry John was great. Rebound they're great passes the great key player. And that's what he specialized Anderson Hunt was a great shooter. Greg Anthony was a great ball handler. Passer and defensive. They all specialize. My father was able to bring together these different talents. They CA- Cohesive Unit. And then they got them to play hard in the near the team that country. And if you're looking at were the best team well. They certainly could competed with any other team. History called basketball whether they went on common. Certainly would have been competitive. Oh I think about those teams augment and hunt and Anthony and Larry Johnson and accolades and scurry. They were fun to watch too. Were speaking with Danny Arcane. About his new book rebel with a cause the true story of Jerry Tarquini in his legendary father. Kirby let me mention about your talk. Everybody knows about the early nineties teams and how great they were. Probably the most entertaining team in History College basketball would have been the late seventies teams that. Unlv they averaged one hundred ten point six points a game one year and one hundred eight the next year and they did it without the three point line or the sock clock and they did it with pressure full court defense and raise the ball up the court again. Shots off Reggie. Theus was a star on. That team had a great NBA career and they had a bunch of other good players but imagine squander kind of points and playing that fast Before the clock in three point line it was really amazing. Rebel fan and there were a lot of people. Let's let's face it. Who diminished your father as a coach who said Oh he was one of these guys are just rolled out the ball but that was of course far from the case sure. When my dad first started his career he was his own coach. One to two zone and they in the third year long division want to before he got there so in three years as division one coach she takes. Long Beach within two points of upset and UCLA. The instant toy tournament during their seven year run of the National Championships closest game. They ever had Jon Gruden after the game at several of their players. That was the best defense he'd ever seen the never been up against a defense like that before then he goes to. Unlv doesn't have the big players but he has a quick athletic players and he switches to pressure core man to man defense and the ball up the court and they become the best defense of full court team in the country then the years. They win a national championship. There are half court pressure. Defense with the AMOEBA and many people say was the greatest zone That was played during that time and So he was able to adapt require and he's a great great. Great Defensive Coach Goes K. Book the Pre face to the book except that my father is one of the greatest defensive coaches in the history of college basketball again. We're speaking with Danny Titanium Danny. Of course so when people think about your dad it's almost impossible to separate him from his fights with the NCAA and there was a time at which it seemed he was the NCAA's primary target. They went after him as we've already established time and again for years. What was the root of the conflict between Your father and the NCWA? That's a great point. I put that in the book the AFC TRAE hadn't officials education on my father's sixteen of his thirty one years coached more than half the time. And it all started in the late sixties early seventies. College basketball wasn't tremendously popular. They wouldn't sell out and citrate term games. They won't get it high ratings on TV. So the anti-trade protected the programs are real popular the Ucla the Kentucky Fathers Along these. He wrote some articles. Saying you know the answer. Trae go after the big boys. They're going after the smaller schools. Like Western Kentucky University of Kentucky breaks more rules at one day and Western Kentucky dozen here. Why GO AFTER THEM? Well the SE. Trey got upset you know. Here's this young coastal be knows about the Spartan off to the NC twice so they wrote a letter to the League. Commissioner saying who does talk being long. Beach is one of the big boys. We can come after him and they had to put. Long Beach on probation matter of fact Had to do it over again. He would have thanked him for put him up for Bachchan they fun friends with them and kept them as a friend as opposed to an enemy but he just he went after him. He didn't back down from him and he had fired an assistant coach who Went to the. Nfc tweet and made up a lie. Things that Talking in some of the other coaches we've talked about planning drugs and prostitute with an NC twenty investigator and it'd fury to the answer tweet documentation of metals and Letters that were sent between them saying we gotta get gotTa Run about a coaching. Because all these things that he was gonna pass rugs and and so forth and anyways it created just a horrendous adversarial relationship and my father did back down by OTA. He's beaten heritage. He knows how to persevere as most Armenians doing it was a never ending battle until the insecurity finally got him of course about it. You know they receive Danny Tarquin Ian about his new book about his father rebel with a cause the true story of Jerry Tarquini in one of the most legendary coaches in the annals of college basketball of course a hall of Famer and Danny. Before we let you go. I would be remiss if I did not ask you what your father would think about the current state of The NCAA of its relationship with college athletes. So much has changed the world we see now seems to be turning towards a place that your father was saying for a long time. We should be at where we should be getting to. And although he's no longer with us does it feel like get away. He's winning well. What he did was he exposed the NC twice false and and and what their actions back in the early seventies and people thought he was just saying it because he had been put on probation. Now other people are experiencing the same things. Go lies in this right the NCAA still not their organization. But most importantly the rules aren't there. They're the rulebook. My Dad always to put a organization like the NC Twain have five to ten rules to stop people from drinking major violation instead you got a rulebook full of scooping in philly violation many of what they found UNLV guilty of it and change later and made 'em legal because it was so ridiculous. I think the best thing. My father did incorrect. The NC twitter was to try to make it more fair for people to play intercollegiate sports without Basically treating the kids that are playing as second-class kid. These kids don't have anybody that comes. Thank you sixty on basketball's the dominated by intercity poor black kids that don't have the money to pay for extra things call such as going on a date or going to the movies with a girlfriend or even going out to lunch I thought it felt that was wrong. That those kids should be treated the same as the other. Call it student. He stood up for them. And that was part of the battles with the NC tway tar. Canes new book is rebel with a cause the true story of Jerry Tarquini in his father. It's a fascinating Story about one of the most compelling coaches not just in basketball but in sports period Danny thanks so much for joining us here on the Sporting. Well thank you. If you'd like to get the book it's on Amazon Dot com and use the country by name a rebel with a cause. And you'll find it. Thank you so much for having me on. I'm Jeremy Shockey and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN APP. Beginning at six am eastern time..

basketball unlv Jerry Tarquini Danny NC Jerry Tarr Canaan Kentucky Danny Tarquini Basketball Hall of fame NCAA NBA Long Beach Jeremy Schaap Greg Anthony UCLA craigslist Danny Arcane Larry Johnson Jerry Tarr Kanaan Anderson Hunt
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:03 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"How Larry Nassar abused? Young gymnasts without detection for years Tasha Schweiker who wasn't Olympian from in two thousand shortly after. She had competed for the Olympic team. She actually went to see Larry Nassar in his home. She thought of him as an uncle. a-plus Melissa Isaacs explain some of the difficulties that many young female athletes faced in the one thousand nine hundred seventies nineteen seventy five. We weren't allowed in the quote unquote. Oh Boys Jim. It are large suburban high school which is not in any way unusual. Yeah we couldn't practice or play. We're certainly grateful. We had a team and we had uniforms uniforms but we share the uniforms. Among every other girls team also we remember curt flood forever changed the landscape of Professional Baseball after twelve of years in the major leagues. I do not feel that. I am a piece of property to be bought and so on my wishes I believe that any system which produces that resolve. Oh violates my basic rights as a citizen and is inconsistent with the laws of the United States this is the sporting life on. ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. Welcome to another edition of the sporting life later later in the show in appreciation of Curt Flood Change Baseball and all of professional sports and in the process sacrificed his own career. But I it was a monumental week in New York. There was the retirement of Eli Manning and there was the Captain Derrick jeeter gliding into the hall of fame with not one hundred but ninety nine point seven percent of the vote to consider jeeter's legacy his achievements his accomplishments at a remarkable baseball baseball career. We welcome his Boswell. Jack Curry of the Yes network in formerly the New York Times. Who Co wrote with? Jeeter his autobiography more. Within twenty years ago the life you imagine Jack. Thank you for being with us this week. Jeremy it's great to talk to you. You saw the whole thing beginning to end Twenty years because when you think about this moment for Derek jeter which has been a foregone conclusion for a very long time what immediately comes to mind. I think the fact Jeremy Jeremy that he was able to survive more than survive thrive in New York for twenty seasons put up the numbers and the resume that he did six most hits. It's of all time five world series captain of the Yankees and not only do it on the field but never have a hint of controversy off the field you you and I both covered many athlete. who were swallowed up by the distractions or the temptations of New York? Jeeter never let that happen to him and working on that book I think I traced some of the solution and some of the reason why talking to his mother. Father Grandmother Sister High School friends they said. Derrick jeeter that got to New York as a starting shortstop in nineteen ninety six at the age of twenty one slash twenty two that was the same derrick. Jeeter they knew as a fourteen or fifteen year old that that he was committed he was disciplined. He was mature. He had this goal and he was going to chase it down and I. I don't millions of kids at that goal to play for the Yankees jeeter actually made it happen. Speaking to Jack Curry of the yes network. WHO's covered dare cheaters entire career as a a player New York all two decades of the five World Series Championships Rookie of the year award? The three thousand hits Jack You got to know him Uh of course on a personal basis. Well I was around is one of those guys who was around occasionally. I'd seen once in a while and and I developed honestly honestly a fondness for him but to be around every day that contradicts push for twenty years. How would you describe him on that personal level jeter jeeter there was consistent A lot of reporters who covered him rightfully said when you would walk away after a ten minute interview jeeter man he. He answered answered all the questions but but he didn't really say a heck of a lot. I think I think that was by design. One of JEETER's favourite players in fact his favorite player growing up was Dave Winfield. He had a poster of Dave Winfield on his wall. He talks about the reason that he started his turn. Two foundation was because he heard Dave winfield started a foundation and and Winfield had some tough times with the media in New York Times with the owner in New York and Jeeter digest all of that and I think when he came to New New York it was his plan that I'm going to be courteous. I'm going to be cordial but I have never going to say something that is going to end up putting me on the back page now in one one on one settings when you talk to jeter I absolutely think he was better in one on one settings. You could talk baseball with him. He would talk about the importance of his family and his life. And that's one of the things. Jeremy that I think should be highlighted and not looking to criticize other players but I've got a lot of players who will mention family and fro family Out there and then an action will occur. That will make you say wow that didn't jive with what they just said Jeeter's relationship and the importance of it with his parents and his sister. STOR is one hundred percent sincere. He told me that he talked to his mother or his father every day of his major league career. And I absolutely believe that is true. It's interesting As someone again who covered them You once in a while. We had a game rolled around or during the playoffs. But you were there all the time. You'll my sense was it. He was a leader. Obviously in much was made of his leadership abilities but he was that quiet leader he wasn't he wasn't Apollo Neal. He wasn't like those veterans who were on those teams that won The four out of five between ninety six and two thousand when those guys left. What kind of leadership to Derrick jeeter exert in that clubhouse in on the field I think jeeter had a co captain of sorts? One of his best friends friends in baseball of all time as the Sada. And when you talk to players in those Yankee years they said that Saadeh was the fiery sort sort of the guy who might get in your face in the clubhouse as you just said Jeeter was more of a lead by example and it might be a stare or or a glare. If you're late for meeting if you were late for stretching and he did like to get on guys in the clubhouse but I think that his method of being a leader Peter Jeremy and you already hinted at it was follow. What I do and Yankee players in executives used to say this all the time if your best player on a tapper tapper back to the mound is running? His pants are on fire. Well everybody in the Dugout should take notice of that. And how often do we see that. Nowadays of a player taps the the ball to second base. And there it's a slow trot the loaf the first base you watch every at bat of Derek jeters career. That never happened. So that's how I think. He manifested himself as a leader. What was it like for him all those years and he's already established as a superstar? He's already basically you been turned into a marble statue in New York. He so revered here. When Alex Rodriguez Gets New York in two thousand four and then they end up sharing for longtime the left side of the Infield? How did that relationship work? How did how did Derek feel about it? Yeah it's interesting. You bring that relationship. Ah In our book which came out. Twenty years ago and A-rod was still a competitor. Era Did A little sidebar. Little five hundred handed work sidebar about their friendship and their relationship. We know that subsequently A. Rod was quoted in Esquire magazine and paraphrasing here. But where he said something along the the lines of not the guy who's going to beat you. He's not the first guy you look to take down when you're facing the Yankees it might be O'Neill or -Tino or Bernie and those words Stung jeeter and Jeeter wasn't happy. We all know the history there that Iraq tried to apologize. I think jeeter said he accepted it. and Oh wow suddenly now that guy is to. Here's the thing about him but jeter wanted to win and Iran made them a better team and so having a rod fifty feet to his right. I think jeeter and era survived together. I don't think they were the greatest of friends anymore. But I think they understood for the common good This is how the Yankees we're GONNA win. And they eventually did in two thousand nine. I'd I'd be remiss if we didn't get to the one out of three hundred ninety seven element of the story. This week. I'll take my perspective is like big deal. Who Cares? You know one out of three hundred ninety seven but it is a big deal because now the hall of fame isn't just about getting in it's not what percentage you got it. Of course that wasn't the story for the vast majority of the history of enshrinement in the hall of fame Your your thoughts on the controversy. I'm going to tell you an exchange I had was jeeter. We had him on our yes network. Derrick Jeeter Hall of fame special the other night and I asked stat question. I said Derek. The huge bold headline is Derek. Jeter goes into the hall of fame somewhere down in the lower half or the bottom of the story it says is one person did not vote for him. How do you feel about that? And the first words out of Jeeter's mouth where I don't care to listen I'm going to focus on the men and women who did vote for me. I'm in the hall of fame. That's what matters. And then after a little bit of a pause he said. Hey Jack you're the one guy so he had a little bit of fun with it. Because I I still have a hall of fame vote and no I was not the one person I think he's GonNa be fine tuned. I it was not me Ah Shaggy the reggae Song Reggae guy have a song was a mate. That wasn't me a little musical knowledge in there. I think along the lines lines of you you do not get a bigger plaque. You do not get better placement because you were unanimous would it have been really nice symmetry for he and Mariano to to go in at one hundred percent in back to back years yes it would have but when we start going down through history Jeremy and we we recount all of the players who were not unanimous which everybody except Mario Rivera right. I have a hard time getting all worked up about it. This was not the railroading of Captain Dreyfuss or the Tana Heist you so you would've thought so in New York Jack Hurry It's always a pleasure and especially this week as I said. Derek JETER's Boswell the CO author with Derek Jeter of the life. You Imagine Jack tells me is still in print at available at Amazon Jack. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me Jerem enjoyed it this is is the sporting life on. ESPN radio and the ESPN APP..

Derrick jeeter New York Derek jeter Jack Curry Baseball Yankees Jeremy Jeremy Derrick Jeeter Hall of fame New York Times Derek ESPN Peter Jeremy Jeremy SCHAAP Larry Nassar Dave Winfield Tasha Schweiker Melissa Isaacs Jeeter Jeeter digest
When Eagles Fans Booed Santa: The Notorious True Story

ESPN Daily

01:25 min | 1 year ago

When Eagles Fans Booed Santa: The Notorious True Story

"It's one of the most infamous legends in Sports History Philadelphia. Eagles fans are so naughty. They once booed Santa and pelted him with snowballs in one of ESPN's finer moments of investigative. Work Jeremy SCHAAP track down the mythical man who is on the receiving end of that icy attack got to the bottom of the SPA humbug story. It's Wednesday December twenty v. I mean times and this is espn daily presented by Dell small business at ESPN daily. We tell the stories of the world's greatest teams coaches built championship teams with players uniquely qualified for their roles. That's why you need indeed for Your Business. Indeed provides tools like skills tests to help candidates. Show the perfect retire for you post a job at indeed dot com slash. ESPN daily and try skills tests for free that's indeed dot com slash. ESPN daily terms. Conditions and exclusions apply. JEREMY HIGH TO LOW MEENA. Happy Holidays when do I

Espn Jeremy Schaap Jeremy High Eagles Philadelphia Dell Santa
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Jeremy Shop Over the next hour a profile of Browns defensive end myles Garrett recent actions surprised the people who know him best some kids they'd rather doai than any kind of exposure experience of poetry but he was one of the few that jumped right into it. Writing is this something creative in private firm plus author. Michael Michael Powell explains the important role basketball plays in the Navajo community. They've been playing this for well over a hundred years and it is absolutely. We've passionate of the place. Lee is a town where I was based of thirty five hundred and if it was any kind of big game they would have five thousand fans there at night this is the sporting life on. ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. Welcome to another edition of the sporting light. Later in the show will be speaking with Michael Powell The New York Times about his new book on basketball on the Navajo whole reservation in Arizona. But first we start with perhaps the biggest story of the week the Colin Kaepernick workout. Which I guess you could say went awry it was supposed to be an NFL organized workout at the last moment There were complications. I guess we could put it that way and capper happen. It worked out under his own. Auspices are Howard. Bryant's are frequent guest and good friend was covering the goings on and he joins us now. Howard it's been? It's been a busy week for Colin Kaepernick and and for you personally is well. We're speaking now on Thursday Thursday. And how are you wrapping your head around the events of last weekend and subsequently well I think the bottom line Jeremy it really is is on a week later. We still have questions. That simply have been unanswered. And it's really important to get those questions answered as of Oh a week ago today the NFL and Colin Kaepernick. It was Thursday. They had pretty much. Set The die in motion in terms workout in flowery branch Linda. I probably went Georgia about an hour. Northeast of Atlanta Falcons facility. However what they hadn't done was worked got the actual details of the workout itself? What were the parameter is going to be who is going to be in what positions etcetera etcetera and so the desire the nature of what took place was on Tuesday? The NFL gave Colin Kaepernick's team a two hour. Take it or leave even offered to be in Atlanta on Saturday. But they had done this. Essentially without the buy in of the thirty two teams and essentially it appeared. But we're going to happen. was that the teams the teams being Catholic team in the NFL office legal team. We're going to have some sort of rolling negotiation creation up until Saturday. I guess both sides fairly confident that they could get a deal. Done not necessarily the way to go when you've got so much animosity. Between these two sides for the the past three years neither side had spoken since capper nick and the league had settled. Their collusion settled their lawsuit in February. So they haven't spoken in. What about eight months nine months and so as the week rolled on detail after detail after detail became sticking point after sticking point and by the time we got to Friday night? The capital team was beginning to feel very pessimistic. That anything was going to happen. If they also didn't want to be caught in a situation where they they went down there and they didn't want to be accused of sandbagging the event. They WanNa make sure that by the time they left. Atlanta there was some footage of common CAPITEC working Out For the world so they began mobilizing looking for an ultimate plan. B. Location Calling School districts calling the call Georgia Tech. They were calling different places to see where they could hold a work out in case these negotiations broke down. Eventually they had settled if things hadn't worked out at the Charles R drew high school in Riverdale. Oh about ten minutes south of the Atlanta Airport and by Saturday morning. The workout was supposed to take place at three PM Saturday. By eleven eleven thirty things were going even further south and by by two twenty the Catholic team informed the NFL. Even though while I was sitting out in front of the gate at the Falcons facility. NFL teams began in a NFL. Teams began arriving to the facility. Catholics team had informed warm the NFL that they were not going to be attending and that they had planned in indeed to go to plan B.. An alternate site an hour away. And that's that's where things broke down cabinets team went down to Riverdale. They did the they did their work out for about an hour from around four thirty five thirty on Saturday eight. NFL All teams went down and watch the workout. The other seventeen or so decided to skip it including Hugh Jackson who always to be running the the workout for the NFL. L. Speaking with Howard Bryant. Who's been covering the Colin Kaepernick workout in negotiations with the NFL last week and has been covering the Colin Kaepernick story now now for more than three years and ultimately Howard? What was the straw that broke the camel's back? The ultimate sticking point that could not be surmounted the ultimate sticking point was trust really. It's turned into a truth issue. He said she said but the bottom line was trust and Katherine team wanted to have their their own independent cameras filming the workout. The press was not allowed to attend so the cabinet team felt like if they were in real danger of having the NFL taken at if the raw footage to broadcast outlets if they were the they didn't trust it the NFL wouldn't just simply take an hour workout in break down to his five worse throws or the mistakes that he may have made in terms of footwork. Or whatever or that he wanted the world to see the entire workout. He didn't want to be at the mercy of the NFL HE NFL on the other hand refuse to allow them to have independent cameras and with no media and no independent independent cameras. The cabinet team felt to expose and they felt like that was something they couldn't abide by. What about the waiver? Not just the injury sorry waved. or which would indemnify the NFL of Colin Kaepernick got hurt during this workout. But would also prevent capper nick from pursuing litigation nation against the NFL based on anything. That's happened since The the settlement they reached back in February or the Catholic team. I had no intention of signing that waiver that was so broad it would have essentially forfeited collins writes in case something to place at the workout. And what they were really afraid of. What the real real deal was? It wasn't necessarily injury it was it was the post workout interview that took place later. For example the real question action was obviously every team in the league that had talked to cabinet was going to ask him if we signed you. Do you plan on neely. And if he had said yes and then subsequently no team signed him. That may have produced an actionable offense that might have been proof of collusion or if one team talked to him and he said he was going to kneel in that information got around to the other thirty two teams then had common CAPITEC. Sign that waiver then he would have had no recourse for a second collusion lawsuits suit. I simply believe from what I've heard in terms of the reporting that that there was simply no trust between these two the NF that the that the cabinet team counter counter with. Just let's just get that language out of there and let's just do a standard injury waiver in the NFL also noted that and and between that and the video taping this whole thing fell what part what we thought a week ago might turn into a story about the reconciliation of the NFL with Colin Kaepernick. a very much different story right now as we consider it a few days later Howard Bryant has been covering it for. ESPN always a pleasure. Sir Thank you for joining us live pleasure thank you this is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN APP for his actions. In a game against the Pittsburgh steelers steelers last week defensive end myles Garrett of the Cleveland Browns has been suspended indefinitely by the NFL without pay Garrett. Reportedly argued in his appeals heels. Hearing this week that he was provoked by steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph and hit Rudolph on the head with a helmet only after Rudolf directed a racial slur at him. Rudolf categorically denies that accusation a former first overall pick in the draft Garrett who'd been having a strong season he was among the league you leaders in sacks was recently profiled by Ryan Smith for sixty. Here's the first part of that story endlessly he walks among Unseen two most. He doesn't exist when I was a boy who wrote poetry with Mama for the man play. Football is a raging tempest very quilt. Only buys you would never think when he steps inside the white lines that a train wrecks fixing to happen. He's going down and guess who is weapon of destruction and function without instruction judge by his production..

NFL Colin Kaepernick Howard Bryant ESPN myles Garrett basketball Atlanta Jeremy SCHAAP Michael Powell Michael Michael Powell Atlanta Falcons Riverdale nick Jeremy Shop New York Times Lee steelers Atlanta Airport Arizona
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:29 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Here's Jeremy Schaap next week tale bowl the renewal of one of the great rivalries in all of Sports. It is the game Harvard at Yale football rivalry that goes back much much more than a century to the very beginnings of College Football College football this year celebrating. Its One hundred fiftieth excess quiz centennial anniversary. And you could say safe for the first half of the history of College Football Ivy League football absolutely central to the game that has not been the case in the last sixty sixty five years since the Ivy League made the decision to deemphasize football but even after that decision was made nineteen sixty eight on November twenty third one. The greatest one of the most epic one of the most exciting football games ever was played at the elbow. It is known as the game among all of of the Games and joining us. Now is the author George. How cult whose book the game? Harvard Yale in America in nineteen sixty eight was published published last year to Commemorate The fiftieth anniversary of the game. George thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me George for people who are unfamiliar. I'm familiar with that remarkable game that ended in twenty nine twenty nine tie. What makes it so significant even now? Well the significance Is that as you mentioned it was. It's one of the most thrilling college football games of all time. Harvard and Yale came into the game undefeated for the first time since Nineteen O. Nine Yale was ranked sixteenth in the country. Going into the game ahead of. Nobody knows anything about college. Football today will believe this. They were ranked ahead of Alabama and Nebraska Aska and so It was it was actually a game that would affect the you know if you'll won the game handedly. It was said that they would vote. Bolt into the top ten football rankings. And what made the game so Fascinating at the time was. He'll raced out to a sixteen sixteen point the three minutes to go Harvard. School harboured went down the field. They ended up scoring sixteen points in the final forty two seconds of of the game which is almost a mathematical impossibility And Tied Jail Twenty nine twenty nine absolutely stunning ill. which was heavily favored to win the game? Now the reason people still remember this game is not only because it was a thrilling game but because because it was a tie in nineteen ninety six as you probably probably know the. NCAA voted to to allow overtime. So there's not gonna be any more hiking in college football and so That was one of the reasons for the game is still remembered for me. What was interesting about the game was that it was this seemingly miraculous truce kind of The players you didn't see it that way sat in the midst of an extremely polarizing year nineteen sixty eight when all sorts of things were happening in the country to divide our country actress. There's a lot to be interested in in the game from nineteen sixty eight fifty one years ago next week There were a lot of players who would go on to do remarkable Kabul things in their lives in and out of football. I think there were three Rhodes scholars on the Combined Rosters of the two teams Calvin Hill. Who would go on to great career in Football Tommy Lee Jones was playing guard for Harvard And that remarkable. Finish that you mentioned. But the book really is about the backdrop of the country in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight in the middle of the Vietnam War The campuses themselves Harvard. I Yale which were just boiling over with tensions and anti war sentiment How do you situate the story of the game and football football which which in many ways we think of as kind of a cornerstone of of society When when society was falling apart at the seams? Well it's so interesting that's a good question because at the time in the Ivy League schools particularly yell all Harvard and Harvard football was seen as a very very militaristic sort of Right wing sport. I would even say the the Harvard students who know sorta scorned the football players in some ways whereas the L. football still played a major part in campus life but in nineteen sixty sixty eight when both of those teams were moving through their seasons undefeated Even the Harvard students start started to get interested in football and started to. I think this is kind of remarkable and I think on both campuses football provided something of a relief from all of the stresses that were going on the world at the time. I mean most of the students at Harvard and Yale in those days as soon as they graduated from college they were GonNa be facing the draft and so They we're thinking my God. What am I going to do going to go to Vietnam? I going to go to Canada and football. I think in that regulus you you know season for Harvard and Yale provided them with a diversion and outlet. Oh let's go to the Ilbo. Let's go to Harvard Stadium and forget about the war for two or three hours and just watch these two. You know amazing teams Do what they do best again. We're speaking George. How cult about his book published last year? The Game Harvard Yale and American nineteen sixty eight Colt was nominated for a national book award for Nonfiction for his his book. The Big House about his family's home on Cape Cod That was that book was published in two thousand three. Your Harvard man and yourself described to our listeners. Don't really understand what it's all about the Harvard Yale rivalry if we can do so in fewer than a few hours. Well as you alluded to you know. Harvard and Yale Yale primarily practically invented. The game not quite white they are. It's to Harvard and heels endless grant that theirs was not the first first. Football game played in this country they were beaten by about five years by Princeton and rutgers but but once Harvard and Yale began to play they pretty much made all the rules for the sport through the end of the twenty th the the Nineteenth Century and the early twentieth century. Walter camp at Yale pretty much device the modern game and Man I do have to Pop Warner Lean in credit. I mean it's you're right. It's all ter- camp but we do you know I feel obligated. A foreigner make some important contributions and on the Field Yale and Harvard pretty much dominated Perhaps Cornell did too but I think he'll and Harvard with you know they want a lot of national championships up until about nineteen twenty five and then And then those you know the Ivy League began to fade. What made the sixty eight game remarkable is that you know? It was one of those years that the Ivy League was in resurgence You know also Princeton nineteen fifties with the cavs Meyer. Who would win the heisman trophy? They were they were little waves of excellence for for Ivy League. Football and sixty eight was one of those ways. But you know so Harvard and Yale Pretty much defined the sport As as you mentioned really for the First Fifty Years Fifty Years of the sport you know of course we're talking about nineteen and sixty eight the assassination of Martin Luther King Junior and Robert Kennedy of taking place a few months earlier race riots in many American cities is there is unrest as we said particularly concerning the draft which is now which is now taking more Roy college educated kids so the campuses are in an uproar. How was Harvard? And how was Zale reacting to larger societal forces at this time well one of the reasons I wrote. This book is because I had a real desire to know no what the players on the field. I was fourteen when I was at the game and I saw these players and they were like Greek gods to me but I wanted to find out who they were in nineteen sixty eight whenever this uh-huh how did they react to things like the draft. How did they react to the war? How did they react to the assassinations? And and all of the really horrible things that went on that year and indeed you know many of the players the players were affected in some way but for instance Harvard's top player. John Tyson chastened who was a Who is would have had? NFL career in mind and certainly would have probably would have gone on to play in the NFL. After Martin Luther King's things assassination He actually quit the team to devote his life to to furthering the cause of African Americans is on on the Harvard campus and he helped set up the the You know the the the African American studies major at Harvard. So he quit the team. He didn't actually play in the nineteen sixty eight game Harvard also had two members of students for Democratic Society listeners. May Not remember this but students for SDS. 'cause the radical antiwar organization and Harvard to Harvard players were members in fact five as months after the game they would be part of the group that took over a university hall Harvard Ministration Building for for night before they were dragged out by the Cambridge. Police And Harvard had Vietnam veteran on its roster. He was an all ivy safety. He hadn't touched a football in three years before forty came back from Vietnam in nineteen sixty eight and rejoined the Harvard team. Can you play a big role in that yield. Game four of the players on the field that day would go on to to to serve in Vietnam and all the players would be in some way affected. You know by that year by that you're you know has all of us who lived through that era tumultuous time and a remarkable game. We didn't even get to the famous headline Harvard. Bt Twenty Nine Twenty Jeanine. George how colts book is the game. Harvard Yale in American one thousand nine hundred sixty eight the Harvard Yale game taking place again at the elbow as it did in nineteen sixty fifty eight next weekend in new haven. George thank you for joining us. Thank you so much. Jeremy I appreciate it. I'm Jeremy Shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting being life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN APP. Beginning at six. Am Eastern Time Long. I stole are found in the attic. Attic it's closed. Its eyes are just very lifelike. One head keeps spinning scary. Very really scary. Mixing GEICO's easy to use mobile APP. You can manager Keiko Policy Whenever Land Looks Don very deep in the ground. Happy gyco wing download the industry-leading GEICO APP today..

Harvard football Harvard Yale Yale Football George Harvard Stadium Ivy League Harvard team College Football College Harvard Ministration Building Sports Jeremy Schaap Vietnam GEICO
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:01 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"This year. I thought she was gonna move. We're moving last year. I thought she was going to beat us soccer atlanta's here's u._s. Open she's lost four times in a row now. <hes> and she's never done that before the most she's ever in finals including last week's when she has retire canadian open the most. You've you'd never lost in finals before. That was two zero <hes> so look. I'm hoping for the best for i one six serena make more history than she's already made <hes> and there is so much that i respect about her. I like about her <hes> but i just can't act that way and new new york has always been a problem with serena her worst <hes> temper her biggest biggest problems have always happened at the u._s. Open long ago when it was against leads kim clijsters and she lost her way and she ended up getting defaulted the end of the mansion sam soldier when she played the loss of her in the u._s. Open final and this thing last year. I mean this i think because it's the last major of the year and three and basically shut down her season after the open. I'm more often than not that. She's trying to make history as she's trying to do. In a couple of weeks i think and the fact that it's new york probably doesn't know and new yorkers who who wanted to see you're going. She's always had it hortus. I think they hold it all together in new york. I've never seen her behaved the way she has in new york at say wimbledon on san and court. They're speaking with mary carillo mary. You know you know this stuff obviously as well as anyone and <hes> you you know there's what we do in sports radio. We're talking about the greatest talk superlatives and and from somewhere in the outside it seemed almost heretical over the last years to suggest i that serena's not the greatest <hes> women's tennis player of all time is there. Is there any argument about it anymore. Is there competition. Can we still talk about <hes> steffi or martino or is the debate for all purposes all intents and purposes over. I can make that argument. I mean i that martina in october one as much as she did and played singles doubles and mixed doubles as astonishing to me that steffi graf won twenty two majors that is a great number except when you realize that greatest rival at the time monica sell us was out for almost two and a half years when someone stabbed her literally stabbed her <hes> uh in the name of steffi graf returning to number one martina and chrissie they meet each other cry just about every weekend for more than fifteen years was the problem but it's not a problem of course serena is in that conversation and maybe it's a very upset that she has not had a great great rivalry. You know not for a long time we all thought in the early two thousand that she and venus would be playing majors for major titles forever and then after a couple of years that didn't stop happening except once or twice more at wimbledon. <hes> serena's the sharapova serena things i mean god bless maria sharapova but she hasn't beaten serena since two thousand four so the rivalry there is more for <hes> sponsorship deals <hes> and watch videos then tennis matches <hes> serena habit terrific looking rivalry with the belgian players you're seeing n._f. For awhile and and all of a sudden just seen up in up in and and leaves the sport retires so i you know when you look at the overall scope scope of serena's career it is luminous. She's magnificent. <hes> i think why there's still a conversations because people like me very well. Remember what it was like watching chris ever play martina and how consistently they got into finals you know so in how much how much they were playing yeah i i mean and margaret court is maury courts twenty. Four majors is the one that serena's going after and people are critical of that saying because mortgage started in the amateur days <hes> and eleven of her twenty four majors came at the australian open. We're quite frankly a lot of the draws they weren't not only were they not full of great players but but they weren't even large they were thirty two draws instead of today's twenty eight one hundred twenty eight drunk so of course these barstool arguments and and you you know i'm i'm very happy to belly up to the bar and blow the suds off a few and had this conversation bud more interesting conversation for me is on the men's side and again again until roger federer novak broke which put down their rackets for good i don't i can't say who's the greatest of all time i can't really say say that the greatest hope is roger federer i if you figure that novak much younger than those guys roger just turned thirty eight. <hes> novak's was playing unbelievable tennis. He just wanted wimbledon that got him to sixteen against roth is eighteen majors and and cetera twenty imagine to federal had won that final any two match points jeremy he would have gotten a twenty one majors and djokovic stated fifteen. That is a huge difference. It's insane. When we i grew up <hes> you know roy. Emerson's twelve seemed as if it was going to stand forever and half of those were australians of course but but you know then we can talk about labor right eleven and all those years. He didn't get to play because he was a professional. Professionals didn't get to play in the major championships when he one of the u._s. Hoping then got so fourteen majors and so all right. Here's a good way to end. He had to have been thinking well. That's going to last a while <laughter>. I you know i i genuinely thought god pete sampras is he could be the greatest player of all time. Now people don't even having no in the same in the same conversation as the three were watching now especially because he didn't win the french yeah because he doesn't have the career grand slam i it's it's been fascinating a men's tennis and before i let you go. I got probably seventeen assignments just today but you know at a time when you were playing the game in the late seventies as a professional and american men <hes> were so strong so powerful in the way that they continue to be in the sports such as golf per which along with tennis most international sport in some ways <hes> and what is it been now. It's been what has has it been. Eighteen years since an american man won a major tournament. That's something we never thought we'd say andy. Roddick winning the u._s. open right in one or two <hes> i mean that's something that seemed of course take it away. From the big three and murray as well ended virtually no one's want anything other than those guys but but the americans haven't been and finals they haven't been in some good players but they're none none who is great. What's a what's going to rectify that for the american men. Is there anything <hes> <hes> you know the american men and this is a bit of a broad generalization but anyway american men tend to lean on in big serves and big forehands <hes> they played pretty good looking offense not as big on defense the best players in the world these days of all brought up on clay play on clay which i always call the sports classroom you learn how to run. You learn how to be fit to learn how to attack. You learn how to defend you learn how to transition <hes> that is not something that the american men have been famous for for a long for a long time. <hes> you know the and i i'm not sure how so i i truly believe that more american boys had to grow up on clay and stop using just us their offense as as their weapons because it's just too many people can get that stuff back and the american men who are you know and there's a couple of nice looking the young guys who are coming up francis fiascos playing well taylor fritz <hes> i leo polka is seven feet tall jeremy. I mean his service. It's it's hard to even track sometimes but are they. They compared against these other guys who can play so well from everywhere on the court and and have more variety and are more willing to grind out long points. <hes> and it's gonna be tough. It's it's almost people say it's cyclical. I never under under quite understand when people say oh. It's it's cyclical. I don't really know what that what that means what i do know. Is that <hes> simona halla. I there's just one wimbledon twenty seven year over manian not that big not that powerful now in romania is another story is pitched. I i wanna go. I mean when she wanted wimbledon. She beat serena easily. In the final she went back and at the bucharest sports city and there are thirty thousand people cheering her on you know she's getting awards and people are crying weeping just looking at her and i mean tennis is the biggest sport in romania now they used to be especially for women would have the star see tiriac. It's been a long time since those guys they've had. They've had some. They've had some very colorful. Oh that's a good word like healing the south he like he anterior but the biggest sport for romanian girls in you know it used to be gymnastics just ten now. Everyone wants to be simone the hell so in those ways i believe in cycles <hes> i think novak djokovic is inspired servia roughing. It certainly has inspired spain to produce champions so maybe if we do finally get a grandson champion on the men's side. Young boys will play as it is plenty of young girls but and we've got very good young girls coming up including maybe especially cocoa gop. The caters got through the qualities that women living got herself for the fourth round before how took her down. It's fun step good time to be <hes> watching tennis well. We it's always fun watching mary carillo doing whatever she does at the olympics on tennis on real sports and i'm not saying that just because you once offered me a job as as one of your writers producers at the olympics at twenty eighty five years ago when we were beijing jeremy. I might take you up on that anymore. Thank you know what <hes> aw all the help. I can get that stood but but thank you so much for joining us. It's really been a pleasure and there's nobody better were honored to have you here on the sporting life jeremy schaap thanks for having i'm jeremy shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every saturday and sunday morning on e._s._p._n. Radio and e._s._p._n. App beginning at six a._m. Eastern time..

serena tennis new york novak djokovic roger federer novak martina steffi graf jeremy schaap soccer romania kim clijsters mary carillo pete sampras roger federer atlanta maria sharapova olympics margaret court martino
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"The dips in Sunday's come. And we'd better be prepared for it. As it is every Sunday. I always say he's like he he'd be the best center fielder of all time. Because the way he tracks the ball or best one when we're running it and throwing it or quickly guys. Guys, did a great job of getting them in the right, shoes and can't slip. It's not okay. To does some things. First verse special, right? It doesn't things that other people can be dangerous. You know, the answer that one, you know, in there, we we we gave the game ball to the city into the fans I'm having a blast. It's a great group of guys to be around. Frank's our great leader for the organization and. I'm having fun playing a game. Again. I think if you look at the game we control the game each season stands along with right? I feel like it's it's building blocks. You know last year was a building block for this year. We're seventy six right now, we still have up here about we have to continue to be very, greedy hard never say die to to. It's non-judgmental group for guys shoot. My fair share balls in the dirt and falls in the wrong place. But you'll learn until you just got to keep chipping away chipping away and trust. Trust is a huge part of this game greatest team sport in the world. When you talk about mental toughness that guy we got playing quarterback force. He's a tough, son. Now, we'll continue to work. We don't absorb the negativity. That comes with our current position. We understand that you know, we're just gonna keep competing our tails off in preparing our tails off in with chips fall where I had enough big decisions to make during the course of the day, and I didn't wanna have to make any more. So it kinda got that out of the way, you know, we didn't run the ball as well as we'd like, but that's an eleven man job for office of unit, plus the flagon fit very good in my pocket. I was always didn't know if it was gonna fall out. I mean that was a there's a good three films. Catch the first one certainly looked like we were surprised we didn't win it. But again, I've been surprised before. I mean, we you sit here and hindsight's, you know, but twenty twenty fifty fifty whatever deal is probably, you know, looking back at it. We'll we'll evaluate its, but my. Have been wise to hold onto that other one. Joe Philbin being out of challenges less than ninety seconds into his Packers coaching career is an epic sports achievement. What is Bill Polian doing? I mean, the colts have taken no for an answer six times this year. I mean, he's he's the grittiest team in the league. And that they don't take no for an answer and six times this year. No, they've taken a no. And the now, hey you wanna win? No. It was It was at at one one time. time that Frank right? Could've just taken an I don't know as final answer. Jeremy Schaap talks about one of the most stunning results in the history of sports with us, neck donlevatar. I love me..

Bill Polian colts Frank Jeremy Schaap chipping Joe Philbin Packers ninety seconds
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"Let me ask you another thing about that part of your job. What what is the most memorable e- sixty or outside the lines or any of those features right that you've worked on for me. They're kind of related. But one in particular, which I'm proud of his story that we did about cut tar and Decians in which migrant labourers there live and work. And that was very, we did is that the one I'd get ready for the World Cup right about now building the world competent was a story that you know. Was largely unknown story that we were working on for years story that I think opened up a lot of is systems in place carts are, which is one of the richest countries in the world which is going to be the host of the world's hot dealers sports event in which you know continues, I think, make a difference because there's still pressure being applied to improve the conditions. Workers in cuts are, and that's really the thing that's been most wording, eleven years plus that we were working on east sixty that we've kind of carved out this niche doing stories on human rights issues around the World, Social Justice issues here in the US and around the world that sometimes are only tangentially about sports only marginally about sports, but that's. You know, that's been our mandate. He'll be story and they, there's res about sports and society and. That one, that one's the one that stands out and then connected with the story that we did about e foot up ladder your later. Let us that wretched we did an hour on the mess that was in particular during the bladder. And I think that opened up a lot is to the timing was good. Ended up coming out just before best. Igations were announced to the work. Fief broke some news and within a couple of weeks, there's a causal relationship timely within a couple of weeks. That piece guy who seemed like in that job river with out of that, or you know, it's, you know, it's interesting people on the outside wouldn't know this, but ESPN may do fifteen hours on a particular sport, let's pick soccer and and promote it, show it talk about it, make it seem like, you know, ESPN. And soccer or one. And then it joins us tonight at ten when Jeremy Schaap takes all fee for apart. Understand that the these are two separate two separate things. I found that out, you know what ESPN sports does and what you guys do on your end sometimes are two different things that you have that kind of autonomy and that kind of freedom. That's right to follow your own projects. And you know, we always have, you know, we've been. Luke, we've been fortunate it is, you know. You know, there are relationships Lee and our relationship with the global governing bodies all that stuff. But you know, they've never prevented us from doing our boarding United States, things that we're a, you know, most proud of over the years or challenging the powers that be calendering national government now challenging redo allies. The US, whatever it may be. You know, we've gone out. We've done those stories than human rights stuff. We kind it in. Fard RA. And those these are all these are all serious serious topics that end up being, you know, obviously. Sort of cultural cultural changing the culture of of a lot of sports, and then you do something, which I think isn't necessarily culturally. Seismic. The guy shoots himself in a nightclub in New York. Is that more funny or is that more. You know that one, you know, like SCO, Burress right around think giving, you know, thousand eight. You know, it's not funny though because circumstances there is certainly something comedic about the circumstances. If somebody shooting themselves in the leg raising themselves, essentially a skin wound in Ben ending up in prison for twenty months using thirty five million dollars bringing down the giants season. All of those things perplex go, very sad..

ESPN United States soccer Jeremy Schaap SCO giants Igations New York Burress Ben Luke Lee thirty five million dollars fifteen hours twenty months eleven years
"jeremy schaap" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy schaap" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"Welcome everyone to the next installment of holding court with Gene-o REM. This is Gino Auriemma hopefully you've gotten the sense now of our previous podcasts. We touch on a lot of things, mostly sports, but not always some, you know, popular some maybe not so well known, but always interesting. I hope and today's guest has a famous last thing and has become famous in his own right, Jeremy Schaap, son of the legendary dick chap who people my age grew up with very influential sports reporter writer, author and Jeremy now, very prominent writer, journalist sportscaster at ESPN among other various projects that he does, and we're going to touch on a lot of different topics. Hopefully ones. That you'll find interesting and ones that you'll find thought provoking here we go. I didn't grow up with a with a famous dad, my son, my son did my son grew up with a famous, and I remember an and he actually played basketball, and it was actually really, really good. And I know some of the things that you know growing up through high school and and all that. Tell me about growing up with your dad and watching him on TV and reading his stuff and listening to people talk about him. At what point did you think? You know, I wanna be like that, or I want to do something like that. Not necessarily be like that. You know, I, I wouldn't say it was from the very beginning. I mean, growing up with my dad. You know, it was a lot of fun in the nineteen seventies in New York. He wasn't just the guy who covered war wasn't going to be talking about four t was just kind of part of the team. No know he knew these guys get relationships these guys. So you know they were. They were friends of it. They were business partners. Well, he wrote books with, you know, gave Bush shirt. Tom's e kill name, rank year godfather, Jerry Kramer. Any room and he was very close with, you know, I'll leave all of those Knicks tonight era. Reggie Jackson came over the house. So there was somebody who mattered in the world of sports. Pretty much my dad knew them, so it's still natural to be around that and it was fun. I mean, most of my weekends, you know these days Inc, things have changed. No parents take their kids to, you know, their little league games and all that kind of stuff. I just tagged along with my dad to work. I mean, my weekends were pretty much up in NBC who's working. I was a little kid hanging out and just watch him, do his show pieces us the live stuff. And it seemed like a lot of fun. I mean, I got to the all these great games and I was president some of the most historic moments in sports. You know, he took me to spring training that was like being in the candy sports being he. Loved baseball. So it was great. Why wouldn't you wanna do that? You're part of that because I really never felt. I think him like. And that's everybody's dream, you know to to actually have a job where it's not work. I mean, you know, I had a job where a bunch of jobs we're actually had to go to work and actually do work. So when people say, you know, is it hard work coaching, basketball? I said, well, I don't have any calluses on my hands so I don't. I don't think it is. I've calluses in my brain, I guess that's where we get them, but growing up. What was your favorite sport? I was the baseball guy. I really would. I mean, I had an appreciation for all of them. I think you know, I was grown up in the in the all leave razor, four mini era. And so- boxing was also it was just a big part of everything we talked about in sports at that point when I was a little kid. So I was who's he asked about the history of it. But for me, I, I've always been attracted to as much as what's going on now and sometimes more so the history..

Jeremy Schaap Knicks baseball basketball Gino Auriemma Jerry Kramer writer Reggie Jackson New York ESPN reporter Bush sportscaster NBC days Inc Tom president