17 Burst results for "Jeremy Owens"

"jeremy owens" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:37 min | 2 months ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Lisa Brady, the U. S just crossing that tragic milestone in the Johns Hopkins count. President Biden continues to urge Americans to get the vaccine offering reassurance. It is safe while his administration tries to keep deliveries going. Fox has gone all Scott has more live. At least the White House senior adviser for covert response, Andy Slavitt, says shipment vaccine has had been slowed by winter storms, but they are catching up. We now anticipate That all backlog doses will be delivered by midweek. That is because workers and shipping companies have adjusted hours to pack and send out doses held up by storms in several regions. Slavitt says The sites also are being urged to extend hours to vaccinate what he calls an anxious public Now that we have reached 500,000 people dead of covert Lisa Thanks, Colonel. The House Budget Committee, meantime, approving the president's nearly $2 trillion covert relief Pion Republicans note. Billions still have Been been spent from previous relief bills, the president's pick for attorney general offering priorities and reassurance that his Senate confirmation hearing Fox is Jared Halpern is live on Capitol Hill. Attorney general nominee Merrick Garland says he will put a premium on protecting civil rights and prosecuting domestic extremism. Communities of color and other minorities still face discrimination in housing. Education and employment. In the criminal Justice six system. Garland also stressed independents telling Republican senators he sees no reason. As of now not allow the special counsel reviewing the origins of the Russia investigation to finish his work. Don't have any reason to think that he should not remain in place. Garland was nominated for the U. S. Supreme Court by President Obama in 2016, a nomination that then Republican led Senate did not consider Lisa Skerritt. America is listening to Fox News. It's or all three. If use Radio 1055 w we are see. New developments in the fight to keep space command in Alabama. President Biden's defense secretary and mobile native Lloyd Austin has issued a statement in support of the U. S. Air Force's decision to move Space Command headquarters from Colorado to Redstone Arsenal. In Huntsville. Republican representative Doug Lamborn of Colorado, along with the rest of the delegation, wrote a letter to Austin asking him to review the decision, believing it was politically motivated. This despite Too thorough review of Huntsville facilities and the needs of the developing space command. Now Austin has publicly stepped forward to support the decision making process of the Air Force and the move to Alabama before the command can be moved. The Air Force says it'll take at least two years to conduct an environmental review and the final decision will be made in 2023. I'm Leah Brandon and accused Cop killer admits He did it. Jeremy Owens pleading guilty to capital murder in the killing of Birmingham police Sergeant Why Tasha Carter? Ones also entering guilty pleas in the attempted murders of two other officers. Owens sentenced to life without parole The cold weather, pushing back tornado recovery and Fulton Dale now officials are saying it could take years before the city gets back to normal. More than 65 homes destroyed in that storm, debris still piled up everywhere. The fire chief Justin Mackenzie. A lot of the pipes that might have been somewhat damaged during that time when the freezing weather hit then we didn't have a lot of water main breaks in the damaged buildings and things I know it's been a while in a couple weeks from it, but our residents.

Jared Halpern Andy Slavitt Lisa Skerritt Leah Brandon Jeremy Owens Doug Lamborn Huntsville Lisa Brady 2016 Slavitt 2023 Owens Garland Colorado 500,000 people Tasha Carter Alabama Lloyd Austin Merrick Garland White House
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Senate races even compressional races are about gonna be about other issues as well what's the inside and discussion and within the California Republican Party on this right now I think it's turned out I mean the bottom line is that people there was a wave principally between mostly with women and some moderate Republican women that wiped out the Republicans that they can pick up one or two congressional sees that they lost then they'll call it a victory the parties on the move back for it and I mean the goals of the bar is very very low for the California Republican Party but on the national stage it's a whole different story I mean the Republicans really really want to take that Congress and they're thinking that if Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren are the nominees then in a lot of the states that were swing states they're gonna be too radical in too much and when we looked at Adam Schiff talking about freedom they say freedom is not what the Democrats want mandated health care by the government and all the other prescriptive things that the federal government to do so that's the Republican play alright well thanks to both of you for making time for us this afternoon KQED politics and government correspondent resell Lagos and GOP strategist Sean Walsh great to have you both thank you this week's Silicon Valley got a shock when officials close to the Saudi crown prince told the Wall Street journal they had knowledge of the planned to half the phone of Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos bases his phone was now famously hacks last year leading to the self revelation of an extramarital affair also this week Google became the fourth company ever to reach a trillion dollars in market value and the latest battle for eyeballs in the streaming wars has begun and Netflix is feeling the pressure with me now is San Francisco bureau chief and tac editor for marketwatch Jeremy Owens and business columnist for the LA times Michael hill sake would joins us now via Skype from Los Angeles welcome to you both thanks for having me thanks good to be here and Michael let's start with you in Los Angeles because you're just out with a column this morning talking about how you're not convinced that Silicon Valley is going to suddenly start viewing Saudi Arabia is toxic to take investment from that's right the the big scandal that is connected to the Saudi regime is the killing of democracy Shoji who was a columnist for The Washington Post he was a well known Saudi critic and dissident he was murdered it's it's well established and he was murdered by the Saudi regime in twenty eighteen and then made is that is that has a because the Saudi regime could be toxic as an investor or as an investment destination then this this word that that the regime may have actually uses his phone isn't going to do it either and we're not just talking about Silicon Valley you talk about Hollywood and other industry that is very entrenched in taking money from Saudi Arabia right a lot of industries a lot of American companies see Saudi Arabia as as a growing market opportunity so we've seen hotel companies like Marriott signing deals we've seen construction companies like that tell signing deals and we see a high tech companies showing a lot of interest in investing in the Saudi industrial infrastructure so a lot of them are going in you know you can look at this and say capital has no inherent morality or it's a moral but but individuals make these decisions about where to invest and and who to take money from and and at this point there's very very little evidence that anybody is saying we should not be doing business with Saudi Arabia and not only who to take money from but who take direction from remember that the Saudis own a board seat on uber one of the biggest companies go public last year in a huge company in San Francisco and and it does span beyond take as you mention McKesson here in San Francisco as well is is that one of the largest builders there is an and they have a lot of involvement with the Saudis you mention in your column that's true but I mentioned also Penske media which owns variety and Rolling Stone and women's wear daily they could two hundred million dollars from Saudi Arabia in twenty eighteen the Saudi investment is still live over and speak and and it looks like it's part of the kingdoms effort to really control the narrative about its behavior yeah you mentioned also endeavor which unlike the companies you just laid out there did give the money back after that can show G. killing endeavor the big talent agency down in Hollywood Jeremy what we know at this point about the mechanics of how this happens carried out well one of the comes from a consultancy believe it's called at TI that examined businesses iPhone and they were able to say exactly you know with a hundred percent confidence that this was the thing that did it but there was a what's that message from MBS to Basil's and after he received that message which they weren't even able to say whether he clicked on or not all of a sudden he started sending a lot of data from his iPhone toward Saudi Arabia so that's what kind of gave them the confidence to say well this is probably what did it but you know there have been doubts from other people who say they should be able to get more from this phone and from this message Alex stay most from the former chief security officer Facebook which owns what's out actually told the Wall Street journal this morning that he believes that if they had jailbreak the phone if they had been able to get into more of that message and once that they should be able to tell us more than they're telling us right now quickly would love your take on Michael's column I mean there's so much money from Saudi Arabia sloshing around in Silicon Valley and there are late stage companies still in start up mode that are desperate for capital they are in one of the few places they've gotten capital over the last year or two has been softbank and that soft big vision fun is almost half Saudi money right and right now we have a lot of startups desperate for cash right we're seeing austerity a lot of these late stage start ups and things like twenty three million post mates love the livery companies that are starting late people often and look for ways to cut to look better for IPO if they can find money to get them through and give them time to get to IPO and look a little bit better they're gonna take whatever money they can get at this point because there just aren't a lot of people out there willing to give money to late stage startups Jeremy let's switch gears and talk about alphabet reaching a one trillion dollars market cap Amazon dot there and it's falling back but Microsoft is still there as is apple what makes people different well Google's given if you look at apple makers on the Amazon never actually officially made it there they made it there on a single trade intraday and fell back they've never closed at that level Google joins apple Microsoft and if you just look at when they were found in those are different generations of companies apple Microsoft or that first generation of tech Google is the second generation so for it to make it there it will have less revenues lesser lesser finances than those shows that the different parts with in alphabet beyond just Google search but you talk about you too you're talking out way mo a lot of these different business is the Google owned android or potentially very valuable and I think that's what investors see cancel their not as scared of anti trust in fact if you're looking at it from an investment perspective if they did break up alphabet and for some these companies to be independent they may be worth more you know this one the most fun games wallstreet complex how much is you to work independent entity yes let me know so in some respect that lack of transparency over breaking out how much each of these units makes might be playing to Google's hand Michael what's your take on that do you think that investors have become complacent about the idea that the anti trust police might come along and break alphabet and Google out this is a probably properly skeptical that something like that is really going to happen first of all because you need a democratic president and.

California Republican Party Senate
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stop it other times in Brcko came off as a walking thesaurus people making an extraordinary noise from centralization uncle slices prospect to being cool to also question less on the bike they realize that and recognize their own folly Jeremy Owens was been as controversial as he's been entertaining in the two thousand sixteen brexit referendum he voted to stay in the European Union and brexit tears claim he bent parliamentary rules to favor pro you lawmakers early this morning as parliament was suspended Brcko was again his outspoken self criticizing the prime minister for sidelining parliament for such a long time at a crucial moment in the country's political history is not standard it's one of the longest full decades. Xanax not just in the minds of many colleagues but huge numbers of people outside an active exit. a brief scuffle broke out as opposition legislators tried to prevent the suspension it concluded with a grinning Brcko shaking the hands of the remaining lawmakers as they filed out of the Commons Franklinton NPR news London..

parliament Jeremy Owens Brcko prime minister European Union London
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Other areas and peers Frank or done yes reports the ministration wants to use the money to help with enforcement of immigration policy at the southern U. S. border the trump administration says the border searches over stretch their resources officials claim they need the extra money to address the lack of detention space for new migrants particularly single adults showing up at the border they argue the money is left over from previous years and won't impact current recovery efforts in Porter Rico president trump yesterday signed an emergency declaration promising additional federal aid for the recovery but Democrats are slamming the decision is wrong headed and cruel as tropical storm Dorian speech towards Porter Rico in Florida those FEMA finds help communities clean up and rebuild after disasters Franco or Dona as NPR news Washington democratic presidential candidates have a final shot at making it to the debate stage in Houston next month if they have not yet made the cut and peers Jessica Taylor says those trailing have until the end of today to qualify the Democratic National Committee doubled the benchmarks from June and July requiring Canada's to register at least two percent and for national or early state polls and reach a hundred thirty thousand unique donors so far ten candidates if it both marks including Joe Biden Kamilla Heris Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren that means the candidate field will be cut in half and they will be just one debate next month unless another cannot qualifies today then the cameras will be split across two nights billionaire activist tops tire needs just one more qualifying pole in order to make the stage next month in Houston why Congress woman Tulsi Gabbard needs two more polls Jessica Taylor NPR news Washington at last check on Wall Street the Dow was up nearly two hundred points this is NPR news from KQED news I'm Jeremy Siegel the case against former Google engineer Anthony Levin Taos ski returns to court September fourth federal prosecutors have charged the self driving car innovator with thirty three counts of trade secrets the aft before creating a start up that was acquired by uber marketwatch tech editor Jeremy Owens says leavened owski faces ten years in prison on each count this point I don't think it's any kind of question that Levin Belsky took this material but the US attorney's office is going to have to prove that he meant to do something with it and that he knew what he was taking it for that purpose if they can't prove that he meant to take it then they're not gonna get the connection Levin dusky has been released on a two million dollar bond San Jose is trying to make it easier for residents to build homes in their back yards with changes to its permitting process he would be Sonya Hudson reports the city's trying to get more people to build accessory dwelling units in what its dubbing Edie you Tuesday is the city will have expressed appointments for homeowners to get permits for their backyard homes approved in ninety minutes normally at that process would take about twenty days mayor Sam Ricardo says he's focusing on eighty use because there are relatively easy and cheap way to increase the city's housing stock and so this is a way for us to build a lot more affordable housing without all the challenging struggle it takes to build a large apartment complex which may involve.

Frank two million dollar ninety minutes twenty days two percent ten years
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To affordable, reliable wireless service, especially for people in lower income and minority communities. The proposed virtual would cut the number of major US wireless providers from four to three may well, on the federal front, the number of antitrust investigations against Google Facebook, apple, and Amazon are growing here now to discuss these issues are Santa Clara university, law professor, Catherine Santa Vall and marketwatch tech editor and San Francisco bureau chief, Jeremy Owens, nice to have both of you. On the proposed merger of sprint and T. Mobile are ten states led by New York and California filing suit to block it. Professor sound of all your former Commissioner of the California Public utilities commission. What are your concerns about the proposed merger and how would it affects the consumer's, right? I'm also thank you so much for the tation. I'm also namely trust law, professor. And so both as a former regulator in any trust law, professor, when you look at the complaint, a couple of things really jumped out at me. First of all the complaint alleges that T mobile and sprint already have over half of the market share in both Los Angeles and New York City in the first and second largest markets in America. They already have over half of the market share. It is huge. And then there are a number of markets where they have very large market shares. And as you mentioned, especially these are both marketed as value brands and so they've been especially important for lower income consumers for value, conscious consumer. Moore's because they compete on price. And so the concern is that as you have to head to head competitors, who already have huge portions of the market, who compete on price if they merge that you're going to lessen incentives to compete on price or to provide other innovations such as exemptions from data caps, that are important for people to be able to watch content like yours to be able to watch content like some of my videos that I used for my law classes, and Jeremy sprint t mobile did agree to a set of concessions, right? They include not raising prices for three years and improving their broadband service, especially in rural areas and that seemed to satisfy the FCC chair cheap pie. He now supports the merger. Why does California's attorney general heavier Sarah feel differently though? This is one area where you can come down on either side..

professor California Jeremy sprint Catherine Santa Vall Jeremy Owens California Public utilities co T mobile US Santa Clara university sprint San Francisco bureau chief Google Facebook FCC editor apple Commissioner
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But that's I mean, I don't really want people to know when I'm at the doctor, or you know, so here's the thing. You might be using you mentioned the example of a weather app. Well, that weather app to work well needs to know exactly where you are. So when that permission comes up you go should weather app. Acts be able to know my location. Always when I'm only in the app, and if you click always they're always getting your location twenty four seven that means not only do they know to serve you. Right weather, but they actually know where you live because you spend eight hours a night hopefully in her house each night, and they're selling that data. So what I'd like to see is not just permissions. Can they use the app can they use the location? I would like to see them have to disclose whether they're going to use that internally or share it with anyone else, and we were talking about this before. But really until we know better. I would just not give apps. Particularly permission to always use location fell. No. No, you do not have access to why location unless you're using it one. I talked about hallway as well. That is a major story. At Washington's behest, Canadian authorities arrested atop hallway executive, this is the major Chinese telecom company and US prosecutors say that she violated American sanctions against Iran. Jeremy there's a lot of business between companies particularly in Silicon Valley and China what's been the reaction in Silicon Valley. Well, it's been fear about going to China. I feel like every exact now who has to go to China and back is worried about going to China and facing reprisal. We have learned that two Canadian nationals have been arrested in China prominent Canadian nationals, and that's going to create worry about going to China and being in China and dealing with China, and what the reaction's going to be changing their travel plans as a result. I think individuals are you know, early on. We heard Cisco maybe considering stopping all executive China than they relax. But I think you know, you know, you just don't know if you're an executive that means you're a person, and you do you really wanna risk your family's your safety and your your. Families integrity to go on a business trip. And I think that is the danger of this whether they had caused or not. You know, it's the type of thing that's very easy to ask late and very hard to rain back. And that's the danger of all of our kind of brinksmanship with China right now is nobody's really stood up to China like this. How are they going to react? What is what is the actions? Are they gonna take and scary to think about what they could do? And so we're gonna continue to think about it. We see what they actually do. Yeah. It served. Just feels like this trade war has been escalating nonstop for a year now and the stakes keep getting higher, and it doesn't seem like anyone at the top of either country is really invested in making it stop anytime soon. And I think what you have. That's really interesting and is going to be an issue for awhile. Is you have both countries. See their tech industries as key to their strategic independence at the same time. The way the tech industry is structured today. China and the US are incredibly independent interdependent on one another Chinese money invested in. In tech companies. You have China needs US silicon today, they need the chips from Qualcomm to make their phones. But the US needs those phones to be made in China to serve the US market. So as much as each side would love to be not dependent on one another. They really are today. Right. All interesting to follow in a free, Casey Newton and also Jeremy Owens, thank you all for your time. With California's new legislative session underway. Housing is among the top issues. One attempt to address the state's intractable housing crisis is Senate Bill fifty which would require high density residential developments near major transit stations. The legislation is a revision of another Bill died in committee earlier this year. The new version incorporates more protections for neighborhoods at risk of displacement and gentrification and also targets wealthier communities where development joining me now to discuss this are say Senator, Scott Weiner, the bill's sponsor and also law. Professor Ethan L kind who studies transportation and land use law at UC Berkeley. Thank you, both the ring here Senator winner. This is the second time. You're introducing legislation of this type to require high density residential development near transit, hugs. What are you hoping to accomplish with this shirt? Well, we have a terrible housing crisis in California housing deficit of three point five million. In homes, which is equal to the deficit and the other forty nine states combine, and we see the results with working families being pushed out people being pushed into homelessness young people unable to get a foothold, and we have to take real action. So as we build us three and a half million homes. What we don't want to do is keep building sprawl further and further away so people have to our commute. So we're building in wildfire zones. We want to put that housing near public, transportation and your jobs. The first version of you Bill though died in committee and one of the major complaints was that it mandated development in primarily disadvantaged communities since those are primarily the neighborhoods that are closest to major transit yet. It spared wealthier cities. What changes have you made to address those concerns? Sure. And to be clear the Pryor Bill did include wealthy communities as well. But it was disproportionately in low income areas we took that criticism to heart and so right now the current Bill it allows delayed implementation. And low income communities at risk of this placement. So that local communities can plan to prevent displacement. And it also includes communities that may not have a lot of transit. But have a lot of jobs so people might drive, but they're driving shorter distances and right now. Palo Alto Mountain View, a lot of the tech companies or Cupertino. There are various cities also in southern California in the fall in that category. And we have a problem now where we want. We know we need the housing to go by transit and jobs, but in so many of our areas that are job centers that are transit centers apartment buildings are banned. Only single family homes or allowed, which is not sustainable. So a professor L kind regarding the provision that Senator Weiner just mentioned the one that applies what you're calling job rich areas. Right like Patino where apple is or Palo Alto Mountain View. How big a shift is that in California's housing policy because up until now really local governments have a lot of say over development in their cities. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, that's the tradition in California and many other states of local control or local governments, cities and counties. Get to say what the zoning is going to be how tall buildings are how far apart they're going to be from each other. And the result of that is that we've seen over and over and over again, these cities counties say, no new housing, and so in terms of having jobs, rich housing provision. This new legislation will have to see. See how that's defined? But I think these Silicon Valley communities here in the bay area are really a good poster child for that they've been very willing to greenlight projects upbringing a lot of jobs, but not the commensurate housing. And so what they're essentially saying is we want all of these workers to be housed elsewhere outside of our community. And we want to essentially put those burdens of the commuting on everyone else because then people are clogging up the freeways for the whole region. So what has been the reaction from those cities to this latest version of the Bill S B fifty well, they've been uniformly opposed to any loss of their sovereignty over land use, and that's been the big battle in California. And that's why you haven't seen legislation really until Senator wieners SBA twenty seven and the now SP fifty that's really tried to rein in some of that local control. But that's a very powerful dynamic. They're very powerful interest group at some of our wealthiest communities they like their communities, low density. And so this is a big fight with them. And I think the question is is the coalition in favor. All those people who weren't fortunate enough to buy homes when homes were cheaper and tax. Burdens were lower or all that discontent enough to push this over the finish line. And but there's another point that some critics were making too is that transit near housing makes sense in places where there's a comprehensive transit system, like New York, for example. We don't really have something like that here in the bay area unless you're in the city in San Francisco that it works fairly. Well, so how can you Bill be truly effective? How many people can actually serve? We actually especially in the bay area. We have quite a bit of transit when of course, San Francisco but Cal train and bar, and we do have quite a few high frequency bus lines because buses are included in the legislation in Los Angeles. They're building God bless them. An enormous number of new rail and subway lines. So we are seeing increased investment and one of the reasons in this new Bill that we include a job rich areas was to be clear that you can be a hub world people work, even if you don't have transit. So we want to make sure we're addressing both. We the core principle here is people should be able to live near where they work and your public transportation and right now because of ROY hyper restrictive zoning they can't do that people are basically being kicked out and Ethan are there examples of other reaches with public transportation situation. Similar to the bay area where high density housing has worked as exceeded housing. More people are really going back. There ridge vision of what cities were they were walkable, very vibrant places that people could live and more compact neighborhoods, and we see examples of that all over the world. Here are more locally in the US. I think Portland is a very good example of a community. That's really tried to focus development in word and boost their transit system. Seattle has taken some really progressive steps in the last decade or so, and so you see transit ridership increasing you see home prices generally stabilizing there. So there's certainly are models that we can draw from is it a cultural problem in California. Do you think with the suburban sprawl what California's certainly pioneered the auto dependent type of lifestyle LA in particular. Now, you see it across the west with Phoenix Vegas parts of Texas. So we definitely pioneered it. But I think there's a lot of people who really want that kind of an urban lifestyle you see the skyrocketing demand. When there are neighborhoods that provide that kind of lifestyle. I mean, think of lots of neighborhoods in San Francisco rock. For example, they're very desirable. So there is a lot of demand for it. We just haven't been good at building it primarily because of the pressure from these single family homeowner groups that don't want to see those types of neighborhoods built and Scott new also co authored another ballot measure. About a ballot measure as opposed to this piece of this Bill that you have and this is one that targets the twenty twenty ballot. It would be peel a clause in California's constitution article thirty four that banned cities and counties from developing or buying low income rental housing without a majority vote of taxpayers. This is something that's been in place since nineteen fifty how does it hurt the housing prop? So it's really hard to believe that article thirty four is part of progressive. California's constitution it is a racist. Classiest relic of a time period where people wanted to keep largely black people out of their neighborhoods, and and certainly poor people out of their neighborhoods. And so what happened was after World War Two. There was a significant migration of African American people from the south primarily to California. So Oakland, San Francisco other places had a growing African American population. And some people got really upset. That African Americans moving into their neighborhoods advantage really was to slow down construction. Right. It may developers have to show that they that..

California China Bill US Senator Silicon Valley San Francisco Senator Weiner Professor Ethan L Jeremy Owens Los Angeles Bill S B Senate executive Palo Alto Mountain View apple Qualcomm Cupertino Oakland
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For a different kind of angles to to some kind of movement on much station. Primarily on things that you think you can get some bipartisan appeal out of it. What about other things that are perhaps a little more divisive? Trying to Walsh is or impeaching President Trump. What will you do on those issues? So that's not that's not my my district, and they're not early reflecting, my views, I think reform ice, absolutely Averill, immigration reform, absolutely. And some of the other pieces that President Trump. I don't think is something we should do right now since we we have to have Republican support for that to actually go anywhere. And instead, I think we need to focus on protect protecting the malaria mestigation and on conducting our responsibilities as a congress. So I would say I support measures in that direction. But not not as you know, I'm I'm simply not as far west, as you know, some people are from these districts that are totally blew President Trump is threatening to shut down the US government if he doesn't get funding for a border wall. And this week we saw very tense televised Oval Office meeting between him and Nessie Pelosi and Chuck Schumer what what's your reaction to that standoff? What does it tell you about the mood in Washington right now? I think the stance that we as turn crossed the take is that we don't have the majority in any chamber. And so if there's a shutdown it is entirely on Donald Trump and the Republicans and once we. Get there. We can we can talk about you know, our our piece of it. And so if President Trump wants to get anything done if the Republicans want to get anything done they're going to have to work with us and vice versa. So there will be cooperation Pasadena, but it's not going to be easy. And there's there's always going to be tension. But I think there are so many of us who are committed to actual change and actually accomplishing things that will we'll see a change in town. All right. And just on a lighter note here, you tweeted, something pretty amusing recently related to your your transition to congress. You ran into Nancy Pelosi last month at the airport. And you lamented your casual appearance there. You are with a very cute photo of yourself totally exhausted. While adding in your tweet that Pelosi looks flawless, and you said sometimes you just have to laugh in trust the process, so very good sense of humor. And now that the county is over what is what has surprised you the most about the whole process of running for office and winning office. I actually think since I got elected one of the things that surprised me the most in a really really positive way is as a freshman class. We're we're already working incredibly collaborative lead together. And we are we're being heard by by these more senior members who are making a real effort to change the way that things historically been done in involve us in the process and make sure that our priorities in our opinions are really prioritize. So I think there's a certain sense of like, oh, we're gonna have to go in and fight to change a lot of these things. But we're pushing for one of these things, but there has been an incredible receptiveness to it. So it just gives me so much optimism for the future. And for what is next year two years ago? Like, all right. I'll that optimistic note, we will leave it there. Congressman woman. Alexa, Katie hill. Congratulations again. And thank you for being with us. Thank you. Thank you so much now to tech Google's chief executives Sundar Pichai testified before the House Judiciary committee this week. He denied allegations from some lawmakers the company's suppresses conservative viewpoints in Google search results, the company also faced questions about privacy and data collection. Similar questions are being leveled at Facebook for how it handles consumer data. Meanwhile, the recent arrest of one of China's leading technology executives at the request of Washington has ignited fears in Silicon Valley that China might retaliate here. Now with this week's tech roundup are the verges Silicon Valley editor Casey Newton marketwatch tech, editor San Francisco bureau chief Jeremy Owens and actually us chief technology correspondent enough read. Welcome to you all so more troubles for Facebook. Today. The company revealed a major security flaw may have allowed third party apps to improperly access people's photos, even those that hadn't been fully a been uploaded and this could affect nearly seven million users when it Facebook. No about this. And why are they telling us just now? Well, this is the biggest issue. So it's bad enough that these are photos that you wanted to post its photos that you might not have even wanted to post. And then they basically have known about it since September just letting the public know about it in December. And just letting European regulators know about it November. That's actually could end up being the bigger story here. Well, this is part of a larger pattern we hear over and over again. Oh, we have this fall. We had this region. We don't hear about it until months later. So are there any calls to fine Facebook at this point or have some kind of other sanction or penalty? Well, there are provisions in both the new European law as well as the consent decree with the Federal Trade Commission, the do require Facebook and companies to notify about data breaches. So this is where actually you can find consequences. There's basically no law at this point that prevents companies from having data breaches, which is good because they all lose our data. But there are laws about how. And when they notify people and. This this could come back to bite them. Do we have any information? Are they disclosing any information on which apps had access and how these fighters photos might have been used? Yes. So I don't think we've seen the complete list yet. But we know that there were fifteen hundred apps from something like eight hundred and fifty developers. So it was a lot of people who could have seen those photos. I will say though that among all of the Facebook data breaches this year. This is maybe one I'm less concerned about when I think about the photos, I take with a Facebook app, but don't upload them. It's like bad selfie blurry, photos, low light photos, right? It's like it's stuff that I probably don't want a developer to have. I'm not gonna freak out if they as opposed to something like say, Cambridge Analytica, for example. And I know that you've also been following the gluco hearing that happened this week. Casey. And and you wrote an article that was very critical that the hearing taking to task both CEO's tech CEOs and lawmakers for not doing a better job of clarifying problems around issues like data privacy. How do you think? Why why do you think first of all they're not doing a good job? Well, I think that in situations like this the sites keep talking past each other. And on the lawmakers side, they often seem to fundamentally misunderstand how the platform works. Sometimes it ways that feel intentional like they're kinda rally their base and for their part. I think the CEO's including soon, Dr in this case, they they just try to say as little as possible where I think they would have an opportunity to answer the spirit of the lawmakers questions. Even if the lawmakers don't get the details. Exactly, right. So how can they do better? Well, I would love to see the lawmakers developed some basic platform literacy, so for example, they could understand that Google has real financial incentives. Not to make their search results, politically biased. Google wants to serve as many people as possible. And that needs survey the best search results, it doesn't mean. Trying to skew things one way or the other. And then again on on the Dr Pichai front, he faced a lot of questions about what Google is doing in China, and all he would really say about it is we have no plans to launch right now his answers were irrelevant by the time. The hearing was over and we actually know that Google has invested a lot in developing some kinds of products for China. So I would love to see him get better answers to those questions in the future. I'd love to see lawmakers actually make some laws important thing said in that hearing is he's okay with GDP or sale regulation in the United States, and we continue to have these hearings. How many we had this year? Now, right. Check. Remy's point in that time, there's actually built consensus privacy groups tech companies the industry, everyone said, okay, here's a framework for what we'd be fine with and you actually have privacy groups and tech companies not that far apart. So I do think we'll see that in the new year, and we're twenty years into the internet and ten years into social media and mobile phones, and we still haven't developed these kind of laws to address that those services that have really changed how we interact with each other and how we interact with the world. And in his point you think that come twenty nine nineteen with a new concourse in place. We will see more regulation. It depends on if the Democrats really make that are hard part of their platform. Right. They're going to have to get in there and decide what they want to go for and I feel like with all of these hearings and with the backlash from Americans that would be one that they could go for and maybe find some consensus even in the polarized times that are happening in congress. I suspect we will see it because California passed a big privacy law this year that incorporates summoned. These provisions that folks would like to roll out nationally and that goes into effect in twenty twenty which means there's kind of a ticking clock, and if the tech companies can't reach a consensus by then there's going to be a patchwork of regulations all across the country, and that they'll be nightmare for them. The problem that California law is it's not really set in some what it is. They basically passed a blank sheet of paper and said, we'll come back to it and tell you what these laws are going to be. So until we know what those laws hours, very hard to then see that transfer to the federal level, but you still have to imagine they would light a fire under them somewhat because they don't want to hold patchwork of laws across the country. Also wanted to talk to you about some more disturbing news about apps that emerged this week apps. Knowingly tracking our private data once again. The New York Times in this latest investigation found that all kinds of apps from those used for tracking weather to your exercise routines. They constantly monitor your location and then sell that information without your knowledge who's buying this data, and how is it used? So I mean, it's very valuable and very.

Facebook President Trump Google congress Nessie Pelosi Washington United States Casey Newton California Averill China Sundar Pichai Chuck Schumer Alexa Walsh CEO Federal Trade Commission Katie hill
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But that's I mean, I don't really want people to know when I'm at the doctor, or you know, so here's the thing. You might be using you mentioned the example of a weather app. Well, that weather up to work well needs to know exactly where you are. So when that permission comes up, you should weather app x be able to know my location. Always when I'm only in the app, and if you click always they're always getting your location twenty four seven that means not only do they know to serve you. Right weather, but they actually know where you live because you spend eight hours a night hopefully in her house each night, and if they're selling that data, so what I'd like to see is not just permissions. Can they use the app can they use the location? I would like to see them have to disclose whether they're going to use that internally or share it with anyone else. And you know, we were talking about this before. But really until we know better. I would just not give apps. Particularly permission to always use location fell. No. You know, you do not have access to location unless you're using it one to talked about hallway as well. That is a major story. At Washington's behest, Canadian authorities arrested a top highway executive, this is the major Chinese telecom company and US prosecutors say that she violated American sanctions against Iran. Jeremy there's a lot of business between US companies, particularly in Silicon Valley and China. What's been the reaction in Silicon Valley? Well, it's been fear about going to China. I feel like every exact now who has to go to China and back is worried about going to China and facing reprisal. We have learned that two Canadian nationals have been arrested in prominent Canadian nationals, and that's just going to create worry about going to China and being in China in dealing with China, and what the reaction's going to be. I think that's changing their travel plans as a result. I think individuals are you know, early on. We heard Cisco maybe considering stopping all executive traveled to China than they relax it. But I think you know, you just don't know if you're an executive that means you're a person, and you do you really want to risk your family's your safety and your your family's integrity to go on a business trip. And I think that is the danger of this whether they had caused or not. It's the type of thing that's very easy to escalate and very hard to rain back. Then that's the danger of all of our kind of brinksmanship with China right now is nobody's really stood up to China like this. How are they going to react? What is what are the actions? Are they going to take? And it's scary to think about what they could do. And so we're gonna continue to think about it till we see what they actually do it serves just feels like this trade war has been escalating nonstop for a year now and the stakes keep getting higher, and it doesn't seem like anyone at the top of either country is really invested in making it stop anytime soon. And I think what you have. That's really interesting, and is going to be an issue for a is you have both countries. See their tech industries as key to their strategic independence at the same time. The way the tech industry is structured today. China and the US are incredibly independent interdependent on one another. Chinese money invested easy money in tech companies. You have China needs US silicon today, they need the chips from Qualcomm to make their phones. But the US needs those phones to be made in China to serve the US market. So as much as each side would love to be her. Not dependent on one another. They really are today. Right. All interesting to follow in a free, Casey Newton and also Jeremy Owens, thank you all for your time. Thanks. We. With California's new legislative session underway. Housing is among the top issues. One attempt to address the state's intractable housing crisis is Senate Bill fifty which would require high density residential developments near major transit stations. The legislation is a revision of another Bill that died in committee earlier this year. The new version incorporates more protections for neighborhoods at risk of displacement and gentrification and also targets wealthier communities where development join me now to discuss this our state Senator Scott Weiner, the bill's sponsor and also law. Professor Ethan L kind who studies transportation and land use law at UC Berkeley. Thank you both for being here. Senator weiner. This is the second time you introducing legislation of this type to require high density residential development near transit, hugs. What are you hoping to accomplish with this shirt? Well, we have a terrible housing crisis in California housing deficit of three point five million homes, which is equal to the deaf. And the other forty nine states combine, and we see the results with working families being pushed out people being pushing the homelessness young people unable to get a foothold, and we have to take real action. So as we build those three and a half million homes what we don't want to do is keep building sprawl further and further away so people have to our commute. So we're building in wildfire zones. We want to put that housing near public transportation and near jobs. The first version of your Bill though died in committee, and one of the major complaints was that it mandated development in primarily disadvantaged communities since those are primarily the neighborhoods that are closest to major transit yet. It spared wealthier cities. What changes have you made to address those concerns? Sure. And to be clear the Pryor Bill did include wealthy communities as well. But it was disproportionately in low income areas, we took that criticism to heart and so right now the current Bill it allows delayed implementation in low income communities. At risk of this place, man. So that local communities can plan to prevent displacement. And it also includes communities that may not have a lot of transit. But have a lot of jobs so people might drive, but they're driving shorter distances and right now. Palo Alto Mountain View where a lot of the tech companies were Cupertino. There are various cities also in southern California to fall in that category. And we have a problem now where we want. We know we need the housing to go by transit and jobs, but in so many of our areas that are centers are transit centers apartment buildings are banned. Only single family homes are allowed which is not sustainable. So professor L kind regarding the provision that Senator Weiner just mentioned the one that applies to what you're calling job rich areas, right like, Patino, grapple is or Palo Alto Mountain View. How big a shift is that in California's housing policy because up until now really local governments have a lot of say over development in their cities. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, that's the tradition in California and many other states of local control where local governments, cities and counties. Get to say, what does owning is going to be how tall buildings are how far apart they're gonna be from each other. And the result of that is that we've seen over and over and over again, these cities counties say no to new housing and so in terms of having a jobs rich housing provision in this new legislation. We'll have to see how that's defined. But I think these Silicon Valley communities here in the bay area are really a good poster child for that they've been very willing to greenlight projects upbringing a lot of jobs, but not the commensurate housing. And so what they're essentially saying is we want all of these workers to be housed elsewhere outside of our community. And we want to essentially put those burdens of the commuting on everyone else because then people are clogging up the freeways for the whole region. So what has been the reaction from those cities to this latest version of the Bill S B fifty. Well, they've been uniformly opposed to any loss of their sovereignty over land use, and that's been the big battle in California. And that's why you haven't seen legislation really until Senator wieners SPA twenty seven and the now SP fifty that's really tried to rein in some of that local control. But that's a very powerful dynamic. There are very powerful interest group at some of our wealthiest communities they like their communities, low density. And so this is a big fight with them. And I think the question is is the coalition in favor all of those people that weren't fortunate enough to buy homes when homes were cheaper and tax burdens were lower. Or is that discontent enough to push this over the finish line? And but there's another point that some critics were making too is that transit near housing makes sense in places where there's a comprehensive transit system, like New York, for example. We don't really have something like that here in the bay area unless you're in the city in San Francisco that it works fairly. Well, so how can you Bill be truly effective? How many people can actually serve? We actually especially in the bay area. We have quite a bit of transit when of course, San Francisco, but Cal train and bar. We do have quite a few high frequency bus lines because buses are included in the legislation in Los Angeles. They're building God bless them. An enormous number of new rail and subway lines. So we are seeing increased investment and one of the reasons in this new Bill that we include a job rich areas was to be clear that you can be a hub world people work, even if you don't have transit. So we want to make sure we're addressing both. We the core principle here is people should be able to live near where they work and near public transportation and right now because of hyper restrictive zoning they can't do that people are basically being kicked out and Ethan are there examples of other regions with public transportation situation. Similar to the bay area where high density housing has worked as seeded in housing. More people are really going back to the original vision of what cities were they were walkable, very vibrant places that people could live in more compact neighborhoods, and we see examples of that all over the world. Here are more locally in the US. I think Portland is a very good example of a community. That's really tried to focus development in word and boost their transit system. Seattle has taken some really progressive steps in the last decade or so, and so you see transit ridership increasing you see home prices generally stabilizing there. So there certainly are models that we can draw on is it a cultural problem in California. Do you think with the suburban sprawl what California's certainly pioneered the auto dependent type of lifestyle LA in particular. Now, you see it across the west of Phoenix Vegas parts of Texas. So we definitely pioneered it. But I think there's a lot of people who really want that kind of an urban lifestyle you see the skyrocketing demand. When there are neighborhoods that provide that kind of lifestyle. I mean, you think of lots of neighborhoods in San Francisco rock. Edge, for example, they're very desirable. So there is a lot of demand for it. We just haven't been good at building it primarily because of the pressure from these single family homeowner groups that don't want to see those types of neighborhoods built and Scott, you've also co authored another ballot measure. About a ballot measure as opposed to this piece of this Bill that you have and this is the one that targets the twenty twenty ballot. It would be peel a clause. California's constitution article thirty four that band, cities and counties from developing or buying low income rental housing without a majority vote of taxpayers. This is something that's been in place since nineteen fifty how does it hurt the housing problem through? So it's really hard to believe that article thirty four is part of progressive. California's constitution it is a racist. Classiest relic of a time period where people wanted to keep largely black people out of their neighborhoods, and and certainly poor people out of their neighborhoods. And so what happened was after World War Two. There was a significant migration of African American people from the south primarily to California. So Oakland, San Francisco other places had a growing African American population. And some people got really upset that. African Americans will move into their neighborhoods advantage really was to slow down construction. Right. It may developers have to show that they that..

California China US Senator Scott Weiner Bill San Francisco Professor Ethan L Palo Alto Mountain View Los Angeles Jeremy Owens Senate executive Silicon Valley Qualcomm Senator Cupertino Oakland Portland
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:53 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Different kind of angles to affair some kind of movement on legislation will be on the we're gonna be talking primarily on things that you think you can get some bipartisan appeal out of it. What about other things that are perhaps a little more divisive trying to abolish ice or impeaching President Trump? What will you do on those issues? So that's not that's not my those aren't reflecting with my district. And maybe they're not really reflecting my views. I think reform is absolutely real immigration reform. Absolutely. And some of the other pieces impeaching President Trump. I don't think is something we should do right now since we we have to have Republican support for that to actually go anywhere. And instead, I think we need to focus on project protecting the. And on conducting our responsibilities as a congress. So I would say I support measures in that direction. But not not as simply not as far west, as you know, some people aren't from these districts that are totally blew President Trump is threatening to shut down the US government if he doesn't get funding for a border wall. And this week we saw very tense televised Oval Office meeting between him and Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer what what's your reaction to that standoff? What does it tell you about the mood in Washington right now? I think the stance that we as Democrats need to take is that we don't have the majority in any chamber. And so if there's a shutdown it is entirely on Donald Trump and the Republicans and once we get there. We can yes, we can talk about our piece of it. And so if President Trump wants to get anything done if the Republicans want to get anything done they're going to have to work with us and vice versa. So there will be towards cooperation some passive. But it's not going to be easy. And there's there's always going to be tension. But I think there are so many of us who are committed to actual change in and actually accomplishing things. Then we'll we'll see a change in town. All right. And just on a lighter note here, you tweeted, something pretty amusing recently related to your your transition to congress. You ran into Nancy Pelosi last month at the airport, and you lamented your casual appearance there. You are with a very cute photo of yourself totally exhausted. Well, adding in your that Pelosi looks flawless, and you said sometimes you just have to laugh in trust the process. So a very good sense of humor. Now that the campaign is over. What is what has surprised you the most about the whole process of running for office and winning office? I actually think since I got elected one of the things that surprised me the most in a really really positive way is that as a freshman class. We're we're already working incredibly collaborative lead together. And we are we're being heard by the by these more senior members who are making a real effort to change the way that things have historically been done involve us in the process and make sure that our priorities in our opinions are really prioritized. So I think there's a certain sense of what we're going to have to go in and fight to change a lot of these things, but refreshing these things, but there has been an incredible receptiveness to it. So I think it just gives me so much optimism for the future. And for what this next year next two years ago. Look like, all right. I'll that optimistic note, we will leave it there. Congressman woman Alexa, Katie hill, graduations again. And thank you for being with us. Thank you. Thank you so much now to tech Google's chief executive Sundar Pichai. Testify before the House Judiciary committee this week. He denied allegations from some lawmakers at the company's suppresses conservative viewpoints in Google search results, the company also faced questions about privacy and data collection. Similar questions are being leveled at Facebook for how it handles consumer data. Meanwhile, the recent arrest of one of China's leading technology executives at the request of Washington has ignited fears in Silicon Valley that China might retaliate here. Now with this week's tech roundup are the verges Silicon Valley editor Casey Newton market watch tech editor and San Francisco bureau chief Jeremy Owens and actually as chief technology correspondent enough read. Welcome to you all so a more troubles for Facebook. Today. The company revealed a major security flaw may have allowed third party apps to improperly access people's photos, even those that hadn't been fully a been uploaded, and this could affect nearly seven million users when it Facebook know about this, and why are they telling us just now? Well, this is the biggest. Tissue. So it's bad enough that these are photos that you were wanted to post its photos that you might not have even wanted to post. And then they basically have known about it since September just letting the public know about it in December. And just letting European regulators know about it November. That's actually could end up being the bigger story here. Well, this is part of a larger pattern, right? I mean, we we hear over and over again. Oh, we have this fall. We had this region. We don't hear about it until months later. So are there any calls to fine Facebook at this point or have some kind of other sanction or penalty? Well, there are provisions in both the new European law as well as the consent decree with the Federal Trade Commission, the do require Facebook and companies to notify about data breaches. So this is where actually can find consequences. There's basically no law at this point that prevents companies from having data breaches, which is good because they all lose our data. But there are laws about how and when they notify people and this this could come back to bite them. Do we have any information? Are they disclosing any information on which apps had access and how these fighters photos might have been used? Yes. So I don't think we've seen the complete list yet. But we know that there were fifteen hundred apps from something like eight hundred and fifty developers. So it was a lot of people who could have seen those photos. I will say though that among all of the Facebook data breaches this year. This is maybe one I'm less concerned about when I think about the photos, I take with a Facebook app. Upload them. It's like bad selfie blurry, photos, low light photos, right? It's like it's stuff that I probably don't want a developer to have. But I'm not gonna freak out if this as opposed to something like say, Cambridge Analytica, for example. And I know that you've also been following the Google hearing that happened this week. Casey. And and you wrote an article that was very critical if the hearing taking to task both CEO's tech CEOs and lawmakers for not doing a better job of clarifying problems around issues like data privacy. How do you think on? Why why do you think first of all they're not doing a good job? Well, I think that in situations like this the sites keep talking past each other. And on the lawmakers side, they often seem to fundamentally misunderstand how the platform works. Sometimes it ways that feel intentional like they're kinda rally their base for their part. I think the CEO's including Sudar in this case, they they just try to say as little as possible where I think they would have an opportunity to answer the spirit of the lawmakers questions. Even if the lawmakers don't get the details. Exactly, right. So how can they do better? Well, I would love to see the lawmakers developed some basic platform literacy, so for example, they could understand that Google has real financial incentives. Not to make their search results, politically biased. Google wants to serve as many people as possible and not survey the best search results, it doesn't mean. Trying to skew things one way or the other and then again on on the sooner Pichai front, he faced a lot of questions about what Google is doing in China, and all he would really say about it is we have no plans to launch right now his answers were irrelevant by the time. The hearing was over and we actually know that Google has invested a lot in developing some kinds of products for China. So I would love to see him get better answers to those questions in the future. I'd love to see lawmakers actually make some laws most important thing that sooner said in that hearing is he's okay with the GDP regulation in the United States, and we continue to have these hearings. How many we had this year now, right? Berg check John Dorsey Jeremy's point in that time, there's actually built consensus privacy groups tech companies the industry, everyone said, okay, here's a framework for what we'd be fine with and you actually have privacy groups and tech companies not that far apart. So I do think we'll see that in the new year, and we're twenty years into the internet and ten years into social media and mobile phones, and we still haven't developed these kinds of laws to address that those services that have really changed how we interact with each other, and how we interact with the world and to his point you think that come twenty one thousand nine with the new congress in place. We will see more regulation. Well, it depends on if the Democrats really make that are hard part of their platform. Right. They're gonna have to get in there and decide what they want to go for and I feel like with all of these hearings and with the backlash from Americans that would be one that they could go for and maybe find some consensus even in the polarized times that are happening in congress. I suspect we will see it because. California passed a big privacy law this year that incorporates some provisions that folks would like to roll out nationally and that goes into effect in twenty twenty which means there's kind of a a ticking clock, and if the tech companies can't reach a consensus by then there's going to be a patchwork of regulations all across the country, and that they'll be nightmare for them. The problem that California law is it's not really set in some what it is. They basically passed a blank sheet of paper and said, we'll come back to it and tell you what these laws are going to be. So until we know what those laws ours, very hard to then see that transfer to the federal level, but you still have to imagine they would light a fire under them somewhat because they don't want to hold patchwork of laws across the country. Also want to talk to you about some more disturbing news about apps that emerged this week apps. Knowingly tracking our private data once again. The New York Times and this latest investigation found that all kinds of apps from those used for tracking weather to your exercise routines. They constantly monitor your location and then sell that information without your knowledge who's buying this data, and how is it used? So I mean, it's very valuable and very.

Google Facebook President Trump congress Nancy Pelosi Washington United States CEO Casey Newton California China Sundar Pichai Federal Trade Commission House Judiciary committee Chuck Schumer The New York Times editor Congressman Cambridge Analytica
"jeremy owens" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"I almost felt like it was bad luck to sit of let myself feel good about it all to own it. I mean that that phrase is just make you cringe, but but I just do wish looking back that I allowed myself to. Recognize that that. I, I was being recognized and that that wasn't, you know I had, as I said, it was this posted syndrome, like it was. It was just a mistake didn't really mean anything and an an an now, you know, as life goes on time goes on you and I've got, it's hard enough. You know, it's it's hot and that's sure as hell. All going to be moments where things don't go your way and you don't get good reviews and you don't get prizes. And and so when you do, you know, enjoy it and capitalize on it and let yourself right the wave when the wave comes, let yourself ride. Don't hold yourself back because you feel that you don't really deserve its will. I think that that is something I regret. I just said of was always fi shy about about kind of riding the wave and, and you know, and that's politics you. I am had to make peace with it. And of course, I'm sure it's given me other things in in some ways. I mean, probably a lot of autism that way will act as that way or whatever, because we're all screwed up and Inskip it. But I, I do, I do think, yeah, that's what I would say to to to a I. I met Carey mulligan actually at some award thing. A fee is ago just off to have fast film and education, and and I said, that's a I said, really just, you go frit just enjoy. It. Just go. Fritsch is no how great this is and don't hold back in. Don't hold yourself back and I'm show. I mean, she was she. She didn't show any signs of of of somebody that was going to do that anyway. But I do remember really feeling strongly got this woman. This girl is so talented and she's got this great thing, and I just really wanted to touch it. Just feel good about it in and let us go with it. And so I said it, was there a moment where you felt like you really had broken through? Well, that's the thing is that I don't think it's anyone someone, you know. I mean, even when I read the thing from today saying, you know, Rebecca's game to ask you about, you know, being a strong and powerful women. And you'll career with them like that's not me. They've made a mistake. I feel like I really said if it doesn't feel like a description of me. And so it's only when I gets invites. It's things like there's only maybe I have. Did I break breakthrough? I suppose I did. Yes, you did. It's just like, but it's the same feeding really have. I had a career and the set of merits will this. So I didn't think I absolutely just gonna save that for the record. Thank you. Well, I don't think I ever as you can see really allowed myself to think oath I've broken through this is the moment where I feel like I've, it's all happens. And here I am and I'm, I'm kind of I've arrived, although there was one. It was one quite funny moment where I was. I did a film of the Pink Panther years ago of a remake of the Pink Panther with Steve Martin, and I was his French assistant, Nicole, and that will all these very, very famous people in the film like on say, and Jeremy. Owens lose people and Anticosti and stuff, and and that would pop pop Razzi around because there will these famous people in the film, but all the famous people have bought from me going home this one night and I much from my trailer and I had call is, and I was getting to the Senate left my colleagues in because they wanted to keep my head Kelly for as long as possible..

Rebecca Fritsch Inskip Carey mulligan Steve Martin Senate Nicole Jeremy Owens Kelly Anticosti
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The police officers union to talk about tasers policy that's after the city's police commission adopted rules for the weapons in march and the police officers association launched a failed bid to change the policy at the ballot box police commissioner robert hirsch says the meetings will focus on discipline for failing to follow policy nobody on the commission is suggesting that we're going to negotiate the substance of what this commission already did months and months ago with the way police chief william scott says meetings with the officers union will start soon the police department is expected to begin deploying tasers by the end of the year a bill heading to governor jerry brown's desk would move california closer to year round daylight savings time k cuties guy marzorati reports on the bill that passed the assembly today south bay assemblyman cancelled choose says more hours of daylight will mean fewer car accidents and more time for californians to exercise outdoors but passing the legislature is just the first step in a long process to stop turning clocks back or ahead and our first voters would need to approve a ballot measure to let lawmakers make changes to the clocks and then another bill would need to be passed to make the changes official with the permission of the us congress i'm guy marzorati k q e news intel is looking for a chief executive the santa clara base chip maker announced today that ceo brian chrysanthemum is resigning after the company learned if a consensual relate ship he had with an employee a violation of company policy jeremy owens tech editor at marketwatch says while kazan was ceo intel lost a step was kind of getting beat in machine learning and artificial intelligence by invidia he lost the title.

editor jeremy owens ceo california jerry brown kazan robert hirsch brian chrysanthemum chief executive intel us official william scott
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Turning now to check this week a federal judge approved an eighty five billion dollar merger deal between at and t and time warner the case had been closely washed as a bellwether for other big corporate deals at and t is the nation's second largest wireless provider and owns direct tv time warner owns the broadcasting powerhouses cnn and hbo the ruling was a blow to the justice department which has sued last november to block the merger saying it would hurt competition and lead to higher prices for consumers also this week electric car maker tesla announced it would cut its workforce by nine percent tesla ceo elon musk said the layoffs would help the company become more profitable as it tries to boost production of this model three sedan joining me now to discuss all of this are marketwatch tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens and chief technology correspondent for axios ina freed welcome to you both so jeremy a federal judge has now cleared the way for at and t eighty five billion dollar purchase of time warner why was this deal so important at and t who is a huge fight for content out there you think about netflix and all the original content it's making all of these places are trying to get more content and that is a huge expense for a place like at and t which owns direct tv and his pain for those channels that it puts on direct tv so when you look at them competing against them like comcast which purchased nbc universal it's going up against somebody that has cut those costs by owning the content itself as well as the pipes so to compete well it felt like it needed to go out and get that same type of deal and it's getting programming that's very popular like game of thrones cnn the harry potter movie franchise and so this then begs the question a lot of people are pointing to this does this mean that we will now see a big wave of other similar corporate deals after this green light from a judge for example one day after.

warner cnn tesla elon musk editor jeremy owens technology correspondent netflix comcast nbc ceo san francisco bureau chief eighty five billion dollar nine percent one day
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Turning now to tech yesterday president trump attacked amazon in a tweet saying the company doesn't pay enough taxes and is harming the us economy this comes amid a rough week for the tech sector facebook faces continuing fallout of data privacy and tesla issued a major recall journey me now with more is market watch tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens jeremy nice to have you back all right let's begin with amazon president trump's complains about amazon essentially saying that it pays little or no taxes to state and local governments and has hurt the economy is that true not really we looked at the s and p five hundred effective tax rates vance on the new tax law we found that amazon was topped in the s and p five hundred for the previous by quarters they had an effective tax rate of more than forty percent we go back even further we we now have a calculator online where you can look at any s and p five hundred companies affected tax rate over the last eleven quarters amazon's at about thirty one percent which is higher than the average for both its sector and for the s and p five hundred overall not much the average of the five hundred thirty percent amazon is collecting taxes in the forty five states that have sales tax exactly they started doing that now the the real question there is third party sellers on the amazon platform are they collecting enough sales tax from what they're doing and is that on them or is that on the small businesses that are selling on amazon's platform and amazon is said we'd like federal law that would make this the same across all states and and that would make it easier to deal with this problem but that law hasn't been passed in the law that passed cut tax rates for corporations so why do you think amazon is cutting the president's crosshairs right now well you'd have to ask him that i mean obviously the ceo of amazon owns the washington post which yes which trump has not had a great relationship with since he's become president so that's a that's a possibility but it's also there in the.

amazon us facebook tesla editor trump president ceo washington post san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens five hundred thirty percent thirty one percent eleven quarters forty percent
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Turning now to tech yesterday president trump attacked amazon in a tweet saying the company doesn't pay enough taxes and is harming the us economy this comes amid a rough week for the tech sector facebook faces continuing fallout over data privacy and tesla issued a major recall joining me now with more marketwatch's tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens gerry nice to have you back all right let's begin with amazon president trump's complaints about amazon essentially saying that it pays little or no taxes to state and local governments and has hurt the economy is that true not really we looked at the s and p fivehundred effective tax rates in advance of the new tax law we've found that amazon was topped in the s and p five hundred for the previous five quarters they haven't affected tax rate of more than forty percent we go back even further we we now have a calculator online where you can look at any s and p five hundred companies effective tax rate over the last eleven quarters amazon's at about thirty one percent which is higher than the average for both its sector and for the s and p five hundred overall not much the average hundred about thirty percent amazon is collecting taxes in the forty five states that have sales tax exactly they started doing that now the the real question there is third party sellers on the amazon platform are they collecting enough sales tax from what they're doing and is that on them or is that on the small businesses that are selling amazon's platform and amazon is said we'd like a federal law that would make this the same across all states and that would make it easier to deal with this problem but that law hasn't been passed the law that passed cut tax rates for corporations so why do you think amazon is kind in the president's crosshairs right now you'd have to ask him that i mean obviously the ceo of amazon owns the washington post which jeff bezos yes which trump has not had a great relationship with since he's become president.

washington jeremy owens bureau chief san francisco jeff bezos ceo president amazon trump editor marketwatch tesla facebook us thirty one percent eleven quarters
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Equifax and all of the data that's out there for us i mean just this week orbits lost a bunch of data that was also old and as we move along we're going to see a lot of these old caches of data that are vulnerable that people can go into and that's going to be an issue moving forward for a long time is that all of this information is sitting out there and vulnerable and it's not a question you know strictly for what facebook is going to do but what are we going to do as a people what are we is our government going to do to try to protect us from anybody who wants to get to this outta kenya i know you've been talking to facebook employees how are they reacting well insiders inside of the company off the record has been saying that they have known about these issues for quite some time but they felt that the higher ups have not been listening really to the point of making true change and so it has taken something like this to really blow the lid from the outside to have the internal dialog about it all right thank you all china mostly jeremy owens and also jenny gephardt's and now a journalist who should be very familiar to our pbs audience judy woodruff the anchor of pbs newshour in two thousand thirteen she and the league when i feel made history when they became the nation's first all women network news anchor teeing this week it was announced which ruffled now officially be the show's sole anchor i sat down with judy woodruff recently when she visited the bay area and reflected on her journalism career judy woodruff such a pleasure to have you here thank you for joining us it's great to be here tweets always wonderful to come back to san francisco and the.

Equifax facebook kenya china jeremy owens jenny gephardt judy woodruff san francisco
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I mean if you look back at equifax and all of the data that's out there for us i mean just this week orbits lost a bunch of data that was also old and as we move along we're going to see a lot of these old caches of data that are vulnerable that people can go into and that's going to be an issue moving forward for a long time is that all of this information on us is sitting out there and vulnerable and it's not a question you know strictly for what facebook is going to do but what are we going to do as a people what are we is our government going to do to try to protect us from anybody who wants to get to this outta tanya i know you've been talking to facebook employees how are they reacting well insiders inside of the company off the record have been saying that they have known about these issues for quite some time but they felt that the higher ups have not been listening really to the point of making true change and so it has taken something like this to really blow the lid from the outside to have the internal dialog about it all right thank you all china mostly jeremy owens and also jenny gephardt's and now a journalist who should be very familiar to our pbs audience judy woodruff the anchor of pbs news hour in two thousand thirteen she in the league when i feel made history when they became the nation's first all women network news anchor team this week it was announced which ruffle now officially be the show's sole anchor i sat down with judy woodruff recently when she visited the bay area and reflected on her journalism career judy woodruff such a pleasure to have you here thank you for joining us it's great to be here tweets always wonderful to come back to san francisco and to.

equifax facebook china jeremy owens jenny gephardt judy woodruff san francisco
"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy owens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the trump campaign cambridge analytica reportedly harvested personal information from fifty million facebook users without their consent after days of silence facebook ceo mark zuckerberg responded to the growing scandal in a blog post and interviews zakar brook said facebook will take new security measures and restrict access to some user data by third party apps me well some lawmakers wants to testify before congress and there's now a social media campaign urging users to delete their facebook accounts joining me now with more on this are cake silicon valley bureau chief tanya moseley marketwatch tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens and electrician frontier foundation researcher jenny gephardt's welcome to you all well there are so many issues here trust regulation data privacy how facebook is responding to all all of that but tanya i have to ask you first of all lay out the senior figure for us because the misuse of data involving cambridge analytica happened in twenty fifteen when did facebook know about it and why did it not notify users who were affected earlier so facebook received word that cambridge analytica had this data around that time in twenty fifteen and they went to them and said please you need to destroy this and cambridge analytica said yes we will do that and they actually gave them an agreement saying that they would do that from that point i want to tell you though they found out about it from reporters from the guardian reporter there as well as another publication notify facebook that this was a possibility and it's this was happening i think the million dollar question is why they didn't notify the public until now we received word before the new york times published its piece about all of this that facebook was going to deny cambridge analytica on there platform and they were we receive that in a facebook post as well as on their newsroom blog as well so that's the big question is why we didn't know about the sooner and what do you think the answer is i mean it's were they wanted to practice protects their profits or what do you think happened here.

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