15 Burst results for "Jeremy Farah"

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

07:13 min | 2 months ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Hello and welcome to god. What now. I'm your host story linski. Alexandra drain is an actor writer and relevant this week a former competition specialist in the regulation pharmaceutical markets. Hi alex hello. Doreen kissed ongoing trouble. This week visiting jesus house churches pasta opposes gay rights to no uncertain terms. I understand i apologize. Which offended another group of people. Do you think was. It was wrong to visit wrong to apologize. Do you unravel this one. I mean to say he was wrong to visit. Would be to subscribe to the the idea that it was a conscious choice. I think it was a fuck up. any few by united lou. Labor's explanation the basically. They chose the location. Because it's a vaccination center in their religious place. They thought good spot for a good friday message and didn't really realize the rest of the stuff. Then it's a cockup at which means he was absolutely right to apologize but it's really shabby work isn't it. I mean it betrays a lack of professionalism. I think in the back office which was meant to be one of the benefits of opting for starmer as leader that unite was going to be a more professional outfit I mean okay. They can be justified to be a little relaxed considering prince. Charles didn interview there in. The prime minister did an interview there in the last few weeks and little or none of this criticism crop tub. But that's not to excuse it. You know because we we do and should expect the labour leader labor h. q. Switched on about such issues. So you don't buy the argument that till the you know that it's okay to sort of you know get to speak to you a kind of a black church one that is of see helping administer vaccines addressing vaccine has been seen in the black community. The fear you still have sort of red line. Because i suppose that's the kind of a calm down keys argument. I think that plenty of places that could have done the same job without causing the same offence. If that makes sense so that you know there are other judges who whose leaders are not as batty as this guy would have done the job just as efficiently just needed a little bit more research. And they didn't bother to do their own work. Which is called no sin. Namie smith is chief. Executive britain hi namie loyalist youths and rioted in our old home-turf northern ireland over the last few nights throwing petrol bombs fighting with police. And so on. What is behind this latest outbreak of violence. I mean to be frank luck question could probably were an entire podcast. Upstate of own. Is there anything in the history of northern ireland experiment. Let me get so yet. Nine police officers were injured on monday. Night in these disturbances and of course storm is very roy. Being recalled from its easter recess and regular listeners would have heard me say this phrase before about northern and it is a frozen conflict not to resolve conflict. Anything that heats up tension sues that very very quickly and all of that conflict bubbles up to the top. And i think what is really driving this now. There is some talk about how you know it was. The xinfang members attended a an uncertainty distanced. Funeral the rest of it. But but really i think what is the dishonesty over the northern protocol on all of the promises of unfettered access. The johnson and others in the government have talked up in the denial of borders even as is actually physically being erected nuts all contributed to loyalist anger. And if you can imagine being a unionist northern ireland who now cannot get their orders from companies that used to ship to the whole of the uk dipping made to feel like second-class citizens to fill. They're not really being treated as british because a company that used to ship to them is now saying sorry. We can't because of the limitations we just can't anymore so there is huge resentment being stoked up coupled then with economic woes and recession. And anytime you have a economic strife in areas like mine didn't in conflict zones you get a resumption of young men. Feeling very disenfranchised disempowered on then turning to other means to get validation for themselves on this week's podcast vaccines tickets. Government plans to introduce proof of immunities away. Out lockdown is run into opposition from other parties. It's about benches and even the hospitality street that it's trying to help. Can they be successfully introduced in other morally justified or an unacceptable infringement on individual liberty plus we meet two of the research is leading the brakes witness archive a little history project which aims to write the first draft events. They gave us this podcast. Smother less fun stuff to that talking to some of the buys influential people on both sides of the campaign including gives us jewett on let win and dapper supervillain richard thais what they found out an extra bit for patron backers is kissed on the clocks up one year leader. We look at the opposition to the opposition. What to stop internal critics want and can research is authority. I this week five years on williamsville sheriff's passports except he's the kind that get you into pubs clubs theaters marinas and they don't come in patriotic blue. The government has been looking at what they're calling into possible to covid status ticket scheme since december spending four fifty thousand pounds on eight separate pilots games. The idea is tickets would record whether someone has been vaccinated recent negative test or has natural immunity. opinions cusco spotty lines evenly. Remain lines sage advisor. So jeremy farah says he believes the certificate crosses that line of individual freedoms and public health and our own in. Dont as called them. Id cards on steroids. They constitute the greatest change the relationship between the individual and government in the modern period because in his very emphatic Alex before we before we start on this. We should do the latest vaccine news. Which is Press conferences on the possible link between the astra zeneca vaccine blood clots. What what have they told us. So just as we were about to recall the drugs regulator the image jarrai did a press conference at the same time as they. Ema in europe. Which i think is incidence so what they say is that although there is still no positive proof that the jab causes the clots the link is getting firmer that's their language The side effects are still extremely rare and more will work will go one incident whether particular groups that are at particular risk. Their is that the balance of benefits in is still very favorable to the majority of people. So what they've said..

Charles europe Doreen five years Alexandra drain monday alex uk Nine police officers Namie smith december This week Alex this week friday both sides one year two richard thais one incident
"jeremy farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:36 min | 11 months ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"End to the Corona virus pandemic are indulging in wishful thinking. Can we find a way of living with covert 19 in a way that respects the science while mitigating the damage being done to our economic and social lives? Well, my guest is Sir Jeremy Farah, director off the welcome trust. Key scientific advisor to the U. K government without putting those restrictions in place and keeping them in place. We would have had a much worse pandemic, even though we have suffered so far, and at the moment there is no exit from this, we can't use. We know if these restrictions further than they are now which out without seeing a resurgence on the idea that this is only seriously affecting a small group of the population, I think is wrong. That's a Jeremy Farrah on hard talk after the news. Hello. This is Danielle Yoav yet Scott with the BBC News. Rescue workers in the Lebanese capital Beirut are searching in the rubble of collapsed buildings for those missing after Tuesday's massive explosion, which devastated the port area. More than 100 people were killed and dozens are still missing over him. Shamus spent the night looking for his nephew. He's 29 years old from 7 p.m. In the evening. We've been all over every hospital in Beirut, and now we're waiting for the names to come out. Nothing has come out. We don't know if he's dead or alive. We just don't know 4000 people were injured by the blast caused by tons of ammonium nitrate stored in a warehouse. People and politicians want to know why such a catastrophe was allowed to happen. The Indian Prime minister, Narendra Modi, has laid the foundation stone off a new Hindu temple in Ayodhya. Hindu mobs demolished a mosque there in 1992 sparking riots in which 2000 people, mainly Muslims, were killed. A new temple is a decades long promise off Mr Modi's Hindu nationalist B J P. Yoga, Teela. My reports, the holy site has been at the center of one of the most violent disputes between Hindus and Muslims in the country. Historic mosque that stood at the location was destroyed in 1992 by people who believe it was built over the birthplace of one of Hinduism's most prominent gods. This triggered religious rites in many parts of the country. Last year, India stop caught allowed a Hindu temple to be built at the site. Three Lankans are voting for a new parliament with safety measures in place to contain the spread of Corona virus. Early figures suggest a 25% voter turnout by mid morning. With the rise in majority. Sinhala nationalism, along with a divided opposition president go to buy a Roger Pictures party is hoping to secure a majority. He wants to install his brother Mahinda as the prime minister. The BBC has obtained what's thought to be footage from inside China's system of mass incarceration in the western region of Xinjiang, A member ofthe the Uighur ethnic group murdered Gap has taken a video of himself in a bare cell handcuffed to a bed. Video and accompanying text messages appear to contradict China's insistence that most reeducation camps have been closed, his John said. Worth the messages describe a cramped cell with prisoners hooded and shackled. And the constant sounds of torture from elsewhere in the jail. They were sent after Mr Gap. It was moved to an isolation cell as a precaution against Cove, it 19 where he was given access to personal belongings, which are known to his guards. Contained his phone. The Chinese authorities did not respond to the BBC's request for comment in March. Relatives say the messages stopped on Mr Gabbar has not been heard from since. World News from the BBC. The U. S. Will send its highest level delegation to Taiwan in four decades with the Health Secretary Alex A's are visiting the island in the coming days. Taiwan's fight against Corona virus is likely to be on the agenda. Relations between Washington and Beijing are strained, and analysts say a Cabinet level visit to an island China claims as its own can be seen as provocative. The Australian state of Victoria has reported another record number off Corona virus infections and deaths. 15 people died from covert 19 while more than 700 people tested positive. More military personnel have been deployed to enforce a nighttime curfew. Phil Mercer reports. This is another grim milestone for Victoria. It's recorded Australia's worst day of the pandemic so far. Health officials are stressing the figures reflect infections that occurred in the past fortnight. They're confident tough lock down restrictions, including a nighttime curfew in Melbourne will push the number of new cases down in the next two weeks. All non essential retail stores in Victoria are preparing to close. Is increasingly strict disease control measures are introduced. A study in Britain has found that people from black and minority backgrounds were greater risk from Corona virus than white people. Reports say that they are more likely to be key workers use public transport and live in multi generational households. And a study in the United States says that black owned businesses are hardest hit and more likely to close their doors. Satellite images have identified 11 previously unknown colonies of Emperor penguins in Antarctica thought a number a few 100 penguins each, The finds increased the no number ofthe emperor penguins by up to 10% to more than half a 1,000,000 birds. Discoveries were made by spotting the distinctive red brown guano patches. The birds leave on the ice. That's the latest BBC news. Welcome to hard talk on the BBC World Service with me, Stephen Sacha. My guest today is one of the UK is foremost experts on infectious diseases. So Jeremy Farah has been involved in efforts to combat and eradicate global threats to human health for some four decades, taking in HIV AIDS, SARS bird flu And now covert 19. He is director of the Wellcome Trust, a major backer of scientific research here in the UK is also a member of the scientific advisory group on emergencies. Sage, which has been advising the Boris Johnson government on its response to the pandemic, with more than 46,000 covert deaths and more than 300,000 cases..

BBC Sir Jeremy Farah China Beirut Victoria Taiwan director Narendra Modi Jeremy Farrah scientific advisor Corona UK Mr Gap Prime minister Mr Gabbar India Mahinda Shamus Phil Mercer U. K
"jeremy farah" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"A few years before vision started in two thousand nine, another group of scientists in America had created predict. This would eventually become the world's largest project to find new human pathogens. Over the decade that they worked predict scientists discovered one thousand two hundred new viruses with the potential to infect humans, one hundred sixty of them were corona viruses. It really came out of the avian influenza experience of two, thousand, five, two, thousand, six, two, thousand, seven Dennis Carroll, was one of the founders of the project, and in working in that space for about two and a half three years it sort of began raising questions as to whether or not that dynamic of wildlife livestock people. Was Unique to avian influenza, or whether it was really reflective of a much larger dynamic, involving merging fireable threats at large. When we talk about Coruna viruses or feel viruses, how many are out there that we don't know about? And that number was about one point, six one point, seven million viruses, and estimating about six hundred thousand, plus or minus may have the potential to actually infect people or dicked was really an attempt to say well. Can we really move? What had been academic science into exploring the viruses and wildlife? Can we establish it as potentially an arm of the global health portfolio? Could it become a backbone? A new surveillance ability to identify future threats before. They spillover grinned us, and could we use that knowledge about where viruses are circulating? What is there in what might even be the hot spots? Hell we could granules is understanding, and could we get insights into the genetic profiles of viruses in ways that allowed us to be far more forward leaning if we began developing a catalogue of this data. John Is An. Epidemiologist University of California Davis and the Global Director of the predict project. Some of her work involved extracting the genetic material from samples to find out what viruses will present, we extract the earn a then we make see DNA. We would go and sequence that to speed it, and if it was in our highest priority than we would sequence, the whole genome advances in genome sequencing technology have been revolutionary Steven Baker explains next generation sequencing didn't exist when he is. So pulling out the genetic information from someone's research, she swap in Wuhan was unthinkable until ten years ago. Perhaps so not only then as our ability to actually make these things happen change, but our ability to understand them quicker is also changed. Scientists can identify and analyze new viruses. But how can they find out? If an animal borne virus can infect humans? We know how they work. We know what sauce are sue binds. We know what influenza things Bindi that you can do it from genetic material that you can identify how likely they are to bond to send receptors in the spirits tract of humans or other animals, and also you could then infect cells in a laboratory and see how well they stick, and then predict that potential evidence. We need to be looking at the morphology virus. We're looking at spike proteins that are generated by quantum viruses, because they're the key to enter into the cells, and we've done that and are working on that with some of the best experts in chronic viruses. We've even looked at things like how many species are in the area how the land uses changing and we call from I, think thirty international publicly source databases. which species can host these viruses? And things so busy play a crucial role. Poultry of essentially ubiquitous. Vary good mixing vessel, because shares as humans that's Jeremy Farah an infectious disease doctor who helped sets up the visions project in Vietnam almost a decade ago. He now heads the wellcome trust one of the largest medical research charities in the world. He spoke to me on the phone. Says a huge number of animals holds the data about being clearly covid nineteen from Bats I've not. Intriguing host was. The species we'd have really what is the..

Jeremy Farah Dennis Carroll Steven Baker America Epidemiologist University of C Wuhan Global Director Bindi John Vietnam
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Strauss say they'll cut spending. His pressure announced Zuckerberg to address misinformation at races. That's all straight ahead on Bloomberg. Daybreak. Europe on Digital Radio London, Bloomberg 11th. Rio, New York, Bloomberg 99 1 Washington, DC Bloomberg 1061 Yo dot com and fired the Bloomberg Business Act. All Radio and Caroline. Those statistics on the global virus death toll and, indeed, number of cases pretty startling. Absolutely 10 million Corona virus cases now worldwide confirmed half a 1,000,000 deaths. On the issue is that momentum is picking up certainly in the U. S in places like Brazil and India in terms of the infections, But we were speaking, Teo a guess. In the last hour. Barry Norris, who is the CEO of Argonaut Capital Partners, you a UK fund that is doing particularly well on he was talking about how infections within you because actually, we seem to have the moment have a better handle on the Corona virus in Europe that that could be a big boost in terms of you. P in equities over the next few months. Yeah, course So here today In the UK, we're getting interesting developments. The overall picture of the virus is very much on decline. But Lester, for example. Now there's seemed to have a spike of cases. Some sense that that city may be facing one of the UK is first regional lockdowns. No clarity on that, but it's certainly a possibility Mobile. Meanwhile, Boris Johnson talking about big spending On schools, but also more why be on infrastructure That certainly seems to be affecting the pound of the moment and a sense that he really needs to get the direction of his government back in gear in a moment, where over the weekend polls suggested, in fact, he's a less popular choices prime minister than his labor counterpane Yeah, indeed. That's a kiss Dharma. Let's get you to the markets. Then away from the politics that talk about Asian equities, which are dropping because of this worry about the pandemic would see a specific down 1.3% 2.3% drop in the next 2 to 5 on the seaside, 300 down 9/10 of 1%. Despite Cem Slightly better figures for industrial profit may out of Chinese firms. As for the bond markets this morning Treasuries have been steady if no absolutely flat in terms of years this morning trading at about a 64 basis points for US yields. Also, inflation data will be key this morning for Europe. We get numbers from Germany and Spain out this morning. As for the FX space right now, we see a slightly weaker dollar this morning. We could 10th of 1%. The pound trade stronger as you mentioned cable and sterling stronger because of boys. Johnson's big spending pledges of 1 23 73 is where we trade there. A drop in all prices. And yes, as I say a slightly weaker dollar this morning. Well, let's pick up on that cross over to Berlin. Where Richard Jones the markets live team joins us, Richard Very good morning to you. The weaker U. S. Dollar weaker against what certainly against the euro and clearly on cable as well. What's the outlook? Do you think over the summer months? Good morning, Roger. Well, I think in the second after this year's U. S dollars and climb back to the highs that we saw in March. I think this is going to happen on the back of the flight of a flight. I think that's going to drive demand the green I mean, we still have this pandemic being a front better concern for investors and it's closing a great deal of uncertainty, global economy and I think haven currencies such as the Swiss frank on the job again will be in demand. But I also think we can ask dollars. This list as well. Back in March, when we had fears overcoat with 19 after high the dollars sword. Now. Since then, I'm on a train waited base. The currencies pulled back about 5%. And we've seen risk has been improving on the demand for these havens, sort of em. Nonetheless, I think the pandemic is going nowhere going away any time soon. I think it's going to remain ever present investors sort of thought process, and I think the dollar will benefit from this investor caution that we're going to see. I think this is especially true against the euro In the pound. I think the Eurodollar You got in addition to the pandemic, you've got rising trade diplomatic tensions between Brussels in Washington, and I think that's going to impact the European economy of disproportionate way and I think that will mean a dollar up form against the euro. Then I think it was fun. But sterling. I think the dollar will benefit against the pound for along the brakes, and I'm certain that I think will probably seem towards the talent of this year. So I think over the next six months, I think both the euro in the pound located on the back foot versus the dollar. Right. Well, thanks so much Indeed. For that Richard Jones there. Onda actually want to catch up. Maura, what's going on with regard to that Brexit issue station because you got Russell's edition coming up a little bit later in this hour? Real time market. COMMENTARY ANALYSIS You can check out markets Life M L Ivy on Bloomberg Terminal. Well, let's take you to our top stories this morning Corona virus cases are searching. Johns Hopkins University says that total cases have now topped 10 million. The number of deaths has reached half a 1,000,000. Despite some experts, hoping that the pandemic would start to fade in the summer infections are multiplying faster than ever. Here in the UK as I mentioned, government officials are meeting those in less than this morning to discuss Corona virus testing data, a local lockdowns being considered for the city after surging cases public L've England says 866 new infections have been reported in the last two weeks. The home secretary. Pretty. Patel addressed the issue on the BBC's Andrew Marr show. There will be support going into lesson. In fact, the health secretary was in touch with many of us over the weekend, explain in some of the measures of support on testing. Resources that are going to the local authority as well because with local flare ups, it's right that we have a localized solution. But the Leicester Mayor Peter Salisbury, said that there was quote no immediate prospect over locked down for the city. Also speaking on the Andrew Marr show yesterday, Jeremy Farah, a member ofthe the scientific advisor group for emergencies, so the outbreak in Britain is on a knife edge, and he believes cases are likely to increase over the upcoming weeks. More boss. Johnson is hoping that he could reclaim the political agenda this week by announcing plans to rebuild the U. K's shattered economy. But Enberg Sebastian solid reports now. Schools in England is set for a £1.8 billion boost the prime minister's focus today's education and the first rebuilding programme for English schools since 2014 on Tuesday, he's using sets out the bigger picture House spending on infrastructure will rescue Britain's economy from the worst slump in at least a century. He's already ruled out, returned to the policy of austerity that followed the 2008 financial crisis. But this is a part minister who badly needs rescuing himself as weekend polls showed him to be a less popular choice. Now as prime minister that his labor rival kiss drama in London are Sebastian Solich, Bring back Daybreak Europe We're gonna have much more on UK politics on Bloomberg, Westminster at 12 noon UK time today, will be speaking to Flor Anderson, who was.

UK Bloomberg Europe Boris Johnson prime minister Richard Jones Andrew Marr Bloomberg Terminal England Washington secretary Zuckerberg Strauss Caroline Rio US Johns Hopkins University Enberg Sebastian Leicester
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:20 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

"Your about to seize your Keel. O.`Neil like you've never seen him before the show about my life just because I have more than the average guy doesn't mean I'm better than the average got jack like all new Thursdays at nine on. Tnt Don't often ready to face the world on my own Tracy. Morgan is back. You are low rough around the edges. Tiffany Haddish is back with. We support one another. Everything is going to be. Okay the last Oji all new Tuesdays at ten thirty nine thirty central on TBS as the United States wrestles with the health and economic impact of Corona virus. President trump has just sidelined the inspector general assigned to monitor the two trillion dollar emergency spending package removing critical oversight from that program. The United States is still struggling to bring its corona virus testing op. Full speed as frankly here in. Britain is my next guests so Jeremy Fairer is uniquely qualified to discuss both the progress of Britain's fight against grown virus and the status of the prime minister's help a medical doctor himself and one of the world's leading experts on pandemics. He serves on the Government Scientific Advisory Group for emergencies or sages. It's no and he runs the wellcome. Trust which is one of the world's foremost medical research philanthropies. So Jeremy is joining me now. He said we've never faced something like this something where we are. All engaged in less than seventy days has gone from one city in China to essentially every country on earth. Jeremy Farah thank you very much for joining me. Can I just ask you in your capacity as government expert as head of a committee and in touch over the over the months presumably and weeks with the Prime Minister? What do you make of the fact that he was rushed to ICU? After spending a night in hospital what what what do you think? He's in critical need of right now. Thanks so much. Good Evening Michael. Let's go out to him and his family This is affecting all of it doesn't matter if you will the prime minister or any other country on around the this is terrifying for everybody and obviously the ministers being ill for some time. I think he was taken to hospital it at an appropriate time dancing. He was rushed and he's in a fantastic hospital. We'll be looking after him. But it just shows you this. This is indiscriminate. It affects all of us We hold family. We've all got friends who are in intensive commitment to nothing best wishes to all of them but also the healthcare workers that are looking off them who deserve such respect. The things let me start by asking you something that you've promoted this week and with the former. Prime Minister Gordon Brown. You calling for a global response now right. I mean are you saying that? Just hasn't been because we keep hearing from various different capitals about what they're doing. What exactly are you calling for and also trying to get private business onboard the sharing of information originally from China but now around the world have the the data the epidemiology. What is happening? As far as the has been global response in in that in that way but will the hasn't been. Yeah so what we need is how are we going to get out of this How are we going to get out of this now? And how are we going to make sure that it doesn't come back in the future? Because at the moment the probability the possibility of a second Senate waves it's very high After we go through this I crisis. We may face other crises in the future. A nearly long-term Exit from that East going to be to develop the drugs that we need to treat people and save lives at also critically the development of vaccines. That are going to be needed to make sure we can prevent this happening in the future. And that is about science it's about development it's also about the manufacturing and the distribution of those axiom that everybody in the world can benefit from that science and the at the moment. We don't have that global coming together of the Scientific Endeavour the puts aside nation-states will decide where it would made aware of manufactured. And say we need this for the whole world and we need to make sure nobody is left behind now the. Who needs to be at the hall? So that the European Commission a leading extensive work to try and bring countries together. A number countries have been already very generous in terms of supporting but we do need more And businesses which badly affected by this job was just saying also need an exit strategy and the Best Exit Strategy Role of is that we have treatment vaccines that can get events and prevent future pandemics. I I want to ask you about the mechanism for an exit strategy. Is the mechanism testing. Is it is it a vaccine. What is the mechanism because both the United States and the UK have been pretty slow? It looks like from the numbers from the promises made and from what we know to be the reality. Very slow getting testing in any meaningful way not just patients or people but also to frontline medical workers and it's in sharp contrast to what Germany's being able to do with testing and the like can you put that into perspective for us please. You'll each country is going through a different phasing epidemic. I mean obviously stops in China coast at Japan Singapore and then Germany was affected very early. In this and setup. Testing vary in the third down to the lessons. That must be learned about how Jimmy set up in has done a great job in Delaying its epidemic even if it may not prevent all together so it was very important coming into this epidemic to make sure people were tested early. Healthcare will cause easy. Say to try and slow the spread of the epidemic the testing to be crucial as we come out of the epidemic as the numbers. Hopefully Scott stablize which I think in Western Europe. Now they are starting to stabilize than it's crucial. That all countries have the capacity to to test even as we come out to the epidemic those people can isolate a wide spread it to other people in the community. Testing is absolutely crucial of the stock of the epidemic in some ways even more important at the end of the epidemic but testing is not the solution on its own is critically important and it buys time but what is important is that we have a long term strategy to prevent this ever happening again and that the demands having diagnostic testing having drugs and having vaccines okay so the obvious question is then how long before a vaccine. So how long before a vaccine? I wish I could answer that. I wish it was tomorrow. What a Juno is is. It'll it'll take time for whenever we stopped and actually the vaccine were did start in the middle of January and as you know the first Potential Vaccine Was given to an individual volunteer in sixty three days after the sequence of the process. Debatable account shape between the National Institutes of Health in the United States volunteer. Today was in Seattle and it was also supports hit by the Global Alliance for vaccines so it is happening. And we know vaccines take a long time to work and to to develop but they take time from whenever you stopped And so the quicker we start and the quicker. We don't just do these things in sequence we don't do the signs and then we think west. We manufacture how do we distributed? How do we make sure everybody in the world has access to it? We need to all of those things in parallel and we need to take some big old risks. I can't tell you today without vaccine will come from. It may welcome the United States. It may well come from China. It could come from Cuba Russia or India. It could come from anywhere in the world with some innovative scientists So as global as a global issue. This is enlightened self-interest every country must have access to the vaccines when they're available and therefore I think the world has come together and support financially and scientifically and come together in a way that is true global public goods that we would benefit from. Well you detail that in the op-ed that you wrote I'm just GonNa read from it a calling for the G. Twenty and governments and big business to fund A. Cure you basically said it's now or never for global leadership on covert nineteen healthcare systems and societies of buckling under the strain caused by this corona virus. But if we do nothing spreads an African Asian Latin American cities which have little testing equipment and fragile health systems. It'll cause devastation. Persist and perhaps inevitably fuel of outbreaks worldwide. The only way we can end the crisis sooner rather than later is to do what we've admitted to do for years fund the Public Health Scientific Economic Agencies that stand between US and global disaster. Why I mean. It makes eminent sense but the problem is that some countries do that. We mentioned Germany. It does have a very very high rate of funding it's public health therefore it has masses of ICU. Beds that are empty right now. It has testing you know really over the top testing while the big countries like the United States Britain smaller than Germany in terms of economy nonetheless. Don't have that so what what can happen. What do you expect will happen with this? Call has been a little support for the cool is there and those words you just read. I think are at the very heart of the case. That's being made and the down. The country's astonishing to think Cologne lease lines Governments have Germany no way Japan along with the Gates Foundation. Welcome set upset many years ago. The the Global Alliance for Vaccine Initiative. The is has been in place since twenty at twenty three thousand two twenty years now at the W. H. O. W. it's fantastic through this pandemic provided global health leadership and they provided public health support to to protect each low middle income countries. At the reason coming together the European Commission is talking about said bringing all countries of the world together to try and find a solution to make sure that yes. We found. The testing that is critical. But that's a national That's a national priority. What this is about is bringing the world together to put put aside differences and national approaches and say the only way we can get through this is to develop those treatments those drugs that are critical to save lives but also to make the vaccines that are going to be needed. Yes it it will take weeks and months. It may not happen until into twenty twenty one but just imagine a world where we go through this first wave we come out division. We think they're okay. And then there is a second wave in twenty twenty one on the end of twenty twenty and we have not got a vaccine. I think that would be an intriguing. We can leave anybody behind. We'd have tiny little bit of trouble with the sky. But I just want to ask you. Are you saying that this kind of locked down can lost into 2021 how do you envision the lockdown preceding not the lockdown? Kennel go into twenty twenty walnut. That is very clear that the damage to health as well as the damage to economies just chew profound that we we have to find a way to if you like bridge for where we are today with very draconian measures in place to relaxing those in the weeks and months ahead on the basis of testing testing testing and looking off vulnerable people and caring for people in hospitals. That's the bridging strategy until the epidemic. Truly in its first wave comes to an end. That's critical and we must have will do that. But that's not enough on. Its own if we don't commit ourselves. Now that's a world to come together to make those drugs those vaccines which are the true exit strategy from this pandemic and I just cannot envisage a situation where we face the second and third wave next year and we did not have flows treatments and back scenes. That would be an absolute is ASTA SITUATION TO BE IN. Jaffna go back into these lockdowns to have to go back in to this INC economic disruption Which affects so many people's lives and inevitably when you have these economic disruptions. It affects the poorest and most vulnerable in society. That is always true out and then we ought to everybody to not just provide a short term solution here but to provide a loan solutions that we don't have to go through this again indeed. Well we'll keep checking in with us. The Jeremy Fair. Thank you very much indeed and a quick note the wellcome trust which is Jeremy. Medical philanthropy is in fact opening..

United States China prime minister Germany Jeremy Britain Tiffany Haddish European Commission Prime Minister Gordon Brown Global Alliance for Vaccine In Government Scientific Advisory ICU Jeremy Farah Jeremy Fairer Tracy Morgan TBS President National Institutes of Health
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

14:04 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to on. Here's what's coming up. Boris Johnson the British prime minister remains in intensive cab even as his government fights the corona virus. What does this all mean for Britain and for Johnson himself? I speak to the former British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne and to Jeremy Farah the leading pandemics expert advising the British government. Then tennis legend Billie Jean King joins the fight against this pandemic the site of the US Open named in her honor is transformed into an emergency hospital and veterans science journalists. John Cohen Tracks. Down the truth behind the corona virus spin. Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour working from home in London where here in the UK. The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson remains in Intensive Care Downing Street insists that he's in good spirits stable and receiving quote standard oxygen treatment not invasive ventilation but it is serious and frankly unsettling as the country struggles to fight the disease that has struck the prime minister himself. Unlike the United States Britain has no formal succession. First Secretary Dominic Robb. Who's the foreign minister is deputized to fill in as necessary? But what exactly does this mean? And what happens if Johnson is further unable to do his job the number of corona virus cases and deaths in the UK is very much on the rise with more than fifty to fifty five thousand cases reported and over six thousand dead with the peak perhaps expected to crest over the Easter weekend when David Cameron was Prime Minister his finance minister. Or Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne served as first secretary his designated deputy the role. Dominic ROBB has right. Now I was born is now editor of the Evening Standard newspaper. And he's a keen observer of course of the inner workings of government at this critical time and he is joining us right now. George Osborne Welcome to the Program. Good to be on. So we're trying to talk over skype in. It's a pretty intense situation right now. This is the first country as you know where. The leader is basically incapacitated. I know that's not a technical term. But he's out of action in intensive care. Can I just ask you? Do you think that he remained a Downing Street for too long? I mean anybody can see from the latest video when he came out to try to cheer the NHL workers as Britain's do every Thursday night. Now I mean he looked absolutely terrible. Do you think he should have been in hospital earlier? I'm not a doctor. I don't know I what I do. The Boris Johnson is a fighter. Would've absolutely hated leaving the center of government that amendment like this and I think also somebody who would not have wanted to thank the spat place in the hospital. Sc absolutely needed to but there is something remarkable going on because this has been a very divided nation as you know your views now we've a lot of partisanship era. Recent years this crisis and indeed the prime minister's illness has brought his country together in a way I would never have guessed that made us a much more United Kingdom because the whole country now and whether they supported him or not politically wants to get better at Zoa wishing him well in his Situation in intensive care indeed and there have been obviously well wishes coming from all over the world from the United States from Europe from many many parts of the world and as you say it does united particularly as this really deadly disease is threatening every single person on this planet and of course in this country as well. I just wanted to ask you what you think about. The idea of what this government has been telling us look yesterday just hours before Boris Johnson was was rushed to intensive care. We had tweet that. We reported on this show of him tweeting that he was in charge. Let me just read it. I'm in good spirits keeping in touch with my team. We work together to fight this virus and keep everyone safe. But as I was reading that Dominic Robb was saying in his daily press. That actually hadn't been speaking to Boris Johnson. Since Saturday the question now is is the government leveling and do they now more than ever have to be absolutely a thousand percent transparent with the public yet? I think they do. I think we live in an age anymore. Where you can pretend your will head of government is is fine when clearly is not his intensive cat in Bygone Era Winston. Churchill had a stroke while he was prime minister managed to keep it secret. And you know when I was a child you always have this funny situations in the Soviet Union. Where some what was pitchy knows very well in the state media was saying that they were identing networks and I think the current plan you get from Dang straight regular updates on the prime minister's health condition is much too on them pretending these fine and Dandy and sitting in his hospital bed in guiding trigger. Paint black because I think as a country throughout this entire we want our leaders that level with us not to be overly optimistic not to give us full and at the same time just to set out the facts because everyone is in the same boat and this disease strikes everyone is. We've seen very obviously with the condition that the prime minister's in Georgia born the United States has a constitutional process whereby if the president is incapacitated the vice president takes over and then if that doesn't work the speaker of the House and so on here it's not like that. Boris Johnson himself created. First Minister in the Foreign Minister of Foreign Secretary Dominic Robb and he is going to deputise as necessary. You yourself as we said. Were given that position by David Cameron. So what do you think it means? What does deputise as necessary? Mean and we'll I ask you that. Of course. Britain does have a head of state. That's how majesty the Queen and she broke costs to the nation very unusually on on Sunday night and rally people and she see many prime ministers. Come and go. We have a system. Where in the prime minister's really Chaired the cabinet of individuals secretaries of state. Now there are some pals that the prime minister exercises alone Wilson. Pows been lied. The United States nuclear weapons shoot down a passenger plane that might be hijacked by their already established. Procedures for deputies alternates. Is that gold to undertake those? Very extreme house as should the prime minister of being capacity Unavailable so that that that was already in place. This is an unusual situation. Where for period of time you. The prime minister might be out of action but the cabinet can function without. Its lead at least for a period of time and and what? Donald Graham has to do and he's very capable. Individual is bring about a consensus in the cabinet. What he doesn't Avid Boris Johnson's ability to say. If you don't agree with me I'm firing you as A. He has the mobile consensus behavior. It's a very temporary situation. Just very clear because you know you. There has been criticism from within the party that WHO KNOWS WHO's governing the military right now. What if a hostile power decides to take advantage of this momentary weakness does dominate? Rob Control the military. And does he have the nuclear codes the to show answer B. S? Basically you know the the nuclear codes state secret. The will turn it But I'd be put it this way very surprised if it wasn't the foreign secretary the Secretary of State dominate rap. But I think you're already bad situation in the world would be very much less if you had to have access to the nuclear codes Sunday and I think those minitry questions yes now would be innovated to donate wrap. That wouldn't have been the case and a couple of days ago and it wouldn't be the case if the prime minister was conscious. Eleven intensive care under supervision nevertheless very much With his mind but if it's the case that he's properly incapacitated uncertain word be on a ventilator. Then yes dominic Robb would be able to take those decisions but again in the British System. They then not presidential decisions. You still need the support of your cabinet. Done the tank avalon military action as Defense Secretary Indeed did not county Get the consent of parliament. Is that thing? So does not doubt that Dominic Robb has all POWs that he did not have a couple of days guy but it is still within the context of a cabinet system where he is as I say. First among equals and doesn't have a low patronage and future impact on people's careers that a prime minister thousand that keeps people in order right. He can't hire and fire. You're saying and the Queen withdrew. Respect is a constitutional monarch and she cannot make government decision so one of the major decisions that has to be made is reviewing prime minister. Johnson's three week timeline. For the lockdown and that expires sometime next week. What is your gut instinct? What are you hearing? Do you think that that will remain in place this lockdown or do you feel the Dominic Robb will have the opportunity to lift it? What do you think is going on in terms of the time? Line of this virus and whether that decision will be made while Boris Johnson's in hospital first of all I think if Boris Johnson were to stay in hospital for a long period of time this would soon emerge as the big question facing Dominic Robb in the Cabinet. A question which is Johnson has not previously provided the answer in the moment the cabinet. And Mr Shaw just lamenting plans already set out for the quarantine for the measures to protect the economy at Modena. My guesses improved. Guess is that there's no way. The quarantine lifted next week in Britain in any other significant European country in because the rate of deaths continues to grow the infection continues. The experts medical opinion is we might be approaching the peak. We certainly haven't reached it now. I did notice Mr Abbott. Did A press conference a couple of hours again actually started to shift the goal cut goalposts submit as instead of this three weekly review which we've got the U K which was supposed to be every three weeks we review the Corinthian continues analysis going to review whether the quarantine continues or in what form continues until after the peak has been paused and actually has not been the case yet here in the UK. Sadly so I think that decision anyways but off effectively this afternoon and very finely as you know of course. The chancellor did a massive stimulus for the British people and of course in the United States as well and there is a big argument underway. Right now debate. Shall we say within governments as to whole sort of? Is The Cure. Worse than the virus. Should we start preparing to get back to work as a former chancellor? What is your view on that briefly? Now I think in the moment is no question that the quarantine is necessary. Sick Society is not going to have a healthy economy. I think he's going to be a much bigger question. In the coming months as we passed the peak is a large number of people have had the disease and Clinton is just not possible to shut down in economy. Full NINE MONTHS CINDY ORIENTED. Never have very serious health effects of you. Did I think the final thing I just say is that there is a bit of a hole in the in the dam that has been built up to try and protect the economy from this wave of redundancies. And and that is these. Many companies will will not benefit from some of the government's games or indeed schemes like hit in Europe. And I think you're gonNA find Western governments taking stakes in companies. Something unthinkable even a couple of months again to try to inject some equity businesses so that that crucial question you're all spam out. When can you start easing? The CORENTIN is at least put off a bit on life support for the economy continues to come because We're GONNA need more of it as this situation. Goes on and on Georgia's one former Chancellor of the Exchequer editor of the Evening Standard. Thank you for joining me tonight. As the corona virus pandemic has four schools across the country to close teachers are scrambling to get their curriculum and their students online. I'm poppy harlow in this week. On box-files I talked to leaders. Who are supporting those teachers.

prime minister Boris Johnson Dominic Robb Cabinet United States secretary Britain chancellor George Osborne Chancellor David Cameron Europe United Kingdom Christiane Amanpour British government Georgia Billie Jean King Evening Standard
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"You very much reasons to be cheerful abundant in jet long. Well here we are in the ALTRO. And we've had plenty of email so far during social distancing and just a taste of that this first one comes from Kelsey flat who says Dear Eddin Jeff stay from Nepal we are locked down in Katmandu and eagerly consuming lots of reasons to be cheerful. In fact your podcast is kept US company across ten countries over the past five months. We learned about the case. Veganism on empty desert roads in the debate at the four day working week on a ferry in Lake Malawi and admired the articulation of young activists on a sleeper train rolling through Mattia prudish in India. We even took reasons to be cheerful with us. The base camp of Mardi Himal before arriving in our current state of Nepali isolation reasons to be cheerful come easily privileged to travel this far along good health and the extraordinary graciousness of the Nepali people. This is from Kelsey and Tom and they also send some suggestions. I if we took about in future episodes so we'll we'll have a look at those. What a lovely. I want to raise one from Lily from Edinburgh who said Friday's discussions strange. Time as a relatively young solo dweller. I'm twenty six. I'm feeling quite ignored. The General Chattanooga's coverage of social distancing which implies that everyone will have housemates will families. They live with well. I love living alone peculiar toughness tonight. I went so much to be able to sit in a room with anyone. Learn how to handle mom will forbid a hug for weeks or months on end and he coverage I've seen of London's old people I can't stop thinking that the fight. The solitary confinement is used as a special extra punishment defy the press cetera. Discussing how tough this is. The live alone makes it worse again. Not only as a special kind of crap bortles the forgotten about so you discussing it inherently make a lot better. Thank you for sending us that thought. And I'm sure you speak for a lot of people and we received the same out from John. John Merritt who says? I don't know how a loner might be in this view but I would really like some of the day-to-day media consumed try and stay out of reporting on corona virus. My logic is that it's hard enough. Being isolated from friends and family. Big Start for purpose was workers in limbo without doom and gloom reminders of the impending apocalypse to. It's it's difficult isn't it? Because you know we feel that we have to stay relevant during this but maybe there are other things that you'd like to hear about. Maybe something we've touched on on. This episode is what the World Starts. Look like when we come out the other side of this and maybe that's something we could spend a bit of time. I mean I think I know what Jon means because I certainly look around for things to listen to which is not about corona virus speaking for myself. So we're kind of feeling our way here. I suppose An We'd love to hear falls on things that we should be covering. I mean I think I think the flip side of what Jones talking about is at the same time lots of things feel. I mean everything not relevant but up against the sort of existential threat that corona viruses. Lots of things can feel secondary just within this moment of emergency. And of course we'd love to hear from you. You can email us through the website. Cheerful PODCASTS DOT COM. I let thank guess really sort of excellent and really great that they spread the time. Laura Spinney Jeremy Farah Adam twos and thanks. This week's cheerful person. Jen Ashley. Emma Cochrane produces a podcast. We've back from recent from Joel Perez Medicine Evans Pavlina Dragon over and Joe. Kenyan Gal lofthouse is announcer. James dickey made the identity at seed post music and the artwork was designed by Henry Cole. He's been Jeff Lloyd. He's been at Villeurbanne. These reasons to be cheerful..

US Jeff Lloyd Kelsey Lake Malawi Henry Cole Katmandu Gal lofthouse Laura Spinney Jeremy Farah Ada Nepal Mardi Himal India James dickey Mattia Joel Perez Medicine Evans Jon Villeurbanne London Emma Cochrane John Merritt Edinburgh
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"We've no idea whether the innovate come from. It may come from America. It may come from Europe. It May for the dump from China Russia or Cuba or or India and yet the whole World Rooney. And so the me. This is the best example in fact of the global public goods and that leads public funding. Yes the private sector philanthropic sector but it sends the public thing as a global cooperative Approach which can shows. Everybody has accessed in an equitable way to the innovations. That will come. Where are we up to in the global effort to develop treatments and vaccines? I think there's A. who solidarity trial. What what role. The wellcome trust playing in this treatment so moving quickly The Global Solidarity Trial Naked by the world. Health of nation has started recruiting patients than I think. Four or eight hundred countries now are joining up with the votes out. We will generate evidence for the best treatments and Prevention From anywhere in the world and it will be joined together through the W. H. O. So every country's informed the students we have a treatment of works and similarly with vaccines a sixty three days off the the virus a sequence which released at the first phase. One study in People Vaccine was given to a person sixty three days off the arl sequence not something which would usually take five to ten years of people will be seeing the dissolved that is unfolding in many countries in the world but also recognizing that some of the poorest countries in the world haven't yet been hit by the full force of this virus. Wh what is the scale of threat? They're more on. What can we do to preempt it in with people living in very very difficult circumstances compared to developed countries? It's my biggest. My biggest fear is just this virus inevitably spreads to central South America Africa South Asia where health systems are incredibly vulnerable and fragile and overstretch The time access to healthcare is very limited. I think pressure there on this. When this inevitably arrives will be enormous. I think we're facing a a health disaster but this is no longer just a health issue. This is also a social issue an each an original issue. And that's a big danger of when this or countries of the world we will be judged by how we reach out to them. And how we deal with this Equitable in this way off. Slowly judgments on his old Jeremy Farah. You're playing a really important role in in trying to coordinate the health response to this ad form to say thank you for joining us. Thank you for the work that you in the wellcome. Trust to doing great pleasure. Thank you very much. Indeed NASA talk about the international economic response to this crisis under. Let's say that we're joined from New York. Batum twos WHO's director of the European Institute at Columbia University and Author of Brilliant Book crashed? How a decade of financial crises changed the world. Adam thanks so much for joining us the morning so just big picture for our listeners. What is your assessment of the extent of global cooperation? We've seen in this economic crisis economic response to Corona virus. And how does it compare with? Say What we saw in two thousand eight. Well I think the obvious thing to size is extremely spotting. There are certain areas where the basic mechanisms of international governance of sorts of semi working. I mean the W. H. O. W. H. O. Still provides you were the anchor. The least monitoring of the epidemic is it spread Hasn't proven itself to be an effective vehicle for policy At other levels of course through spectacular failures of coordination cooperation while the things for instance of the ban imposed on European travel to the US a donald trump with no hardly nunca consultation with any of the governments in your which which must be unprecedented in baseball. History certainly The area I think which however is most striking and perhaps least as it were AB- surfaced in the public. Discussion is the level of central banks and the Air. We've seen very significant Coordinated Action and then if you unilateral international action by the Federal Reserve of the United States which is the ultimate provider of follows is still the anchor of the global financial system as we know it channel a little bit more. The Federal Reserve has been doing unwise important matters because a huge part of global finance whether it takes place within the boundaries of the United States. So even between non American actors outside the United States is done in dollars. Those are the Basic Lebron the Basic Megan of finance and if most trade as well and so they're all trillions of dollars out that liabilities. That's debts that people need to roll over. Nice debts on repaid in business you rolled-over continuously that have to be refunded over the period of this incredible largely unanticipated shock. And so one of the big worries is being where people are gonNA get dollars from that. They need to funds ongoing economic actor. The at how do we avoid this show being amplified by a sudden contraction in your ability to get dollars and the only bank which ultimately can provide an unlimited quantity of dollars. Which is what you need. But you're having a panic so very well to say well I've got two trillion. Which because a real big paddock going on. Even that could not appear nuff. So China has Three trillion plus that he could go to really big panic on. That is not that large relative to the size of the Chinese economy. The only people who can really say you know if you need jealous come to us. We can provide them in. Unlimited amounts is the Federal Reserve in the United States and so it has oath theme pumping Bilas into the global financial system in New York itself while almost all of the main actors have offices that's easy to do and also doing is providing round out mechanisms sweating bellows into the global financial system. And that's something that the Fed is doing well. Bigger picture won't would great cooperation. Looked like what more could countries and international institutions do partly at role be conscious in with enough as very very big recessions in different wealth throughout the world. E is that more that Global Corporation could be doing to stave the vault those off make them more short lived. Make them shallower defeat stuff that the ones like myself rule excited about Lee reaches certain parts of the global financial system in certain parts of the global economy and the truly poor countries don't have financial all the assets to really Paul type of this kind of fed. Generosity is very much inclined to beaten side club deal so when we're talking about the kind of shot that's going to radiate out into the developing world Nowadays Cooley emerging markets. Then we're talking about the classic institutions of development finance the cycled international financial institute really the IMF and the World Bank those come with huge political legitimacy issues because ready for a government to go cap in hand to the IMF is is the last Straw. I mean that's really enact. Desperation appointment at the house because of stigma the IMF is quite just nowadays all of its bad reputation so the deals are actually better than they were in the ninety s but nevertheless it's difficult to do that on the question of course is does the IMF really have enough resources on hand to provide the kind of support that the large developing world may need face the shot because this is really unlike anything we've ever seen before I mean huge slices of the global economy beyond being either a commodity expert or the Balsam of valujet. You're in real trouble at this point. And that's not even talk about the impact on their public health systems a very stressed healthcare systems and especially sub Saharan Africa. Where you've got knowledge of unique compromised. Hiv popular the populations living with HIV. So there's a real nightmare Those label development ages for best rule worse would be. That would be the key. Levers so what we're talking about now is trying to expand the financial capacity of the IMF. That's a big topic if this pans out to be the kind of disaster the looking like it might be. We're going to have to think beyond the existing institutions think about structures specifically tailored to coping with this crisis. And we might be talking about really major step change in development aid in other words direct provision from the mortgage countries to countries of various types of finance whether it's to support ongoing expenditure will for the purpose of investment. One thing that strikes me Adam. Is He discusses on the podcast couple of weeks ago. Is it because two thousand eight happened. Some of the mistakes were made then a not being. Mr May made this time. In terms of some of the flexibility of the central banks something the Federal Reserve And and some of the international institutions but obviously within these things. You just implied Christ is like any other and this causes certainly not like any other other things. The ones we discussed you think sort of if you were in charge of the G Twenty. Put it that way. What what else would you be saying has got to be done because because it feels like while different institutions of done some okay things Internet hasn't been a coordinated international response either on the hillside of the economic side. Other things without staring into the crystal ball that we should be doing that. We're not in the two thousand. Eight comparison is helpful up to a point. And I think you're right that they have rolled out the two thousand eight playbook in America but but if you detail it's really not age so much on massive doses of steroids so the the the federal was a United States buys bombs to stabilize the debt. Balk at it did that in eight is currently buying American bonds at the rate of ninety billion dollars a day it will one point three trillion dollars worth of assets in fourteen working days. Now that is the sort of spend the bed. Menendez Fed in the two thousand eight crisis would rack up over a period of the year so we are spending in a day. They were spending in a month. So this is a eight but the response to the is is is on a completely different magnitude at that level. If we're talking about quality novel whole new dimensions of policy I think with regards to especially the low income countries. We're GONNA be talking about massive debt. Rescheduling in probably debt-forgiveness a lot of the boom in borrowing in the developing world off to old took place against the background of the debt forgiveness campaigns of the early two thousands. And we're GONNA be looking. I think at wingate need coordinated policy towards the lower income countries the addresses that issue because to assume if you lie that we can continue with business as usual that we can continue with the mobile of mall business driven commercialized a market driven finance for the low income countries which is really being the manager of the last fifteen years. I think is is naive Against Against this backdrop It's it's just too dramatic and the public health impacts are likely to be too severe feeds through to them in the way that it's fed through to the advanced economies depending on the age of the population climate. So there's a lot of imponderables but in the worst case scenario ready to need more help. And how much do you think the high income countries are going to be presented off to this crisis is over? It's obviously a long way from that. How much are they going to be confronted with the questions of financing both the sort of economic sort of slowdown or recession massive recession? That will have happened and this was paying for that. I do think this is the crucial question because right now. Everyone seems to be agreed. Need even fiscal hawks. Like the Germans have agreed that we need to remove the breaks. And we're just GONNA spend spend spend in whatever form is necessary. It's really convulsive. Even more dramatic than it is just a decision. A Kadish is a public health emergency and so the more. We're doing this crazy thing where we're putting the called the deep freeze. We need to keep it alive. So there's an open handed policy of spending right now but that is Achieve night vary substantial of financial obligations into the.

United States Federal Reserve IMF America New York Adam Europe China Russia South America Global Corporation NASA Jeremy Farah baseball donald trump Cuba
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

15:33 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Reasons at cheerful podcastone coming to reasons to be cheerful with Jeff Talknet to lower spinney who is a science journalist and author of Pale rider the Spanish flu of nineteen eighteen and how it changed the world. Laura thank you took into. I'm guessing lots people want to talk to you at the moment And I fail embarrassing that beyond knowing the Spanish flu existed in the early part the twentieth century. I don't know that I knew very much else about it. So I wondered if you could start by giving giving us an overview of the flu pandemic and and what the global impact was. Yeah of course so. It emerged in the northern hemisphere spring of nineteen eighteen while world will one was still raging and that was kind of initial wave. We say struck in three ways. That first wave was rather mild Than there was a second way that erupted in the latter part of August of that year which was by far the most vicious and then there was a third wave in one thousand nine hundred nineteen Overall one in three human beings on earth thought to have been infected. I'm between fifty. One hundred million people died So it was by far the West Catastrophe Catastrophe of the twentieth century out. I'm probably if any century and why is it misleading to refer to it as Spanish flu a no at the moment? We have certain people we don't need to name them. Referring to covered nineteen is the Chinese flu. Are the parallels between that? Yeah absolutely are in the sense that epidemics pandemics of always come along with xenophobia. And blaming the ELVIS OTHER. I mean in this case. It's interesting because we know that a bit more about where this started. I didn't think we have all the answers. But we have more of an idea of the geographical origin than they did in one thousand nine hundred eighteen on the story. That is that in fact. There are so many mysteries around that pandemic and one of the few substances we have is that it did not start in Spain So there are three theories about where it did stop which correspond to origins in China in America and in British military base in northern France. But we do know for sure that it didn't start in Spain. The reason it's called the Spanish flu is because Spain was neutral in that war and so it didn't censor it's press. We know that cases in the US Britain and France at least distant name a few before they were in Spain but those countries kept that information out of the newspapers because they were war and supposedly didn't want to the morale of the population When the first cases broke out Madrid in the spring of one thousand nine hundred eighteen They were reported in the newspapers because it was no. Censorship concluded the King Alfonso Thirteenth Who WENT ON TO RECOVER? His case lent some visibility so even the Spanish and even people in countries that have been infected longer by the flu thought that this disease was rippling out from Madrid and that sort of suited the governments of the countries that it was encouraged that idea and because they were the most powerful countries in the world at the time that name for it tended to stick what was the balance then Laura between nationalism and global corporation in the response to the flu. Did we see countries if we did blame each other closing the borders? All some of the things that we've seen this done. Yeah there is absolutely there was all of that. I mean there wasn't the kind of you might say that. We're not very well organized this time but we far less well organized that time partly because the world was at war and had been four years and really no country had the resources to mount a very effective public health campaign even if they had known what they were dealing with in terms of the disease itself and of course there was this kind of strange information vacuum as well which is partly to do censorship at the beginning when the wolves raging but partly also to do with a complete lack of while not complete but the Large lack of scientific knowledge about the virus that was causing this disease and of course what was completely missing was any kind of global coordination so there was no global health agency like the. Who all any of its forerunners. And in fact the nine thousand nine hundred and flu did change. Some things didn't it. I mean what was quite interesting to think for our listeners. For you to say what the lessons will I mean? Not least the setting up of the W. H. O. Yeah I mean. I think that you can't lose. Fifty two hundred million people without affecting most areas of of human activity so festival. Yeah there was this. I mean just to take a step back. That was the the sort of eugenics this the idea of. Eugenics that People were a kind of responsible for the that state of Health and any diseases? They caught was very prevalent at that time. As there was an idea that if you If you couldn't infectious disease it was because you were sort of somehow inferior in your constitution. What the pandemic told people was that that was not really viable way of dealing with the widespread infectious disease. You needed to treat that problem. Pandemic at the global level at the population level and so it's from the nineteen twenties. First of all that you see kind of socialized healthcare systems coming in where the idea is that health care's free at the point of delivery and he also see this setting up not the. Who because that didn't come until nineteen forty six but its forerunners for example the health branch of the League of Nations Which was set up pretty much immediately after the festival on the pandemic and the idea was that viruses Pathogens that are contagious. DoN'T RESPECT BORDERS. And so we have to coordinate our response internationally another historian of nineteen eighteen. It must be a particular experience to be going through this one. I mean do you. Do you have a feeling of having done your research? Feel Book and feeling you know. History is repeating itself not just in terms of the disease but in terms of the reaction to the disease or the other less than you think we should be learning. I mean I think a couple of things to say about that. It was fascinating to me. Is that having forgotten that pandemic for so long everybody is suddenly reaching for it as the obvious comparison and I have to find. I have to point out that there have been other pandemics. For example there were two other flu pandemics in the Twentieth Century One of them killed no more than two million people in the other killed more than more than four million people which of course huge numbers but nothing compared to fifty million people in a smaller global population. So you know why. We immediately jumping for the worst historical competitor. I don't know so that's one thing to say. Then when it gets down to the sort of more human level I think the real parallels that we can draw an and I'm just every day by things I hear that remind me of stories. I got my book on the nineteen eighteen flu in terms of human behavior. Some things don't change and when you think that we are in a period now. We are waiting for a vaccine. A vaccine is the only thing we will have. That will stop people falling sick. In the meantime we've only got sort of symptomatic treatments now. Even they're not very effective. The the main weapons we have in this period while we wait for a vaccine our social distancing techniques so the things you've heard so much about lately quarantine isolation mosques hand washing and so on which the exact same techniques. They had one hundred years ago and they're having the same debates and we're having the same debates so Yeah in many ways the parallels very very strong and you've written a very good piece in the New Statesman witching includes thinking on the barriers to greater cooperation on Corona virus joint. Toyota's little about what those barriers are and how they can be overcoming future. I mean I think you know what's interesting about this pandemic now on the kind of world struck is that for some time now and I'm not by father First person to notice to say we've been sliding more towards isolationism. I'm in some ways. Pandemic is the is the most powerful way. Cool from that situation that you could have Because it just doesn't work to To try manage this kind of disaster on a national level and even when the w eight show declared a global health emergency back on the thirtieth of January. It said in the same statement. That closing borders is counterproductive. And we advise that you don't do it and almost immediately many nations did do it And we know that not only. Does that not help? Because basically just force people to try them across borders licitly but it also can be really counter productive because it lulls governments and everybody else to false sense of security whereby they think they've stopped the problem and then they find the germs on the inside and they haven't put in place. The measures that they need to contain mitigate the problem inside that country our title. Laura reasons to be cheerful. It's obviously hard to find them in this in this time. Is there anything particularly you take out of the nineteen eighteen experience? Which wants the hurtful things out of that tragedy? There are always silver. Linings are always silver lining in this civil earnings in the short time. Silver linings in the long term. Just to give you one of many possible examples. As soon as the pandemic had passed the doctors and the scientists effectively realized that they had been cooled on the back foot and they had a huge hole in their knowledge almost every doctrine the wealth they were dealing with bacterial disease in one thousand nine thousand nine hundred and of course. The flu is caused by a virus. The virus is a novel. Was a novel concept in one thousand nine hundred eighteen so from the nineteen twenties on you see the field virology taking off the field of epidemiology which is basically the cornerstone of good public healthy understanding of causes and effects and patterns and in health and disease. That takes off. You have the first really effective flu. Vaccines already coming online in in the Nineteen Thirties. And then of course. Nhs is basically in an indirect product of that pandemics socialized healthcare systems the W. H. O. Is a product of that pandemic. The we learn we learn. It may take us a while up. We learn from our experiences including from pandemics. Okay we'll look Norris. Benny history is very very important in these things as in everything. Thank you so much for joining us. That's my pleasure to talk about the way. The world has responded to this crisis in health terms into in terms of its cooperation on health issues. I'm glad we're joined by Jeremy. Farah who is director of the Wellcome Trust the Global Foundation that funds Health Research Jerry. Thanks for joining us. I think it's right to start by saying that. You and your colleagues had been warning. Well before people knew about corona virus that the world was ill prepared for a pandemic. Just explain what your concerns. Were an why you had them? Yeah thanks so much Straight to joy you thought allow twenty years. The world has really changed in enormous wading. These new infections come from animals. They come across from the animal world into the human world and they Human Infections often they try V. It's exactly what's happening now with Navarro's only human side The massive that's occurred in the last thirty four. He is means that human live the union tenants in close proximity to each other. Huge cities In this hound US achieve eleven million people and the human world is incredibly interconnected We now can buy from all around the world in less than twenty four hours so that combination of human-animal in device changing policy ebonite station and travel means. The world is very connective now. as we've seen with rotavirus the world within a few hours what was your anxiety before corona virus arrive. Jeremy about the world's lack of preparedness. Well again over during this century and everybody knows those being a Reduction in commitments from many governments around the world for many different reasons in investments in public health. It's the it's the benefits of public health. You often see When you prevent things and therefore sometimes public health doesn't get the attention it really needs on and over the last decade or so and seen questioning of international organizations like the United Nations like World Health Organization. And so am in the last five years. We've had relative polarization politically around the world. And so that crease. Investments in public healthy free in the sense of Globe working together and increased polarize weld. Means that the the chances of something of hairy spreading around the world and in an environment where people as a path noticed working together as they did in the past is the perfect environment. Something like a pandemic takeoff enough. Exactly what you've seen coming ONTO CORONA VIRUS. Won't you think of the key priorities now for global health cooperation on these issues? What we're what would you say are the biggest priorities? I can put it in three ways really firstly that the absolute has to be supported will help them as Asian everything. They're doing to With knowing him countries middling in countries and vulnerable and marginalized population so the The the very best advice gets the country they will be facing five and that nothing protections the healthcare office so that would be the first Disappointed in everything that doing in public health the second would be. I think the world leaving today as actually realized the implications of this and We're GONNA face a choice between going back to increasingly nationalistic polarized world. All we decide that this is just shut such a shock to the system. We're GONNA come together. Henry recreate reform Redesigned the play blocked detection for these things have to bring the world together and then the third piece is around the exit strategy. I think for this pandemic not his to invest in science and invest in science in an equitable way that insurance. It's not just the ritual that will benefit from that science but it's the whole world and that science is around social sciences and understanding behavior of ice but it is also massive leveling bathrooms and diagnostics in transcended vaccines on that last issue maxine site..

Pandemic flu Laura Spain US Nineteen Thirties Jeremy W. H. O. Madrid Jeff Talknet League of Nations World Health Organization bacterial disease Toyota King Alfonso Thirteenth ELVIS Corona spinney
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Do this as reasons to be cheerful. That milliband. Jeff. Hello. How's it going over there in your household? What say sort of going okay? It's challenges children being very good. Well behaved and understanding the situation. They're trying to see their friends on. Zuma whatever you know sad for them to be separated from them have you thought about taking some kind of maybe a bit like a Christopher plummer in the sound of music type railway you'll like captain von Trapp and you line your family up every evening and they have to sing to you a deer. A female deer Ray BECO- golden saw me they mic hold myself. Saw Long Way to run what you think. Well I think you've you've gone the other direction. Which is that. You would find your family open. You would sing to them and they'd have to listen politely. You see that family they went. They had this video. The scene lots lots of places because they did a takeoff of Lebanese Limassol Blah. It was very very impressive. I haven't seen it but that's inspired you to maybe get your family into musical which is strange to me because you don't like musicals as well. I did remark to my son when I signed when I sold the this family. I said how you you go to musicals. He said you hate musicals and I said Oh. Yeah that is true So how have you been coping? You've got notoriety again. As a sort of as a kind of on the ground reporter suitably socially distanced about what's been going on in your community. Yes I was tweeting about our local facebook group which I haven't revealed the location of a kicked off in there the other day the twenty four hour shop round the corner somebody printed a picture of it and a sign in the window saying ten percent after all. Nhs workers which I thought others great and then they posted in actual fact. They've put their prices up twenty percent overall and that just trying to foster goodwill with the sign they're actually profiteering and then people were commented saying this is disgusting. I'm going to boycott this shop. This went on for pages and pages and then somebody came along and outed the original poster as the owner of a rival shop. Three doors down high-drama in our localized facebook group and what you're being you're trying to bring together the warring parties that are still now. I'm staying out of the people in the twenty four hour shop. Very nice in that guy son of free ice cream once so. I can't believe they've been doing something like this. I've been tweeting about keeping everyone anonymous. All at the same time which I think is the journalistically responsible thing to do. And you're sort of going for the kind of Sweden option. You're used to just in the Cold War context. You'll still trying to keep out of it. Yeah Yeah I'm trying to remain neutral as much as possible. So that set. That's what's been going on this end. Shall we talk about what we're talking about in this week's episode yet well this week? We're talking about global cooperation in tackling corona virus or sometimes a lack of it it feels like many countries have stuck to self interest during the crisis closing borders scrambling about ventilators competing for access to vaccines. Were exploring whether that's really the case whether it's actually some sort of good news corporation going on and discussing ideas to improve cooperation going forward. We'll be talking to journalists Laura Spinney. Who's a really important book about the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic and asking her about the balance between nationalism and corporation during that pandemic and its impact on the world. Then we talking to Jeremy Farah from the Wellcome Trust. He's a longstanding advocate for global cooperation on health and is now calling a major international effort on Corona Virus Treatment and Vaccine Research and Falcon Developing Countries. And then we'll be talking to economic historian. Adam twos about what more coordination on economic response could look like and where the world goes from. He economically in the face of this crisis and in this week's cheerful people. We can be talking to Jen Ashley. Who is part of something called? Three D CROWD. And this is incredible. It's a bunch of volunteers with three D. printers who are creating and face masks for the NHS. And we're going to be talking to jen about that and also how you could get involved in. That was the reason to be cheerful Mars. This week is just the plethora of ingenious ways of keeping a toddler. Entertains that springing up online. And all this sort of video the other day For game called shake off and I played it with my son and it involves covering him from head to toe in post it notes and then playing Taylor swift shaky off and he has to Gigolo around As as much as possible until all the post it notes are full enough and that was great. They loved him. They roll off quite quickly. But then I was able to keep you entertained. Tidying up the post it notes and also he announced yesterday and I thought is making rb announced that he knows yoga poses and I thought it was just being silly but we found something online called cosmic yoga for kids and it turns out they do this with them at nursery and he was demonstrating all these poses. I did a whole work side to whole workout with him. I got him to do a workout and I sat on the city watching him. 'cause I got wind after a couple of minutes but it is brilliant Nama stay. What's your reason to be cheerful well. I thought I'd give you three. We need in these in these kind of grim times. Larry David so curb your enthusiasm has made its way from Scotland which I don't have to June's or something which we do have and what is it is apple TV you. You're buying the way we watched episode one of season ten last night. And it's a corker I thought. Oh it's great. The whole series is great considering opening a Smith's do not quite. But but I think my my wife is a bit of a skeptic about abusing but even she conceded it was. It was good Barry. Now you recommended. Berry along time ago and I've been brel slow uptight. Barry is about a Hitman who tries to become an actor series. One Good Guy. It just gets better and better. That's good and then the goats about the conduct. No Yeah yes on did know. Sorry well basically this thing that the the the humans have retreated in Clendenin no as everywhere and the goats of taken over. I mean have you seen the pictures of the goat stroke? It's like planet of the apes but with goats but that's something very sweet about them isn't the young man who doesn't like a goat high on a hill lifted lonely. Yeah from Santa Music. Exactly I know that's fine but he does something very soothing about the goats isn't Yeah maybe all this is over we should. We should all get a goat. Holds of a dilemma but the story back. He's a question. How the goats? No the humans. Aren't there Genius Messenger. Who the first one goes and says all right lads and last is that one goes. Does it go ricky Humans not around. Yeah I'd like know if somebody who's a listener who knows about animal behavior. How did the goats know that? We're not there. We do they just go. And then there's nobody here and if somebody that they don't run off or is this some. Can they smell for miles away that there's no humans around what what's the suit of signs of this? When I guarantee there is a behavioral psychologist listening to this and they can get into two.

facebook Jen Ashley Barry captain von Trapp Ray BECO Christopher plummer Zuma Jeff Nhs reporter Adam Wellcome Trust Laura Spinney NHS Jeremy Farah Larry David Sweden Clendenin Vaccine Research
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Amanpour

"O. D.. Hello everyone and welcome to Amanpour. Here's what's coming up in. China Corona Virus Death Toll Soars and as it spreads to more than twenty five countries countries. I ask infectious disease experts. So Jeremy Farah how to contain it and America's now energy independent and energy jobs jobs like so many other elements of our country are at a record. High President trump goes all in for domestic oil and gas production reduction but could cause for fracking ban cost. Democrats crucial swing state votes in two thousand nine hundred ninety. I speak to Pennsylvania's Lieutenant Governor. A Democrat the crap and to the manager of a winter bind company there and the traveling drive for dominance in Silicon Valley with Mike. Is it also superpower. The battle for Uber. Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour in New York with with only six hundred dead now and tens of thousands infected the Wuhan Corona virus shows no signs of slowing down and while the Chinese unease imposed severe quarantine restrictions. The disease makes it onto the cover of Time magazine as posing a major challenge to the government of President Xi Jingping thing today as the UK confirms its third case of the corona virus infection. The Chinese ambassador there had this message for Britain and the world. I hope that the governments of all countries including the UK should understand and support. China's efforts respect the professional advice of new age. A boy ogre reaction a boy boy creating panic and ensure the normal cooperation and exchanges between countries so with China a bit defensive. They're just how dangerous is this threat. So Jeremy Farah is a global expert on infectious disease and he's also director of the wellcome trust which which is one of the world's leading providers of non-governmental funding for biomedical research. And he's joining me now from London. Welcome to the program can I. Can I just start by us. New due to react as a medical researcher to the obvious plea by the Chinese ambassador who clearly feels you know the country's under siege. Yeah I've got a lot of sympathy for what he's saying. I mean we all know this started in the city of hand in in China But this this is not just a Chinese problem now and and Actually Federal Dr Federal said from. Who a couple of days ago. This is a time for solidarity not a time for division it it. It is time for us to work together. This could have started anywhere in truth You know when we face the two thousand nine pandemic The first case was probably they're you you know in Mexico or the United States. So you know we didn't Work against each other then we can work against each other of the now a lot of sympathy for what he was saying. Okay so sympathy for what he's saying. But what about the facts here because I mean look as you know there has been a huge confusion now. Chinese state media reported the death breath of the very young doctor. Thirty four year old doctor when Leong in Wuhan And that was reported on state media and it caused a huge amount of outpouring pouring on Chinese social media. People were very very upset about that so while they sought out the confusing fusion about whether he's dead or alive what might have happened had he not been censured by the Chinese authorities when he actually did go to them with this with this concern Cernan with this evidence in December. Yeah I don't know I don't know him personally but but All my thoughts go out to him and his family me. I desperately hope he Is Still Alive A number of doctors nurses in China and Wuhan itself have died. We know that I lost a lot friends. During SARS in two thousand two and two thousand and three and the bravery of these doctors nurses extraordinary. It's the same with the Bowler in the Democratic Republic Republic Congo It's very difficult to describe what it's like to be in the middle of that I don't know the details of Dr Lee went to the Chinese authorities. I don't you know what he went there saying On you about this on about the twenty ninth or thirtieth of December about the same time that. Who knew about this Since then I have to say that the sharing of information has actually been good or very good And I've not been aware of the Cover up that's gone on that sometimes being accused of. I think it's really important to put it into context when you're a doctor or a nurse or public health person working in this scenario it's chaos Wuhan at the moment is in lock down. The city deserves all our support public transport is closed. Workplaces are closed. The hospitals are absolutely the overwhelmed with patients. they're overwhelmed because they're in the middle of the influenza season as well and it's chaos and on a personal level it's terrifying Dealing with an infection that none of us have seen before Your patients your community. The people you know probably friends of yours coming into the hospital With with moderate and very severe disease and some of them are dying in fact many of dying. That's a really frightening scenario to be in the middle of And I think undoubtedly you could look back a now we can say you know maybe the authorities in China could have handled it better. It's always true when you look back. I think time though is really to look forward and think what's happening in China. What can we learn from that? In North America Europe Africa Africa is real concern for me just because of the okay okay systems and it's going on let me ask you because I I clearly WanNa ask you about Africa because that is a big concern as you've just said but in terms of we need to all look up to the future and now get try to get in front of this spread. How can you actually all the data and the rates of infection? How does one actually you know? Get a handle on it. What what do you need to know in order to be able to get a handle on it? Yeah well we do know a lot more than we did. Two weeks ago We a lot more than we did. A month ago. and and that information is not encouraging in some ways The things you need to know No particular order you need to know how infectious this is an who is passing it from one person to another is it. Children Is it the elderly. Is it people in schools and workplaces How long are they infectious for? Am I if I was to catch this today Would I be infectious tomorrow morning. Would it it being five days time and would I be infectious for another week or ten days. That's really critical information to know We need to know if I were infected today. How many people that I met? Would I give it to is one. Is it two. Is it four Because that tells us a lot about way the way. The epidemic is spreading on the clinical side Is it a symptomatic in some people will some people being infected and have absolutely no symptoms. And if they do will they be infectious during that time. And then those who have symptoms. What symptoms do they have? Is it different to influencers or does it look very similar Is it a sore throat. A headache muscle pains cough And if so which patients will go on to develop more severe disease and what can we do to treat those with sedate disease to try and reduce the number of people that are dying. Do you have any do you have any I do. I do. WH happens in these scenarios. Is you start to get a picture of what's happening and and you have to make decisions big public health decisions. Big Clinical decisions based on relative uncertainty as the weeks. Go on this week competitive last week competitor a month ago we're starting to get a picture so For instance the figure that I mentioned if I had a Curve today how many people would I give it to. I think increasingly. We think that's about between two two and a half three people Let's say it's three We think the infectious period probably lasts between Two and maybe maybe up to ten maybe nine or ten days that's really critical information really important And this may be a clinical bias. That we they haven't been reporting it. they've not been picked up but we've not seen many children We've seen many people under the age of twenty. That's a really important finding and then the finding in this week which is completely unexpected at least to me That we had a child born and within thirty hours was known to be infected. When did that child get infected? When did that baby we get infected? Was it during birth or was earlier prior to birth and again As we learn over the impact on your station and pregnant women is a really important question which we don't have answers today but we all getting some ounces. We we know more or less more about the severity we know more about the infectious period. And we do have a better handle on this famous figure on North. Which is the number of people that I would posit to if I was infected today? What you've just said I think you said let's say it's three right? That are not figure for the sake of argument to two and a half to three but look the. Who itself has said today. We need to bring this virus out into the light so we can attack it properly. So you're saying that we have some more information they're saying we need even more information and you just mentioned Africa. I want to ask ask you how Africa what you expect might happen there and how it might do with it. I mean we're hearing here even in the United States reporters if you look at the newspapers talking about people who are coming back from China you know. Some of them are coming to prescribed airports but then a lot of them are on their own. Some of them are going to military bases to be quarantined. A A lot of them are just being told. Go home. Quarantine yourself if that's happening here in the most developed health system in the world what happens in what you right. They say you know a a place at risk with a not so developed public health system like in Africa. What are the particular challenges there well over the last twenty twenty odd years? There's been a dramatic increase in the in the trade and travel routes between Asia. Not Not just China but actually the across the whole region and and Africa and And that therefore opposes a huge risk. That wasn't Maybe ten or twenty years ago just because of the connectivity now between Asia and an Africa we've done some lovely mapping along with colleagues in the UK and the US just looking at where the cities are most connected to to China and and also to Asia and that's essentially. It's the airport hubs. It's the airport hubs of the Middle East. Since the airport hubs of Kenya of Ethiopia of Nigeria South Africa. It's those cities which most connected by travel to to China. But you're absolutely right. The healthcare systems in many parts of sub Sarah Erica. It's not just sub Saharan Africa. It's also true. In Central and South America Venezuela for instance is really going through a crisis in terms of healthcare at the moment and the implications. John's of this if it were to arrive in Venezuela would-be devastating. I would say though and this is really important..

China Africa Christiane Amanpour United States Jeremy Farah Time magazine Wuhan Pennsylvania UK Saharan Africa Asia President Middle East London Venezuela America trump
"jeremy farah" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

25:10 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Consultant in this episode two different takes on public health and wellbeing so Jeremy Farah is director of the wellcome trust the British medical charity that spends close to one billion owns two thousand and nineteen now those three things together have become even more important nick once you've addressed the organizational drift if you like the you talked about when you found in two thousand fifteen I guess one of the big challenges for you is make this organization financially sustainable so how do you go about how you go about that because the brilliant apartment is it's free for all the the first question is to understand what's compromising the integrity of the organized because it's a touch that he subjective of you and I and I think what I inherited what what I came into was a failure that any sort of of you experience on a Saturday morning when you come to your park is is that it should be as close as it was to the first event on the first day in in in two thousand that's what you want pricing so so actually once you've defined the fact that that's what we protect taken everything else is in play it becomes a lot easier to St brand and our integrity which allows you message to really resonate but that's a pretty difficult so you can either have to malls of branding that commotion running event or I can have a foot yours well you've you've got you've got to cross it you'd over at some Jeremy with your with your funding I mean you you can actually wanted to grow you can you can expand your influence if you bring in three partners with fifty million pounds or something yeah so very different scenario to where where Nikki Nikki talking about there is just keeping at the heart of what you do the values and the principles that ethos of why you set up in the first place and and one of the things we did for instance we a lot of people used to refer to as trust and of course there's trust in the NHL distrust in the branding trust in the NHL trusts and other things so we wanted to reconnect with we've actually our founder which is are we now refer to ourselves as welcome because for me he stood for those he he stood for globalization long before it was a a phrase he stood for science stood for innovation but he's also you know really into the humanities and the social sciences and the role the society's play in making good things and bad things happen but we are yes we're we're big the sense we have a very significant damage which obviously looks huge from the outside but the challenges of our time whatever you described them as mental health diabetes the climate change and health drug-resistance epidemics these these compuserve via alone and one of the things I wanted to bring in was a sense that yes we were big but we we were much more willing to work in partnership with others because we don't have to spending power or the authority or on their own to take on these big global orange which are almost existential in their threats and I'll come on to a few of them are also interested in what what comes through in a lot of your literature conversations of the last couple of years is a real willingness to campaign as well it's not about just spending money it's actually having a voice an opinion and shaping the debate about public health it's great to hear that from the decide that was certainly the intention and it goes back to having whether it's neck or us it's this independence is really important thing in today's world you're the political winds of the moment take that away from you it's difficult sometimes in the commercial sector if we are independent you have in my view responsibility to use that and you shouldn't be afraid of of explaining yourself and if that's called advocacy or campaigning then we have to do it because I think I think otherwise we're not being true to to iron independent so yeah we have be more willing to take a position on things we appreciate the not everyone will agree with us and we will therefore be criticized that we have to accept those of us with independence I've got an absolute responsibility to use it and then as this is not just personally to ship it's the organization's leadership at these conversations you governments to harangued them to do more in certain areas it's about big Pharma Stop concentrating on these first world diseases and must help yeah well it is it is any all of those it certainly certainly governments you know what the government's doing Jugaris isn't infections or or international partnerships or climate change drivers antibiotics just at work anymore which treat infections that's right but it's beyond that it yes it's farmer but it's also The role other commercial enterprises play I I have an increasing concern is the public sector starts to retreat from some of its responsibilities and the commercial sector starts to chase quick returns of large amounts of return percentage wise the leaving a big gap in the middle which is really not now covered by the public or the commercial sector and that's going to leave our infrastructure schools are education are a research endeavor I ah into a worrying phrase where previously there was it was a combination Nikki feels that the sort of the world in between Germany described his actually where park grenades an from interested in what you regard as your assesses thus far is it something like taking this message to the world because you're in twenty countries every weekend I think that the successes thus far would be in focusing what we're doing on broadening participation towards people that will have the biggest benefit and the biggest health impact of of of physical activity so so for me when I joined I found an organisation that was committed supporting communities that wanted to run in the in the area was making decisions based around wanting to help people all the were the least active but didn't have any strategical focused direction or commitments doing that and I think what we've been able to do over else for years is B. is really really articulate the purpose of what we're trying to do what we're trying to do is to support communities to become healthier support communities to become healthier we need to introduce physical activity into people that don't do enough physical activity or don't do physical activity at all and now we've been able to articulate that it allows us to one direct top projects very very specifically in those areas into work really hard understand what other things are stopping people from being activists they would like we're doing physical activity because the the paradox of course is is nobody wants to be inactive and nobody wants to be unhealthy if you read enough toxic newspapers your come to the conclusion that you know people make a- As a as a deliberate choice and it's something that that they voted for nobody's ever voted for that they they want to be more active they want to be healthier so where we see ourselves evolving too is being that positive community all mountain showed the encourages supports and champions in doing the things that they wanted to tell me about you know the way in which you do that is with this incredible volunteer workforce you've got thirty five thousand people out every weekend marshalling timing I always wonder when you're effectively small organization sat on top of a vast volunteer woodfull lightness to what degree can you lead them if you like what is an excellent question you you definitely can't lead them by by memo by direct by directive by lows or or or by too many rows and lead them predominantly by Vision by culture go back to the conversation that we're having earlier about is a team and every team is making a contribution and that contribution is towards a an incredible full global objective an and it's trying to attach them to the significance in that in that overall mission and I think well it's about working really hard to make that that experience that they're having in that volunteer capacity as Positive against trying to improve people's health and do that through research I think our challenge always being to to how'd you then take the vision and principles and values he's down through a strategy and implementation of that that's that's I think the the thing we all get challenged goes back to the earlier conversation about top down bottom up and the rest of it and what is being what if you go was was to continue to do what we were doing in a traditional way of funding research but then bringing in another part of a portfolio of better word some some areas of real focus way you say that we're trying to do this thing we're gonNA try and do it over the next five plus five ten years vaccines that makes drug-resistance mental health in those categories so you do what you're doing through your traditional routes where you're trying to find ten thousand flowers blooming and that's a great way to fund Hansen Research but then you're also bringing some focused areas where you say in the next ten years we really want to make a difference to mental health data and health whatever it is that you you can choose what you want but then bring real focus to that and that means bringing science together it means bringing social science together but it doesn't mean policy educations advocacy legal stuff the community the society and there I think you can own you can't bring that when you're going through our traditional methods of funding talk about how the brain works and these are tiny things the breadth of the hair that are looking inside the brain to really find out all post together ever knows how complex the human brain is and maybe one of the most complex things in the universe win not at the scale to address that we there's no way we in address that there are by convening leading sometimes we convene sometimes we lead by bringing together other philanthropic and government agencies and other bodies including commercial sector to try and Jessica problem and then develop platforms where people are willing to share that across those platforms in a way that you know philanthropy and funding from governments can be quite silos they can have their egos they want to do their thing and have their name on it to break that down nerves egos and to work Cross people and say we collectively own this to go forward to address a big problem which none of us can do on our own that's my view what we can bring in terms of partnership nick interested in this organization gets bigger and bigger how you keep in touch the grass roots I mean I guess you have to be running every Saturday morning it probably is in your contract then you also have to when you launch in Tokyo you have to be there or do you check it's going well and check standards are up and so on so I think we do a couple of things and we're really really really duckie the we've got a group of staff who are Ima- in the local community and participate the shelf floor on a you your head office.

Consultant Jeremy Farah director nick fifty million pounds five ten years ten years
"jeremy farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:41 min | 2 years ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Weekend from the BBC World Service, coming up later, this hour, we'll hear from the author of a novel which examines, the enduring psychic legacy of General Pinochet's military dictatorship in Chile which lasted for almost two decades. The wedding trusted me was how that particular period of the history of my country kind of shaped the subjectivity of my generation, not only their life, but our lives. But our imaginations, our way of seeing the present, and we've made throughout the program, Rachel, shabby, British journalist, author and broadcaster knocks Chitty Africa, fellow at the Royal Institute of international affairs, Chatham house. I wanted to ask you about the political situations in two countries that I know you've been looking at Ethiopia and Sudan contrasting. Yes. But there was a driving force for change there that I think you, you're highlighting. Yes. I've mentioned and it's been very interesting. I mean what, what we are seeing really is the, the rise of. The youth as driving force in, in politics in both countries in Sudan. We've seen one of the things that was driving the removal of, of form prison. But she was young people on the streets. Particularly actually young girls on the streets day in day out is still even now and they've been an a massive force for change 'em since since last year. And I think contrary to what people thought this time around, they actually were successful in removing him negotiations are still ongoing, obviously with, with the military government, so it's not resolved yet, but they're clearly a major major force now within within Sudan. And so, they're challenging the, the patriarchal system, this, tablet, and that's been very interesting. If yoga has got a young prime minister, it's got a female prison for the first time as well. The prime minister he's also challenging also docs is one of that the doc is that he's challenged his. Been the longstanding conflict with Eritrea you went to make peace. And so we're seeing a rise. I think of a young, the young getting involved in politics, which is interesting, given what you said about South Africa only fifteen minutes. So, so why is it different? Dan, anythi Pierre today's further south. Well, I mean diff- different countries have have different. Situations. I think so Africa that youth actually were more engaged some years, years, guiding that's been disillusionment within South Africa about politics, I'll say, actually possibly in southern Africa in general. I think we have behind the curve in terms of youth engagement as a force for change in politics. Or if we look at broderie central west Africans, you're seeing a much more activist youth. Dynamic happening there. So it's it's happening at difference. But certainly the youth as a factor in politics, not enough, breath, and globally. We're starting to see that as a twenty first century phenomenon in politics, Rachel read here that you have a newfound. Love of boxing. Where has this come from say, love and? What happened was, I'm someone who spent years, basically going to Jim's, easiest most convenient fitness delivery mechanism as some point a few years ago, I was in a sort of Ellis, joyless, Jamie. And I was thinking, I'm not enjoying this though, this is no fun. So I quit that. And joined a yoga center and books in club, which obviously is quite fill light. That's quite a balanced approach and the thing about boxing clubs and an I should stress the I do not spa. I'm not I'm not fighting you don't get punched at any point, and nor do I, yes, I stress, but very they're not pretentious, not Posey in a very kind of. Very approachable places, and therefore quite nice spaces to be I have found, and in terms of fitness, it's very good. It's books in gates. Yes, I thought you know what I think was going to be about the stress relief of hitting punchbag. Not people. I stress a punch back, but, but actually what becomes more interesting. Very quickly is just that that sort of dynamic of the duck in the diving and being light on your feet, and that becomes a sort of much bigger takeaway, from, from the from the experience of Utah it or not. Release you looking with great intent follow? Boxing, actually, but I can't say that I have much of a box of myself, no scuffles in hotel, lobbies, yet, not recently a matter of time. Six thirty eight GMT. Let's say ten attention we were talking about the politics of parts of Africa, Ramone ago. We can talk about events in the Democratic Republic of Congo specifically with reference to the virus than thousand people have died in the current outbreak there, since August health officials in the country now, openly admitting that they are struggling to contain this epidemic. The UN's World Health Organization had initially hoped that a new vaccine would help bring it under control, but in recent weeks. It's conceded that insecurity in the east of the country's scarce financial resources and resistance within some communities to preventative measures kaffa syllogies and safe. Burials hampering the effort against voter will Tarik release the emergency response director of the International Rescue Committee in Goma in the east of DRC. He told the BBC that healthcare workers including those in clinics were becoming infected because, in many cases, they just weren't prepared for coping with the disease issues. Dealing with here. The similar to other outbreaks where voter happened in areas where it is not well known, which is that the symptoms, I initially very similar to malaria, typhoid and other sicknesses that people treat all the time and how these so most nurses, and doctors and treating a patient that maybe envelopes aspect and being confirmed case in the same way without much protection, and that exposes them, our Arrun of the Democratic Republic of Congo, evola response coordinator says measures are being taken to address the problem. World stress. Jeez to quit health, training centers and raise the numbers of properly trained, health workers, we are also planning to reinforce health controls in high risk zooms by dispatching medical teams in charge of assisting and supervising health workers. There's also a lot to do to improve awareness Amvest from foam people about the disease. Jonathan bowl is on the line professor of urology at the university of Nottingham here in the UK. He was part of the international effort. Find a vaccine for voted you're in the mess outbreak in west Africa in twenty thirteen and twenty fourteen Jonathan vulgar morning. Welcome to the program. Good morning. Give him the work. I just described that you did for five years ago, it must be even more frustrating for you to see what's happening now in Diaz e. Yes. Well, I mean I wouldn't like to take too much credit for the development of what's proven to be an incredibly effective. The lacy stay to. That's come out. This is the V vaccine. It was developed mainly in Canada. And the latest figures show that it's almost one hundred percents effective. But of course, you do need to have the ability to go into communities to go into healthcare facilities, and to deliver that vaccine. Unfortunately, what we see an insert in parts of where the outbreak his is continued fighting on civil unrest. And therefore, the simply isn't happening. So when you've got a combination of a turbulent political situation violence from time to time inexorability, that's what stops this vaccine, getting to the people who need it, it is. It's not simply the vaccine. So at the moment, the there have been hundreds about one hundred thousand doses of facts in have been delivered. And when as delivered in time, it is one hundred percent near enough effected, but the other problem was alluded to in the two reports is a general problem of access. Messing communities as well. And explain in the problem of, and also what to do because if people can get to treatment centers very quickly. Then I you can isolate that person and then they become a reduced threat. And in fact to non-existent threat to the rest of the community. They can also receive good care and that means in the case of Ebola rehydration, which is what stops in dying, but also some of them can get access to investigational treatments. We don't know at the moment, if they work, but we certainly think they probably help. And also it just generally means that you can control the virus spreading within those communities, but Unfotunately certain places those activities, simply on taking place may be happening for a couple of days and having to stop for couple of days because of fight in the last three weeks, we've seen around three hundred over three hundred new cases, many of these happening in people who went. Even been observed for the presence of a bowl, because when you do have a case, you do contact tracing the new money to those contracts to see if, if they have signs of disease, and that's just not happening all the time. Knox. Let me bring you in maybe with an observation or or a question to Jonathan Ville. Thank you. Hi, jonathan. Nexia. I'm yet and the thanks so much for your for your your update. Just a couple of things. One is that doubt Congo? Seems to have a recurrent outbreaks of a ball. I mean if you look at since nineteen seventy six have been a number of, of, of outbreaks, and I think people would be wondering why is DR Congo in particular. Why are there so many recurrent outbreaks? And is there has been a sort of measurable progress in sort of preventative stuff with regard to this? So that kind of be my first question. Yeah. Well, in, in terms of the, the virus itself, it's not particularly virus that circulates and humans. In fact, we think it circulates in a reservoir Spacey's most likely the bat fruit bats. And unfortunately, what happens is people occasionally get into contact with these bats or another animal. It's got the virus from. That's and then we see human-to-human transmissions, an unfortunately, because that's their huge populations of bats spread across this region of Africa. There's always going to be outbreaks of A Bola virus. And in, in terms of what can we do to, to starting in future. I think this is where the fact scene comes into play. And, and in fact, there to vaccines now being used all the second one's about to be used in the day. Oh, say, and if they can provide lifelong immunity than in the future may well, be possible to start vaccinating people just the same way that we vaccinate against mumps measles, and rebel, that's still a long way off that native accent has been licensed. But, but that would be the best way to prevent future teacher. Outbreaks you wanted to know the looks Rachel thank thank you just one very last. Which is really an opposite. I mean, I've been to eastern Kivu and, and certainly the conflict situation is very, very serious. It is kind of something that helps I think to, to spread do you see any sort of positive movement in terms of conflict mediation resolution going on because that is one of the big things in terms of and the situation. Yeah. Well, you can only hope that something like this. Forces people to, to take check and take stock of what's happening, and certainly people like Jeremy Farah who's director at Wellcome Trust has just returned from the area and he's a sense there has to be some kind of ceasefire all this thing literally will get getting out of hand now. Fortunately, we're not seeing the virus spreads too far out of the geographic, Aaron instantly, we've not seen it spread into Uganda, which was always a concern. But of course, there are very effective point of entry checks going on at Uganda, but eventually something will happen that the virus will spread somewhere else. And know it's really important to get this under control Rachel. Hi, Jonathan Rachel. Hi, I wanted to ask you, given that's the situation that, that is in an area of conflict, and the vaccine has not yet developed to parade a sort of mumps measles. Situation, is there a get around if, if access is the problem in the way that it is? What when it, it certainly access because you need not just access. It's also the moment identifying who is likely to be exposed to the virus, because at the moment is simply isn't enough to go around. So we're seeing proposals and I think this is about start again. And he's over in response to this real upsetting in cases, is that they're going to try and sped, the vaccine by reducing the doses that are administered. And I'm guessing it's probably one of the drive is why the second vaccines being implemented. So there isn't NFL scene to try and vaccinate. Everybody's focused but to focus it. You have to know who's at risk. Jonathan thank you so much for coming on Jonathan bull. Professor of the university of.

Jonathan Rachel Outbreaks Africa access Sudan Democratic Republic of Congo boxing mumps jonathan Royal Institute of internation South Africa BBC World Service prime minister General Pinochet director Uganda Chile Chitty Africa Eritrea Chatham house
"jeremy farah" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Day mobile populations fragile health systems and the low diaz is a hugely experienced in bowler and that's to their great credit than msf who reacted within hours i do have real worries that this could really take off so under acting now will cost many lives many millions of dollars later so what should we be doing well we're doing the right things we were contacted as well as dan within about on the eighth of may and within half an hour funds had been released and within eighteen hours people were traveling to the region to bring it under control and the drc is hugely experienced in this and it is all of the socalled simple things which will bring this epic under control isolation clinical care communication to populations and the vaccine will plan additional role in that that's all happening but this is a really nasty potential epidemic is that enough vaccine available this five hundred thousand doses in the world and great tribute to mark the company who have developed vaccine and continue to make and johnston johnson who have another vaccine that's enough i think for now but it all depends on what the wills responses now if we respond quickly this epidemic can be brought under control if we're slow in responding over the next days and weeks then this epidemic could easily take off right but i'm trying to get a sense of the picture five hundred thousand doses in the world will they all now all of those doses will they all be rushed off drc will everybody who might conceivably come into contact with the disease will they will they will be given a job i'm assuming it's an injection it's injection that's a single dose and yes that's the idea but but the vaccine has to be stored at very low temperatures minus seventy degrees that's not easy in a country with limited electric and power cuts you know you're talking about a really fragile state here and and so that is not easy transport of that maxine is not easy so the really important thing is we have a vaccine that's really important but let's not underestimate the critical public health response that damn was documenta jeremy farah don boasts thank you both very much it's twenty two eight let's look at today's papers and news websites on prince harry and meghan markle laurent many front pages this morning they were driven.

diaz dan drc maxine jeremy farah don prince harry johnston johnson meghan markle seventy degrees eighteen hours
"jeremy farah" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"jeremy farah" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Windows tom now is six minutes to nine a team of chinese researchers say the first in the world to perform precise chemical surgery on human embryos scientists have used a technique called base editing to rid embryos of an inherited blood disorder is that us on that china and the scientists china and now catching up with their colleagues in the west or indeed with more money with fewer ethical constraints they could soon pulses by there are two men and there are few men more qualified than our next guest to answer that question support nurse director of the fraud is creek institute and professor jeremy farah the director of the wellcome trust each has got back from china kabani's eubank good morning support as well let's deal with the specific of this story how would different is this form of gene editing could we often hear about gene editing and easy something that could have happened here what we seeing here and what gene editing is is very specific changes of genes in the genome to bring particular outcomes that's being done in other ways and what we seeing here is a new approach which is targeted a chemical to a particular altered base to correct it it's been done in early human embryos so this is a relevant to um human biology and it shown that diseases like found a senior in principle could be corrected by method like this it's a method that we could have done in the uk but it happens to have been done in china for so as it were hats off to the chinese scientist role the van you'd impact pondering have they got different from rules the ones that we have well i don't think that regulation and lax regulation is the basis of this one i personally think is that we're seeing a major investment in science in china we're seeing politico enthusiasm for science for mit advancing the nation and that just getting up there i mean the three major powers really in signs the us the european union and nurturance coming up behind perverse affair as i said you just got back from china did you find yourself there when considering this breakthrough and indeed all else.

Windows human embryos blood disorder china director fraud creek institute professor jeremy farah china kabani human biology uk european union eubank scientist six minutes