24 Burst results for "Jeremy Hobson"

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | Last month

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And you are. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Tanya. Mostly it's here and now in a moment, we'll get to the latest on that explosion yesterday in Beirut that killed more than 100 people and injured thousands. But first we're joined by one of the top Democrats in the House of Representatives as Congress continues to try and reach a deal to provide more assistance to the millions of Americans who have lost their jobs because of the pandemic and who last Friday lost a $600 weekly lifeline from the federal government. House Majority leader Steny Hoyer joins us Now He's at home in Maryland on the best phone connection he could find after Tropical storm say Yes. Knocked out his power leader. Hoyer, thank you for being here. Thank you very much. Glad to be with you. Well, will there be a deal by the end of this week? Talking, doubtful that there'd be a deal by the end of the week. I talked to the speaker yesterday. I think both sides have put forward what their belief is that needs to be done. We spent a lot of time in putting the heroes act together. You know we're going to see whether or not the Senate will come to a point where they can agree to need the problems. There may be difference in numbers that maybe difference in specifics, but we need to move forward. Unfortunately. The Senate Republicans are deeply divided party on and they do not have a consensus on what they want to Dio. McConnell is essentially not engaged in the negotiations. And so it's very difficult, but I've given to the members assurance that they will get 24 hours notice. Obviously, as we are getting later in this day, that's gonna be hard to unemployment benefits have been a major sticking point here. You've said before that it's not $600 a week or bust. You'd be willing to negotiate, Senator Schumer says. It's not Negotiable. Now the speaker is saying Democrats are open to tying it to the unemployment rate, where Democrats on this issue right now. Well, I think what speaker has done and what Schumer have done and what I said in that same interview that's going from 602 100 cold. Turkey was not good for the economy and certainly not good for the families that are Surviving and being helped. However, there are other components that are equally critical dealing with state and local governments. They hire teachers. There are police there are fire they hire sanitation workers and so many other critical employees. Necessary to confront the economic and health problems that are confirming the American people. Are Republicans moving on that issue leader? We're a republic because they didn't want any money for state local It States very groped. The economy would be very badly damaged, and we would go into a deep depression were having struggling now and the only thing that's kept us afloat as we passed this fork over 19 bills, this being the fifth the Heroes Act. Republicans are ignoring the problem. The president said Just yesterday. I think when he was asked, What do you think about 1000 people dying? His response was it is what it is. I don't know what that means. The Republicans, both in the White House and in the Congress have not lead on this issue We have in the House of represents. We've done what we should have done. We did it 2.5 months ago, and the Republicans have done nothing since to come up with an alternate that they that they can pass. The Senate Republicans have said very similar things about Democrats that they don't believe that you're negotiating with them. I want to play you a message from Nathan Connor in Milwaukee who has been unemployed for months. He's living in a motel at this point with his six year old daughter, and I asked him what his message is for Congress. Here's what he said. If they're not in a position where they have to ration out, which I think about which meal they're going to skip throughout the week so they could make sure that it doesn't have to miss a meal. You know, until they do that they should not be bickering back and forth. They need to be together, helping us all. What is your response to him? He's absolutely right. You know when you say the Republicans messages say we passed a bill Now we can't act for the Senate. The Senate has not done its job. But you know, I don't know what they could say. We passed a bill. We think that Bill meets that gentleman's problems and the problems of millions and millions of other Americans. Unemployment needs to be done. We are for that. The Senate said it sport If that's the only thing you do, you will not have confronted the issues that need to be confronted, and that's what we have done. And we're waiting for a substance offer to be put on the table to meet all of the problems, not just one of the promise because we're convinced If we do just unemployment. Senators and the Republican Party and the president going to walk away from the table. You know, we want to talk about number of lower number. We did 3.4 trillion. We think that's the number that's necessary, but They have a note lower number, So be it. We may solve only some of the problems way saw, but only for a short period of time. But having said that we really have not gotten a substance offer. Let me finally askyou one question Last night, longtime Democratic congressman Lacy Clay lost his primary to a progressive candidate Corey Bush. This is not the first loss recently by a Democratic incumbent to a more progressive Candidate. What message? Do you as the leader of the Democrats in the house? Take away from that? Look, that was I don't think there is a message to be drawn from that race..

Senate Senate Republicans Congress Steny Hoyer Senator Schumer House of Representatives president Jeremy Hobson Maryland Beirut Turkey White House Lacy Clay McConnell Bill Nathan Connor Milwaukee
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 3 months ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jeremy Hobson is here and now the White House is warning that code nineteen could get worse in the U. S. in the months ahead here's what has traded visor Peter Navarro speaking on CNN we are filling the stockpile in anticipation of a possible problem in the fall we're doing everything we can beneath the surface working as hard as we possibly can meanwhile nearly half of all states are currently seeing increases in cases several states had record increases over the weekend including Florida and Texas so far about a hundred and twenty thousand people in the US have died Mercedes Carthon as an epidemiologist and vice chair of the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University she joins us now thanks for being here thank you very much what I know it's difficult to make sense of a lot of what's going on because a lot of data coming in in a lot we don't know but from what you can see give us the big picture here what what are you seeing in terms of the spread of new cases and do you think that the spikes we're seeing are a result of businesses in public spaces re opening yes you know what the trends that we're seeing right now are what we anticipated would happen as we return to circulating in society the reason we closed down in March was really to prevent the rapid increase in cases that we have seen ever since Kobe hit our shores and what we're seeing now is that instead of the slow burn that we've had for months those states that have opened up and who have been open for the longest period of time are seeing increases in the number of cases and unfortunately these patterns do follow what happened over in Asia and in Europe when states began their re opening plan are you encouraged by the fact that many of the people who are getting sick now are younger and we know that younger people in general don't die from covered nineteen it near the rate of people let's say over sixty or over seventy well I'm never encouraged to hear that more people are becoming infected however I will certainly agree with the point that the likelihood that the outcomes will be good certainly higher than when medically fragile or older adults contract disease there are two reasons why we're seeing increases in the prevalence of young people contracting disease the first reason is simply that young people are now eligible for testing and so from that perspective we are able to identify and actually count those young adults the second reason that we see an increase in young people being diagnosed is that because younger adults or those who are quite often in the work force providing not only essential roles but also staffing many different types of businesses those individuals are out in the population more thus increasing their likelihood of contracting co that when it comes to the issue of testing as usual we're getting mixed messages from the White House about this Peter Navarro said that the White House is preparing for trouble in the fall president trump said at a rally that he actually wanted less testing here he was in Tulsa over the weekend when you do testing to that extent you can find more people.

Jeremy Hobson White House
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jeremy Hobson friends and family of the slain journalists Jamal Khashoggi today mark one year since he was killed at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul Shoji was contributing columnist for The Washington Post and a critic of the Saudi government crown prince Mohammed bin Salman denies he ordered the killing but a CIA assessment found there's high confidence that he did joining us now is David Miliband whose chief executive of the international rescue committee and former U. K. Foreign Secretary welcome back thanks for lunch so you wrote on Twitter today that could show she's killing has come to epitomize an age of impunity not because it is isolated it because it is symptomatic of a world without rules or accountability what do you mean by that I mean that we're living through a time when more civilians are being killed in war I than any time since the end of the Cold War that more aid workers are being targeted at eight in the conduct of war in a way that is holy country to international humanitarian law and I mean that the perpetrators of these crimes on not being held accountable and that leads to a cycle when more of the belligerents in conflicts around the world feel they can get away with anything and so they therefore do anything from chemical weapons to bombing called coach loads of children to laying siege to towns and cities and a starting the population as we said the crown prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman denies that he ordered could show Jeez killing here is speaking last week with Norah o'donnell on CBS sixty minutes how could you not know if this was carried out by people who are close to you the only doctors like today the investigations are being carried out and once charges are proven against someone. list of their rank you will be taken to court no exception made. has there been any accountability for because show Jeez murder in Saudi Arabia in the year since it's happened. well the short answer that is note that wrong a trials ongoing of some of those who are alleged to be involved but obviously the console G. murder has come to epitomize this sends that opponents can be disposed of without remedy and so the lack of remedy can only be seen as a sign all of encouragement and that's why I think it's so important that countries like the US takes seriously that international responsibilities we've seen Germany refused to sell arms to Saudi Arabia that would be connected with the war in Yemen which remains the world's largest humanitarian catastrophe twenty four million people in humanitarian need and obviously there's an ongoing debate about how the crucial G. murder can be held accountable our point is that the is right to do so but also to recognize it's possible why the syndrome I'm not one to syndrome needs to be addressed well there were calls after his show Jeez killing here in the United States for the US to stop supporting Saudi Arabia in the war in Yemen has that happened no it hasn't because although Congress did pass a very strong resolution condemning the war strategy the failed war strategy in Yemen the president twice vetoed the resolution the went through both the house of representatives and the Senate so there's unfinished business in respect of Yemen and if there is to be any sense that because of his mother has anything been anything other than a polling waste an appalling crime if there's no sense that this is no lesson for the war in Yemen and really there's actually nothing to show for the year of protest that's been going on since the murder a year ago as David Miliband whose chief executive of the international rescue.

Jeremy Hobson Jamal Khashoggi sixty minutes one year
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"WB. You are I'm Jeremy Hobson, Robin young. It's here now, and she has dropped China has responded to the US adding additional tariffs to Chinese goods coming into the US. This was last Friday by raising tariffs on some American imports today earlier today, President Trump warned that China would be hurt very badly. If they didn't make a deal on trade. But in New York there was a big selloff on the stock market at the opening joining us from New York NPR business economics reporter, Jim zarroli, Jim higher oven, and for some background what kind of products of the Chinese putting their tariffs on and how will that affect American companies doing business there? Well, the tariffs that China announced are not going to have a huge affect on the US economy, China just doesn't buy that much from the US. The US sells more to China than the other way round. Now, it is true. The lot of American companies do business with China, but they tend to manufacture within the country itself. So they're not going to be affected by tariffs on on import. It's now certain sectors of the US economy are going to be hurt. A lot of what the US exports to China are agricultural products things like peanuts sugar. We I'm beef and chicken. American farmers are already suffering. They've already been hurt by an earlier round of tariff. Soybean farmers in particular saw the revenue just plummet now starting on June. I can still sell to China, but there will be this extra tax tacked on and it will range from five to twenty five percent of the cost of what's getting ship. So that will make it harder for American farmers to compete against farmers from other countries. So they're going to be hurt even more well on Fox News on Sunday White House economic adviser, Larry cudlow acknowledged this. That Americans are gonna be heard. This is contrary to what the president has been saying that American consumers won't be paying more for goods imported from China. Let's listen to host Chris Wallace, Larry Kudlow, if not China that pays tariffs. It's the American import is the American companies that pay what ineffective a tax increase and oftentimes passes it onto US consumers fair enough. I in fact. Both sides will pay both sides will pay and these things. Well, so he says both sides will pay apparently with China now. Imposing tariffs. There's a little more tooth to that. But the president is still treating out. There's no reason for the US consumer to pay the tariffs which take affect on China today. He linen into say that this was proven because there were only a there was a little bit more that was paid by the US with tariffs, but China had to pay a lot more terrorist because they subsidize so many products. And then he went on to say, but tariffs can be completely voided if you buy from non-tariff country or you buy the product inside the US, what is the sense of who's right? Well, the president has been saying this for a long time, and it is not true. I mean, he says tariffs are paid by. He says tariffs are paid by the Chinese and terrorists are paid by the company that imports products into the United States. They are paid when they go through customs at the port. So the importer is ultimately responsible for them. Now. Importers can absorb the cost themselves which means their profit is lowered or they can try to get their Chinese suppliers to lower their costs their prices that does happen sometimes or they can pass the tariff onto their customers. So it's drew these new tariffs are collected and the money goes into the US treasury. But for the most part the money isn't coming from China. It is coming from US businesses and consumers it's coming from you and me it's like a tax increase on everyone who buys anything from China, which courses everyone in the United States. Well in the goal of all of this to remind ourselves at this. You know, this this tariff war is because the president is trying to lean on China to come to a new deal with the US. Is there a sense that this is working or did China, call the president's bluff, and you had people last week Democrats applauding President Trump for the pressure. He was putting on China. So what's your sense here? What's happening? You know, I don't know it seems like a lot of this may be just negotiating ploys. I mean, the Chinese tariffs don't take effect until June. First the US tariffs do take a away effect right away. But they only apply to products shift after last Thursday. They don't apply to products that are in transit, you know, floating out there on a cargo ship somewhere it typically takes around two weeks for products to get here. So there is we have this grace period, China and the United States have a couple of weeks at least to resolve these issues before the tariffs take effect in both countries are are continuing to talk. Although no meetings have been set up. So as I say, this this may be just kind of a bluff, but it, but it has to be said there are some very big issues on the table still some serious sticking points. And there is this big political factor. I mean, neither country wants to be seen like it's giving in giving in especially China, which is really afraid of looking like it's giving into pressure from the United States. So there is time to stop. This runaway train, but it's gonna take a lot of effort. Well, there's another political factor on the president's Twitter feed right now, and I see someone writing him saying soybean futures the lowest they've been in twelve years. You're decimating are farmers while creating tax for consumers. So there's the domestic politics to consider as well, Jim zarroli NPR business and economics reporter, thank you. You're welcome will now to Florida where the legislature wrapped up at session this month with a host of controversial bills for one thing starting this fall. Teachers will be eligible to carry guns in schools for another one point four million ex-felons who had their voting rights restored by Florida voters in November. Or now facing new restrictions before they can vote joining us now is Lynn Hatter. Who's news director w FSU in Tallahassee. Hi lyn. Hi, thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. And let's start with this gun Bill. How's this going to work which teachers and school officials will be able to carry a gun, and what kind of training will they get while the program has fallen Terry for districts and all classroom. Teachers are now eligible for it. Previously. It was this those teachers with other duties like someone who was a science teacher and a coach or administrators teachers would have to go through about one hundred and thirty some odd hours of training and about half of those hours, eighty of those hours are directly in firearms instruction, and that includes some time doing active shooter training, they'll also have to have additional background checks and undergo a psychological exam, and they'd have to do yearly recertified just to keep their skills up to date and current and school districts would need to decide for themselves whether they want teachers to carry guns. Do we know how many are planning to sign onto this twenty five districts so far have approved participating in the guardian program. And there's another fourteen or so that are considering it. So that's more than half of the school districts in the state, a most others have said that they won't be participating. But it's important to note that those that aren't going forward are in largely rural areas where it's very hard for sheriff's deputy or law enforcement sort of. Get out to those schools. And so we've had most of our world districts that have signed onto this. Now. There are concerns. We've heard a lot about it that that this kind of law could lead to more violence, and in particular that minority students could be wrongfully shot by a teacher. Maybe a misunderstanding. Yeah. We have heard a lot about that. And there have been many reports about that happening in other states. There was a teacher that barricaded himself in a classroom in Georgia and fired a gun. So that was a concern that was raised by Democrats in this process. I recently spoke Lieutenant governor Ginette Nunez, and she said, well, that's why we have the psychological exam in there to make sure that a teacher is emotionally prepared to carry out this duty, but that is not easy. Those concerns at all. And you continue to hear them from people who are adamantly opposed to this, especially teachers teachers, don't like this at all. How much will these guns and the training cost the state? So there was about sixty seven million. That were appropriate for this last year fifty seven million that has rolled over to this current school year. So you've got about fifty seven million dollars on hand just to administer this program, and that would cover increased insurance costs guns the guns themselves. So there's a lot of money that has been put forward to that. But a lot of it came because very few districts actually implemented at last year. So a lot of that money is rollover let me ask you about something else. The legislature passed this month voters approved an amendment last November in Florida to restore voting rights for more than a million people with felony convictions. But then this month, the Republican led legislature added some restrictions. What are those changes? Well, that means the payment of all court ordered restitution fees and fines lawmakers want people who want their voting rights back. You have to pay it all in order to be able to register to vote and some people have called this oppose. Poll tax you've seen that term sort of thrown out there. But those are the restrictions. You have to pay it all back before you can register to vote. No, what are Republicans saying about? Adding these restrictions because this was something that was passed overwhelmingly by the voters to restore the voting rights for felons. Well, Republicans said that they needed to clarify, what voters intended supporters of the amendment said legislature didn't have to do anything that it was self executing. By the big thing that Republicans pointed to was an argument before the Florida Supreme Court were lawyers for the group that sponsored the amendment said it indeed intended for court, fines and fees and restitution to be paid and so-. Republican lawmakers have pointed to those arguments and have said see this is what even supporters the amendment said that it would do it's important to note that that language is not in the amendment itself. But again Republicans have pointed to what happened before the Florida Supreme Court and said. This is what you get and just looking at the politics of this. This was expected to be something that would probably help Democrats this giving the felons the right to vote again. This now will probably be more helpful to Republicans to make them pay all these fines before they vote very much. So you have people who say, you know, this is yet another attempt by Republicans in power to limit democratic votes. But again, this is probably something that's likely heading back to court and already the ACLU. A Florida has said as soon as governor Rhonda Santa's science this Bill it will likely be filing a lawsuit. So, you know, we're we're going back to sort of where this issue all started which was in a court win had our news director of FSU and Tallahassee. Thank you. Thank you. And you're listening to here now..

China US president Florida President Trump Jim zarroli Florida Supreme Court FSU Tallahassee reporter New York director Fox News Jeremy Hobson Robin young ACLU Chris Wallace
Endangered Hawaiian monk seals keep getting eels stuck up their noses and scientists want them to stop

Here & Now

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Endangered Hawaiian monk seals keep getting eels stuck up their noses and scientists want them to stop

"Sort the Hawaiian monk seal research program said it had to remove an ill. From among seals knows. The yield may have been cornered and tried to escape in went into the nose. Or may have been eaten by the seal. They say and came out the wrong way. Apparently, this has actually happened. A handful of times in the past few years either way I feel for this seal who is now on an even. In Kiel after the yield was removed from its nose for real well done here. I will tweet a fixture at Jeremy Hobson, the good news. Lisa, by the way, is that. They're actually a lot of monk seal pups that have been born a record number in the White Nile this

Jeremy Hobson White Nile Kiel Lisa
New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

Here & Now

05:29 min | 1 year ago

New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

"When the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

Ashley Walton Cancer Max Krummel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Claudio Gastritis Robin Young Jeremy Hobson Uc Berkeley NPR Bbc World Service Graduate Student Mclaren Dr Dowd WVU Feld Medical Officer Forty Percent
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"I'm Jeremy Hobson broadcasting today from London Prime Minister Theresa May's cabinet met this afternoon to discuss the deal. She reached yesterday with the European Union. It would provide for an orderly Brexit from the EU, but it has to get through parliament. I and she will need a lot of her own conservative party to support it. We spoke yesterday with two conservative members at parliament, John Redwood is what they call Brexit tear. He told me there's little chance her latest deal. We'll get through. Well, it didn't think plan is even going to get through the European Union is quite clear that the check is plan was still bowled on arrival. As far as the European Union is concerned you can't cherry pick from the single market. You copy hoffy in the market and haul out of the market. We now seem to be looking at west series of proposals from the point of view of all of those who just won't the UK to be a normal independent country again in the looks. As if they are considering a withdrawal agreement, which would impose a thirty nine Bidin soup attacks on the United Kingdom in return for another twenty one months of talks about how and when we might eventually stagger out of the single market and the customs union now, I'm seventeen point four million people the majority in the referendum voted to leave we've aid to leave not just the European Union. But we voted to the it so cooled single market, and it's called customs union faith, the remain campaign made that clear it will be the result of voting to div because they thought that was bad news and the leaf campaign made it clear, we've believing the single machen customs union because we think it's great news because we don't think they work to a well, they they mug the customer. They monk many businesses. They tie us up in red tape. And they charge us a full shooting hard and money, which we have to send as a donation to a series of rich. Countries on the continent to euro k with no deal. I don't want a deal the kind. They have in mind because it drags us. Back into the very thing. We said we're going to leave. It prevents us being an independent country making our animals and spending our money, and it would cost us a fortune. What about Northern Ireland? This is the big sticking point right now is what would happen to the Irish border with no deal. Well, nothing would happen to the Irish vote of in knightdale on our side, the British government would continue with similar border arrangements. So the ones we have at the moment. I miss it is already an international border. It is a VAT border, they're on different levels of sales tax on outside to the Irish side. So they have to be sales tax adjustments is an anti-terrorism border that has failed to police cooperation if the European Union wishes to impose all sorts of barriers on the Irish side that is up to them. And that's something which Republic of Ireland as a subject Member State of the European Union. We'll have to sort out with the European Union, but that'll affect p. People in the UK as well people in Northern Ireland. It'd be affected by that. Well, I didn't think the European Union will do it. I'm not I've had some comment. European Union's OSA might clear that in practice if we just left they would not want to impose new barriers on this side of the border, and I would advise not to in terms of international trade is very unimportant border is abode of the matches to the people who live near it. But it's not a big trade border. At the big trade. Borders are primarily the ones across the channel between France Belgium, Holland in the United Kingdom. So obviously, your prime minister who's in the same party as you doesn't agree with what you're saying. Now, I didn't agree with it. But I think she'll find the mice conservative members. The members of my party agree with me and not with the prime minister. And she will find the dodge number of conservative members of parliament don't agree with her either. They're around one hundred of us who say the eurosceptic view that we should just leave that we wish to sign a penal withdrawal agreement and then there are about fifteen. Conserved Mems parliament who strongly won't to stay in the whole thing..

European Union machen customs union United Kingdom prime minister Northern Ireland Theresa May John Redwood Jeremy Hobson London knightdale British government Member State France Belgium Holland twenty one months
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's your. Coming up. President Trump tries to change the subject ahead of the midterm saying he'll end birthright citizenship with an executive order as he sends thousands of troops to the border to block migrants who are more than a month away. Also Recode CARA Swisher on what exactly Hillary Clinton said to her about whether she'll run for president in twenty twenty and former fed chair. Alan Greenspan says the US is in the midst of a long-term economic decline from you look out and the router or were slowing down rape of growth and productivity. Why fear these stories and the lessons of mister Rogers after a tragedy in his real life neighborhood coming up here now? The news is first. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The office of Justice department special counsel, Robert Muller is raising concerns about allegations that women were offered money to falsely accused Moore of sexual harassment. It says the special counsel team learned of the allegations last week and immediately referred the matter to the FBI it's unclear if it's being handled by investigators who already work in Moore's office or if an outside office is investigating. Boston gangster James Whitey Bulger is dead. No word yet on how he died NPR confirms with the Federal Bureau of prisons at the eighty nine year old was found unresponsive at a prison in West Virginia. Only a day after he was transferred to the facility. The FBI is investigating Bolger was serving a life sentence for his two thousand thirteen conviction of a series of crimes, including eleven murders for sixteen years. He was on the FBI's most wanted list until he was arrested in two thousand eleven vigils continue in cities across this country this week in the wake of the Pittsburgh shooting in suburban Kansas City, more than thirteen hundred people turned out for gathering, supportive. Pittsburgh's Jewish community. Frank Morris have member station. Casey Wyan reports it has evoked painful memories for region. That has also experienced antisemitic violence a white supremacist killed three people at Jewish centers in overland park, Kansas four years ago. So Janie Hanzlick underway into the vigil says the Pittsburgh shooting hits home our.

FBI Jeremy Hobson James Whitey Bulger Pittsburgh Bolger President Trump special counsel CARA Swisher Robin young Hillary Clinton mister Rogers NPR Alan Greenspan Moore Lakshmi Singh Kansas Federal Bureau of prisons Janie Hanzlick Casey Wyan
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and WBZ you are. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here, and now the Trump administration is awaiting the results of Saudi Arabia's investigation into the disappearance of Jamal kashogi. The president said yesterday that if Saudi Arabia murdered the journalists, there would be very severe consequences and that would be welcomed by a bipartisan group of senators. Eleven Republicans and eleven Democrats who've triggered the global Magnitsky act and called on the president to start an investigation to possibly put sanctions on Saudi officials. The law was named after Sergey Magnitsky who died in a Russian prison in two thousand nine after he exposed government fraud. He was a lawyer for American William Browder and Browder is now the head of the Magnitsky Justice campaign William Browder welcome. Thank you. We have to explain your back story here a little bit. You were an investor in Russia. Sergey Magnitsky was one of your tax lawyers. He died after he was tortured in a Russian prison. You then push congress to pass the Magnitsky act, and that is the law that these senators are now using to call on President Trump, to investigate and impose sanctions on the Saudis who are believed to be responsible for Kashoggi's death, how much pain would that inflict? Well, the Magnitsky act basically has two functions in freezes the assets and bans visas of people who are sanctioned under it. And in particular, what it does is it puts people on something called the US treasury fax sanctions list. And what that means is that if you have money anywhere in the world, no Bank will move your money anymore. After you get put on that sanctions list. So it doesn't even matter if you have money in America. If you have money to do by Bank or NHL knees Bank, that Bank doesn't want to be in violation of US treasury sanctions, and your money gets frozen. And these guys in Saudi Arabia who were accused of murdering kashogi have a lot of money and have that. Money all over the world. This would be a devastating shock for them if they get added to the Magnitsky list, but the loss still leaves the decision to impose those sanctions up to the president. Even if the senators have invoked it in the president has been very hesitant to threaten his relationship with the Saudis. Do you have any faith that President Trump will be willing to act? Well, he's in a very difficult position right now because on one hand, he has some type of irrational love for the Saudis. On the other hand, we have a situation where Jamal kashogi, Washington Post columnist was chopped up into little pieces and it out by fifteen Saudi security agents. Some of whom are pictured all over the world, travelling with the crown prince the the, the level of granular evil makes it puts him in a terrible position if he wants to not do these sanctions because it looks like then he's he's involved in a murder conspiracy to cover up the responsibility. Of the Saudis?.

Sergey Magnitsky Saudi Arabia president President Trump Jamal kashogi William Browder Bank Peter O'Dowd US Jeremy Hobson NPR Washington Post WBZ Russia NHL murder America treasury fraud Kashoggi
How years of privacy controversies finally caught up with Facebook

Here & Now

03:59 min | 2 years ago

How years of privacy controversies finally caught up with Facebook

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here and now shares in Facebook, took a nosedive this morning dropping nineteen percent because of an earnings report after the market closed yesterday that is troubling many investors. Here's the headline the number of daily users of Facebook in the US and Canada is no longer growing. Facebook is also now losing daily users in Europe. Callum borders is senior innovation reporter at you. Are he joins us in the studio high-cal glad to be with you. And we should say that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg described this as a solid quarter revenue is still up by more than forty percent compared to this time last year. But what is happening is this all about the privacy issues and people dropping out of Facebook as a result? It's part of it. You mentioned the number of users leveling off or even dipping in in some areas. But I think part of what we're seeing actually may be the reverse, which is that investors could be worried that Facebook is so focused on a dressing user's privacy, concerns that the business is going to suffer as a result. I'm reminded of what sucker Berg said during his Senate testimony back in April, he said, I've directed our teams to invest so much insecurity that it will significantly impact our profitability going forward. And then on the on the earnings call yesterday, he said, we're beginning to see just that this quarter will and tell us about the earnings call because Berg was pretty positive in that call, but then the chief financial officer, Dave Wehner got on. What did he do that caused some alarm? So Wehner said, our total revenue growth will continue to decelerate in the second half of two thousand eighteen. It's that continue were that I think really has investors alarmed. In other words, he was signaling. This wasn't just a bad quarter and it's behind us now and we can move on. He was saying, things are going to maybe get worse before they get better and they lost a huge amount of money, a huge amount of market capitalization in the drop. Just today. Facebook, of course, is grappling with the number of controversies how the platform was used for fake news in the two thousand sixteen election, how the firm Cambridge Analytica obtained data from. Users, and then now the company's policy not to remove offensive content. I wanna listen to Mark Zuckerberg here speaking last week with Recode defending that policy with an example Renzo I'm Jewish and there's a set of people who deny that the holocaust, right. I find that deeply offensive, but the end of the day, I don't believe that our platform should take that down because I think that there are things that different people get wrong either. I don't think that they're intentionally getting a wrong that he has since clarified that statement, but does the company need to do more now to stop the bleeding? I think we'll probably get our answer between now and November. Six, which of course is the date of the midterm election. I think that if in that period we're seeing a lot of headlines about how Facebook continues to be a platform where Russia and other bad actors can spread disinformation. That's going to continue to damage Facebook's reputation. If on the other hand, they get credit. For seeming to clean up the platform and get rid of all that fake news. Then perhaps they can begin to restore confidence of their users and investors. We should say, just for context that Facebook's profits are still up by more than thirty percent compared to last year. And today's drops have brought the value of the stock price basically where it was in, may they've lost all the gains that they've made in the last couple of months. Yeah, this may just be sort of what they would call a market correction, right? It may be that misters were just too optimistic about the future of the company. I think the broader context too is that maybe people are losing a little bit of faith in these iconic tech CEO's throw Elon Musk in there with his Twitter antics lately that stub yours. Calum butcher is thank you. Glad to be with you. Ocalan Jeremy. A longtime tech reporter while Mossberg called zuckerberg's holocaust remarked cowardly. One holocaust scholar tweeted, this is breathtakingly irresponsible and many users do on Facebook to do more to restrict and remove misinformation hate posts, which makes Antonio Garcia, Martinez..

Facebook Dave Wehner Mark Zuckerberg Jeremy Hobson CEO Robin Young NPR Calum Butcher Callum Borders Berg Elon Musk Europe United States Tech Reporter Reporter Holocaust Senate Canada Twitter Renzo
U.S. races to meet migrant reunification deadline

Morning Edition

02:54 min | 2 years ago

U.S. races to meet migrant reunification deadline

"On kqed public radio the. Time is, now nineteen past five live from. NPR news in. Washington I'm Louise Schiavone The Trump administration is racing to, me today's deadline for reuniting migrant families who were separated at the. Border but as NPR's Joel rose reports the government has also. Acknowledged that hundreds of families will not be reunited by the deadline federal officials say there are. Roughly nine hundred parents who cannot be reunified by. The deadline in about sixty cases the. Administration says that's because the parents have. Past criminal convictions but in more than four hundred cases it's because the parents. Are already out of the US either. Because they left, or were deported by. Day's end attention will shift to the hundreds of children whose parents, may have been deported Andrew how much time. We're unified parents in the US should have to decide if. They want to seek asylum. I just, ruptured at the US embassy in. Beijing earlier today China's says a man. Detonated a small bomb outside the compound. Today explosion the only person injured was the man accused of the blast Chinese police responded the embassy. Says there was no damage to its. Property world markets Dow futures are up on the tech heavy NASDAQ. Futures are lower after reported one, hundred fifty billion dollar slide and Facebook shares and while the US and you have diffused. Their trade, issues, China remains concerned about is'relations with the US leading Asian stocks lower I'm Louise Schiavone NPR news. Washington and here, in San Francisco I'm Matt Elmore thank you, so much for joining us for morning, edition today which we'll get back to shortly I Joe McConnell is away today Ted Stevens is in his place to bring us a look at bay area traffic I Ted good morning Matt let's, start on the Altimonte pass westbound five eighty five to Northland road it's stop and go traffic eastbound still. Doing work on the between Greenville road and grant line road It's only the. Left lane is open until eleven o'clock this morning, metering lights are off at the bay bridge but traffic is, starting to stack up to the end of the parking lot and. No delays on Bart trains, are, on time Ted Stevens for. Thanks Ted his. Report brought to you by beach blanket Babylon I'm Jeremy Hobson, Miami is known as the cruise. Ship capital of the world but. The ships are outgrowing the city's port facilities the three major cruise lines they've all. Been growing in terms, of. Ships is in port Miami hasn't. Had the opportunity did host some of. The larger ships so now they're planning to build three new terminals that's next time on here now The here and now program begins. At eleven o'clock this morning it in turn is. Followed at noon by the. Takeaway The Trump administration hits the deadline for family reunification border crossings decreased and shown. But that is to be expected Trump's family separation policy has made no difference what the numbers say about border crossings I'm Tanzania Vega and..

United States Louise Schiavone Ted Stevens NPR Washington China Ted His Kqed Donald Trump Bay Bridge Matt Elmore Joel Rose Beijing Facebook Port Miami Tanzania Jeremy Hobson Andrew
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm jeremy hobson could mars be a second home for humans we have satellite solar satellites that orbit mars and reflect sunlight then you could melt the polar ice cap then rivers can once again flow freely we'll talk with futurist and physicist michio kaku about that and the discovery of gravitational waves that's next time on here now much more comes your way right after forum beginning at eleven o'clock today here on k q e d this is forum we're talking about the election in mexico with the biggest selection of mexico's history takes place this sunday and andruzzi lease with us president of the migration policy institute and author vanishing frontiers the forces driving mexico and the united states together carrie kahn with us from mexico city npr's correspondent and here in studio theresa correo professor latina and latino studies at san francisco state and how do you read trade up ahead in this election theresa correal trade her nafta specifically for that man right it's kind of puzzling sometimes when people think about ending nafta because nafta was an agreement for fifteen years between nineteen ninety four and two thousand and nine to eliminate taxes tariffs and various trade and we got to the end of the period we mexico eliminated so many of their subsidies and the united states did not did not really match the changes that mexico went through like our farm subsidy for example harms mexico and but we but we go on and we've become much more integrated as the three countries and now the question is do we want to does the united states want to start adding taxes tariffs barriers to trade and that's kind of a different question than do we want to continue with nafta semenya mental question let me bring a caller aboard here we've got icon the line good morning you're on the air yes hi i was wondering from these people on the show what is set at all about the minimum wage in mexico because i think that the minimum wage being about one tenth of what it is in the united states it it just leads people to while i emigrated second to to get involved in corruption and gangs of people who transship things to the united states because you can earn so much better money in being corrupt or being a drug gang or or emigrating then you can in mexico so there's anybody talk about the minimum wage has that come up in the campaign kerry to your knowledge yeah it's an election year everybody's talking about lower taxes and higher salaries but that is a big part of lopez over at platform to he that's what he wants to do is help out the young and help them with these scholarships that he says will be one of the first things he does and will not be changed no matter what the economic situation is in mexico and everybody talks about it to the pan party candidate and now you're has talked about that a lot but it's it's and the party in power has talked about a lot but if they could have done something why didn't they raise it before you know it is it is a great problem and it's it's interesting because it's also you hear lopez over at sort of in sync with trump on that you know he wants to raise mexican salaries and he likes that part of that discussion with trump and he talks about it in his rallies but everybody's talking about it of course it's election year lots of promises being made a comment from a listener named louisa who writes let me go to you in this andrew sealy mexico is currently the co writer of the global contacts on migration and refugees and they are playing neutral mexico has been continuously violating human rights of central american migrants a great question let me let me on minimum wage when we jump in and i will go right to global compact which is just to say the bigger plot mexico mexicans aitken average about one fourth of what americans do but the bigger problem is not the the wage workers but it's the people in the informal economy which is forty to sixty percent of the you can raise the minimum wage and instill most people aren't affected because they're in the informal economy and that's gonna be a big problem for lopez whoever's elected on sunday you're right the mexico is is chairing cochairing.

jeremy hobson fifteen years sixty percent
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm jeremy hobson last year a bike accident lifting grossman paraplegic five months later he was back at work is an er doctor option is you are paralyzed what do can do that option b is your paralyzed sit and wallow in self pity and i decided progeny are two of our story next time on here now stay with us for the here and now program it'll follow for him beginning at eleven o'clock this morning here i'm k qa d you're listening to forum on public radio our guest this hour is professor richard walker who is an economic geographer and professor emeritus at uc berkeley has a new book out it's called pictures of a gone city tech and the dark side of prosperity in the san francisco bay area so what are geographers really do dick while we get it they we do what i'm doing in this book we're really interested in places how is a place different from other places what is kind of the soul of a place everything from the economy through the culture that defines our plays and you know we hear a lot of talk we we we're very attentive to scales so it is neither just the local that defines nor is it the global and we hear a lot of loose talk about globalization did this that or the other but ash capitalism the world economy and world interaction happens it's name many skills and we're a good example in the bay area because silicon valley has literally changed the world in other words things that came out of one place have diffused and traveled to transform life into this new digital digital world that is enjoy and plagues literally billions of people.

jeremy hobson professor richard walker uc berkeley grossman san francisco five months
Volcanic lava buries two housing tracts on Hawaii's Big Island

Morning Edition

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Volcanic lava buries two housing tracts on Hawaii's Big Island

"Cloudy skies cosi today with partly cloudy to sunny skies inland breezy conditions today some patchy morning fog and drizzle in the mix too highs today low sixties near the ocean to the upper seventies emlyn that's the bay area forecast and the national weather service has sacramento we'll see mostly sunny skies today highs across the southern sacramento valley of seventy nine to eighty six more and morning edition ahead etiquette weedy traffic update as well from npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly afghanistan's precedent is imposing a week long ceasefire with the taliban beginning next tuesday it will expire on june nineteenth the bbc's jill mcgivering says the halt and afghan security operations follows this week's deadly terror attack targeting a meeting of clerics in kabul in afghanistan was shocked when the high profile gathering if religious scholars was hit by a suicide bombing the influential clerics suggest issued a fatwa condemning militant violence as unislamic president gone ceasefire is a direct response to that edict and a way of showing respect what's less clear is whether it might also signal movement in the peace process the attack on the clerics was claimed by isis officials in hawaii say only a few homes remain in the vacation land neighborhood after the latest lava flows from the killer way of volcano about three hundred forty homes and other buildings have been destroyed by lava on the big island since kill away is may third eruption bill dorman with hawaii public radio says earthquakes continued to be felt as well earthquakes are nothing new for residents of the big island of hawaii many relatively small but larger ones can come with volcanic eruptions a quake with a five point four magnitude sentence ash plume ten thousand feet in the air over the summit of kilo area wall street futures are higher this morning i'm dave mattingly in washington i'm jeremy hobson last year a bike accident left daniel grossman paraplegic five months later he was back at work as an er doctor option as you are paralyzed what do you do that option b is your paralyzed let's sit and wallow in self pity and i decided prop sinead heart two of our story next time on.

Sinead Heart Daniel Grossman Dave Mattingly Afghanistan Jill Mcgivering Dave Mattingly Afghanistan NPR Sacramento Sacramento Valley Jeremy Hobson Washington Hawaii President Trump Kabul Taliban Ten Thousand Feet Five Months
Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

Here & Now

02:47 min | 2 years ago

Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

"From npr and wbz you're i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here now rescue operations in guatemala which continued today after the fogo volcano erupted over the weekend thirty two hundred have been forced to evacuate at least sixty nine people have died and we're seeing horrifying images of the scene here's reporter mark stevenson of the associated press several of the stunning images are the myriad ways in which people died in this rumps and some were burned to death when buildings were set of flame by fast moving flows of lava clouds and then the most terrible thing is that the ashes mixed with water and sent it flows of what appeared to be steaming mud down the river valleys and dan the creeks even reached as far as the capital guatemala city twenty five miles away from the volcano ruediger escobar wolf is a vulcanologist at michigan technological university he's a native of guatemala and joins us on skype ruediger welcome and i just tell us about frago this is what's called a bellwether volcano well frankly it's a very typical strata volcano that has a lot of frequent eruptions it has been active since there are written records standish colonial occupation of guatemala and it and it has continued to the present so it has been erupting continuously since one thousand nine hundred nine and in the last few years since about two thousand fifteen it has had about a large russian per month so it it has had a very high level of activity and that's also partly contributing to this tragedy but when was the last time it had a major eruption are one that is like the one we're seeing now probably in october nineteen seventy four that was probably an eruption of comparable size to what we saw yesterday is this volcano different than the one that we've seen erupting in hawaii yeah it is very different hawaiian volcanoes in this particular case till away i usually produces lava flows in this eruption there were also some explosive events in but it mainly produced lava flows it produces some some ashby very rarely at least from what we know produces this kind of pyroclastic flows which is the deadly phenomenon that caused all the deaths were there any warnings for frago we know that in hawaii they were having earthquakes a lot of earthquakes.

NPR Jeremy Hobson Guatemala Fogo Volcano Mark Stevenson Associated Press Michigan Technological Univers Hawaii Robin Young Reporter Ruediger Escobar Ashby
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbz i'm jeremy hobson it's here and now on this memorial day president trump honored the fallen at arlington national cemetery they marched into hell so that america could know the blessings of peace they died so that freedom could live president speaking after a weekend of us diplomacy in north korea us officials crossed into north korea to continue talks in order to prepare for a potential summit soon between president trump and kim jong un joining us now is dominica montanaro npr lead politics editor domenico hey there jeremy happy memorial day you too and let's take a listen here to the president talking about north korea on saturday night a lot of people are working on it it's we'll get along very nicely so we're looking at june twelfth in singapore that hasn't changed and smoke pretty well we remember it was just last thursday that the president said that the summit was off is it on at this moment maybe we're all planning for it it appears that the president thinks that it may be on a he said that there have been negotiators from the united states who are in singapore he tweeted yesterday afternoon that it's on and that it's you know fake news that it's not going to be happening so you know after an exchange of nice letters to each other i suppose the president and kim jong un of decided that they are going to do this but you know nothing has been totally confirmed at this point and we're watching for it and there's been lots of back and forth in june twelfth is coming right up there was a new york times report that the president took issue with over the weekend the paper cited a senior white house officials saying the summit couldn't happen on june twelfth that it was too soon the president said that source didn't exist but apparently there were fifty reporters in the room when that source briefed them another two hundred on a conference call why is the president denying this well i can't speak for you know exactly what the president was thinking at the time.

npr jeremy hobson arlington national cemetery america president us north korea trump singapore kim jong editor kim jong un york times white house
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbz you are i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here now and we'll start this hour in gaza where officials say israeli troops have killed more than fifty palestinian protesters in one of the deadliest days of violence there in years sound there from gaza the clashes happened as the us opened its new embassy in jerusalem a controversial move that endorses israel's view of the city as its capital npr's daniel estrin joins us from gaza we've got a bit of a delay on the line but daniel described what happened there today tens of thousands of palestinians stream to the border where i was i remained back from the border but many others went closer to the border fence and instead of staying in designated protests spots as palestinians haven't recent weeks they fanned out along the border when i was there i saw black smoke billowing in the sky from tires palestinians burned to try to obscure snipers view on top of that black smoke i saw tall arches of white teargas israeli soldiers shot saw kites with flaming tales smoke on the israeli side of the fence maybe from kite that fell in a field and palestinian officials say this is the deadliest day of violence in six weeks of protests at the border several teenagers were killed they say including a fifteen year old girl i girl to be killed in these protests it's been a very very bloody day is it ongoing right now as we speak.

npr jeremy hobson gaza us jerusalem israel daniel estrin robin young fifteen year six weeks
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from legion based on the marvel comics legion follows the story of david holler a man who believed himself to be schizophrenic only to discover that he might be the most powerful mutant in the world legion premieres tuesday april third at ten on fx from npr and wb you are i'm jeremy hobson lisa mullins it's here and now the titfortat expulsions of diplomats continued today as russia ordered more british on voice in russia to go home yesterday moscow told sixty us diplomats to leave the expulsions are taking place at a rate unseen since the height of the cold war on nbc's today show russian ambassador anatoly antonov said us russia relations are at a new low it seems to me that up must via in washington is poison is poisoned is the folks that got must fear it's high time for us to still blaming each of its title for us to start real recission about real problems our friday political roundtable joins us wanna summers cnn politics senior writer hi wanna is and ron elving npr senior washington editor and correspondent hiran high could with you and run the issue behind these expulsions russia's suspected involvement in that poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in london this month it's roiling international relations and yet president trump seems to be taking a low profile approach this week only issuing written statements to condemn russia's expulsions yesterday and ordering them via a statement on monday no public comments from trump wh what's going on the president is pursuing a kind of two levels strategy if you will on one hand his administration is joining the world community nato in particular in condemning this nerve agent attack not only because of its effect on actual human beings couple of russians and a number of people just in the community there of sows berry who were totally.

trump nerve agent ron elving cnn moscow jeremy hobson david holler marvel nato president npr london russia editor writer washington anatoly antonov nbc
'There Will Always Be Change,' Trump Says as More Personnel Shake-Ups Loom

Here & Now

01:52 min | 2 years ago

'There Will Always Be Change,' Trump Says as More Personnel Shake-Ups Loom

"From npr and wbz you are i'm jeremy hobson i'm peter o'dowd in for rubbing young this is here now and more whispers today of a major staff shakeup at the white house it is reportedly only a matter of time before national security advisor hr mcmaster will be asked to leave president trump's inner circle and there are questions about how long chief of staff john kelly will stay this is white house churn comes as tensions rise with russia and their moves to resume diplomacy with north korea let's get to all of that with brian bennett white house correspondent for the l a times he joins us hi brian hi hi guys and let's listen here to president trump yesterday on these rumored staffing changes at the white house just two days after he fired the secretary of state rex tillerson on twitter they'll always be changed and i think you want to see change and i want to also see different ideas larry cudlow just came in brian were also now hearing that hr mcmaster the national security advisor could be next even chief of staff john kelly what are you hearing so right now there's a lot of discussions high the white house about exactly who bring in obviously president trump pretty abruptly decided to bring larry low on without a whole lot of vetting and discussion with his staff and announced that twitter himself he did the same with with tillerson's departure and so there's a lot of unease i think on the mcmaster question for trump's national security advisor i think talking to white house officials that trump has decided he wants to replace mass mcmaster but hasn't decided on exactly when or who to replace him with so he's that in discussions for weeks with a few people including john bolton and and some others and i think there's some concern that if mcmaster goes now it might be disruptive at this current moment where trump is facing to critic.

Tillerson Larry Low Brian Bennett North Korea John Kelly Chief Of Staff President Trump Mcmaster John Bolton NPR Advisor Larry Cudlow Twitter White House White House Correspondent Russia Donald Trump Peter O'dowd Jeremy Hobson
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wb you are robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here now it took a little longer than we thought but we did it as pennsylvania democrat connor lamb declaring victory after midnight last night with a razor thin lead over republican rick sokoto in a special election for a us house seat that is still too close to call succumbed said he won't concede until officials finish the vote count even as close as it is the results are seen as a victory for a democrat in a district that president trump carried by nearly twenty points in two thousand sixteen joining us now is npr national political correspondent mara liasson hi mara hi jeremy and your thoughts on this this is the district that favors republicans so much that no democrat even ran in two thousand fourteen in two thousand sixteen that's right and a republican is held us district i think has one in the last eight elections but this is a big triumph for democrats and it shows that they can win even in reliably red district's donald trump was fairly popular in this district his approval rating was a little bit higher than it is in the rest of the country but democrats now have a template if they run a candidate that suits the district like connor lamb did he was a marine he was a former prosecutor he was pro union he agreed with donald trump on a lot of things on guns and abortion and tariffs and even on nancy pelosi they can win and this is a just good news for democrats bad news for republicans even if sukur had been able to eke it out with one or two points.

npr jeremy hobson pennsylvania connor lamb rick sokoto mara liasson donald trump sukur robin president national political corresponde nancy pelosi
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr in wbur i'm jeremy hobson i'm robin young it's here now and there's heartbreaking news from the fbi today agents were contacted last month by a person close to confess school shooter nicholas crews with concerns about his gun ownership his disturbing social media posts and according to the fbi press release the potential of him conducting a school shooting the fbi says that the information should have triggered a follow up by the fbi miami field office of course it did not known in some states that person would have been able to petition a judge to take away cruises gun one take a minute to look at the law there is a thorough requirement that people in voluntarily committed to a psychiatric hospital be added to a list of those banned from buying guns president obama expanded that list to include people with mental illness who receive social security disability checks last year president trump revoke that rule but some say the original law didn't work well anyway judge steven life men is with the eleventh judicial circuit court of florida judge life men a you in your state it was very hard to get someone in voluntarily committed in on that list it basically almost means that you have to have a gun to your head or someone else's head in anything short of that makes it very difficult involuntarily hospitalized someone here so you changed the requirement for someone's name on a background check in florida what happened there we did what we found is that under the federal rule you only get on the list if you're technically adjudicated meeting you've actually had a court hearing in a judges found that you meet that criteria well the vast majority of people who come into crisis stabilization units was serious mental illnesses.

npr jeremy hobson fbi president obama florida miami steven
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is here and now from npr in wbur i'm jeremy hobson in addition to punishment prison time can also be about rehabilitation as it is for a group of women inmates in tennessee who just graduated from lipscomb university the private liberal arts college hooghly at a martinelli from member station wpro unattended their ceremony in many ways this feels like any graduation bright purple curtains will lipscomb universities logo adorns stage and a jam graduates and black caps and gowns chad excitedly but it's not quite the same their family and friends wait in line to go through a security check they stand barefoot while they're shoes and items or pass through a scanner they can't bring in balloons or flowers or even a camera to record the special moment but for the graduates it won't matter their proud of their education the first degree i earned in 2013 was an associate's degree and now a listening graduate with a bachelor's degree that's donna almost sixty years old she walks with a cane due to health issues were not using her last name because of the permanent correction didn't give permission donna is serving a life sentence for murder she has spent close to two decades behind bars and will likely spend the rest of her life here you have to remember i'm a criminal a lot of people in society that's all the all remember first there was a prison book club and then and associates program there was no plan for bachelor degrees in prison but richard good a lipscomb history professor and the programmes founder the leave the women could go further so he started the program in two thousand and seven we could have never imagine that it would reach this level and we've seen the programme grow over the years would really the growth is measured in the students themselves though higher education initiatives were once prevailing imprisons lips comes bachelor.

npr jeremy hobson tennessee lipscomb university martinelli donna murder professor founder lipscomb universities chad richard lipscomb sixty years two decades
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the listeners of kqed it'll be a sunny day to day but a breezy when once again in the north face hills were expecting highs ranging from the upper 60s to the low 80s a generally the winds will be west northwesterly from 10 to 20 miles per hour but those areas in the north hills will see wins from twenty to thirty miles per hour san francisco today will have a high of sixty nine oakland reaching 73 san jose will get up a seventy six this afternoon sacramento will have a high of eighty and santa rosa a high of eighty one degrees from npr in wbur i'm jeremy hobson robin young it's here in now and we're hearing incredible stories out of las vegas of heroism during the massacre their fifty th year old mike mccurry is being lauded by the white house for laying across young concert goers to protect them he spoke with kyw philadelphia where he lives i just want oberoi fourteen people bulldozer over on abel said i'm a lot over media has so i go lighting up the momolu word anybody would have done the same clothes worlds as people were front elbowed woollen not only that but he later elaborated older than them meaning that they were younger and should live our also learning more about the arsenal shooting suspect steven paddock brought into his hotel suite 23 legally purchased kearns more than ten bags full explosives were found in his home reporter by men as in las vegas for npr brian at the start though with you know the victims fifty nine victims were learning more about acts of heroism what are you hearing now this is really wrenching i mean uh you know we've been hearing about these high school sweethearts bobby and jessica parks she died he's i've a few has kindergarten teacher and palmdale california and her husband are also seriously injured they have two children you know this was a.

kearns jessica bobby steven paddock jeremy hobson santa rosa san francisco kqed california reporter north face hills abel philadelphia white house mike mccurry las vegas npr sacramento san jose eighty one degrees
"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy hobson" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbur i robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here and now lawmakers are leaving washington for the fourth of july recess with no healthcare bill passed through the senate and senators on the fence will likely get an earful from constituents back home so how're americans feeling about healthcare and washington will a new npr pbs newshour mirrors polls out today it finds president trump's approval rating at a new low just thirty seven percent and pure political reporter jessica taylor is here with the details i jessica high jamie so while the president's popularity continues to wane he does still have support of republicans right he is holding onto his base and this sort of one of the few things the white house can take solace in right now overall we found the president's approval rating is at thirty seven percent and that's been about where he has been at for the past few months for comparison obama's approval rating was fifty six percent in june two thousand nine so typically presidents get a little bit of a honeymoon period now trump does have the approval of about eighty percent of republicans and those who identify themselves a strong republican he's at ninety one percent so with his core base he's doing really well and among people who voted for him last fall eighty nine percent approve the job he is doing how is he doing among various demographic groups are there any surprises there we'll there are some hints that maybe you know maybe not his traditional base could be eroding a little bit white non college educated voters were really key to success last november and his approval rating is just sort of barely above water with them fifty two percent say they approve of him while thirty seven percent disapprove of the job he's doing and among voters who were six year older he's underwater as well only forty three percent of those voters approve of him while forty seven percent disapprove.

npr jeremy hobson washington senate trump reporter jamie president obama jessica taylor thirty seven percent eighty nine percent forty seven percent forty three percent ninety one percent fifty six percent fifty two percent eighty percent six year